33 Burst results for "David Green"

Stacey Abrams Spearheads Campaign Against Voter Suppression

Morning Edition

06:52 min | 8 months ago

Stacey Abrams Spearheads Campaign Against Voter Suppression

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I may tell Martin after the chaos of the Iowa caucuses there is new scrutiny about how the US conducts selections when you partisan voting rights group is focusing on elections in swing states this year it's called fair fight and it's led by Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams Abrams got a lot of national attention in two thousand eighteen after she lost a close race for governor in an election that was clouded by allegations of voter suppression here's an here's Debbie Elliot a few thousand volunteers are spending a Saturday morning in a hotel conference room in Macon Georgia for a boot camp of sorts on voter suppression good morning in everybody Hillary Holly is organizing director for fair fight action the group that's waging a campaign against voter suppression in the twenty twenty election we are walking into year that's going to be exciting little bit stressful we're gonna be working a lot participants call themselves democracy warriors people like whole worker of lane Morgan Johnson make every single cam Johnson is motivated to be here in part because her sister was removed from George's voter rolls under a mass purge of people who have not voted since two thousand twelve or responded to mailed notices from election officials Johnson thinks it's part of a broader strategy to curtail voting rights reducing their opposition don't wanna lose power I mean we're seeing that nation why it's depressing and that's why I'm just trying to be active in a way that I can my parents worked for civil rights in and we're not for going backwards this training is part of an effort launched by Georgia Democrats Stacey Abrams an African American woman who broke new ground in our two thousand eighteen campaign for governor she energized new democratic voters and lost by less than fifty five thousand votes in a largely Republican state there was a record turnout for a mid term election but also hours long waits at some polls election server security breaches and allegations that strict adherence on signature matches dampens participation Abrams says the defeat galvanized her to launch fair fight in the wake of the election my mission was to figure out what works could I do even if I didn't have the title of governor what what can I do to enhance to protect our democracy because the voting rights is the the pinnacle power in our country verified is training grassroots advocates lobbying for new election laws and arguing in federal court the George's election system is unconstitutional Abrams says long lines precinct closures and purging voter rolls are all barriers that disproportionately impact minority voters most of us understand voter suppression as the nineteen sixties images of Billy clubs and hoses and dogs barking aggressive interference but in the twenty first century voter suppression looks like administrative errors it looks like user error it looks like mistakes but it is just is intentional and just as insidious George's current secretary of state Republican Brad wraps and Parker acknowledges there were some problems because of the high turnout in two thousand eighteen but rejects the notion that cleaning up voter rolls is an attempt to gain partisan advantage no what we're trying to do is make sure that the you know Lexus are clean fair and accurate this is something that has been going on in Georgia long before Republicans were in charge in Georgia and courts have upheld the state's authority to purge the voter last after fair fight suit but other election related lawsuits are pending attorney Jack Evans is chairman of the Georgia chapter of the Republican National lawyers association Georgia is ground zero for election law Evans says the focus is here because Georgia is becoming competitive the reality is you know George's changing and there's a lot of transplants coming in from the west coast and the northeast and there's also changing demographics so I think it is time for Republicans to grow the tent but I definitely think it's woke up a lot of Republicans in Georgia now Abrams is expanding fair fight to reach in hopes of putting other states in play she recently traveled to Florida for a town hall with college students to talk about ways they could protect their vote for verifying voter registration for learning how to ask for a provisional ballot if you're turned away at the polls political scientist Andrea Glaspie of Emory University says there are a lot of national groups doing voting rights work but fair fight stands out because it's been able to use the energy around Abrams electoral defeat to try to reap benefits for other Democrats in this election cycle her story was compelling she got a lot of attention by being the first black woman to be nominated by a major party for gubernatorial seat and she was really smart and you know strike while the iron was hot in order to play that type of organization together fair fights political action committee is raising the millions of dollars including a five million dollar contribution from democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg and it's pumping some of that money into battle ground states early fair fight C. E. L. Lauren grow Largo says the idea is to beef up the democratic ground game around voting we're in the mission of making sure our full citizenry can vote we also happen to think that when all Americans are able to vote Democrats win she says they've invested more than a million dollars and sent dozens of staffers in eighteen states to ramp up democratic voting rights infrastructure things like establishing voter hot winds and creating voter protection teams to be in place for the primaries so they can prepare for the general election gathering information and data what is order struggle with when election administrator struggle with what support are they gonna need critics say fair fight is a vehicle for Stacey Abrams political aspirations Abrams counters that she's been doing civil rights work her entire career but acknowledges our interest in higher office including the presidency I see myself as a warrior for democracy but I'm also someone who has been training my entire life to do more as for this year's race Abrams hasn't endorsed any of the democratic presidential candidates but says show welcome a phone call from the eventual nominee when they're looking for a running mate Debbie Elliot NPR news

