35 Burst results for "David Greene"

How the Barrel of Monkeys Can Help You Motivated

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

01:29 min | 2 weeks ago

How the Barrel of Monkeys Can Help You Motivated

"Consider what you can learn from the barrel of monkeys. Now this does amy okay. Barrel monkeys was not popular. When i was a kid. It's more my grandparent's generation. But i had a grandparent and they had a set of barrel of monkeys sitting around that i played with when i was a young child. The concept of barrel of monkeys is that you've got all these monkeys with hands like this okay and they all linked together. You make this chain of monkeys now. The reason i like to use that as illustration as i think that's the best way to set up a community and a lifestyle when it comes to real sin investing or other goals so in my world. I always try to have someone above me. That i'm reaching up to and i'm learning from them and their knowledge is pouring down into me. So that i'm improving. That keeps me humble. I never actually think that. I'm too great when i'm looking up to other people and then i like to have somebody below me that i'm pouring down into them often. The information that came from above that came to me. And i could disseminate it so the people that are hanging below me now that keeps me for becoming down myself because i'm always reminded like hey i have something to offer. I just want to encourage all of you guys to think the same way. You gotta have people above you and you've got to have people below you if there's not people above you then you can start to think that you got it all figured out pride sets in you'll make mistakes and there's only below you then you'll start to think like what's my purpose. Why am i even doing this. And you'll lose some of the humility that comes into play so consider how you can be a monkey and develop your own chain in the barrel of monkeys in the same way that bigger offering

Amy Okay
Everything you Need to Know About Buying From a Wholesaler

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

02:10 min | 2 months ago

Everything you Need to Know About Buying From a Wholesaler

"Today's first question comes from read an m. red ass purchasing an assignment from a wholesaler. What do i need to know. They have their own attorneys and title company. Doing all the work. Should i have an attorney. Look over the contract on my side. This is a good question. Because more and more people are actually buying from wholesalers. Right now you should expect to see more of this. The hotter than a markets. When there's plenty of deals on the mls obviously people would rather go to the mls. In order to find properties gets us an agent. They don't have to worry about as much of the due diligence being done on their own without guidance but as wholesaling is becoming more and more popular these type of questions come up a lot more. There's two ways that i've seen wholesale deals go bad. Those are the two things that you want to focus on. The first one is that you don't have a fiduciary representing you in this transaction because there's no real involved which means a due diligence is all on you. I've bought a wholesale before. Where i was told it was fourteen hundred square feet. The property ended up being eleven. Hundred square feet. I took the wholesalers word for it and i didn't do my own due diligence now. The problem is it appraised for exactly the price per square foot that i thought my bird woulda went perfect but because there was three hundred square feet. I actually didn't have any equity in the deal. And i ended up paying market value for that eleven hundred square foot house thinking it was fourteen hundred square feet. So what am i getting at. Make sure that you're doing the due diligence and you're getting a home inspection on a property. That's coming from a wholesaler. Now a lot of wholesalers to pay cash for a property. You can pay cash and still get an inspection contingency. You need to talk to the wholesaler and see has inspections been done on this property. And what is my timeline to back out after. I'm doing inspections now. They probably won't call an inspection contingency because you're not getting the same type of a purchase agreement that you get with the realtor so the question you need to ask the wholesaler is. Hey if i have the put it oposite down. do i have to get that deposit back or be. If i move forward with this house can i just not put. It applies it down. So i could get some inspections done and if it doesn't look good i'll get out

Red Ass MLS
How Your First Time Home Buying Decision Affects Long-Term Wealth With Scott And Mindy

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

06:00 min | 5 months ago

How Your First Time Home Buying Decision Affects Long-Term Wealth With Scott And Mindy

"Scott trag- mini jensen. Welcome back to the bigger pockets. Podcast each of you former guest house here on the show. Now your Your guest which is pretty exciting. What's up guys. How's it going. Thanks for having us. I'm super excited to be back. I haven't seen you in one hundred years so i know it actually has been a while Kobe put a delay to my regular trips to denver but didn't stop. David greene hair from travel in the world and hanging out in mexico. What's up david. What's going on guys. Yeah i'm in kabul san lucas. It's my first time here. It's pretty awesome. Yeah sometimes you gotta take a vacation from maui. I guess right. I don't like to myself on the back. It's been very hard. I think. I just realized for the first half my life that when people say they're going to kabo and kabul san lucas set the same thing. Is that true. I think i've never realized that was the same thing to different cities. But i just put that two and two together that that was the same thing. I'm going to new york versus. New york. city apparently shortened nickname. Anyway rather than talking about my intelligence or lack thereof. Let's get into the scott mindy you guys last few years so for those who do not know you. I want to start with this one. Scott obviously you know everyone knows scott tranche. Everyone knows me jensen but for those who don't who are you. What's your real estate strategy. Ben and then. I wanna move into talking about the market a little bit. But let's start with that. We'll start with mindy ladies first. Mindy who are you and What what are you doing. My name's mindy jonathan. I do a lot in real estate. I am primarily a flipper. Which means i buy a house that is very unattractive. I move into it. I live in it as my primary residence fixing it up. So i live in a construction zone for two years and then sell it and make massive tax free cash when i sell it. I'm also a real estate agent in colorado. And i am the community manager for big pockets and the co host of the bigger pockets. Money podcast with me as always is my illustrious co host scott trench. Thanks wendy for the eliminating ensure there. I'm scott trench from the ceo of bigger pockets. I'm an investor here in denver colorado. I've got Eight units about one point six one point seven million in assets within that portfolio and the last couple of years have been a little quiet for me on the acquisition front and my personal portfolio. I have been spending more of that time. Investing in syndications and last year. I really set up property. Management rehabbed and Tackled a bit of maintenance that i had been deferring guests on this show. And i've been differing on a couple of my properties and took care that this year. And so i was able to reset them. Do a big refinance take a lot of cash out nine back into acquisition mode looking for that next deal. Awesome guys well speaking of next deal. It's been a crazy last year. Obviously with the real estate market covid doing some crazy things and things that i don't think any of us really necessarily expected i shouldn't i. Was you know worry that we're going to see a crash or something happened and all of a sudden instead it's just like somebody shot him on steroids into the real estate market the last six months. Why do you think real estate has gotten so competitive. And i don't even call hot as the best word i can use for it. Real real. The real markets gotten hot almost everywhere in the country. Why is that. And then i'll ask. Where do you think it's headed but let's start with that one mindy. Why do you think it's gotten so crazy lately. I think there are a bunch of actors of course cove it. I think a lot of people who were considering selling but maybe didn't have to sell has decided that i'm not gonna have random people traipsing through my house bringing their covid into my house and then i catch it and maybe die so i think there's a shortage of sales just based on the market are the pandemic itself. I think there are ridiculously low. Interest rate why. No they're low interest rates that are fueling people. Ooh i can upgrade to a better house and we didn't have anybody building houses from two thousand eight to two thousand and twelve thirteen fourteen. I mean in my area. They're just starting to do these massive builds again and it takes time and there's people that are still moving here but there's nothing to buy so prices just keep going up. I just sold a house on friday for more money than i thought was ever possible here in the story over and over. Scott what do you think. Yeah i would agree. I think the the first biggest lever is going to be interest rates. The payment matters more than the price to most homebuyers and frankly most landlords like all that fifty percent rule your expenses are not magically changing. You know in those two in those types of things based on interest rates so if your interest rate if your your payment goes down you can afford to buy. You can pay more for the same property and get achieve the same or greater cash flow so i think that interest rates are the number one biggest lever and then the second one is going to be the stimulus and just the in injection of cash and liquid into the economy. In general. I think that last year a lot of people weren't spending as much money as they nip term typically what at least those who would be potential competitors of yours when buying homes and rental properties and so people are now in a position to buy with liquidity and low interest rates. I think fundamentally the that's what's driving it. And then i also think diminish point the other factors are all many of them are also fueling this. There's been an exodus from apartments to single family homes red single-family rents have gone up apartment. Rents have fallen over the last year. Single family housing prices have exploded by more. I think it was like single family. Rents went up by three four percent and prices went up eight nine percent over the year. I think that's that's showing a fuel in demand from apartments to single family homes as rentals but an even greater preference to buy. I think fueled by that interest rate shift so other things. Lack of housing starts continued population. Growth and then Inflation in expectation of inflation. In general are all you know fuelling real estate right now. Who knows how long that will continue but hasn't been a bad year for those who held real estate going into twenty twenty.

Scott Trench Scott Trag Mini Jensen San Lucas Kabul Kabo Scott Mindy Scott Tranche Mindy Jonathan David Greene Mindy Denver Colorado Kobe Maui Jensen Scott Mexico Wendy
Extraordinary Boston Patient Offers Surprising Clues To Origins Of Coronavirus Variants

Consider This from NPR

03:54 min | 5 months ago

Extraordinary Boston Patient Offers Surprising Clues To Origins Of Coronavirus Variants

"Are trying to learn more about corona virus burien by studying the case of one extraordinary covid. Nineteen patient and this patient was a forty five year old man who admitted to a boston hospital last spring doctors at brigham and women's hospital treated him he got better and he was discharged but his infection never went away. This is a of an extraordinary individual who was readmitted over the subsequent five months for recurrence of his covid infection and severe pneumonia. Dr jonathan lee. One of the doctors who treated the man says he was not a so-called long. Hauler a person who clears their covert infection but has lingering after-effects sometimes for bunce. This man says had living growing virus in his body for one hundred and fifty four days. That is one of the remarkable aspects of this case and in fact he was highly infectious even five months after the initial diagnosis re spoke to npr science reporter. Mike lean duke left. Who picks up the story from here. These says the man's immune system wasn't working normally. He was taking any suppressive drugs for chronic illness. So his body couldn't fight off the virus very well but we also wondered if perhaps the virus was taking advantage of this unusual situation with so much time inside the man. The virus might have the unity to test out different versions of itself in find. More infectious versions. So lena's colleagues begin to examine the viruses genes. How shocked shocked because of virus was mutating very quickly inside the man's body these mutations allowed it to evade his immune system to escape detection by antibodies when i saw the virus and the viral sequence. I think i knew then that does that. We're dealing with completely different at a potentially important completely different because the virus had a whole collection of mutations not just one or two but more than twenty scientists had never seen this before during the whole pandemic. The in his team published the findings in the new england journal of medicine. The report didn't even make big news. That was november twenty twenty then about a month later a new corona virus variant causing international concern is. Npr's david greene reported. Scientists this past december detected new genetic variants of the virus one in the uk one in south africa and then later when in brazil guess what these variants have in common with the virus in the boston patient. A sudden collection of multiple mutations in a combination. That is worrisome. That's jeremy lubin he's a virologist at the university of massachusetts medical school he says these new variants look remarkably similar to the virus lee and his colleagues found in their patient. They the same but they share important characteristics. They both have about twenty mutations and they have ones that make the virus more contagious in so right now. Lubin says one hypothesis is that the new variants the one from the uk south africa and brazil arose inside. People like the boston patient people with these long term infections and who are immunocompromised because their immune system was not working and normally they could eliminate the virus and over time the first and acquired a collection of mutations that otherwise did not insieme. let's work in other words. The virus this long-term infection as a testing ground to try out different mutations in c which one's v the immune system become more infectious in eventually spread more easily around the world.

