22 Burst results for "David Hall"

Pentagon police officer charged with murder for allegedly killing 2

WBZ Midday News

00:36 sec | 3 d ago

Pentagon police officer charged with murder for allegedly killing 2

"More details from ABC is Louis Martinez, the off duty pending on police officer claimed he had shot at human after they nearly ran him over after he spotted them, breaking into a car outside his apartment building. But police in Takoma Park, Maryland, say David Hall, Dixon's version of events didn't stack up. They say he opened fire. They're after the danger had passed and that an autopsy showed the victims had been shot in the back Fixing, has now been charged with two counts of second degree murder. In a statement, the Pentagon said Dixon remains on administrative leave pending the results of an internal administrative investigation. We Martinez ABC News, the Pentagon, the Biden administration and the Pentagon and meanwhile

Louis Martinez Takoma Park David Hall Dixon ABC Maryland Pentagon Biden Administration Abc News
Off-duty Pentagon police officer charged in Maryland shooting that left two dead

WBZ Morning News

00:34 sec | 3 d ago

Off-duty Pentagon police officer charged in Maryland shooting that left two dead

"Officer with the Pentagon police charged in the shooting deaths of two men in Maryland. The off duty pending on police officer claimed he had shot it Human after they nearly ran him over after he spotted them, breaking into a car outside his apartment building. But police in Takoma Park, Maryland, say David Hall, Dixon's version of events didn't stack up. They say he opened fire after the danger had passed, and then an autopsy showed the victims had been shot in the back Fixing has now been charged. With two counts of second degree murder. In a statement, the Pentagon said Dixon remains on administrative leave pending the results of an internal administrative investigation. We

Maryland Pentagon Takoma Park David Hall Dixon
Pentagon Police Officer Charged With Murder for Allegedly Killing Two

WBZ Morning News

00:35 sec | 3 d ago

Pentagon Police Officer Charged With Murder for Allegedly Killing Two

"Charged in the shooting deaths of two men in Maryland. The off duty pending on police officer claimed he had shot a two men after they nearly ran him over after he spotted them breaking into a car outside his apartment building. But police in Takoma Park, Maryland, say David Hall, Dixon's version of events didn't stack up. They say he opened fire after the danger had passed and that an autopsy showed the victims had been shot in the back Fixing, has now been charged with two counts of second degree murder. In a statement, the Pentagon Addiction remains on administrative leave pending the results of an internal administrative investigation. We Martinez, ABC News, the Pentagon, the

Maryland Takoma Park David Hall Dixon Pentagon Martinez Abc News
America, The Washington Post And America David Hall discussed on Brian Kilmeade

Brian Kilmeade

02:16 min | 1 year ago

America, The Washington Post And America David Hall discussed on Brian Kilmeade

"Of the parkland high school students have been kind of quiet but they are back in a big way today unveiling their peace plan for America The Washington Post got all the details on their peace plan on how to eliminate gun violence and mass shootings in America and it's a Whopper yeah it's pretty much less just eliminate guns I mean it's kinda where they're headed because they they want to do it all they want a national licensing and registry they want you to sit down for interviews to get your license and then they want you to renew it every year they want to ban the assault rifles or weapons they want to be in the high capacity magazines they want a mandatory gun that gun buy back program so yeah I mean they should have just said we want your guns turn a man yeah why can't have guns anymore and not all that will solve all our violence problems line up over here and take a number and this plan is being unveiled today it's a peace plan for a safer America David hall again a lot of the students from parkland where that horrible shooting occurred are the faces and voices of this you can be sure that there's a lot of big money behind this behind the scenes loosely helping them and it's all being rolled out today David hog one of the founders of the March for our lives says this is a critical moment our country's in a lot of pain right now you see the shootings on TV every day very little is happening it's painful to watch it's been hard for me and many of the other students we want answers now this is the plan and we will be pushing hard to get this enacted I am the thing was that a yes they went through something very traumatic and that hopefully the majority of the you know most of us listening or not ever going to have to experience but I take a step back in you in in go okay if we do this what are the chances of it being successful very very slow down and it's not clear right okay all of