David Green Martin Iowa NPR United States
"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 9 months ago

"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

"David green I'm Steve Inskeep what does the president want to do to disability benefits in America the administration budget proposes changes in requirements to go on disability this affects a lot of people across the country so let's check the facts and the implications of something we heard on this program this week White House budget director Russell vote said there is a chance to save money on disability there's about seven billion dollars in improper payments in the program so we obviously want to read those out but in general we want to get people back to work in labor force right now the inability to speak English is a qualifying factor that allow you to get disability we think that's not how the program is meant to work and so that's an example of one of the reforms that we have within the disability program so much to dig into their an NPR Selena Simmons stuff and is in our studios to help us do that good morning my name first seven billion dollars in improper payments is that much money available to be saved well I asked on the for the source of that figure and they sent me a report that shows the seven billion dollars in improper payments across disability programs in fiscal year twenty eighteen but here is an important point that is out of hundreds of billions in payments to beneficiaries OMB puts the rate of improper payments at about four percent other estimates say it's closer to one percent that is decimal dust according to a source I talk to about this and another important point vote says route out but most of these improper payments are because of inefficiencies or administrative issues not because of fraud people trying to game the system in some way okay first decimal dust as of yet is I'm gonna say from very much I appreciate that second he said the thing about speaking English that if you don't speak English well you can get disability and you didn't see the president doesn't seem to like that is that correct kind of you cannot get disability benefits just because you don't speak English you have to first have a serious medical condition that prevents you from working if you do language skills might be considered along with other things it's like agent education level the thinking is say you have a physical conditioning can to manual label labor for instance but you could work in a desk job you don't have the education or work is going to language skills to do that all of that might be taken into consideration although for talking about language it sounds like a measure here to target immigrants at some but it sounds like that's not necessarily what's going on here this is not is not just about immigrants claiming disability right it's part of this really complex grade of considerations and the trump administration tells me it's close to final finalizing a new regulation to remove that consideration out of the grid and some experts I talked to said that that process does need to be modernized but English language consideration would not be the place that would start it's a pretty small piece of the pie okay Russell vote also said that the administration wants to ask people much more often if they really are qualified for disability let's hear that we want to have ongoing disability reviews instead of having a root disability review every seven years we want you to have it every two or three years what's the story there okay part of what he's saying is not quite right to seven years is the very outer limit between what are called continuing disability reviews this is for people who have really serious conditions like an intellectual disability down syndrome might be an example there is a recent proposal from the trump administration on this but it would not change reviews from seven years to two years we make some other changes to the frequency of these reviews on these changes aren't final yet the disability advocates have been sounding the alarm and some people told me that the frequency is not the issue it's that there isn't enough staffing or funding for these field offices in order to actually check up on people regardless of the time exactly Selena thanks so much for coming by thank you NPR's.