Brigham And Women's Hospital Dr Jonathan Lee Mike Lean Boston Pneumonia Chronic Illness NPR Lena Jeremy Lubin David Greene New England Journal Of Medicin Brazil South Africa University Of Massachusetts Me UK Lubin LEE
"david greene" Discussed on BiggerPockets Business Podcast

BiggerPockets Business Podcast

03:06 min | 7 months ago

"david greene" Discussed on BiggerPockets Business Podcast

"And they can't hit that ball. You're not gonna get paid and that little figuring out like what you should be doing versus what you should be doing has had exponential results as well so david very much sounds like by running your real estate business through the lens of not real estate sales but running it through the lens of building out a business with very distinct systems processes and incredibly efficient teams right rather than just let sell sell sell instead really working on a system in process that is repeatable and just works i'm seeing another similarity here to what we talk about a lot in the world of real estate investing right where if you it correctly you can take that business you can take that system you can take that process and launch it into other markets where you are not physically present. Am i interpreting that correctly. Yes so that would be the next phase of what i want to do. And i'm so glad you asked that because know we're going to talk about a couple of different businesses that i'll have running within this same ecosystem and my plans for how to grow in two thousand twenty one. The ultimate goal for the real estate team is to get my teeth kicked in in the bay area where we're putting these systems together. I'm learning who to hire how to hire how to pair people all these things that i'm talking about. You know you gotta kind of tweak to figure it out then take that model and planted in different markets around the country. So that i would love is for all the bigger pockets listeners. In southern california in dallas in miami and tampa who say. I wanna buy a house. But i can't find a good agent to know. There's a david greene team in those markets that they can trust that they're going to get a good experience with and i find the right partners and i say okay. Here's our system. I'm going to incorporate you into it and you can get some form of a similar experience for people no matter where they are and then skillet absolutely love. Love love that because of course here on the bigger pockets business podcast. We really liked to differentiate our show by talking about how real estate people can be parts of these other businesses that provide consistent experiences that can generate passive income. Perhaps in just overall that you are really approaching this in a manner that enables you to launch not even necessarily just in the us even potentially worldwide. So you are clearly approaching it from the right angle. I love that very very cool. You're.

david david greene bay area tampa dallas miami california us
"david greene" Discussed on BiggerPockets Business Podcast

BiggerPockets Business Podcast

07:46 min | 7 months ago

"david greene" Discussed on BiggerPockets Business Podcast

"More most likely that's going to be multifamily because we're we're all leaning towards and then utilizing the skills and the superpower's that i have Namely being on the podcast to get other people to go out there and find multifamily into partner with other teams because the thing that we do really well we can raise money. We can reach a lot of people we have that influence. And that's what the superpower. Our team should be working on. And so that's that's when he won and luckily for us. But what you david. That's a really good question. So what. I learned this year with eight you. I came up with a myself in twenty nineteen. I sold forty six homes in twenty twenty. It's going to be a little over one hundred and forty the differences. When i was at forty six and i had to explain everything to every client i could only do about forty to fifty properties that so much time i had to be the person. Explain this to the client why the deal would work. Or what did we should go. After this year. I had more people on my team that i trained four of them or three of them and they had those conversations and we triple or quadruple production and that was what i realized. My one cut would be teaching people and pushing them to a standard of excellence. I want to raise the standard of how we serve our clients and how we save them money on how we get them deals and really how we handle conflict. Because that's a part of business. And then i want to coach. Teach people up to that higher standard. I'm a firm believer that if you want to be more successful in anything whether it's martial arts fitness reading books writing books running a business it starts with raising your standard and then the success will come to you that that everyone's looking for the hack. How do i. Where's the great deal. That i mean i find that. I don't have to work for but the truth. Is you raise your standard for lead generation or your standard for. How will you analyze the property or how you can rehab it and then many more deals make sense for you than they would for somebody else. So what i'm looking to do is find more people that are coach that i can raise their standard get them up to a higher level of excellence. That clients are thrilled to work with. So there can be ten twenty thirty forty of mies instead of just one of me always dealing with clients so what that will look like. Impractical steps will be having David greene team expansion into southern california into hawaii into probably areas. Where i think california's will be moving. So i think a lot of california's are moving to nashville. They're going to be moving to florida right. So i go to the markets where i think many of the people from here going gonna leave and i put a david greene team in keller williams over there and now i can connect you with an agent. Who understands our training. Our teachings are systems that you can trust. So that's what my big challenge is going to be as finding those people hiring the right ones pouring into them. Getting a system of education built around both the lenders. The real estate agents the solar people all the different little divisions that we have and both increasing their their their standard as well as their knowledge awesome. I love this. And it's so clear that both of you have spent a great deal of time resources energy and discussions with your existing teams. And how you're going to be moving forward into the new year right. I mean this isn't just something you're making up on the fly this is very consistently delivered throughout your messaging. So there's a ton of time and work that's been put into it. My next question for both of you is what about for those of us or other community members who have not yet really. Maybe we're the procrastinators. The people who pay we've had a lot going on. We have a lot of ideas marinating. Were still a little bit overwhelmed. But we're really looking forward to what twenty twenty one has to offer right. What are couple tips that each of you have to just get us started on goal setting process like what is the very first thing we should be doing to get on that path of what we wanna do to achieve something new in great moving into the new year. Yeah i'm i'm a big believer that people oftentimes think that life is about choosing analogy. You're on a beach and you have metal detectors and you're trying to find the hidden treasure. The hidden whatever coin on the beach looking all over in other words looking for their destiny. What do i do the right thing for me. What's the best path. What i was trying to reframe that. Two people is like remember that we are not on a beach with a metal detector. There's not one hidden treasure out there. We are an artist. We are sitting in front of a gigantic white easel. Our white piece of paper on an easel and we ought paintbrushes our hand and we can paint anything. We wanna paint like anything you want to do. You can do so in other words expanding the idea like rather than what's right for me or what should i do his answering the question. What sounds amazing. And because there's a million things you can do and so just what sounds amazing lake lake. Just start their answer questions and start just brainstorming. What sounds amazing. What sounds amazing. Was sounds amazing and when i did that like you know what sounds amazing is like having a team of four or five people that were like people that i really liked a lot and we hung out in the evenings and weekends and our kids play together. It's not pretty easy. So i started there literally. How opener capital started with that thought of that sounded fun. Okay well how do i afford four or five people. How do for those salaries well. I have to build a business that can support that right. What what the ingredients do. I have in my fridge right now and i just kept building until i came up with the vision which you can kind of see behind david if you're watching youtube it's not can't see 'cause they'll white it out but it's like a four foot poster. I think we talked about that when i was on the show last time. But idea the vision or the the vivid vision and so. I painted a very clear picture of what i wanted and it doesn't matter like it doesn't really matter that much as long as it sounds. Awesome do you. It will spur you on to a great twenty twenty one. So if you have like let's see your franchise owner and you're you own a mcdonald's somewhere and you're like what sounds amazing. Well know be really great to take three months off later this year. Just completely take thurmond's completely often. Just go to like switzerland for three months. Okay what would it take to have that like paint that picture. I'd have to have a general manager able to control know man in my store. Okay so what is that. Look like and you work backwards and paint this amazing picture. And now you've got a really clear outline of where you need to get to you and then you can implement that into systems and and like i'm gonna get this done in quarter one quarter to quarter three. We get there. But i think a lot of it just begins with that vision david. I don't think i can follow that. Okay good of an answer. It's amazing the number of things in business and investing and in life where the answer is work backwards. Start with the end in mind and work backwards and i think it's a it's a great reminder. Okay so let's say we do that. Let's say i create all my goals. And i have a vision. I know exactly what i want to start doing. And then i do. So many people do in. I create my new year's resolutions. I am going to go to switzerland and to do that. I'm going to hire general manager. And do that. I'm gonna do x y and z and then january fourth comes around and up. I skipped today and january fifth. While i already missed one day. I think i'll just take off another day and before you know. July comes around and you've forgotten about those new year's resolutions. Can we do. Because i know brandon you. We've talked about this. What can we do as mere mortals to overcome and actually when. I say we've talked about that. We haven't talked to us. I listened to you to a podcast with somebody recently. Where you talked about this. So i apologize with twelve week year yet. Goal before i'll give you four things. I've been thinking about this a lot lately. There's like four things. I think a person can do to stay persistent. that's we're talking about. Here's persistent. But i don't think any of us don't believe the following fact like if you stick with anything long enough you're going to succeed. I mean i. I had a. We talked about this. When i was. I think what you guys a long time ago. But i had a wooden sunglasses business. One time housed on wooden sunglasses. I thought it was a cool idea and it was a wooden frame so there need. That was four years ago now. I think five years ago. If i were stuck with that i would have been successful right now..

David greene david lake lake california keller williams southern california nashville hawaii florida switzerland thurmond mcdonald youtube brandon
How A Cybersecurity Firm Uncovered The Massive Computer Hack

Morning Edition

05:36 min | 7 months ago

How A Cybersecurity Firm Uncovered The Massive Computer Hack

"David Greene in Los Angeles. And I'm Noel King in Washington, D C. Good morning. How should the U. S government respond to a computer hack that breached both government networks and private companies? Most cyber security experts think Russia is responsible for the Hack and NPR's national security correspondent Craig Marie has been talking to some of them. Good morning, Greg. Good morning. No. Well, perhaps most importantly, is the half over. Absolutely not. It's still ongoing and we're continuing to learn details. We've heard now that the Treasury Department hack occurred in July, and like other government departments, this was just uncovered in recent days. Email of top officials was hacked, though apparently not. The account of Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, also no evidence that classified systems were breached. This information has come from Democratic Senator Ron Wyden, who was briefed on the matter and we can expect this kind of information to sort of dribble out in the weeks and months ahead. As government agencies and private companies go through their computer networks. But clearly much of this is going to fall on the Biden administration to make sure the hack inside government computer networks is over that there's clear attribution on who did it and then to decide how to respond. These major breaches have happened before. Does the government have a strategy to deal with them? No, absolutely not. Again. There are no rules or red lines are clear consequences for adversaries who get caught Now, today what we end up seeing is lots of hand wringing and ultimately some sort of limited responses. Right now, With this current hack. We're seeing wrestling over the definition. Some members of Congress called this an act of war. Now, cyber experts and the intelligence community do see it is a big deal but more along the lines of traditional espionage, albeit on a massive scale. I spoke about this with P. W singer cyber expert at the New America think tank. This was not an act of war. This is more cold War style back and forth espionage stealing of secrets. That's why you've seen the reaction from the intelligence community to be a mix of Oh, my God. What just happened? And Gosh, we got a tip the hat to them. What a coup for them. So if there is no clear way to respond, Greg what of the range of options here? Traditional spying might generate public criticism, kicking out suspected spies, perhaps, um, sanctions, But when this has happened, it really hasn't changed the behavior of Russia. Any other adversaries they still seek. Hacking is a low cost high return proposition. Singer says the U. S can and needs to do much more and should create deterrence in two ways gave a boxing analogy, saying US needs to punch back harder and also develop more resiliency to absorb the growing number of cyber blows. Make the parallel to Mike Tyson. You don't hit him because he'll punch you back in the face vs Mohammad Ali rope a dope right through resilience where you don't hit me because it just won't work out for you. What else do we know? So we know that the government and private companies were both hacked. What do we know about the private companies? We haven't heard that much from them. Have we? No, that's right. But we are hearing more of the hackers clearly targeted. Many tech companies in this makes a lot of sense. They hackers Coley want these cutting edge cyber tools that these companies have, so presumably the hackers can use them themselves. And the first organization to detect this hack two weeks ago was fire I, a prominent cyber security firm, Fireeye CEO Kevin Mandia spoke with NPR's all things considered yesterday. And he said, these hackers were extremely sophisticated, and once they got into the system, they carried out an operation that was specifically designed to attack fire. I he realized very early on as they launch their own investigation that this was a level of tradecraft he'd never seen before. And he said the scale of this hack really drives home the need for a strong national cyber policy. It's time this nation comes up with some doctrine on what we expect Nations rules of engagement to be And what will our policy or proportional response beat of folks who violate that doctrine Because Right now. There's absolutely in escalation in cyberspace. It just seems astonishing that we don't yet have the doctrine in the year. 2020. The US, however, does have a lot of cybersecurity might what is preventing us from using it more effectively? No. Well, you're still seeing a lot of things that are in the works. Homeland Security Cyber Agency was just launched in 2018 and focused on the elections this year. And and by all accounts, did I did I did a good job. Right now, There's the military authorization bill on the president's desk waiting to be signed. It has money for additional cyber upgrades, and by all accounts, you're seeing a lot more cooperation between the government and private tech companies. But this country is losing huge sums of money due to the cyber attacks. And a couple years ago, the N S a director Paul Marcus, Sony was at his confirmation hearing. And he was asked if adversaries fear the U. S and cyberspace, he said the answer is absolutely not. MPR's Greg Marie, Thanks so much, Greg. My pleasure. America's hospitals are really