America The Washington Post America David Hall Parkland High School David
"david hall" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Two hundred one pound senior transfer from Cleveland state wake Abby what does Shawn news Thursday night. A good crowd here. Bobby Hurley has reenergized the fan base in the valley of the Sean. They're averaging nine thousand six hundred ninety six fans per game. And drew a record fourteen five nine two upset victory. Over top rank Kansas high on atmosphere we experienced bit perhaps it it's very best for the pep rally in this building on the eve of the ball. And we get underway tonight. David hall to referee costs the basketball in the air. The ball tipped out of bounds. And it'll be Oregon state's basketball was to inbound two seconds into the game. Adjacent to the Arizona state bench down to our right Michael flows. Into backward to Ethan Thompson who will be met by Remmy Martin with Arizona state and man demand Remmy very physical guard. Good ball pressure applied by the sun. Tyler Kelly, right elbow. Tried to get it to trace tinkle. The ball tipped out of bounds by Lou dork guarding trace tinkle, very closely. Trae still lacking the explosiveness off that sprained left ankle needs to kind of pick is still a very intelligent crafty player to have on the floor tracing bounced Ethan Thompson, fourteen in the shot clock. Two brothers Stevie Midcoast extended right to Cuyler Kelly faxed out against mellow white is double team over hands to Stevie was sex on the clock. TV goes to the dribble to the left with three left corner to Ethan a three pointer out of the corner raises the bottom of the rim and a shot clock. Violation is called by Eric curry appeared as though shot raise the bottom of the rim, but Eric curry thought, otherwise Eric curry del Rey, car the Pires David hall, the referee the beavers began in there too. Luganville door five-star feet on from Canada stepping into three clangs. Wildly rebound. Tap were mellow white in the hands Cuyler Kelley blue door. Now. Twenty five seventy nine from three back the other way trays Tinkle's kept from the left side. Jenan? Al no, good. Rob edwards? The rebound front court to Remmy mart right in front of our vantage point, low close to a mellow white backs down Tyler Kelly chop collar doesn't go Stephen Thompson. Secures the rebound the beavers the other way three on five pitches to trace tackle attacks in the basket and lays it in and the beavers with the early to to not be lead getting out in transit can trace receiving from Stevie. Court comes Remmy. Martin put the Sean double snaps to doored against the two three. High post design cheat them to rob Edwards. Deep left corner to door low postal Ramallah white comes around Tyler Kelly and lays it in. So Bobby Hurley has decided to go right at Cuyler Kelly with his big Mello white factor. Backcountry for white and attacks the hoop that gets the game even at two less than two minutes in Tempe. Ethan Thompson fake slapped dribble pulls up at the right, elbow and travels with the Basketball Hall. Bobby Hurley jumping to grab the attention of David hall about the travel and David smiled as he turned to Bobby who was want to get after the official said I gotta I gotta David smiling on his way up the floor vantage point, two two tie rally Martin against the beavers tooth. Resolve is island cheat them in front of the Bieber batch out on top to Rummy fakes the reversal goes to the dribble. Good cutoff. By thompson. Thirteen on the clock. High post to cheat. Him by tracing the paper bound struggle with a right elbow. Jumper doesn't draw iron Tyler Kelly secures. The rebuy Tyler gets it out. The Thompson tied at two seventeen thirty five to go on the first half. Ethan Thompson, two brothers Stevie right-wing in front of Bobby Hurley most outstanding player in the final. Four ninety two national champion Duke left hundred Izak Michael's bumped and fouled and aunt foul. Rob Edwards called for the first name early won two national titles. As one of the great point guards in the history of the game. In fact, still the all time assist leader in college basketball fan start here. The beaver store your nonprofit beaver gear headquarters. Shop OSU Bieber store dot com. Reichel inbounds left to Thompson top of the key to trace tinkle trace bumped into without a whistles, gene. I'm very physical hands off to Stephen Thompson junior and of the left one hundred rays eight on the shot clock. Trouble in a blocking foul called on Remmy. Martin. It is clear that Bob. Hurley to they're going to attack the low block, look mellow wide on Tyler Kelly. So and they are going to be ultra aggressive in their man demand. Very physical defense to fouls in this trip down the floor called against the sun. Devils in this to to tie trace tangled up the left wing looks for Stevie popping high jab step by all those took dribble at the left. Elbow picks up the dribble needs help. Find Steven Thompson junior with nine of the shot. Clock will go right now. Cuyler Kelly comes to set a screen Stevie goes the other way finds trace left point three way. Short long rebound to rob Edwards Edwards cheaters islander layup. No good. But he was fouled. Ethan cops from the personal and two shots coming presiding sheet them Eric curry. Is coming over. And I'm not sure what Bobby Hurley's upset about. It was a foul called Holly Thompson. Xilin cheat them to the free throw line. Sixty one percent free throw shooter. Arizona state ninth in the league at sixty six percent as a team and coming off of dreadfully game at Maples pavilion in the eighty five seventy one loss wear in the sun. Devils were six seventeen from the line and Xilin feed them on Hugh misses the first free throw here. Silom six eight two hundred one senior tied to give the sun devils, the lead and goes making wanted to three two to close rugged affair early here. It Ned wal boy he's been Thompson against the full four God rubbing Martin methodically. Brings it across the mid flight gets it on the we'd Zach Weichel Jack back and forth with the other south on the floor for the beans grows. It into Tyler Kelly left, the lane turnaround thirteen quarter and airball taken out of the air by Stevie saves. It could trace over to Ethan top to bottom the clock. For abors scramble their way back to the lead at five to three into the front court calms, Luke and store door to tax around a lot of the basket hangs in the air. Get it. Rebound rabbi, cheat them. And then the ball poked out by Cuyler Kelly or Zach Weichel it'll be Michael. Was sixty-nine to go in the house, and it'll be a two-shot opportunity coming for Xilin cheat them with the beavers leading five to three..

Ethan Thompson Tyler Kelly Bobby Hurley Stevie Midcoast Cuyler Kelly Remmy Martin Rob edwards Stephen Thompson Eric curry Arizona Holly Thompson Steven Thompson Remmy Cuyler Kelley Thompson David hall rob Edwards Edwards Devils Michael Xilin
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"You. Need is good wifi? Like, you said good, wifi and Amazon web services account and. You got a business go. And so I think that they should start businesses. That's the best way to learn. This job is by being an entrepreneur. And and my final question, what is it that, you know, about venture capital investing today that you wish you knew fifteen years ago, or so when you again started I I wish I appreciated more how much this was an apprenticeship business, right? How much you've gotta learn from people, and you've gotta you've gotta sit there, and and sort of really it's it's hard to do this unless you've been an entrepreneur and have lots of domain expertise. But, but but going through the typical channels you've got to learn from somebody else, you can't read books about this. You can't watch shark tank and come away as as VC you've got to learn from other people and then by asking questions, you know, so so was that a good or a bad company and having those questions asked to you and develop that that gut in that that that that insight and intuition around around what makes a good founder and what what's what's the right business opportunity? A lot of that's got to be sure you've got to be shown the way or shown a handful of examples on how to do it because every VC's a little different. But I think that that most of us is you talked about from sort of business mentors. We learned how we approach these from from other people not from books or from classes quite fascinating, we have been speaking with David hall. He is a partner at the rise of the rest seed fund part of revolution partners. If you enjoy this conversation. Well, be sure and look up an intra down and.

partner Amazon David hall founder fifteen years
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"And that's because it's it's become so transactional, you wanna white shirt? You go to the department store you buy a white shirt. But if you wanted to go and see what's there? You don't natural. Think to go walk through a department store and sort of browse and be be an having experience. And and what what neighborhoods is looking to do is bring back some of that experience. It's almost really a throwback to the way that the department stores used to be where you'd get you know, you could go and browse and look at something that seasonally appropriate, but also have a bite to eat at the lunch counter. And you know, we have a broader array of things to buy. And so these guys are curing lots of digitally native brands that are looking for retail points of presence because it's become obvious with businesses like Worby Parker like having stores actually matters because people want to touch and feel and experience your product. But then there are other larger more mainstream brands that are looking for new ways to activate and show off their products to their their existing consumers as well as new consumers. And then you see lots of like makers local folks, local craftsman that have cool products that they wanna share. They don't have a a big. Showcase a arena to do that. And then obviously wrap that all around with food and community music art, and it's a really cool installation in in sort of how how we think or at least the company thinks consumers want to shop in the next next generation, tell us about a time you failed and what you learned from the experience. So I was a banker, and and, you know, they're they're no no limit to the failure stories there. But one particular moment where I- I- consistently said. Yeah, I understood what I was doing and had no idea what I was doing. And I got it. Rai the end result of the analysis was completely wrong. And for that for me was was a heart failure to take. Because I never wanted to be the guy that got it completely wrong. But what it led me to understand and recognize is that I I'm not gonna walk away. If I don't understand what's going on. Mkx ask the don't assume that asked the dumb questions, you know in. A world like like banking, you get caught up in the jargon. And folks were dropping all sorts of terms. I had no idea what they meant. And instead of asking I just tried to figure it out and two o'clock became four o'clock became six o'clock in the morning, and I'm still looking at the blank screen, and it was it was an embarrassing awful failure. But it was the last time I ever had that failure interesting. What do you do for fun? We know you play tennis. But outside of that tell us what you do to keep either mentally sharp or fit outside of the office. So attempt tennis is the main thing I've got two young kids and try to spend as much time with those folks. And and you know, they're young boys and all they love to do is run around. And so I get a good workout with with those folks. But it's it's it's it's harder. These days to find that time to to get sharp. And I really I struggle with it. It's one of the things I really work on. But but I'm recognizing more and more. Now that I've gotta take the hour or two hours for myself and either go play ten. NS or go right on the peleton or whatever and try to try to sweat it out a little bit. If they millennial recent college grad came up to you and said they were interested in a career in venture investing. What sort of advice might you give them? I would say start a business really become an entrepreneur. I the I don't think that this was given much to my generation of college graduates. And I think again as we talked about the cost of starting a business or nothing and the opportunity cost of doing it when you're twenty two you know, if you fail you dust yourself off and onto the next to go get a regular job there. But you have so few opportunities to start a business and live off Rama noodles for for a year with your three three best mates in in a tiny either co worker co living facility or or small cheap apartments starting a business. All.