David green Steve Inskeep president America
"david green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:08 min | 9 months ago

"david green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I'm David green the corona virus has many countries sealing their borders with China and that includes Chinese already reclusive neighbor North Korea which has clamped down on trade with China suspended international tourism and instituted weeks long quarantines for people arriving in the country North Korea says they have had zero confirmed cases but the country is also notorious for misleading both the international community and their own people for more on this we turn to Jenny town she closely follows North Korea she's the managing editor of the state thirty eight north use in our studios in Washington thanks for coming in a pleasure to be here so what if any information is is leaking out about about coronavirus in North Korea right now well there are some rumors that are floating around as cases of corona virus but they're very hard to corroborate because the symptoms are so similar to other diseases like pneumonia like the flu a minute is winter in North Korea as well as of these are common elements during the winter and especially in a system that has insufficient medical resources and medicines to treat some of these diseases also in addition to to sort of be notorious for misleading I mean the the other problem is the capacity North Korea has to to deal with this and you're to be able to test for this virus also treat the disease it causes which is now being called covert nineteen I mean what capacities North Korea having health moment like this well I'm you know their their public health infrastructure really is lacking and so some of the hospitals in Pyongyang have better facilities and might be able to do these tests but as you've seen in China for instance the testing can take up to two days they've been doing like C. T. tests in the mean time to to see if at least there's no money at to treat these kinds of medical facilities are not common in a lot of north Green hospitals especially outside of Pyongyang and so it's really hard for them to be able to handle any kind of crisis like this especially if it starts to escalate and so their best on their their best weapon against this is to prevent it as much as possible and they've really been stressing this throughout the country is good hygiene early detection early testing but also really just trying to prevent it from getting there to begin with so are they giving citizens good information I mean you say they're encouraging people to use good hygiene or are you confident that the government is is doing the best it can in terms of information to to help people avoid this they are certainly taking this seriously and they know the ramifications if it gets there how difficult it would be to actually treated and control the spread their air are a lot of information campaigns going on domestically about corona virus about the severity of it about the need for good hygiene and there are different treatment centers and and especially quarantine centers that are being set up throughout the country if there are suspected cases of it so you know it is something that they are putting out information campaigns and there are reports on daily and can others of incidences where people have gone to some of these information sessions and they actually have doctors at the information sessions talking about what's going on and and urging the importance of prevention you know obviously the the first and foremost we've been following the the the possible impact on on lives of of this virus but in addition the economic impact around the world and we've we've talked about even the effect on China towns in the United States I wonder about the economic impact on North Korea means now sealing its border with China trade with China Chinese tourists to really economic lifelines for North Korea could could this have an impact on the regime this is going to have a huge economic toll on North Korea and especially since we don't know how long this is going to last so you know they've cut as he said they've cut off trade but tourism is the big thing this is been propping up the economy over the past year and you know they just built like this MGN city this new hot springs and they've been working on building up that one son beach resort and so all of these things have really been geared towards Chinese tourism and so every day that that borders closed in every day that they've cut down tourism it has a huge economic impact and it's hard to see and I'm sure the regime now is is re calculating some other choices especially on their external affairs Jenny town is managing editor for thirty eight north also a fellow at the Stimson center thanks so much for coming in my pleasure thanks an environmental law that is obscured to many Americans became a point of heated debate between business and environmental groups in Denver yesterday the trump administration held the first of two hearings on proposed changes grace horde of Colorado public radio reports the fifty year old national environmental policy act or nepa requires a major evaluation every time new infrastructure like highways dams and oil pipelines get built reviews can average seven years to complete trump administration officials and industry advocates like ed Mortimer with the U. S. chamber of commerce say the process needs to be streamlined the investors can be lined up but those plans may be mothballed for years and sometimes decades due to the ever thickening layer of process that has amassed I'm project applicants who seek federal programs are permits under nepa the trump administration would limit and depth environmental refused to just two years analysis of cumulative or indirect effects would no longer be required that would limit the government's ability to evaluate climate change impacts of projects and it concerns third generation Nebraska rancher and former Jeannie Crumley who lives along the path of the keystone XL pipeline we take seriously that fifty years from now when our grandchildren are running this very farm KXL would have an advantage in toxic leaky thirty six inch pipeline in our field leaving our grandson with a liability the proposed changes would allow private companies to write the most complicated reviews themselves under federal supervision and public comment periods would be moved to earlier in the process something a bar mentalist worry would limit participation with only about one hundred speaking slots available in Denver many spoke outside the hearing nearby about one hundred and fire mentalist gathered around a small stage in a parking lot people like Denver metro resident Meryl Blackwell one hundred slots for something so critical is not really enough for public comment that's why we're here a second hearing on the trump administration's proposal to reform the national environmental policy act will be held in Washington DC in two weeks digital comments are being taken through March tenth environmental groups are expected to challenge any final changes in court for NPR news I'm grace hood in Denver this is NPR news and this is WNYC in New York I'm Richard hake good morning.