Noel King U. S Government Craig Marie Steve Mnuchin Senator Ron Wyden Biden Administration David Greene NPR Greg Russia Treasury Department Mohammad Ali Rope New America Treasury Los Angeles Fireeye Kevin Mandia D Washington Wrestling
"david greene" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

02:21 min | 8 months ago

"david greene" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Well they haven't our conversation with. David greene co host of the bigger pockets. Podcast real estate investor and k. w. agent folks. This is episode was. When i was i was really looking forward to sharing with you because it is his journey really talking about the last five years. And i've heard. Gary say you can be anywhere you want in five years and if you think about the things you want your life to think just five years you could have those kind of hard to believe yet you'll look at. Abs journey a set a goal. He got clear on what he was going to say. Yes to which made it a lot easier to say no to other things. The things that the people in his circle at the time were saying yesterday going to vegas going out. He said yes to having a relationship with his goals he said yes to investing in his education and by doing those things that set him down this path. Where you fast forward. This is where he is and he grew into the conversations that he was able to share with you today. So here's a question for you. Where do you want to be in five years based on. That was one thing you can do by doing it. Everything else would be easier or unnecessary if he did not mention this but he did. Write a book on burn busting. If you google the burbach be with four rs the burbach you'll learn more about it. There are sincere hope. Is that this episode. Inspires you to take a fresh look at your goals. If you've yet to set your goals this upcoming weekend we have our virtual goal setting retreat for individuals and teams. You can go to the one thing dot com slash. Set my goals to join us. This will be recorded and available through the end of the year. So if you wanna revisit your goals. Think about the things that david share today. Please join us. The one thing dot com slash set my goals. If this episode has brought value please share it with one person. Subscribe to the show and consider leaving us a rating and review. I'm your.

David greene vegas google Gary
"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David Greene I know there are a lot of concerns serious concerns about safety but I still can't help be excited about this baseball is really coming back this year major league baseball and its players union yesterday announced that they have reached an agreement to play a shorter sixty game regular season players are gonna be reporting for spring training by July first with opening day scheduled for July twenty third to twenty fourth now disagreements over money and safety delayed the return of America's pastime and let's talk about what's happening here within here sports correspondent Tom Coleman hi Tom hi David so baseball is back but it is not going to look like the baseball we're used to it sounds like baseball is a marathon as you know in it normally here's a hundred sixty two games from spring to the front edges of winter twenty twenty baseball regular season is going to be a sprint sixty game schedule as he mentioned which the union still has to review games largely will be against division foes there are regionally close so that cuts down on travel and for the first time since nineteen seventy three when the designated hitter started batting for pitchers in the American League no they'll be a DH in the National League two extra inning games will start with a runner on second base sounds a little like little league doesn't it sure does weird but this is a health and safety measure to prevent super long games teams don't want a bunch of exhausted players with a season jammed in a very short schedule and then pandemic roles include pitchers having to bring their own rosin bag to the mound and reportedly they can carry a small wet rag in their pocket they can use instead of licking their fingers when new reality try to train them to do that right yeah so remind us why this all took so long to come to a deal here there were long and acrimonious negotiations over money and the number of games to be played players wanted more games so they could make more money because their salaries were already going to be greatly reduced owners wanted fewer games after all that the two sides never agreed MLB commissioner rob Manfred unilaterally impose this season he had the power to do that and so players are going back to work but are not overjoyed and they might file a grievance to try to reclaim up to a billion dollars in pay I mean obviously some of these changes are meant to keep players safe it's a really short season can you talk about some of the the pluses and minuses of free and all this sure you actually start with every team having a chance you know every year they say in spring training if one has a chance this time they really have a chance if they can put together a hot streak in this very short regular season conversely a slow starting team won't have time to rebound exhibit a David the Washington nationals last year after fifty games they were nineteen thirty one of course they surged from that point on that's now legendary they went on to win the World Series so Tom what do fans think of all this you know summer thrilled you sounded thrilled yeah sports fans are very good at forgiving and forgetting and just getting caught up in the games others are angry about players and owners battling while the world has been framed with a pandemic and protests in the street and huge unemployment and it's left some fans saying a pox on both your houses to players and owners even if you are the excited fan the coronavirus is surging in Milwaukee pitcher Brett Anderson's tweet this week can't be ignored referring to the virus he said what happens when we all get it and I don't think even the health and safety manual they'll be using which is over a hundred pages has an answer for that okay so baseball is back interest Tom Goldman Tom thank you so much you're welcome a.

David Greene
DACA recipients on the front lines of fighting the coronavirus

Morning Edition

04:27 min | 1 year ago

DACA recipients on the front lines of fighting the coronavirus

"This spring court could decide as early as tomorrow the future of the deferred action for childhood arrivals policy daca that's the Obama era program that protects immigrants who came to this country illegally when they were kids in two thousand and seventeen the trump administration tried to rescind daca arguing that Obama illegally created it now it is up to the Supreme Court more than ninety percent of daca recipients are students or they are working some of them are the health care workers on the front lines in the cold nineteen pandemic are co host David Greene talked to two nurses who are dealing with the emotional toll of saving lives while also waiting to find out the fate of their own status in this country your status twenty nine year old Estefania betting korma CS an ER nurse in Vancouver Washington was working the night shift when when a a patient patient came came in in with with covert covert nineteen nineteen we we got got him him in in the the middle middle of of the the night night and and respiratory respiratory distress distress his his oxygen oxygen levels levels were were really really low low and and I I just just remember remember him him telling me I can't breathe this is in her first year on the job and is one of the only Spanish speaking nurses in our hospital she tried to comfort her patient as they were preparing to put him on a ventilator I was the only person in that room that he could communicate with and I just remember him like he was he was crying he was in and distressed in the heat of the moment I'm a nurse first but I also have to be a human being and I have to come for this man and I and I was able to connect with him and you know telling like I know you're scared but we are here to help you hi V. R. Q. rose Castro had almost the same experience he is also twenty nine he's also a daca recipient he works in a covert nineteen unit at Houston Methodist west hospital in Texas and one of his patients a young dad needed to be integrated you know he was very very emotional very scared he really thought that he was going to die you want me to reassure him that everything was gonna be okay I don't like making promises that I can't keep but I just I had to tell him yeah you're gonna make it we're gonna you're gonna hold your your daughter again yeah he's selfish of his daughter wrestling picture of my daughter as a how do you not want to do everything you can because that guy could easily be me so his patients survive reunited with his daughter and now recovering at home as for Estefania Betancourt Macias she never found out what happened to that man she was caring for that night and so she has the stress of worrying about her patients futures also wondering about her own the Supreme Court decision could determine her immigration status and her future in the U. S. my patients don't know that I'm undocumented person living in the U. S. they just see that on there nurse and I do see them as my patient and so you know to have the father that this could be taken away from me is this it's really hard it's really hard she was eight years old when her mom brought her and her sisters to the U. S. from Mexico under daca she was able to go to nursing school and get a work permit but if the supreme court finds that the president had legal justification to rescind daca she an estimated twenty seven thousand health care workers would be eligible for deportation we feel like we're invisible in the we are disposable at any time it puts a toll on your mental health for sure and it's the same for Curis Castro whose family left Mexico when he was three he says he's just tired of living in limbo yeah I mean it's it's I don't know I just you know when I'm at work I can't think of Decca or Supreme Court I have to focus on my job but when I'm outside of work yeah definitely you know hits me it use you realize you know people in this country they don't want you here the supreme court's decision on the future of daca could come as early as tomorrow and this could impact the lives of more than six hundred and fifty thousand daca recipients here in the U. S. as were heavier Cuba's Castro and Estefania button korma CS they say they're just going to continue fighting covert nineteen caring for their patients through this pandemic as long as they can

Barack Obama
DACA recipients on the front lines of fighting the coronavirus

Morning Edition

04:26 min | 1 year ago

DACA recipients on the front lines of fighting the coronavirus

"This spring court could decide as early as tomorrow the future of the deferred action for childhood arrivals policy daca that's the Obama era program that protects immigrants who came to this country illegally when they were kids in two thousand and seventeen the trump administration tried to rescind daca arguing that Obama illegally created it now it is up to the Supreme Court more than ninety percent of daca recipients are students or they are working some of them are the health care workers on the front lines in the Copa nineteen pandemic are co host David Greene talked to two nurses who are dealing with the emotional toll of saving lives while also waiting to find out the fate of their own status in this country your status twenty nine year old Estefania betting core must see S. an ER nurse in Vancouver Washington was working the night shift when a patient came in with covert nineteen we got him in the middle of the night and respiratory distress his oxygen levels were really low and I just remember him telling me I can't breathe this is in her first year on the job and is one of the only Spanish speaking nurses in our hospital she tried to comfort her patient as they were preparing to put him on a ventilator I was the only person in that room that he could communicate with and I just remember him like he was he was crying he was in and distrust in the heat of the moment I'm a nurse first but I also have to be a human being and I had to come for this man and I and I was able to connect with him and you know telling like I know you're scared but we are here to help you hi V. R. Q. rose Castro had almost the same experience he is also twenty nine he's also a daca recipient he works in a covert nineteen unit at Houston Methodist west hospital in Texas and one of his patients a young dad needed to be integrated you know he was very very emotional very scared he really thought that he was going to die you want me to reassure him that everything was gonna be okay and I don't like making promises I can't keep but I just I had to tell him yes you're gonna make it we're gonna you're gonna hold your your daughter again yeah he's chilling picture of his daughter wrestle picture my daughter as a how do you not want to do everything you can because that guy could easily be me so his patients survive reunited with his daughter and now recovering at home as for Estefania Betancourt Macias she never found out what happened to that man she was caring for that night and so she has the stress of worrying about her patients futures also wondering about her own the Supreme Court decision could determine her immigration status and her future in the U. S. my patients don't know that I'm undocumented person living in the U. S. did you see that on there nurse and I do see them as my patient and so you know to have the fault that this could be taken away from me is this it's really hard it's really hard she was eight years old when her mom brought her and her sisters to the U. S. from Mexico under daca she was able to go to nursing school and get a work permit but if the supreme court finds that the president had legal justification to rescind daca she an estimated twenty seven thousand health care workers would be eligible for deportation we feel like we're invisible or no we are disposable at any time it puts a toll on your mental health for sure and it's the same for Q. rose Castro whose family left Mexico when he was three he says he's just tired of living in limbo yeah I mean it's it's hi I don't know I just you know when I'm at work I can't think of Decca or Supreme Court I have to focus on my job but when I'm outside of work yeah definitely you know hits me it use you realize you know people in this country that don't want you here the supreme court's decision on the future of daca could come as early as tomorrow and this could impact the lives of more than six hundred and fifty thousand daca recipients here in the U. S. as for heavier Cuba's Castro and Estefania button korma CS they say they're just going to continue fighting covert nineteen caring for their patients through this pandemic as long as they can