tennis Mkx Worby Parker two hours
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Or Stanford located VC's. I I don't know what other other VC's entrepreneurs look like I'm very data is not broadly shared to say, the least. And but I'm very proud that. We we've got quite a few entrepreneurs of color women entrepreneurs in in our portfolio, and and they've performed thus far. Really what we one of our exits was by an African American female entrepreneur who had this business part pick that will soul to Amazon and hark pick heart pick. It's it's it's like Shas AM for visual search so picture of something, and it will run its algorithm and say, this is most likely screw, and you can you know, and Amazon acquired the business a couple years ago, and you know, and she'll when I use the Amazon app and say I want to see this. You could take a photo of something. There are parts of the Amazon app. I don't exactly how how it's been filtered into the Amazon application, but that basic Consalvi rhythm. But yeah, that basic concept is part of that part of that part of the Amazon. DNA now in an I'm just very proud of that. I'm very proud that we, you know, we we look at a broader we have a broader aperture for for who is an entrepreneur. And and what types of investments we're willing to make tell us what else you really excited about these days on my teeth a little bit earlier, but I'm really excited about thinking about the future of retail. You know, we every ecommerce is eating the world yet. Eighty five percent of the things that we by or still things that you buy sort of in-person, and we were investors, and like I mentioned this company FOX trot, which is redoing the convenience store were also investors in a company called neighbourhood goods. It's a Dallas based company that's looking to sort of reinvigorate, the department store model you walk into a department store today, you see more employees than you do customers walking around..

Amazon Stanford Dallas FOX Eighty five percent
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"I mean, like folks like building kings whereby it, and it's the the authors now written several other books about like, you know, the inner game of golf and the inner game of business and things like that. But but for me the application as somebody who loves tennis and loves playing tennis into business into my personal life has been really helpful guide. That's fascinating. I am late to the game of tennis only started playing within the past few years. Years. And my one of my biggest issues I do these drills on Monday nights. And most of the I shouldn't say most about two thirds of the gets men's drills two thirds of the guys are considerably younger than me. And there's a group of guys in their fifties. And sixties most of whom are either good or very good. And the problem with playing with the young studs are that they want to crush the ball. It's baseball and as much as I laugh at them. It's like unforced their unforced era when you're playing with big hitters. You can help the crowd sucks you along. And suddenly I'm trying to smash the ball, and it's a constant effort. I love that idea of relaxed intensity. Don't try and kill the ball play within yourself. And, but you you mentioned that and I immediately went to that I'm gonna crush this ball, Roger Federer style. But you're not ready for federal you don't have that. Yeah. Just get get the. All across the net, the place that you wanted to see if you can hit the ball where you want it to go. You will nine times out of ten when the point right? And if you can focus on just that hitting the ball where you want it to go well before I learned the proper mechanics, I could literally put the ball anywhere on the court. Yeah. Not with power not with speed. But I could kiss any line. I wanted to once I learned the proper way to stroke a ball that skill set took a step back as you start learning the mechanics and becoming more comfortable with it. But there's like Mike Tyson says all of that preparation goes out and you get hit in the. That's exactly that's exactly right. And and that testosterone poisoning that competitive spirit. These are drills. It doesn't there's no winning and losing who cares. Right. You get sucked right into it. It's the most amazing bit of of crowd psychology. I I it's I'm gonna look into that book because it's definitely appealing. And once again, we digress. About tennis instead of talking about. What we should be talking about. So let's talk about the venture capital industry. What's changed since you've joined the industry, and is this for the better or the worse. I'd say the biggest thing has just been the the influx of data into the industry. You know, it's it's funny. We we require and suggest an advisor companies to leverage data and your decision making. And I think for the for the first time now, we've got huge sets of big data that help us understand and rank and target entrepreneurs. And so it's important for us to to leverage this data because it helps us and helps us make better decisions and helps us be more. Algorithm. Mc about our decision making. But it also really helps us recognize that that we can bring in more entrepreneurs of color and women entre preneurs into the fold because we're not necessarily relying on just network pattern matching from from guys who went to Harvard or guys who went to Stanford who all look alike. And so it it's I'm I'm happy that that that's the case because it's may. Taking the table bigger. And adding allowing us to add more seats to the table of entrepreneurs and broaden that scope of entrepreneurs, particularly for as we were talking about earlier some of the people who who have been left behind even further. So when we look at the sort of demographics of who venture investing is is giving money to specifically, do you think revolution is more diverse more gender friendly more people of color friendly than the typical?.