China North Korea David green
"david green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:23 min | 9 months ago

"david green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I'm David green we have other news to cover outside Iowa of course I'm going to turn to the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in China the city of Wuhan has been sealed off from the rest of the country since January twenty third nearly a fourth of confirmed cases worldwide are in that one city in this is left hospitals they're struggling to screen and treat suspected and diagnose cases of this virus despite this quarantine appears Emily fangs been able to reach more than a dozen people in Wuhan who are desperate for medical help and she joins us from Beijing hi Emily he David our people describing the situation in that city the phrases I hear most are we'll have more helpless and we have to wait it's because the quarantine is very likely delay the spread of the virus but is also bottled in thousands of sick people in one city if that has limited hospitals people instead of being asked to go into these makeshift isolation wards where they see they get food but not much else I manage to speak to someone who has been diagnosed with a corona virus in one of these words her name was Lisa home but she was so sick that she had trouble breathing which is why I'm not gonna play her audio but she said she wasn't getting care people just came by in the morning and night to take Kerr temperatures and for parents and families are for patients and families that's been really terrifying this idea of having the still not yet totally understood virus and being put in a room by yourself doctors will hunter also scrambling they're so short on supplies that some have reported their wing rain jackets and rain boots and selling their own masks to protect themselves I mean people were not getting treatment must be baking for it I I I would imagine any just sounds so so desperate what how what kind of response are they getting when they're saying I need help here they're getting faced with this Kafka esque bureaucracy either being let in circles one of the people I spoke to his name to paying say she's been struck with enormous tragedy her grandmother died of pneumonia like illness and January twenty fifth but because she died so suddenly and so early in the outbreak she's not sure her grandmother had the corona virus now her on her mother and father are sick with a similar disease her father is the only one that's been officially diagnosed none of them have been able to get to a hospital and she's so desperate she's been calling even the Wuhan city mayor asking for help how do I you she saying these public officials have such an attitude towards us it's made us so bitterly disappointed they told us we didn't they didn't know who we should contact she was told to call her community representatives who then told her to contact health commission who then told her to contact the community representatives so now she can only wait for a phone call there are hundreds of people in every district in the city who are waiting to get beds where to get screened for the disease usually but they're only able to get as an IV so if you are incredibly sick or have a family member who is incredibly sick you don't feel like officials or anyone is there for you what what do you do you're forced to make this gut wrenching choice right now you can send families to an isolation ward and will Hannah said they're building new isolation wards where they're going to hold people with relatively mild symptoms of the corona virus but a lot of people feel like that's just abandoning their loved ones to to die alone in so they're choosing to take care of them inside their own homes even if that risks infection I talked to pearl tan she's only twenty three that's what she's doing both her parents now have the corona virus living at home with her there's actually no taxis right now and we'll have they're allowed to operate her parents actually biking twenty minutes the hospital every day to get medicine even though they're sick here's pearl comment if you want to know so that you're she says at this critical moment or family and I have to take care of them even if I'm terrified everyone is terrified and of course the problem right now is people at home taking care of these people are also getting sick themselves which which could of course make the the upper given worse just an extraordinary story of worldwide the that will be following impairs Emily Feng in Beijing talking about the epicenter of the coronavirus Emily thanks thanks David so we have had the benefit of live music in our shows this week from Iowa the well pennies have been with us there had a husband and wife folk pop duo from right here in the morning their names are Brian and Serra Vanderpool and a lot of their songs are about coming home to the Midwest.