Barack Obama
Fauci Warns Of Opening Schools Too Soon

Morning Edition

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Fauci Warns Of Opening Schools Too Soon

"U. S. officials are publicly debating whether and how to open schools this fall the testimony of doctor Anthony Fauci is to be careful conditions around September will be far from ideal the idea of having treatments available or a vaccine to facilitate the reentry of students into the fall term would be something that would be a bit of a bridge too far which leaves this leading voice on the coronavirus task force warning the testing and social distancing are the best weapons available don't use word of caution was contradicted by the president to me it's not an acceptable answer who said this week that states should push ahead I think you should absolutely open the schools our country's got to get back and it's got to get back as soon as possible and I don't consider a country coming back to the schools are closed now late yesterday the centers for disease control put out a checklist to help schools decide whether to re open now whenever they do that will students be ready after months at home David Greene learned that this question is very much on the minds of their teachers I want to introduce you to Ashley basin she teaches eleventh grade English at Dunbar high a public school in Baltimore Maryland she was really worried that remote learning just wouldn't work for all of her students some weren't logging into class from home knowing then equities present within our education system and knowing that all my students did not have devices that hold that they use I just spoke to said there was going to be that slide now her school did jump into action they got laptops to students who needed them but still she knows it's going to be tough when she's finally back in the classroom there will be students who you know are at all different places so we will have to do a lot of work just to make sure that everyone is learning at a pace that is appropriate for them but that also does not increase the achievement gap between them and their years so this isn't entirely new right teachers expected drop off in academic performance every summer the so called summer slide but this pandemic will mean months more out of the classroom some researchers are calling this the covert nineteen slide and we'll talk to one of them in a few minutes but first one more personal take because this is something confronting so many teachers at all levels robin Nelson teaches first grade in Florida she's been trying to keep a routine she starts each day with her first grade students on a screen at eight thirty a lot of them are you know getting up in the morning and you will get the sleepy head of hair and the you know jammies and the students hear a recording of the morning announcements and the pledge of allegiance and then she sent them off for a day of remote learning robin Nelson school or take elementary in Jacksonville serves a good number of families who struggle to get by I work at a title one school so we have a lot of kids that are socio economically challenged it in some ways the parents this is been plopped in their lap if they're out of work then they're probably more involved than they may have been before with their job the ones that are juggling a job and the kids and possibly multiple kids and I don't know which is harder the stress of being unemployed and try and make do or being employed in trying to juggle everything on top of that no Nelson has stayed optimistic so far she thinks most of her students maybe eighty percent have kept up her biggest concern right now is for students who speak Spanish at home English is their second language and their parents may have trouble supporting them I speak a little Spanish you know enough to get me in trouble and the kids are okay with my level of Spanish but for me to communicate sufficiently with the parents to help the kids it's kind of a it's definitely a blockade we're gonna have a summer school for our kids that are learning English but I don't know if we're gonna have the support like we do now so I think it's the kids that are trying to learn English on top of everything else they're trying to do in school they may have the biggest struggle and I just think about it we're talking about kids who are in first grade you know months away from consistently using English in the classroom I mean how much might they be set back that that's it's gonna be a challenge we've got the resources out there but I would not be surprised if there's a bigger slide with them I think it's hard on my end too I was hoping that we would have the end of the year testing and yes it would be ideal but it would give me at least a gauge of how much this child independently nose in an but we're not having that because it cannot be a perfect testing environment so I think that the beginning of the year testing that will do next year hopefully in the classroom will give us a you know a launching point to where we need to meet them to bring them to where they need to be huh so you might I mean assuming you get back in the classroom and in the fall you might be coming in and only then figuring out where some of the problems might be and and get a sense for how significant this was yeah and and you know we kind of brace ourselves every year for that anyway because of the summer lost a lot of kids don't pick up a book over the summer don't deal with numbers over the summer so it will get to see a truer picture on how badly this is affected the kids once we get back into the

Anthony Fauci U. S.
"david greene" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"david greene" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning Broadway has forty one theaters and this virus has been terrible for them they are closed no one knows for how long thousands of people are out of work and then some members of the Broadway community have also gotten sick here's Jeff Lunden on March twelfth one hour before a matinee of Moulin Rouge the musical the company held an emergency meeting says actor Danny bursting and they said that somebody in our cast was currently at the doctors suffering symptoms of cough in nineteen and that they were canceling the show later that afternoon New York governor Andrew Cuomo canceled all Broadway shows Charlotte St Martin president of the Broadway league which represents producers and theater owners says every week Broadway is closed it loses thirty three million dollars in ticket sales on any given year Broadway has between ten and twelve thousand direct employees that are in casting crew plus many thousands of other jobs are affected by Broadway Britney mac has one of those jobs on indefinite hold she was about to make her Broadway debut in the musical six when she found out opening night was canceled man it kind of hits you like a ton of bricks and a crane and a truck Max says she has daily chats with her fellow cast members and I've applied for unemployment insurance and still haven't been able to verify so I have no income but I'm still on on Instagram and I go in there and I seem to move I know getting bursting from larouche's waiting for unemployment insurance as well but he says I'm just happy to be alive in the week after his show closed he developed all the symptoms of covert nineteen and when he collapsed in his bathroom he ended up in the I see you at Mount Sinai hospital on oxygen yeah I just kept telling myself I'm going to get better I'm going to get better this is and I started literally doing dances from locking roof in my bed with my legs trying to you know mimic what I did in the show just to keep thinking forward and after a harrowing five days in intensive care he is getting better but there have been deaths on Broadway playwright Terrence McNally actor mark bloom another actor Nick Cordero who's on a ventilator had his leg amputated for people in the Broadway community say they're pulling together and supporting each other but the worry that shows won't reopen and that the theater going experience may change Charlotte St Martin will we see people's temperature being taken before they come back into the theater will people wear masks will people have certificates or cards that say they've been tested for now industry professionals like Brian Stokes Mitchell a covert nineteen survivor himself are finding ways to give new Yorkers a sense of community every evening after people applaud healthcare workers he stands at his apartment window and sings the impossible.

David Greene
"david greene" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"david greene" Discussed on KCRW

"Edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm no well king the author and win the final queen my grew up in Vietnam seeing the impact of the war her first novel the mountain saying is about a Vietnamese family here's NPR's mandalit del Barco I reached when fund quite a mind at our home in Jakarta before she was evacuated as a corona virus pandemic spread I can't even say goodbye to my friends you know and I'm not sure if I ever see them again I'm devastated she and her husband a diplomat mated to Munich to be with their twenty year old daughter an eighteen year old son it's the latest challenge for the forty seven year old writer who grew up in a small Vietnamese village destitute hungry and horrified by the ruins of war as a child I saw so many people with missing limbs I saw my desk without children people committing suicide because their loved ones didn't come back those images stayed with her as she wrote the mountain saying a novel about four generations in a Vietnamese family a grandmother and granddaughter are at the center of the story but she modeled one character on her uncle who fought against the Americans in the nineteen sixties and seventies he came back from the war devastated section miserable man and you know the thing about this book is that it gives voice to trauma and PTSD in Vietnam where my says as research she interviewed other war veterans and though her grandparents died before she was born she wove their family lore into her novel I told the story of my father's mother who died in the great hunger nineteen forty five is a catastrophe as a result of what to wear two million Vietnamese people died it was horrible and my grandma died together with her youngest son in her grab them the total number of deaths in the family has never been confirmed as the history is still being written after the nineteen forties famine she he also fictionalized as the brutal land reform of the nineteen fifties when her grandfather lost his life because of the policy of the Viet Minh and time to punish land owners so he was beaten up put into prison and he died the Vietnamese famine in land reform policies are historical events rarely recorded in fiction says Viet Thanh when the Pulitzer Prize winning author of the two thousand fifteen novel the sympathizer says he was so impressed by qua mais manuscript of the mountain saying that he sent it to his agent to get it published it is in some ways the Vietnamese version of the grapes of wrath you know because it's describing this time period in Vietnamese history that's deeply traumatic and yet also poorly understood and and in many ways a time period that completely contradicted how the north Vietnamese and the and the Communist Party saw themselves UN says writings about these traumas have long been discouraged even censored he says the fact that qua my wrote the mountain sing in English her second language ensures the novel has a global reach it's a really crucial novel terms of the history that it deals with but also in her way of looking at normal people who are just subjected to this completely unexpected catastrophe in a similar way to what we as Americans and the rest of the world is undergoing with this pandemic is a real test of character that she shows when says he's also moved by queen mais poetry and her own life story and earn.

David Greene NPR
"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning Congress is likely to vote on a fourth coronavirus aid package soon it should include more money for the paycheck protection program that's supposed to help small businesses that program ran out of money after less than two weeks and remember there were three hundred and forty nine billion dollars in it with me now is David Wessel who directs the Hutchins center at Brookings a David the morning SO three hundred and forty nine billion dollars is a lot of money how did it all go so quickly well the paycheck protection program is really a good deal through the small business administration and offers cheap loans just one percent interest you have to pay any payments for the first six months Templars businesses and nonprofits and it says you don't have to pay us back if you maintain your payrolls anybody could apply as long as they would say and this is how the law works the uncertainty of current economic conditions made alone necessary to support on going operations the idea of course is to encourage employers to avoid layoffs but there are millions of companies with more with fewer than five hundred employees in there simply wasn't enough money to meet the demand that was predicted and it was predictable okay and then I know there's been some upset about how the money was allocated right was it all going to small businesses to deserving businesses explained what happened there well in programs like this there's always a tradeoff between getting the money out quickly we are in a crisis after all in writing rules so the money goes only to the intended targets this was a first come first serve program there was a rush to file you have to go to a bank or another lender was authorized to make as BA loans one point six million borrowers got loans but a lot of people didn't get through some big banks which had which do a lot of SBA loans like key bank of Cleveland told me that they usually handle fifty once a month they were handling eight hundred a month an hour during the peak wow what some banks to site yeah it's amazing some banks figured it was easier to make big loans a few of them then a lot of small loans half the money went to Wilson loans of less than a million dollars many mom and pop shops didn't get loans a few big companies did Ruth Chris follow the child Lindblad exit exhibitions quantum pot belly and one of them the shake shack that ten million dollars and got so much bad publicity decided to give the money back so we're hearing in this new round of funding three hundred billion dollars do you think that's enough to meet the demand my guess is that three hundred million dollars will not suffice PNC bank has already told prospective applicants that it doesn't think that'll be enough for everybody to get along but a lot depends on this big question of how quickly we restart the economy what we don't know is is Congress going to put some new rules on the program and in response to this bad publicity about big companies getting money it is likely to set aside that they're at the demand of Democrats set aside some money for smaller banks minority owned banks and for community development financial institutions and the idea that they serve truly small companies okay that's really interesting that the bigger banks obviously were clearly overwhelmed by this was there a different way to do this a different way to get money to employers or banks the only option yes a few members of Congress among them Democrats Kamala giant ball of Washington and Republican Josh Hawley Missouri have offered alternative plans that relying on the system the IRS uses to collect taxes from employers then essentially run the system in reverse to give grants to employers whose revenues are down this could be expensive one estimate I saw puts it at two trillion dollars the some of that would be offset by fewer claims for unemployment insurance David Wessel of Brookings there thanks so much for joining us you're welcome nearly all K. through twelve schools in the United States are now closed we know this is been a tough transition for many teachers but what about remote counseling school counselors aren't just academic guides often they're also mental health first responders and a trusted adult for kids especially teenagers who need a sympathetic ear centers Corey Turner reports.