tennis golf Roger Federer testosterone Mike Tyson advisor Harvard Stanford
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"A little blunt blurry than that. It's hard for me to wanna back that type of company. Everybody's favorite question. Tell us about some of your favorite books be they fiction non fiction. Venture investing or otherwise. So the the book that I really like and have gone back to it's a little tiny thin book. But it's called the inner game of tennis. And it's by guy by the name of Timothy Galway, and it basically talks about how do you how do you maintain high levels of performance while still being relaxed and sort of allow your your inner game the the game that you? Not the game that you necessarily practice for. But what happens when you're on the court playing? How do you how do you perfect that game as opposed to the very mechanical of throw the ball up hit the serve and make sure the ball goes in to like you're playing against an opponent? How do you make that? How do you allow yourself to relax and practice that? And it's it's so the implications of the book well beyond the tennis court and have been huge for me from from a business perspective on how do you maintain intensity while still being relaxed and thoughtful about about how you can approach the game from a different angle, the fasten any other books, you want to mention just finished reading recently a book called this integration by Eugene Robinson who at the Washington Post. It's a fascinating take from me on on the sub segmentation of black America, basically African Americans for for so long have been considered by politicians by by marketers to be relatively monolithic, but unit. Porn blocked. They're all gonna vote this way. They're going to do the by this kind of product. But in reality Robertson points out that there four different types of real subgroups, the the elite so the Obamas on the Oprah's of the world, the the the middle class, which is the the broad sort of group of us that are African American college educated, and who are who are working and living parts of the American dream. But then the the two that are really interesting to me were the emergent class of this is the the group of folks that are are biracial or biracial with with African American being part of that that that composition. But also, the African diaspora and immigrants who are first second third generation immigrants who have a totally different view of themselves because some of them aren't necessarily African Americans they might be Nigerian Brian's, but but but the the notion that that they see the world, and they they act and interact with the world differently. And then the final group was the what he calls the abandoned, which are the folks that just have really. Been left behind and are are the folks that we hear about and read about frequently in the news. And it just understanding that that that that black America's is really subset segmented into these different groups that have you know, obvious similarities, but but some pretty stark differences was a really fascinating some of the date on that fourth group is really very discouraging in terms of employment gains wage gains. It's just the numbers have been pretty pretty intimidating. I on a definitely take a look at that book. I have to ask you if you play tennis. And and if the book was at all, helpful I it, you know, my results not necessarily withstanding, but to me. Yeah. It was absolutely. That's that's it's it's one of my passions. I you know, I try to get out as frequently as I can I just registered for a new flex league. So I'm excited to get out on the court and work out some of the cobwebs. But yeah, I the the the ability to. To relax on the court and focus not focus on the mechanics of getting in the right position. But just play and breathe. And and then control that you can't that you can't that you can't control right? Like, you can control. How many times you bounce the ball? And you and it really teaches you the focus on the things that you can't control because there's so much you can't control. So in that moment, focus on breathing and focus on where you want to hit the ball as opposed to the exact mechanics of how you're gonna stand and how you're gonna position your racket in your feet hit the bottom. It's a it's a great read. The book was published in the seventies and has been used..

tennis Brian America Eugene Robinson Timothy Galway Washington Post Robertson Obamas
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"But also helps potentially expand that that the access for that company. So it's not just network density. But then it's the network affect cross pollinating from city to city. You got it quite interesting. Do you have a target for number of investments you're gonna make each year? Or is it really you just kinda take it as it comes. Yeah. We I think we'll do about one hundred hundred and fifty investments out of this fund over the next couple of years, but we're we don't have a specific target. We again are being super opportunistic about about finding great companies in in in in these regions. And you mentioned this fund. My sumptious is this is the setup as a traditional VC g general partners in limited partners any thoughts on is. They're going to be a rise of the rest to resurrect three going to stack that. Down down the years. What happens when you basically say, okay, we're we're filled up. You know, I'm focused on deploying one hundred and fifty million that are limited partners have invested in in in this fund and hope to really make a difference. And obviously create a lot of value in in in in the fund that we're in you know, who knows what the future is going to hold. But we're super excited about about the the the the limited partners trusting us in the capital that we're deploying into what I think are a fantastic array of companies that that showcase the best of of what's going on. And you know, at least forty seven of the fifty states, although we do have investments in California in in New York, but not necessarily in Silicon Valley or. Yeah. And you know, I I've danced around this question. And and you you came close to answering it, but I haven't asked it. So let me just blurt it out. I have to imagine. There are a lot of misconceptions about venture investing. In general, you reference the misconception about your relationship with Silicon Valley, but just being broadly. What do you think is is some of the biggest misconceptions about how venture capitalist operate what they invest in just generally speaking. So I think from the enve- from the capital deployment side. The biggest misconception is that. It's easy. Is that you just you you sit around listening to a couple of pitches. And whenever something if you write a check, and I mean, and you know, we we apply science we apply data to to to our decision making. And you know, and and we we do a lot of work. I mean, we're it's not just come in for pitch and come out thirty minutes later with with the check. Right. I mean, we the the closest we get to that or are in our pitch competitions. But but but for our our our normal investments, we're we're doing due diligence in asking big questions about the market opportunity in an about the founders domain expertise and about. All all sorts of ebbs and flows of the real market opportunity in the business model. I think from the capital receiving perspective. I think the biggest misconception is that. A lot of entrepreneurs have great companies, but they're not necessarily venture back a ball. And I think that there's this this misconception that that venture is is the the financing source of of of kings. And and you know, I was still whenever I start having conversations and top two particularly large audiences of of entrepreneurs, I say the first best source of financing is revenue right revenue. Doesn't take any of your company? You don't have to pay any of it back. And if you can scale your company through everything that's best. But a lot of a lot of folks have really good businesses that just aren't necessarily venture cap- R V C Baco businesses because they're either not growing at a scale or have a broad enough large enough market opportunity. I mean, typically venture capitalists are looking for billion dollar billion dollar businesses. And and we have a specific model to to help. Hel help define what that means. And you look at companies like Uber. It's totally rematch. The taxi dispatch industry period that's a billion. That's e it's easy to see the multi-billion or global unstoppable. But there there lots of lots of really good really small really great small businesses where the proprietors are going to be millionaires. But those aren't necessarily always great venture backup business. Sure. Makes a lot of sense..