Iowa China Wuhan David green
"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:37 min | 9 months ago

"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

"David green in Culver city California president trump is once again looking to restrict foreign travelers from coming into the United States next week the administration is expected to roll out an expanded travel ban this time on seven new countries most of them in Africa yesterday officials unveiled a new rule as well that would deny visas to some pregnant women and here is John Burnett covers immigration is on the line with us to work through what this all means hi John Hey morning David let's start with the new countries here which which ones are the president adding well the announcement is expected next week would nearly double the current list of countries that have travel bands seven additional ones NPR's confirmed they're Nigeria Sudan Tanzania and Eritrea in Africa here to stand in Central Asia Myanmar in Southeast Asia and Belarus in Eastern Europe so you know they're not just in one region or one religion and we don't yet know what kind of restrictions the US would impose they can very from country to country there could be constraints on government official visits on student visas on tourist visas but we can't expect the effect to be dramatic I mean immigrant pieces fell by about eighty percent in Syria and Libya when they were slapped with travel bans earlier in the administration as he said we we don't know the exact details could be different country by country but but broadly do we know why the president's doing this well this is what trump said about the expanding list during oppressor in Davos Switzerland earlier this week our country has to be safe you see what's going on in the world our country has to be safe so we have a very strong travel ban and will be adding a few countries to yeah of the on that not many specifics acting homeland security secretary Chad wolf said the restrictions are necessary quote to mitigate threats from a small number of countries that lack either the will or the capability to vector citizen to travel to the US okay so that gives us a sense of of what they're trying to do I mean these particular countries though I mean if you've been going through the list and then figuring out why they were chosen well in the case of Kurdistan it appears to be a pressure tactic homeland security's not happy that the country hasn't yet adopted biometric passports he's our passports with an embedded computer chip that has biometric data about the traveler that can authenticate their identity and then you have Eritrea Sudan Nigeria with the administration knows they all have really high visa overstay rates for workers tourists and students so the new travel bans will have a big effect especially in Nigeria Africa's most populous country in two thousand eight Nigerians got more than two hundred thousand temporary visas here's Dr you could tell he's with the Nigerian American foundation in Florida we are very disappointed and outreach most Nigerian immigrants in the United States it's not just about those engineer as long as I we are going to move to a lot ought to be able to add the US economy and I guess is a previous on the arguments were from again here if this decision goes forward from the president can can I just as Chinese is this the sort of the same as the president's first travel ban from from when he came into office what we called it you know that that the Muslim band exactly yeah and as it turns out Monday will be the third anniversary to the day went on staff first travel ban just a few days and you know his administration that executive order originally covered several majority Muslim countries but the administration hadn't really thought it through remember immigration agents at airports were caught flat footed there were huge crowds of travelers and protesters in just lots of confusion at international airports then came the lawsuits of the plaintiffs argue that trump had out for Muslims and ultimately was the Supreme Court that allowed trump to keep his travel ban against the existing list Iran Libya North Korea Somalia Syria then his way let Chad in Yemen and now with the new travel ban there'd be a total of fifteen countries on the white house's blacklist and John of this other immigration policy changes announced by the White House yesterday were recording what they they call birth tourism what what is that yeah this was another big change in immigration policy so that it comes from from the state department officials will no longer issue temporary visitor visas to pregnant women that they determined they want to enter the country to have a baby here having a baby in the U. S. secures automatic citizenship for the new born in this has always been since some conservatives they don't believe in birth right citizenship trump has called it ridiculous some hardliners of call these children anchor babies a controversial turn RG Hallman is with the federation for American immigration reform which wants less immigration what they're trying to do though here is is in that this isn't getting the Supreme Court essentially to rule on on birthright citizenship doesn't exist it's just empowering consular officials abroad to be able to screen people out that are strictly come ng to abuse our immigration system so the new rule that takes effect today could affect thousands of pregnant women seeking visas critics say this rule and the expanded travel ban or just more examples of trump's Xena phobia his latest move to shut the door to all kinds of immigrants whether asylum seekers refugees or these applicants and perasaan Burnett John thanks you bet if you've turned on PBS any time over the past four decades you probably recognize this voice good evening I'm Jim Lehrer on the newshour tonight our summary of the.