David Greene Congress
"david greene" Discussed on BiggerPockets Business Podcast

BiggerPockets Business Podcast

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"david greene" Discussed on BiggerPockets Business Podcast

"Let's be honest like we talked about earlier. Not always the greatest reputation right. There's a low barrier entry. How do you go about recruiting that person's. That person wants to come on board with you. You're so luckily for me. Williams actually has a material that makes it easier for you so they they have what's called a Keller personality assessment. which is a personnel segment? I I think it's witchcraft. I have no idea how it can tell you so much about yourself. Just from taking a test when I read mine I was floored without accurate is so I'll send that to them and they'll fill it out and it will we'll come back to me with a very long description about this person's personality how they react under stress how what their social scale is and then it also gives me what's called the job match report which says with all the twenty-eight positions at Keller Williams franchise has this is what their high match for all the way down to a low match tells you based on your personality. This is a role they would probably like so that's my first screening tool. They don't necessarily have to be a perfect fit for buyer's agent. Maybe if they're a really good fit for a single agent that's fine because it's a sales thing but if it shows all the sales stuff is really low and they rank really high for accounting type stuff or numbers. You don't want that person as salesperson unless they have a very strong track record that shows even though it's not their personality can still be good at it. That's my first step then. I bring them in and I basically verify that assessment with them. I make sure it's accurate grit and in doing that. I asked a lot of questions. I think most of us don't ask enough questions in general interview and I would say like let's let's go through a little thing here. Carol Gerald told me what is it about real estate. That's appealing to you. Oh I just love I love designing of homes and I love all those great shows on TV that show us what our homes have have potential for and I love seeing people walk into the front door of a house. That's GonNa be there someday and be like wow in helping them get that house okay and are are you more motivated by the financial means that are. GonNa come from this career or from the emotional spike. You're gonNA give when you know you help someone get a house and you can help design it for them. I'm going to be completely honest honest with you potential employer that me personally it's all about the emotional thing and being able to connect with people and help make their dreams reality okay so if you have to take take time out of your weekend or away from maybe your niece's birthday to go show that person houses because that's the only time that they have free and you know that you're gonNA miss out on one emotional oceano spike to get up potential other. Do you think you're going to make that decision to do with the best you have or. Do you think that because you don't really need the money. You may put that off. You know I never looked at it that that's a really good point. It's got to be honest. It might not be my top priority so those types of things or why you WANNA ask more questions right. Everyone's going to tell you you. I really WANNA work in real estate. I'll ask them okay. Do you think you'll do well. They'll say yes. I'll say what will you do. Well and they'll tell me I'll say. Give me an example of a way that that showed up in your life before for this excellent. It's probably without probing right. It's being without it's just saying tell me a story. Tell me more about yes exactly yeah. People live talking about themselves and they're going to share a story that reveals all the Info you could ever let it out or another thing. I like to ask him. If that's if that's who you are how come you're not doing that in the row you have now. Why are you coming to look look for this opportunity. Why didn't you do it. There and there's legit reasons. Why like this girl admiring. There was nowhere to go. They were never going to pay her more than fifteen dollars an hour. It's all the company could afford. She had that that made sense to me but a lot of the Times people are will tell you what they wished they were doing with their life for who they WANNA be. It's not who they are right now and they come work for you. They're going to be the person that they've always been and so. That really helps verify what they're like. Then the next step would be at what we call a thought process interview where I ask a bunch of pre-programme questions like what did you to prepare for fair for this interview. Who are the three people you most admire. And why do you admire them. Gimmie three two three examples of a time that you were supervise well. What does a good worker mean to you. You you go through all these questions and that really helps you figure out like their values. What does this person value in. What would they be like if they worked there. Then we get into a little bit more serious stuff where we actually go through an employment history you talk about the last four jobs they had what they light with the learned what they were disappointed by and what they wish had gone differently and and I get a really good feel for if you see most people you'll pick up the pattern. This person gets a job and when it's harder than they thought it would be they slack off right this person starts something and runs with with everything they got and if it's not easy and it doesn't come real easy within three months they lose interest right every time this person gets a girlfriend his head gets into the into the clouds and he can't focus on whatever is going on and so you're looking for those patterns because you know that's what you're going to get with yourself and then the last part we do is my favorite. That's what I call the motivational interview. We have have them. We start with a piece of paper dried into four categories. The first category is job. Next category is money and then they get to pick two other things that are really important to them in life. Most people pigs like family or friends or relationships or spirituality something like that and I run into this exercise where we start off with job and I say okay. I want you to imagine that I walk in this room right here one year from now after you've been hired and I say Jane. How's it going and you say it's freaking awesome. David could could not be better. Tell me what this looks like from the job perspective and I make them actually give me a list of okay well. I'm already already been promoted twice and I'm running this side of the business and I'm really good at this and then I dig deeper. Tell me how you did that. Tell me what went well. Tell me what challenges you had to overcome do it. Tell me how you feel inside to know you've done that and I'm basically trying to pull out of them. What is their heart's desire. Their deepest strongest motivating eating put things that drive them and we do that for every category. Now I go to money and ask the same question okay. I'm making three hundred grand a year. I'm driving this kind of car. You're have this much passive income. What does it mean for you to have that passive income. I feel like I'm finally not the loser. Everyone thought it would be so me how that impacts your your your mindset every day when you wake up and I'm digging very deep a lot of the time during that right and at the end I will circle all the words that showed up some writing down as they're talking repeatedly and those words you circle is what shows me what kind of person this is right. A lot of the times driven will show up ambition or happiness or whatever it is that that person's looking for you will see the pattern after running through that exercise then I just WanNa make sure that those things that drive them are powerful motivators within this space. I made our listeners to understand how gold this information. I'm serious so so caroline I spent fifteen in twenty years in the corporate world and I think I speak for both of us rights. We've sat through plenty of hiring seminars interviewing training things and the companies buddies that we worked for literally spend thousands and thousands of dollars to bring in trainers to essentially take a day to tell us all the things that you just summarized in ten minutes literally you just summarized in ten minutes how somebody can take their interviewing game in their hiring game to the next level so for anybody out there. That's listening to this that thinking about hiring their first or their next or their hundred employees fourteen member rewind ten minutes end realistic because that listen to it again and again 'cause Dave rarely just told how does how to get to the core heart and soul of somebody's character in how they're going to have that will align with what is available for that job and that is something that is not not an easy task to do and Dave just broke it down hardcore absolute gold. I if I if I were GonNA talk about this I would have devoted hall and that's that's why we should be listening to the BP money podcasts with rockstars Jake BP money. No that is absolutely everybody buddy she did alive. Scott everybody should be into the BP money podcast and the BP real estate podcast but they need to go in the BP money podcasts and talk about what money you can make by following the advice you learn about on the business where the real goal. It's one big happy okay so that was absolutely fantastic. I I love that. Thank you David question so now that you are a world renowned podcast host your best selling author literally early you are an investor and you spend a ton of time doing speaking in bigger pocket stuff but you're also the head head of David Greene real estate team. How do you split up your time and how do you. How do you ensure that your this goes beyond? Just just the David Green Team but everything in your your life. How do you ensure that. You're devoting enough time and energy to the things you're doing that that everything can flourish. That is a really really good question what I do what I've learned that I have to do in order to make this work is I can only take on start a business or take on a project that has some form of synergistic quality with the other stuff that I'm already doing so I love to speak and educate people about real estate. Which is why I'm involved bigger pockets. They have an awesome waits for me to be able to do that and they have the best reputation around for real estate education. I wouldn't be able to go start like a helicopter pilot business business while doing this it would it would pull away from one or the other but if I'm speaking to people about real estate investing and I also mentioned that I sell houses and they should call me when they wanna the House Acura they wanNA THEY WANNA bite investment property or they just WanNa use these principles that I've learned to represent them in the in the purchasing of a house. I'm killing two birds with one stone own so to speak. I gave my thing and I found clients. While I'm there I can also safe. You guys ever find a house that you WANNA flip. Call me. I'll make you a partner in the deal and I'll walk you through Rua we do. I'm now lead generating for flips so there's one hundred hundred and fifty people that are they're not. All of them are going to want to buy a house or sell a house in that moment. Not all of them are going to want to have their grandma. Grandma needs to sell her house that I can flip but the more things that I do real estate related the higher I increase probability of finding some form of lead out of that free education that I just gave and it's free for them to they want to be able to refer someone their friends and family to an agent who's actually going to be good. They want to find someone that can buy a house cash and show them walk them through how to do it. Whatever the case may be and I can then tie them in with..

David Keller Williams Williams Keller Times Jake BP Carol Gerald partner Dave Rua Acura Jane David Green Team BP caroline I Scott David Greene
"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:07 min | 2 years ago

"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

"David Greene talks with doctor David Schoenfield actor of the national center for school crisis and bereavement and I'll talk about how to talk to children about mass shootings and from becoming up a little bit later on on morning edition and little bit later on this morning coming up on the California report to Latino elected officials in California you'll there's a threat to their constituents or even themselves after the shootings in Gilroy in el Paso one congresswoman shares what she's gone through we have had to put up an entire camera system in my office I had to put up cameras at home that in other news from around the Golden State Saul Gonzalez that's next time on the California report now becoming up just a little bit later on this morning along with morning edition here on KQED public radio starting off mostly cloudy skies this morning temperatures in the mid fifties right now we're looking at sixties along the coast seventies and eighties around the bait to the upper eighties well inland Sacramento expecting a high today of ninety six eighty three in San Jose seventy eights and Sandor fell Livermore and ninety Oakland at seventy two and sixty eight in San Francisco this is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin in Washington DC and I'm David green in el Paso Texas the scene in the city it's just too familiar is that members of the community are attending vigils preparing funerals their loved ones were murdered over the weekend in a mass shooting at a Walmart and we're beginning to learn more about the twenty two people who were killed they range in age from fifteen to ninety thirteen were American citizens seven were from Mexico and one was a German national was getting a clear picture now of the time line if this attack I wanna talk this through with Mallory fox is a reporter for NPR member station K. E. R. and she's with me and I'll pass on Mallory hi David so as you listen to police starting to share more details what should we no one in particular topic we're we're beginning to learn why this shooter was was that of a Walmart police chief Greg Allen said the suspect purchased his gun legally near his hometown Allen it was a seven point six two caliber rifle Allen says the suspect drove ten to eleven hours to Paso and he said the suspect got here and was lost in a neighborhood and ended up at a Walmart because he was hungry the chief said the suspect has cooperated from the beginning and appears to be in a state of shock and confusion just keep thinking about the fact that he knew that the reason he ends up at the Walmart was because he needed he needed food so you went last night to a vigil in this was for one of the really young victims of of the shooting can you just take us there as best you can the vigil was for Harvey era near Rodriguez and he's the youngest victim of the shooting just fifteen years old he was supposed to be starting his sophomore year of high school and as you can imagine there was a lot of sorrow at the vigil have years parents and sister didn't speak but they released twenty two dogs one for how the air followed by twenty one for the other victim I spoke with several of have years friends and they described an energetic soccer fanatics who was also a bit of a jokester one of his friends said hobby I like to tell jokes and then make sure you laughed at those jokes waiting for you to respond yeah exactly kind of give you a hard time until you cocked that smile and during the vigil several of his classmates and former soccer soccer coaches spoke as well as the superintendent of his school district one Martinez and and he got very emotional let's listen how we are the not to serve to re taken away from his family do not take this serve to be taken away from his friends we are the not the sort of to be taken away from the school what have you do not deserve to be taken away from all of us after the speeches his teammate circled up and they embraced each other and it's clear this community will be grappling with his staff for a long time to come well another reality and in this community right now I mean if more than two dozen people injured in this attack in hospitals in some cases I as I understand it fighting for for their lives what what is what is their condition as best we know right now there was a press conference yesterday at del sol Medical Center and that's where the mortar grievously injured patients were taken officials said as of yesterday afternoon a couple of those patients were discharged and one was transferred to another local hospital several remain at dell sold one of them in critical condition and one doctor who was choked up at times said these patients have devastating wounds and of course at this press conference we learned that two victims had died at the hospital raising the death toll to twenty two this is your community you live here I'm I'm just a visitor but even for visitors you get the sense that there's a tremendous amount of pride in this in the city there is an there's really this insistence that this event is not going to define el Paso that'll pass it was a warm welcoming tight knit community and the shooting from someone outside of the community is not going to change that Mallory Falk reports member station K. E. R. A. thank so much Miller really appreciate it you're welcome I just wanna tell you about one el Paso mom we met yesterday her name is Bethany Mada she and her husband were ready to leave the house with their two kids on Saturday morning they were getting ready to go to the movies and that's when news broke of this massacre nearby at a Walmart Bethany stay home with her six year old son Josiah and her three year old daughter and a lease just trying to keep the TV off trying to keep the radio us keep everything in a sense of normalcy for my kids he didn't want to be here.