Silicon Valley California C Baco New York billion dollar thirty minutes
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"And it's a great business perfect for launching a city like Chicago. And and we're really excited about that opportunity. Because we think that, you know, there hasn't been a lot of disruption in the convenience store market in over a generation. And and being able to have really cool products ordering ordered at the top of a phone, but also be be your corner store that you walk past and get a bagel and a coffee on your way to work in the morning is actually pretty cool that that's interesting. So I wanted to I was going to ask you how you source companies, but I'm gonna change that question a little bit. When you announce? Hey, here's our new tour, and we're going to these five cities does that open a floodgate of inquiries or you still flip over rocks? Defines where the next grade entrepreneurs. Wh when we go to a city, and we announced that we're gonna come to the city. We get. Scores of applications to participate even in our pitch competition able to put those companies in our database and start to track them. We really have. I think have taken a more data driven approach to looking at at lots of different companies across the country because it's the only way that we're going to be able to do it with a relatively small team at scale, and we also rely heavily on our network partners. So when we go to these cities, we meet the local VC's on the regional VC's, and we asked them, hey, you know, are there what what are the two or three companies that you guys are most excited about in Raleigh Durham, and they're happy to tell us that two or three companies that they're most excited, and you do that to two or three local funds. And you've got a, you know, a dozen companies at the end of the day that that are, you know, ones that tend to bubble above the some of the rest, but but it's also a temporal thing. Right. You come back six months later, and it's a new batch of companies. So we we we love to maintain these really authentic relationships with with the partners and investors in the community. And then that helps introduce us to the the entrepreneurs that are really making a difference. What what about competition you mentioned other VC's in areas? Are you at all concerned that you're gonna start running into competition in some of these places, or is it still a sort of cooperative friendly group of other players in the same space who might be co-investors in the same companies? Yeah. I see them more as collaborators and competition. We we need people. We're we're not going to write a full investment round. If a company's own a five million dollar series seed round, we're not going to do that entire round. So if we do some of it, we're gonna need other people tell participate in it's always helpful to have, you know, localize in ears on the ground who know the company or no the founder, no the have domain expertise in in the business. And so being able to bring all of those folks into the round is is one of the reasons why we're doing this. We're able to be massive connectors of of you know, if you might be a healthcare expert. Fund based in Nashville, and if we find a healthcare deal in Saint Louis, we'd love to bring you guys into that deal. Because it just only helps make that deal hopes de risk the deal to are limited partners are are fun..

Chicago Raleigh Durham Nashville founder Saint Louis five million dollar six months
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Well, and what the that company is doing is building the technology platform to help shippers prop. Fairly assess and book freight, so it's data platform that helps them determine the the freight costs because of all sorts of things like fuel and temperature and low this being being transported between any two implants hard industry that was basically done analogue right up until these guys have come along and help them help them digitize and create a fulsome platform for for the transmission of freight. That's quite fascinating. What what cities have surprised you that seemed like an interesting surprise. What else has really surprised you either in their focus or any other way. Yeah. So I'd say one of the the big surprises to me was Indianapolis, Indianapolis is obviously a great city as storied American city, and what one of the things and one of the big highlights is there was a business. They're called exact target that sold a Salesforce for multiple billions of dollars, the founders of exact target after they sort of spun out of the Salesforce were. World double down triple down in Indianapolis and created an ecosystem they are focused on B, two B business to business software and services companies. And so they they've really like anchored themselves around this notion of BB SAS, it's going to be what Indianapolis has known for at least from a technology startup perspective. And it's become a hub. They've got a the the founders air created a company called the high alpha studio, they've got a fun there. They invest in in handfuls of companies that are coming out of Indianapolis, and and who would have thought, right? And it was so it was such a sort of great ecosystem that Salesforce after their acquisition of this company. Exact target moved its h q two to Indianapolis. And now has one of the largest buildings in the city of Indianapolis is by sales is owned and operated by Salesforce, and has a couple thousand employees in Indianapolis. And so it's it's amazing to see how that city has kind of really sp-, you know, really exploded in growth. Around a couple of founders who said we're going to double down in our in our hometown that that's amazing. What gimme one more city that kinda was like, wow, I didn't expect to see that an overwhelming set of choices or you know, what I'm trying to come up with a really good good example for you. I I mean, I I'll go back to to to Chattanooga. I was really surprised. I mean, they they, you know, the they're a handful of just really great companies. There's a company that we were not investors in. But but it's it's a logistics and a moving company called bellhop spaced in Chattanooga. That's a really strong company and seeing how a city that that's not the largest city by by stretch of the word has really focused on building this really dense community. We have this. This this phrase that that we use a lot called network density, which you know, network density network density, which means how can you how can you create this? This tight network of people of entrepreneurs of of of of fans.

Indianapolis Salesforce Chattanooga BB SAS
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Entrepreneurs can drive and be changing change agents in the future in against some of the bigger problems that were. Gonna be facing? Which is why I would guess that list of notables who were on the the who are investors in and board members of rise the rest, I'm not going to read the names, go to their website and look at it. I I it's the most mind blowing list of investors I've ever seen associated with one organization in my entire life. I it's it's a standing, and I I don't even want to build up the hype too much just go go to the website and check it out Google rise of the rest funds investors or advisors, and it's it's really astonishing, you mentioned incubators and other types of accelerators. You know, we know about those in cities like Boston and New York and San Francisco, and there were a number of some of which one actually went public. There are a number of of incubators that had been around for a while. Where are you finding incubators outside of the coasts? And are the private or they public or private public joint ventures? Tell us a little bit. Yes. Simply all eve up. Yeah. You find it takes different different types of organizations to help support the ecosystems, right? I mean, they're quite a few and most the majority overwhelming majority. I'd say our private enterprises that people are running and hopefully running for profit some include co working so that there's like a a real business model there others. Are you say co working I immediately think of we works, but that's not what you're necessarily referring to very similarly, you the entrepreneur rents desk space, and so that becomes the the revenue model the business model for the co working space and helps to feed the incubator accelerator, but but we we've seen dozens of models of how this can work, and you know, and I think a lot of them are specific for the company specific for the the the city of geography, but the goal is unlocking entrepreneurship, it's taking the the man or woman who's. Working for one of the big companies in the cities saying, you know, what I can I I've been working at Proctor and gamble forever. And Cincinnati, and I love what I do. But boy, I have a great e commerce opportunity that love to go in and start. And now, there's a vehicle for them to extract themselves from that big corporation and like go start a start up somewhere. So let's let's talk about some of the cities you've been to you mention Detroit. Pittsburgh Cincinnati, nor liens what other cities have have you guys invested in. And how do they vary from location location geography to geography? Yeah. So we, you know, we've been named a few of the cities but cities from small as a couple of hundred thousand people to as large as you know, three or four million people. We are most recent seventh rise of the rest tour three or four million. Let's like Chicago is that what we're talking about. You know, we we went to Dallas Chattanooga Birmingham. Memphis and Louisville Kentucky and our last tour. That's great. Cross section of the types of cities, we go to some big, you know, big major cities at that. Everybody has heard of others all these people cities people have heard of, but but others less well known for being tech hubs like, I don't think of Chattanooga as tech hub. And you'd be surprised to find out that Chattanooga has such a strong logistics tech industry. Why is that? Well, I think it's there the proximity of Chattanooga to both the obviously Atlanta, which is a huge nearly unless you have who you have a couple of airlines couple airline is there a couple of transportation companies, then you go up to Chattanooga. And it's it's close. It's it's it's close to a lots of that transportation Cup. But also a lot of freight travels through Atlanta at the Chattanooga. And even the winner of our rise of the rest tour in in Chattanooga this year. It was a company called freight waves that leaves not freight way freightways. Yeah..