David Greene David Schoenfield fifteen years eleven hours three year six year
"david greene" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"david greene" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"David Greene story read that book, but then pour your heart into it. Starbucks is awesome. You'd love this book. So he is a white collar executive. He's traveling around the world, he goes to Italy, and he realizes everybody's gathering around at a community place having coffee, and he's like this doesn't happen in America in America. Nobody's gathering around having coffee, grab it and go. So he's asking who's making the coffee this coffee's better than into their coffee. I've ever had. It's good. He's kind of like you Jason. He's a foodie for coffee. Yeah. You like double shot. Right. I love all coffee, but double shots, very close to my heart. Why do you like double show? I like the way that they brew it. I like the people who grew it. And I mean, I'm not like, Starbucks like a sheltered say, you know, you you pay for the. Experience the coughing. I am. I mean, I am I am I'm a trans culinary student trained. Culinary student. The colon. Oh. But yeah, double shot. Just does it differently. They have like a really cool atmosphere and the coffee speaks for itself. So Mr. Scholtz, he starts Starbucks. No, no, no, no this. What happened? He went to the founder of comes back from America after going to Italy being these baristas with the vision to build these small coffee houses where he can have baristas. But in America, no one gets the idea. So he goes to the dude who owns a company called Starbucks chip. Are you were you aware that Starbucks existed before how I did not know this, and they sold being grinders and beans. So he goes to the guys by the way, the original logo for Starbucks. I want to put a link to on the show notes. Yes. It is a bare chested mermaid remember they had to change the logo because it was a -fensive in a lot of cities. So anyway, so they go to this day. He goes to these foods these coffee grinder guys. And he says here's the deal guys. We could open up a coffee. Shop miss. We don't want to open a coffee always do. We'd like to make the beans the grind the beans. That's cool. But seriously, we could make money as a coffee shop just went to grind the beans. You'll never work. Wait. He says here's listen up. Can I use your beans? I'll pay you for the beans. And I'll give you if you let me use your name because you're not establish name in town all work for free. Now, this white collar executive chip is they white collar executive, right? So Howard Schultz leaps his job in works for free living.

Starbucks executive America Mr. Scholtz Italy Jason David Greene Howard Schultz founder
David Greene, DJ Kellet And Birmingham discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

David Greene, DJ Kellet And Birmingham discussed on Morning Edition

"And I'm David Greene in Alabama police now say they've killed the wrong man on thanksgiving night fighter broken out at a mall near Birmingham police shot. A twenty one year old black man thinking he had fled with a gun. A lawyer. I family says they were lied to and told their son was murdered was this. Our new report gets far more specific about the possible consequences of climate change. It's Monday, November twenty six hope. He's resting his greatness this morning. DJ Kellet turns forty three years old today. The news is

David Greene Dj Kellet Birmingham Alabama Forty Three Years Twenty One Year
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel not seeking election to third term

Morning Edition

01:24 min | 3 years ago

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel not seeking election to third term

"Mayor Rahm Emanuel shocked Chicago when he said yesterday that he will not run for re election next year, the former congressman and Obama White House chief of staff has served two terms as mayor, but it was far from certain that he would win. Here's NPR's David Schaper Rahm Emanuel has long had a reputation as a ferocious campaign animal someone who eats drinks and breathes politics. In fact, he'd already raised ten million dollars for his reelection bid. And at fifty eight seems far for being ready to retire. So it shocked many here when manual announced at Chicago city hall that after two terms he would not seek a third. This has been the job of a lifetime. But it is not a job for a lifetime. Standing next to his wife. Amy rule in holding hands. Emotional Emanuel noted that all three of their children are. Are now away at college. We look forward to writing the next chapter in our journey together. Emmanuel gave no reason for leaving job. Some predecessors held for decades. But his first seven and a half years in office have hardly been smooth sailing bitter, teachers strike in two thousand twelve the closing of fifty schools. The very next year and persistent gun violence in some neighborhoods lead many residents to sour on his tenure instead of cruising to reelection in two thousand fifteen Emanuel was forced into a runoff by progressive county Commissioner

David Schaper Rahm Emanuel NPR Chicago City Hall Emmanuel Catherine T Macarthur Foundati Rachel Martin David Greene John D Chicago Emmanuel Administration Barack Obama White House Congressman AMY Chief Of Staff Commissioner Officer Ten Million Dollars Fifteen Minutes
Thousands of teachers in Washington state strike over salaries

Morning Edition

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

Thousands of teachers in Washington state strike over salaries

"DC and I'm David Greene, in Culver City California John McCain will lie in state at the US capitol tomorrow since his death last weekend we've been reflecting on his life his impact. And his legacy and one memory that often stands out to me was. Covering some of his presidential campaign events in the summer of two thousand. Eight, Russia and its neighbour Georgia were in conflict and McCain just couldn't stop talking about it world history is often made in remote obscure countries which being made in Georgia today. It's the responsibility of the leading? Nations, of the world

John Mccain Georgia Russia Washington United States President Trump Mccain Feingold Congress Churchill Churchill Arizona Rachel Martin Mikheil Saakashvili Culver City David Greene Emmy Wnyc Jake Tapper CNN
Scientists Find a Strange New Cell in Human Brains: The 'Rosehip Neuron'

Morning Edition

02:51 min | 3 years ago

Scientists Find a Strange New Cell in Human Brains: The 'Rosehip Neuron'

"Scientists have taken one more small step toward understanding what makes. The human brain unique as NPR's John Hamilton reports they've identified a type of brain cell that exists in people but not in rodents the cells are called rose hip. Neurons and, they were first. Described by scientists. In Hungary named Gabor Thomas Ed. Lean of the institute, for brain science, in Seattle says Thomas was recording electrical signals from cells taken from two human brains in the course of doing these recordings he started. To notice a very distinctive type of cell that's to him, have the shape of, a rose after the pedals have fallen off so he called them they rose upsell meanwhile lean. And other scientists at the Allen institute had also run across these unusual neurons while doing genetic analysis, of the brain cells so the researchers combined with they had learned and lean says their conclusion was remarkable, this particular type of so head properties that had never actually been described in another species today the findings suggest that the human brain is. More than just a big mouse brain at some point it acquired at least one kind of cell mouse doesn't have scientists aren't, sure exactly what these cells do though they seem to be, involved in controlling the. Flow of information in the brain and, lean says their existence has big implications for researchers it throws. Some Doubt on the ability to use the mouse then, to study a certain elements of human function and disease rose hip cells are a type of inhibitory neuron. They act like the brakes in a car telling other brain cells when to slow down and lean says it's possible they play a role. In mental illness these, types of cells, are extremely important and dysfunction of them can actually directly be linked to different types of neuropsychiatric disease like schizophrenia rose hip cells are. Involved in brain disorders it could help explain why so many, brain drugs that work, in mice don't work in people Josh Gordon directs the National Institute of mental health which helped. Fund the research it may be that in order to fully understand psychiatric disorders we need to get, access to these special types of neurons that exist only in humans Gordon says this study is part of, a larger effort by the national institutes of health to identify every type of cell found in the brains of mice monkeys and people we. Don't know how How the brain works if. We don't know all of its parts so in order to describe how the brain produces behavior. We want to know what are the different parts in the brain and then. How they work together new genetic techniques are rapidly improving scientists, ability to detect new types of brain cells and Gordon expects that researchers will find more. Cells that, exist in people but not animals I think it's very very likely that this is the tip of the iceberg the new research appears in the, journal nature

President Trump Nafta Ohio Canada United States Mexico North Korea Tim Ryan Josh Gordon NPR Congressman California John Hamilton Great Lakes Democratic Party Culver City California David Greene Steve Inskeep
NPR, CIA and President Trump discussed on Mike Gallagher

Mike Gallagher

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

NPR, CIA and President Trump discussed on Mike Gallagher

"Boorda Rico is still recovering from hurricane, Maria, but the Federal Emergency Management agency says, the situation is no longer in emergency Puerto Rico's government disagrees. I'm well king and I'm David Greene, six years ago. The Democratic Party told its candidates in rural areas to show off their guns and political ads. We'll hear why that would be a bad idea today and Aretha Franklin's adopted hometown mourns for loss people in Detroit. Remember how she brought respect to women there to the city itself. It's Friday, August seventeenth singer, Belinda Carlisle. From the go. Go's turns sixty. The news is next. Live from NPR. News in Washington I'm korva Coleman about a dozen former intelligence officials are speaking out after the White, House revoked the. Security clearance a former CIA director John Brennan, he's repeatedly clashed with the president calling Trump's failure to denounce Russian interference in US

NPR CIA President Trump Director Sarah Mccamman John Brennan Washington Aretha Franklin Harvey Democratic Party David Greene White House Belinda Carlisle Boorda Rico Detroit April Dembosky Valley Puerto Rico Steve Bucknor
Nobel-winning author V.S. Naipaul dead at 85