Chattanooga Dallas Chattanooga Birmingham Cincinnati Google Atlanta Proctor Boston Chicago Kentucky Detroit San Francisco Pittsburgh Memphis Louisville New York
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"And if we can just not not move California from four fifty to forty nine percent to lift Georgia from one to two percent. But just grow the denominator the pie bigger it. It it it really because the beauty of what we do is, you know, as an asset class venture largely creates jobs, right? When when we write it when I'm investing in a company, the first thing, I always ask what are you gonna do with the money? And almost always the first answer is we're gonna hire, you know. It's not it's not we're going to close the factory to generate profitability, or we're going to close the trade at a you know, three a twenty thirty percent IRR. It's I want to go higher fifteen developers and to community managers and and a CMO because we're trying to build something. Great. And that to me, you know, the we all know and cities and politicians are well aware of things like the tech multiplier where every technology job generates, you know, five to six general economy jobs. So when they go out and hire five people, that's you know, another dentist that gets hired or another restaurant that needs to open or coffee place that needs to open on the corner to help sort of accommodate all of that growth in some of these heartland. Areas that have been losing for the last couple of years. I I love your take on on failure in and Silicon Valley. My favorite thing on some of their VC bay area websites is their list of here's. Yeah. We we said no to over. We said no to apple we said, no to Amazon like their list of failures. And it's a badge of honor your you're dead Ryan on that. It's quite it's quite fascinating. So when you're putting together a portfolio of companies when when I look at a portfolio of stocks, I wanna see some US companies some emerging market companies some European and Asia Japanese companies, how do you approach creating a portfolio g think in terms of different sectors and distribution of risk to tell us about? How you go about doing that? Yeah. So we were were obviously geographically diverse because that's part of part of our mandate. But but in that we we have lots of different industries. We have lots of different business models in, you know, summer like we've talked about a little earlier summer direct to consumer some are business to business, and you know, some are like will likely end up being pro-cyclical some will likely be countercyclical. And so I feel like as we, you know, as we take a step up and look broadly at our portfolio, we do have a range of of of really interesting business models in in in targets of the economy that are different. You know, we've got some healthcare companies we've got some retail or e commerce companies we've got a handful of food opportunities that were pursuing and so food different from agriculture or one on the same. We we see food and agriculture's perfectly co-mingled, and we've got some some some longer plays and the ad tech business, and we also have a couple of of food brands that were also really excited about I remember reading and it's a couple years ago. Ready? I think it was wired magazine you talk about Agritech. They're these big commercial. Like, John Deere tractors and people pretty much created a using an iphone and a satellite receiver away to self program. These tractors to do a whole field with nobody sitting in the cab long before they were self driving cars and trucks. It seems that tractors were pretty much the first to do that. When you talk about Ag tech is is that the sort of stuff you referring to or is it more specific soil chemistry and material science and things along that or a little bit. Ev it's a little bit of everything. I'll I'll give you an example. We are investors in the business called app harvest app harvest is based in pike Ville, Kentucky, and what this business does. And it's so fascinating the founder and entrepreneurs has just this really dynamic guy. And he's found he he's basically turning abandoned coal mines into hydroponic farms hydroponic greenhouses, and he's hiring former co workers to come work these new farms. On on what used to be a coal mine. And so to me, that's that's the the essence of.

pike Ville US Silicon Valley California apple Georgia founder John Deere Agritech Kentucky Ryan Amazon twenty thirty percent forty nine percent two percent
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Like folks were financing on S one one threats in an eight or nine and that didn't play out very well for them. And I think you're seeing the companies take the time and build the scale necessary to get. Right, right. When when the IPO actually ends up happening quite interesting, let let's talk a little bit about the sort of venture investing. You guys do at revolution. What sort of returns? Are you looking for on any specific of fund or any specific investment? Yeah. You know, we're we're a traditional V C. You know, we wanna put a dollar in the machine and get more than dollar, hopefully, hopefully, a five or ten coming back on out of the machine. But but but to me the goal is also about building these great icon companies that are tackling some of the toughest problems that we as a society are facing around, healthcare and education, transportation food security and things like that. Because I think that those are those are going to be big winners for investors over security. Having great in an open access to healthy clean food options. Because we're we're we're still trying to make sure that we have a healthy population. And there are lots of businesses that are working really hard to get farm-to-table is is the huge now the yeah, the the rule of the day, but but just trying to figure out how do we make? How do we do that at a sustainable scalable level? Right farm-to-table in Brooklyn, or or the city or even the suburbs are small restaurants and local farmers, and it's very high end and very chichi. You're talking about a much broader approach, and and I want to mention industries that you're looking to disrupt include food healthcare transportation agriculture. These are like basic foundations of society. How can you disrupt those? Yeah. So the way that we think about that. And we largely see opportunity through the lens of geography, and that we think that you know, the the if. You're going to come out with the newest Pharm tech business kinda hard to see how that's going to be a guy from midtown Manhattan coming up with us to say or a lady from Silicon Valley who's going to be able to come up with those ideas, who's never spent time on the farm. And we think that there are, you know, lots of experts in places like demoing or Saint Louis who know a bit about farming and agriculture within their lots of manufacturing experts who who come out of places like like, Detroit and Ann Arbor who can help us Bill things as as a country. And so we we think that those types of opportunities are gonna come perhaps outside of the valley and outside of New York and let let me be clear because it was one of the criticisms we get our fund a lot is about about bashing the valley, and we are definitely not not bashers of the valley. We appreciate looking valley. They are the cathedral that every other city aims to be as it relates to sort of allocating capital in the Sesing risk for for early stage entrepreneurs. And and I tell you know, a lot of the city's when we go into our always ask us, what's. One thing that they do in the valley better than what we do, you know in pick a city and the answer's always they accept failure. And they accept risk so differently than you know, ninety percent of the cities in the country because because it's it's it's just woven into the house of Silicon Valley things fail but out of that like like Phoenix's, you know, these great companies can emerge from entrepreneurs who've had massive failures. And so we go ahead. We just we love to to highlight. You know, we're not we're not looking to steal share from New York or Boston of the valley. We're looking to grow the denominator and say, you know, if seventy five percent of all venture capital went to three states last year, Massachusetts, New York and California one percent of venture capital, go some place like Michigan one percent goes to Georgia. There's a lot of smart people in those states..

Silicon Valley New York Ann Arbor Brooklyn Manhattan Detroit Saint Louis Phoenix Georgia Michigan California Massachusetts Boston one percent seventy five percent ninety percent
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"There's something going on in the middle of America that, you know, either their personal portfolio didn't necessarily have have enough allocation, but also, you know, a lot of these folks are from David Rubenstein, one of our LP's is from Baltimore in basis is from New Mexico, their their hometowns are these cities that have been left behind a lot of times. And of course, everybody wants to see their hometown, flourish. And they want to see the return of jobs to to a lot of these places where where they have they haven't seen the economic growth in vitality that that that we've seen a lot in on the coast. It's fascinating. So let's look a little bit about private markets in and venture investing. Why is it that when we look at private pre public companies, there's an expectation that the performance is going to be so much better than the public markets. You know, why shouldn't people just by an index fund and forget about it is is how someone put the question to me. So I'm going to pass it to you. What are the potential upsides of venture investment? Well, well, I think you know, the the first thing is the the appetite and ability to allocate risk whereas because of regulation because of just the the the cost and visibility of being public. It's harder for companies in the public markets do that. But on the private side, we're able to see things before they're before they're ready for primetime with you're still very risky and can completely flame out the risk of every round of investment that we do it revolution. And the rise of the rest. We we run the risk of the company calling us up one day saying it didn't work and. You know as as painful as that is there. Luckily for us. There's so many more calls that say, hey, it's working really well, or it's we think we've got eighty percent of it figured out. And and then the risk has been greatly reduced, but the opportunity is still huge to come up with, you know, the next social network, you know, it it's it's really risky when it's a little a little face app for.

David Rubenstein Baltimore America New Mexico eighty percent one day
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"It's so funny. I was on a call just the other day with a company that relocated from Boston to Wisconsin. And they were able to extend their burn by over six months, just by redeem asylum, the company, right? So I think that I think that they're a couple of things I think that obviously the cost of living differences is a really different. And and and and you can grow a company a lot farther on on the same amount of funding. But I think you're also seeing the flow of talent. I think you're seeing people graduate from the university of Michigan or graduated from Georgia state or Georgia Tech and say, you know, what I don't I don't necessarily feel like I wanna go to these these these coastal Hobbs. I wanna I wanna stay here. I wanna become an. Entrepreneur and it's easier because my network is here. It's it's it's it's a more livable more, affordable, definitely more affordable environment. But the jobs are now starting to happen. It's it's part of the flywheel the the receiving this flow of talent boomerang back home. Because that's where they wanna be. And I think that, you know, the combination of those two factors with the flattening of the, you know, it's never been cheaper to start a business because of, you know, things like a laptop and an internet connection and Amazon cloud, and you pretty much ready to get ready to go. And that wasn't always the case, you know, a decade twenty years ago, just to say, the least there is a giant demand for stem jobs, even in the highest paying Silicon Valley and and a biotech in in Boston and a little bit everything in New York. Do you run into an issue of shortage of skilled labor in in those towns that may not be known for their their tech works? Offers. So I would you know, that's a that's a common issue. We hear a lot. And I think that the real the real focus is for a lot of the early stage jobs. A lot of the junior folks the entry level jobs. They're coming right out of the university. So I it's it's no different from leaving Morgan St. Morehouse than coming up to New York to work at Morgan Stanley, these folks graduated from you know, Vanderbilt and then go work directly into one of the the Nashville startup Nashville startups. I think what about coders and pro statistical analysts and design, I guess designers. You could pretty much find you can find a lot of these folks anywhere. And I think you're starting to see the recruiting of them away from the hubs one of the big challenges for for for developers. Particularly in in the coastal hubs is there's such a high opera to be cost on their talent. Right. If you have a bad quarter as a startup or miss a couple of year, milestones, half year development staff is looking for another job because they recognize that, you know, unless they work for. They're out. Yeah. And and so, but but in Madison or in Detroit, like you've got a stickier employees. And we're seeing that those folks end up staying around longer being more productive. You know, they're able to get a backyard and start a family. I mean, I've I I saw deck one time where we're a we the question was asked what about recruiting how hard is it to recruit, and the the the entrepreneurs showed a slide of a birthday party. And he says it's easy for me to recruit because I can promise this. I can't promise a backyard birthday party in San Francisco, New York, and I have to point out and ask you about the board of advisors for rise of the rest. This is just an astonishing list. Gyms Barksdale of of Netscape Jeff Bezos, Tory Burch Ray dally. Oh, Steve case John door. I'm just I'm gonna stop there. But that's just an unbelievable list of investors that goes on and on and on what's it like working with a group that August, then esteem? We are beyond privileged that that those those notable entrepreneurs investors business leaders among the best of our era have decided to join us on this mission. And you know, we think that the things that they saw an us, and and sort of the implicit mission of what we were doing of democratising this flow of capital was really important. But we also think that they're they're, you know, they're investors. The these folks understand business, and they understand that there's something going on in the heartland..

New York Boston Nashville Wisconsin Georgia Tech university of Michigan Morgan St. Morehouse Morgan Stanley Silicon Valley Amazon Hobbs Georgia Jeff Bezos San Francisco Tory Burch Ray dally Netscape Barksdale Vanderbilt Detroit Madison
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"And and for. Financial services. And it just was so exciting to me said, I I've got I've got a plot. My way there I you know, I did a little cyber stalking at the time. Finding out where the revolution offices were. I did some linked in searches to find who I knew there and ended up finding a woman that I went to business school with who was there a couple of free coffees for her and a glass of Chardonnay, and I found myself with with a an Email introduction to one of the one of the founders. And that's that's how it started. And and not I have to point out. Unlike most of the big VC's revolution didn't set up shop in New York, a Boston or anywhere in the bay area and Silicon Valley, they're pretty close to where the Washington Post is headquartered. It's it was three blocks. It was the easiest commute run interview. I'd ever had. Yeah. I mean, you know, the the revolution story, and and what Steve has built and others have built with revolution is is is really phenomenal in in the Washington DC area. It's you know, it's been it's home ALL grew up in the in the Dulles corridor. Has been a phenomenal explosion of just capital ingenuity in that area. And has helped spawn, you know, the the grandchildren of AOL are now companies like vox media, which is run by Jim Bangkok who was at AOL or even living social which was a huge company that was run by a former product manager at revolution health. So you're still seeing these spillover effects of that that sort of huge entrepreneurial flashpoint with AOL. Now, I think of that area as very heavily Laden with telecoms and other networking firms is Ernie cross pollination with revolution. Or you have a very specific set of things you focus on and telecom not yet. Well, I mean, given given sort of the AOL DNA of our place. There's a lot of a lot of focus on on on social networking, social media and general consumerism like how how do we how do we make the lives of consumers? Better easier faster cheaper by investing in a lot of products that that sort of where the consumer is the end user. So a lot of our investments throughout time have been either be the C directly or be to beat a see where where the end user the business might not necessarily be generated from the consumer. But the end user was a consumer because just you know, the AOL DNA is really pervasive about how do you make? How do you make it easy for the average Joe to get online? That's exactly what they do on ramp to the internet. That's how he described AOL for forever. So does that background change? What you look at. How you look at it. Or what you put company capital in? What's the impact of the AOL background? Is it is it just so obvious as hey, we're used to doing be to see sort of investments business to consumer sort of investments, or is there a change in the entire process of what comes your way in? And the way you consider. It. Well, I I guess the way that I'd most likely consider it think about it is we really approach things from a brand building perspective. How do you build the brand? So that it it in is helps the consumer recognize that there's there's trust behind the brand. There's a simplicity there's a real value. Add that's coming through through the the products. That were backing I would also say that, you know, we're we're also as we deploy capital and a lot of the deals that come to us or deals that that are are pretty focused on consumer stuff. We we have a lot of B two B business to business and investments as well. But, but you know, a lot of the deals that we see just end up being really strong consumer brands. I previously had a one of the partners in your firm. Steve Murray on an I discussed ever so briefly rise above the rest with him. And he said, hey, I got a guy you should speak to about. This name is David. I love this concept. And I and I have to..