Weekend Edition Sunday

04:31 min | 3 years ago

Nobel-winning author V.S. Naipaul dead at 85

"Naipaul winner of. The Nobel prize has died the Eighty-five-year-old author was at his home in London perhaps best known for his. Novel bend in the river Naipaul, was a controversial figure, in, the. Literary world NPR's, Lynn neary has this remembrance by all accounts vs Naipaul was not an, easy, man his biographer Patrick Francis Naipaul set, high standards for himself and he expected as much from others the it. A waiter in a restaurant a fellow writer or an entire country Naipaul did not hold back his criticism when he felt it. Was deserved if you think of the first line of his book. Abandoned the, reverts the. World is what it, is and his view was that. You looked things straight on it looked at them dead, on and you told the truth as you saw it as you perceived. It and, if that was going to distress and upset people then, so be it Naipaul's relationship with his birthplace Trinidad was nothing if not complicated, his grandparents emigrated They're from India as indentured servants Naipaul has said he thought it was a mistake that he was born. There French believes he probably meant that as a joke but here's how Naipaul described Trinidad in nineteen Ninety-four. NPR interview after the destruction of, the aboriginal people Wilderness and then. On. That ruinous late in the eighteenth century then began to, be created a plantation and, I fear that is how we have to think of the place, it can't be country in the way you would think of. Being a country or Turkey be your country Naipaul's early. Novels give, a warm and humorous view of Trinidad. A house for Mr., Biswas which some consider his best book was based on his father's, life but Naipaul, didn't wanna get trapped and Trinidad like. His father so he sought and won. A scholarship to Oxford biographer French says Naipaul's early years in Britain were difficult he suffered from depression poverty and. Loneliness to arrive in that setting. With very little money very little security the racial prejudices of the nineteen fifties that was was quite tough for him and probably. The toughest time of all was after he left Oxford and he really didn't know what to do And he was so short. Of. Money that he was he was he got ill he, didn't have enough to eat, he had nowhere to stay if such a difficult period I don't, want to to be reminded of it I prefer to deal. With it and imagination when a collection of his letters. Was published, in two thousand nine Paul told NPR. He did not believe, in wallowing in the intense emotions of those early experiences instead he, used his writing, to work through those feelings what happens. With with pain is really time does. Heal it and one deals with in the end with an abstraction to be reminded of the week to week Difficulties, are those times it'd be too much for me actually in his later years Naipaul live comfortably, with his second wife in the English countryside he was. A highly respected writer winner. Of the Nobel prize in literature. Still he always seemed to. Be a man caught between, two worlds the world of the colonizer and those. Who are communist and has views on the. Formerly communist could be harsh but French says it is the tension. Between those two worlds that whole Naipaul's writing I think that if you've you've come out of. Something, close to slavery you've grown up in the colony. You are of Indian origin but you come from the West. Indies and then you turn up in the nineteen fifties in Oxford new make your home in England You are from the most complex triangulate background possible and out. Of that distinctive experience he created, extraordinary works fictional non fiction sometimes it has. Seemed that my pulse caustic pen and pension for controversy would, overshadow his accomplishments as a writer but biographer Patrick French believes those moments are short lived in the long term, he says I have no doubt that people will be reading his books for for. Decades and centuries to come, in the end French thinks that my Paul, was satisfied with his life but. Never self-satisfied for VS Naipaul, the world was a provocative place there was always something else to be said something else to be written,

Patrick Francis Naipaul NPR Writer Nobel Prize Lynn Neary Paul Patrick French Trinidad Oxford Aboriginal People Wilderness New York Times England David Greene Biswas London Washington Britain India Iran
President, South Carolina and China discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

02:04 min | 3 years ago

President, South Carolina and China discussed on Morning Edition

"After a very tight. Primary vote Kansas secretary of state Chris, comeback is narrowly leading in his bid. To unseat Republican governor Jeff Collier the results still aren't official but the. Tiny margin victory means there is the potential for a recount, Stephen Kuranda of the Kansas news service reports co box says he will. Not recuse, himself if a recount happens the race is still incredibly close with co, Bach leading by. Fewer than two hundred votes out of more than three hundred thousand ballots. Hundred ninety one votes what an exciting night it was when an exciting race that's co box speaking to reporters. The day after the election he's the state's top elections official and if, there's a recount co boxes he would not need to recuse himself it's. An issue that is endemic to, having an elected secretary of state and of course there are. Safeguards in there because the secrets State's office is not the sole office looking at. These co box says one of those safeguards is that much of the work. Is done by. The counties the. Secretary of state's office merely serves as a coordinating entity, overseeing not actually counting. The co Bach would also get to determine the cost of a, recount which. Would be paid by whoever, calls for it governor Collier is hoping the outcome could change when results are finalized he will not say whether he'll call for a recount or whether co box. Should recuse himself we're, not there yet we need to get ready. For the first count and we want to make sure that every vote every legitimate vote is counted. Chris Biggs is democrat and the. Former secretary of state that Bach defeated to take over the job big says oversee in your, own election is part of the. Office but if he were in this, situation he'd look for some outside help. To avoid any perception of a conflict of interest if there is a. Way to somehow get some independent referee or voice or something Involved that would eliminate any questions. I would certainly consider looking into that, it will be around a week before mail-in and provisional ballots are counted then there. Could be consideration of a

President Trump South Carolina China South Carolina Chamber Of Comm President And Ceo Walmart Governor Collier United States Bach Chris Biggs NPR David Green Rachel Martin Official TED Congressman Mark Sanford David Greene Secretary Eugene Parker
Dozens shot across Chicago in spate of overnight violence

Morning Edition

09:27 min | 3 years ago

Dozens shot across Chicago in spate of overnight violence

"Which Norman Lear produced and wrote Charlotte Rae in a documentary about the facts of life a spinoff of different. Strokes railroaded giant befall. And a rice sense of humor to both shows which helped revive the flagging fortunes of NBC at the time Charlotte raise last screen appearance. Was in the movie Ricky and the flash When she, was nearly ninety shortly before she was. Diagnosed with bone cancer net Libby NPR. News police in Chicago say at least forty people were shot there over the weekend at least four people died the Chicago Tribune, reports the largest single shooting came early Sunday, morning when gunmen fired on a group of people standing in a neighborhood Chicago police chief Fred Waller link most. Of the shootings to. Gang violence I'm korva Coleman NPR news in Washington Support. For NPR comes from tirerack offering a tire decision guide to help customers find tires that fit their car and, driving conditions with, a network of more than seven thousand independent installers tirerack. Dot com helping. Drivers find deliver install You're hearing morning edition. On k. q. e. d. public radio little later this morning on science will hear about the first pharmaceutical drug derived from marijuana which may soon be coming to drugstores near you it's a medication to reduce, seizures in. Epilepsy patients, a Berkeley teenager was the first patient to try the drug, after his. Mom went to extraordinary efforts and risked. Arrest to get it, for, him here, more on science during morning edition this morning at six twenty two. And again eight twenty two here on kqed public radio. After morning edition it's forum this is. Michael Krasny today on forum in our second hour Airbnb strategic advisor chip Conley joins us to discuss his new book wisdom at warp it's all about how to stay relevant in the workplace as you age join us for forum, it's nine to. Eleven here on public radio Hot and dry weather is forecast in the, Sacramento valley with smoke from wildfires affecting air quality. Today's forecast high in Sacramento is, ninety six degrees with very light to westerly. Breezes this afternoon in the bay area sunny warm day is forecast well hot and dry in the inland valleys of the bay area morning clouds along, the coast should burn off by noon today's highs. Will range from the mid and upper sixties at. The coast to the seventies and eighties around the bay eight upper eighties and low nineties bay area inland seven and a half minutes now past four o'clock morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene in, Culver City. California and, Noel king in Washington DC good morning what exactly was the, nature of. A meeting between Donald Trump junior and. A Russian operative at, Trump, Tower in, two thousand sixteen the White House I said that meeting was about. Adoption policy but the president has described it in other. Ways and then yesterday he tweeted quote. This was a meeting to get information on An opponent he said in that same tweet that it was legal but he also. Said, that he knew nothing about it the president's, also been tweeting about his former, campaign, chairman Paul Manafort Manafort is back. In federal. Court this week he's on trial for Bank and tax fraud, his trial comes out of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference Chuck Rosenberg. Is on the line with me now he's, a former federal federal prosecutor he worked in the. Eastern district of Virginia where manafort's, trial is taking place Mr. Rosenberg good morning Good morning well all right so. This isn't the first time that the, president has acknowledged that this meeting. Was affected Lee an attempt to get dirt. On Hillary Clinton President Trump of course. Was not at that meeting why do you think that President Trump is bringing. This back, up now See'ums mightily concerned about it and perhaps with good reason if, you look at the indictment that the Muller team lodged against the Russian military officials. From the GRU we know that in, March and April of two thousand sixteen so prior to the meeting and Trump Tower the g. are you already started to hack into the emails of, the Clinton campaign the Democratic National Committee and the, democratic congressional campaign, committee fast forward to that meeting I. Think, the operative question Noel is what did the US persons Trump, junior Manafort and others attending that. Meeting know, about what the Russians had already done and did? They joined. That, conspiracy even. After it began with the president has said said on Twitter that this meeting was quote totally, legal also though made an attempt or made. An effort, to to, say I didn't know anything. About it I mean could this particular meeting cause legal trouble for president Trump Quite. Possibly it certainly seems like it could cause legal trouble for the Americans who attended the meeting at the very least meeting with a. Hostile foreign power with the Russians should trigger counter intelligence concerns among any sort of savvy political. Person first thing you do is pick up the phone and call the. FBI they don't seem to have done that could cause legal trouble for the president quite possibly as. Well particularly if having heard about the meeting getting the readout from his son about what happened at the, meeting he tries to cover up the intent of the. Meaning he tells false stories about what the meeting was, four and as we know dictates a statement on Air. Force One, concealing the purpose of the. Meeting that's an obstruction of, Justice quite, possibly and it could land the president and others around him and quite a bit of. Trouble let's talk about one person who formerly was around the president who is potentially in quite a bit of trouble palm Manafort since we last talked to you the trial started the government is laid out some pretty powerful evidence for. The jury do you think prosecutors are in a strong position heading into week two or how. Would you characterize your position no I think that's exactly right I think. It's a strong physician and here's why these cases paper intensive document cases tax fraud and Bank fraud. Tender run according to script there's somewhat formulaic the government introduces income they introduce expenditures they put on accountants, to show that the accountants didn't know that Mr. Manafort. For instance had foreign Bank accounts or that he was, concealing income and then unwittingly these accountants help them prepare. Tax returns, that he files with the. IRS which understated income and, omit the, fact that he has control over these foreign Bank accounts all of that is formulaic and. All of that is precisely what's happening in a courtroom in the eastern district of Virginia manafort's case are testifying to These things yeah That's exactly right and so what I expect you'll see in the coming week is a little bit more. Of the same there'll be some summary witnesses from the FBI who will total up the amount of money in the Bank accounts and ultimately will tie those accounts to Mr. Manafort directly will show that he committed income from his. Income tax returns then I expect we'll hear. From, Mr., gates well. Yeah that is that is that is the big, question? This week right manafort's Paul, manafort's longtime deputy Rick gates expected to. Take the stand how does he fit into the? Prosecution, strategy here well criminals tend to. Run with criminals so Mr. gates. Isn't admitted criminal Mr. Manafort is. An accused criminal it shouldn't surprise the jury very much that these two guys plotted together conspired did much of the same thing tax fraud and Bank fraud to fat in. Their own waltz I think the government will put Mr. gates, on the stand they'll they'll have him. Admit To all his wrongdoing that's fairly typical to and then they'll take him step by step through. The indictment having him explain each of the. Things, that, he and. Mr. Manafort did together to cheat the IRS and, to? Fraud banks and just briefly, how do you see Mr. manafort's defense. Lawyers countering the government's case what's your strategy here? Well, they're gonna try and do two. Things one they'll try and say. That Mr. Manafort lack the intent. To defraud the IRS or the bank's perhaps if his income tax returns understated income they'll say it was an accident because he was a very busy man and second I. Think they'll try to pin as much of this on Mr., gates as they possibly can The real one at fault took Rosenberg, was a federal prosecutor in the eastern district of Virginia thanks so much Israel passed a law last month that continues to cause controversy the, nation state law defines Israel? As the, nation state of the Jewish, people critics say this? Law, discriminates against religious minorities like Muslims and. Christians. Who make up about a fifth of the Israeli population as NPR's Daniel estrin reports from Tel Aviv this law is sparking protests, from religious, group that's one of Israel's staunchest supporters the Druze religious minority in Israel. Held an, unprecedented protests this weekend thousands gathered in Tel Aviv's main square chanting the Hebrew word for quality She The you are religious group and shoot of, Islam their ethnic. Arabs but unlike most other Arab, citizens they've committed to serving in the Israeli, army they.