AOL Steve Murray stalking Washington Post telecoms vox media Dulles New York Joe Jim Bangkok Boston David product manager
"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Energy is in the rest of the country while you're gonna find this conversation. Absolutely fascinating with no further ado my chat with David hall. My special guest today is David all he is a partner at the venture capital fund rise of the rest seed funds part of revolution partners of VC. He comes to us with a B A in economics from Morehouse college in an MBA from Harvard prior to joining revolution. He worked at the Washington Post as the director of planning and developing managing corporate, Manet and investments and helping to launch a number of new print and digital publications. David hall. Welcome to Bloomberg. Thank you. It's pleasure to be here. So I've been speaking to a number of VC's over the past couple of years, and I'm always fascinated by their backgrounds. Your background is a little unusual. How do you get from the Washington Post to the world? Eventually let's start with what what were you doing at the Washington Post? Yeah. So I went to the Washington Post actually intern. At the Washington Post company between my first and second years at at Harvard Business School, and it was for me. It was a perfect place because we're do newly minted NBA's want to go. They wanna go to industries that are in crisis. And there was no greater crisis in the two thousand early two thousands than the print newspaper way. Let me interrupt you newly minted NBA's wanna go to industries in crisis. I always thought they either wanted to go to high paying Wall Street jobs or high paying Silicon Valley jobs, you're suggesting other. Well, I figured I could always end up in one of those high paying coastal jobs, but but for cutting my teeth right needed to manage a business through disruption, and that to me was going to be such an interesting, you know, how how how could I be the savior of the great grey lady of of of Washington, at least and managing a business through disruption. Sounds a lot like what VC's look for in startups. I it's you know, I was reflecting on the train up here from from wash. Shington how much of what I been working on? It's been kind of cumulative. It's looking for these these how do you recognize disruption before it hits? And then how do you manage through the disruption, and how do you and now from a from an investor's perspective. How do you manage that process? Sort of indirectly because we're not in the company everyday, but we're advising these companies about disruption that's either coming or disruption that hopefully they're creating with their products and services that they're launching quite quite interesting. So that was your first experience in the workforce. How did you tack from that or to venture it's easy to talk about? But it, but it's actually more visual. You know, I was sitting there one day at the Washington Post, and it's the only place I've ever worked where sitting on your desk reading the newspaper was called product research. Right. And so really article was reading an article about Steve case, and the firm that he'd just launched after leaving AOL Time Warner called revolution. It was going to build these big iconic businesses that we're going to tackle really tough problems around health care.

Washington Post David hall NBA Washington partner Morehouse college Harvard Harvard Business School Bloomberg AOL director of planning intern Steve Warner one day
Heroin's Children: Inside the US opioid crisis

St. Louis Composting Garden Hotline with Mike Miller

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Heroin's Children: Inside the US opioid crisis

"Also netted one arrest detectives say they, seized about seven kilos worth of cocaine and seven, hundred and thirty two grams of marijuana all from a home on. Silver charms way in new Albany late last month the drugs have an approximate street value of. More than seven hundred thousand dollars David. Hall was arrested and the forty two year old is facing. A slew of drug related charges and there's a documentary on. The nation's opioid crisis and it features and Ohio community heroines children produced by Al Jazeera USA, is set in chillicothe e, and was developed as part of their weekly. Program fault lines. It's now been nominated for an EMMY the documentary. Looks at the invisible victims of. The ongoing crisis a generation of children who are, being Neglected abandoned or. Orphaned due to the effects of the opioid crisis for your ABC six first warning weather forecast. Sunshine today with a high near ninety. M Allison Wyant breaking news and weather alerts instantly follow us, on Twitter at six ten WTVN news Great.

Allison Wyant Al Jazeera Usa Cocaine Emmy Marijuana Albany Twitter Chillicothe ABC Wtvn Hall David Ohio Seven Hundred Thousand Dollars Thirty Two Grams Forty Two Year Seven Kilos
"david hall" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"david hall" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Your parents insurance come on what are we watching here where we we were hearing from teachers who are demanding that the governor we're demanding that the legislature give them what they want meet their demands and if they don't get that they're going to illegally walkout they're going to illegally strike and the voice of the union is twenty three years old and has not even served one full year as a teacher in the state what are we watching here this is insane to me it is insane to me that teachers are going to walk off the job on thursday it's like this cat is the pied piper i call them the david hall of arizona the pied piper in teachers who have been in the in the profession for decades are following this i don't i'm having a hard time with this and i'm having a hard time with one part of the of our government say yes we're going to do this and the other person you know what it's impossible cuts and tax increases i'll get your reaction at four fifty you are it's forty four minutes after the hour news talk five fifty kfyi time for east side west side traffic was steve geller leap how you bet you james eastbound santan freeway shown a lot of traffic arizona avenue out to gilbert road shame thing if you're taking the superstition home eastbound eastbound sixty sonal from rural to mesa drive still dealing with that car motorcycle crash in timpee.

legislature david hall timpee arizona steve geller forty four minutes twenty three years