Paul Manafort Manafort President Trump Fraud NPR Virginia Chuck Rosenberg Mr. Gates Donald Trump FBI IRS Trump Tower Coleman Npr Noel King Bank NBC Chicago
Noel King, Iraqi Government and Basra discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

01:01 min | 3 years ago

Noel King, Iraqi Government and Basra discussed on Morning Edition

"It's morning edition from npr news i'm noel king and i'm david greene let's turn now to iraq the most widespread widespread protests since two thousand three are sweeping through the southern part of the country right now demonstrators have been gathering for a week they're demanding jobs also better services and in response to this the iraqi government has sent army and counterterrorism troops and bears dana raff has been monitoring these protests and she joins us from amman jordan hygiene hi david so why are these protests happening and and what is the timing of them here well first of all is this morning in basra it's a hundred and fifteen degrees temperatures rising it is hot and so imagine you're sitting in that degree temperature and you turn on the tap and all you get a salty water and then the electricity goes out and they've been dealing with this for fifteen years since the us invaded iraq and promise them better lives and they just haven't got it so they've been demonstrating.

Noel King Iraqi Government Basra United States Iraq NPR David Greene Dana Raff Amman Jordan Fifteen Degrees Fifteen Years
U.S., China vulnerable to fallout from tariffs

Morning Edition

01:32 min | 3 years ago

U.S., China vulnerable to fallout from tariffs

"And i'm david greene china went dollar for dollar with the united states on friday imposing its own tariffs on thirty four billion dollars worth of american goods and one product on the list soybeans it appears that china wants to inflict pain on rural voters who make up part of president trump's political base trump says tariffs will ultimately help create a more level playing field for american workers but some in the us are suffering consequences from this back and forth and we have michael pedophilia on the line with us he is president of the minnesota soybean growers association and he hasn't member station k se in rochester minnesota mr pedophilia good morning thanks for having me well thanks for coming on i know you in addition to leading this organization your farmer yourself and i guess if you could take this to a personal level for us i mean how important is china's a market for your crops it's tremendously important on a whole united states exports about forty percent of our soybeans china and that would hold true farm too and when you look at the amount of impact this has had in terms of dollars since the announcement of retaliatory tariffs the soybean market has dropped almost two dollars a bushel for my family farm with the amount of soybeans i produce that's a close to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars of lost value two hundred and fifty thousand dollars of lost value because of these retaliatory tariffs from china's i just talked to me about what that could mean for the decisions you make for your farm and for your family well that's a tremendous amount of money to me and when you look at going forward in terms of what kind of a quick we need to buy or investments we need to make in our business or.

David Greene China United States President Trump China Michael Minnesota Rochester Fifty Thousand Dollars Thirty Four Billion Dollars Forty Percent Two Dollars
"david greene" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"david greene" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And i'm david greene the united states and the uk issued this rare joint alert last week warning that russia is actively preparing for a future cyber war against the west ginette manfred is the department of homeland security cybersecurity chief and she says one dangerous technique is called spoofing allows an actor to pretend that they're the computer or the device that you think you're talking to so they get into the middle of that connection between two different devices and they can spy on a traffic that is going back and forth they can be late the traffic rachel martin spoke to men for about this threat this is very focused on recall enterprise or even small office or home office routers and switches so these are the devices that basically make networks work and what that means is that is somebody is sitting on those routers are those switches they have full access to all of that data all of your communications they can see that they can potentially manipulate that and they have pretty broad access than to your network so that sounds horrible vagary can i ask what has transpired to make this threat more severe now we've issued previous alerts but what we saw was that it was not reaching far enough and wide enough not enough people had access to this new to take action so we felt that we needed to get it out to as many businesses as many even home offices as possible which necessitated a public alert.

united states uk russia rachel martin david greene manfred
"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm david greene in culver city california ten people are dead and fifteen more injured after a rental van mowed down pedestrians yesterday in toronto canada police there say they have captured a suspect twenty five year old alec manashian suburban toronto police chief mark saunders said the driver's actions appeared to be deliberate but didn't offer any details of why this might have happened at this particular point in time there's nothing that does affect the national security footprint we are looking very strong to what the exact motive motivation wise for this particular incident to take place i want to bring in christine bureaucracies host on the cbc's world report in toronto hi christine good morning david so the police chief they're saying no national security footprint affected do we take that language that they are ruling out terrorism here well not so many words they pretty much have yesterday having watched scenarios like this unfold in cities around the world is you mentioned man driving rental van plowing through pedestrians you can't help but think the worst and i think a lot of canadians were there yesterday events were tied to supporters of the islamic state we should say absolutely and here in the media we were being incredibly careful and certainly public officials were being careful not to label the incident as terrorism or terror attack until they were sure and very early on yesterday the public safety minister came out and said while they weren't labeling it they also found no national security threat related to this at that point and still at this point seemingly senseless act so do we know anything about the twenty five year old that would suggest why he moved on this.

david greene california cbc culver city toronto canada alec manashian mark saunders twenty five year
"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And i'm david greene the united states and the uk issued this rare joint alert last week warning that russia is actively preparing for a future cyber war against the west jeanette manfred is the department of homeland security's cybersecurity chief and she says one dangerous technique is called spoofing allows an actor to pretend that they're the computer or the device that you think you're talking to so they get into the middle of that connection between two different devices and they can spy on the traffic that is going back and forth they can be late the traffic rachel martin spoke to men for about this threat this is very focused on recall enterprise or even small office or home office routers and switches so these are the devices that basically make networks were work and what that means is that if somebody is sitting on those routers those switches they have full access to all of that data all of your communications they can see that they can potentially manipulate that and they have pretty broad access then to your network so that sounds horrible vagary can i ask what has transpired to make this threat more severe now we've issued previous alerts but what we saw was that it was not reaching far enough in wide enough not enough people had access to this new to take action so we felt that we needed to get it out to many businesses as many even home offices as possible which necessitated a public alert.

united states uk russia rachel martin david greene jeanette manfred
"david greene" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"david greene" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"Founder you know you should at least study bad seeker continue the reuss right in the acre bigger part of the council urged analysis and check out our swedish calculated actually of a brand new went out there as if you guys haven't seen a yet it's the rehab estimation calculate actually help you budget in plan your rehab so get bigger pockets that come such analysis tried out awesome are two before we move to the root famous for david got this book we we we mentioned it in the beginning of and and i think i think we should talk about it's called long distance real estate investing rips long distance real estate investing how to buy a rehab and manage out of state rental properties by author david greene so david dream why why write a book and give us give us kinda the gist of of this thing so i wrote that book because i hear a ton of people saying david on one of us in real estate but i can't my market isn't work i don't have enough money there's always some reason why people say that they can invest right there's no reason that you shouldn't be investing if you understand the fundamentals of investing so i spelled out my entire system everything from finding the market you want to invest in the technology that i used to do this stuff how i do it efficiently and with time consideration the people that i need on my team to put it together how to build those relationships and then a ton of stuff on actually how i rehab properties i have a section on a rehab hacking basically upgrade hacking where i show you if you're going to replace something any ways and you have to rip out a certain part of the house to do it sometime suspend an extra two or three hundred bucks to get upgraded items in there is get you your money back in spades you know i winner recommend that you take out your appliances.

Founder reuss real estate david greene the house
"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And i'm david greene democrats got some badly needed wins last night the party took back the governorship of new jersey and also held onto the governor's seat in virginia and that virginia race was seen as a test of president trump's popularity here's the winner physician ralph north them virginia has told us two in the divisiveness that we will not condone hatred and bigotry and to and the politics that have torn this country apart north carolina bringing npr serra maccammon who covered this race era i david so everybody seemed to be looking at this race in saying they were going to be some broad lessons here but this is just one state rights of how much can we learn it's one state but you it's more than one statewide of race at for example democrats did much better than expected not just in the statewide offices but also in the virginia house of delegates normally we don't talk a lot about state house races at the national level but this is significant because the house of delegates all one hundred seats were up and it had been controlled by republicans was expected to stay that way but democrats flipped a lot of seats and control may come down to some local recounts also oh the statewide offices they did very well raf nor them of course one and that's despite some really sharp criticism from the liberal wing of his own democratic party in recent days he did that it looks like by focusing at least in part on president trump and as we heard calling for an end to to hatred and bigotry and device this so this seems to show that at least in places like virginia which is an increasingly blue state there is anti trump energy that democrats can capitalize on if they organized well i mean speaking of the president trump never campaign for the republican candidate at gillespie and trump tweeted after the results came in that the left be quote did not embrace me but i mean how much can the president distance himself from from this outcome of virginia i would say not all that much in reality glaspie was pretty clearly trying.

virginia trump north carolina the house blue state gillespie david greene president
"david greene" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"david greene" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Lights that sparked fire nation jld here ends welcome to episode 1800 in twenty eight of eofire where i chat with entrepreneurs on fire seven days a week and if you're ready to massar productivity discipline in focus in one hundred days fire nation suspicious it's the mastery journal dot com now shower today's featured guest david greene david are you prepared to ignite lights yes sir i'm ecstatic about a of the davis a police officer real estate agents in investor with thirty houses he's been featured on hgtv house hunters he runs greed income dot com and teaches others to build a passive income with real estate david take a minute fill in some gaps from that intro and give us a little glimpse of your personal life all right so i got started buying rental properties in two thousand nine all right after the market had crashed i saw an opportunity there that i could buy properties that i could rent for more than i own and that's about as much as i knew i didn't know that was thing that people did but i knew that i wanted to take advantage of it so i've decided i'm going to do whatever it takes to get there i started work in ninety two one hundred hours a week is a police officer sleeping on my car i kinda gave up like a big chunk my light and just that i'm going out to this but everything i have a angela by quite a few rental properties a market turnaround in 2013 and they got so expense by in california so i said hey all going to be this in arizona where i can stop i am i put together a team of people that would help me environmental properties over there realize it's kind of the same no matter where you do it they're just be little pieces that you mean and then stand on gotten better that system inaugu lorna in arkansas and i own properties in wisconsin texas georgia everything and i buy properties in all kinds of other states and i think rules state is one was harmful things i've ever come across rebuilding while compassionate the talk.

david greene david davis real estate agents real estate officer california arizona arkansas wisconsin texas georgia ninety two one hundred hours one hundred days seven days
"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"david greene" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And i'm david greene in culver city california of former warcrimes prosecutor has decided that she is done she had enough of serving on a un syria commission because in her words the commission does absolutely nothing this commission was investigating human rights violations they released around a dozen reports on atrocities but the united nations never referred syria to the international criminal court carla del ponte is the former prosecutor she's on the line now from her home in switzerland thanks for joining us good morning for me it will so tell me why you decided a quick this commission my saturday didn't care and my colleagues in declamation recruit knock do it we could not achieve that we wear mainly crime and security councity me are you at all go with a then uh try a report of the founding of one right we check down the reward of wages eight no nothing happened jeff this if not initiate he got sent felt i got you not friend day creek you had enough and quick how much do you point the finger at russia russia's a permanent member of the security council bacon veto via anything and they of course support the government of which are letter or or they have a big reason that that nothing has happened in your mind after booking because they are looking at a veto veto right is that there are noticeable should afford their reputation over i'll train donation grab you on a girl guard at ashai and out that ordinary because in the end what are you what they mean feed yeah faith that or not making redshirt crevasse shah chain yeah he competing mbeki naked or bill nye said unmarried the lady to be perfect yogurt will declared uniform pdi but i'm not ready to continue to discrimination directed jack got he's an alibi hi ordering technician commute i just want to finish by asking i mean you've worked doing this kind of work with rwanda and the genocide there with.

russia technician mbeki shah declamation human rights rwanda jack bill nye david greene jeff switzerland syria united nations the commission prosecutor culver city california