David green United States Culver California president
"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:13 min | 9 months ago

"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm David green have we got to a point in our country where voters no longer expect to hear the truth a new poll reveals Americans are deeply concerned about misinformation may be so much they think it's inevitable we have some tips for how to stick to the facts and sign orders millions to stay in place as they try to contain a deadly virus is Thursday January twenty third Happy Birthday McIver actor Richard dean Anderson turned seventy news is next live from NPR news in Washington I'm korva Coleman the Senate is preparing for another day of opening statements in president trump's impeachment trial on Wednesday congressmen Hakeem Jeffries house manager of the case alleged the president improperly suspended U. S. military aid to Ukraine for his personal benefit and beers Claudia chrysalis has more Jeffries told senators president trump tried to withhold the millions and assistance that Congress considered critical that is why this Congress allocated three hundred and ninety one million dollars in military and security aide so vulnerable Ukraine on a bi partisan basis because it is in America's national security interests Jeffries also set a July twenty fifth call summary shows the president pedal debunked Russian propaganda that Ukraine interfered in the twenty sixteen election US intelligence found it was actually Russia cloudy salicin P. R. news the capitol prosecutors in New York continue presenting their case today against former movie producer Harvey Weinstein he's accused of rape and sexual assault he's case helped spark the me too movement as NPR's rose Friedman reports the first full day in court so prosecutors claiming that former film producer Harvey Weinstein violently raped or assaulted a number of women he's charged with five counts related to two of them but the DA told the harrowing stories of more hoping to establish that once team had a pattern of predatory behavior they're hoping that will make it easier to convince the jury that he's guilty ones dean's defense team claimed each encounter was consensual showing excerpts of what they called loving email exchanges between him and the witnesses they're hoping jurors won't believe that a woman who was assaulted would write these types of friendly emails testimony will continue today rose Friedman NPR news New York Seattle police say one person was killed and seven others injured in a downtown shooting on Wednesday Seattle police chief Carmen best so several people started firing outside a McDonalds what we've been able to determine now is that this is not a random incident there were multiple people involved there is a dispute that happen in front of the McDonald's people pulled out guns shots rang out people ran in a disgrace directions and as you know we had multiple people that were injured this is the third shooting in downtown Seattle into Danes authorities in China it say seventeen people have died from a spreading respiratory illness in more than six hundred others are ill Chinese officials have now stepped up their efforts to contain the spread of the corona virus they've already started to seal off the central city of Wuhan where the virus originated now they're closing down public transit into more cities in the same Chinese region days ahead of lunar new year China's busiest travel season there are cases reported abroad including the first case reported in Singapore you're listening to NPR live from KQED news I'm Brian white San Francisco district attorney chase of dean is ending the practice of cash bail dean made the policy change official yesterday it bans prosecutors from requesting money from defendants as a condition for release from jail before standing trial dean told KQED cash bail puts public safety at risk by allowing wealthy people were dangerous to buy their freedom it also undermines the integrity criminal justice system by allowing us to detain people who present no public safety risk simply because of their poverty state lawmakers pass legislation in twenty eighteen to replace money bail in California with the risk based assessment for release the law has been on hold after the bail industry put a measure on this November's ballot to put the question before voters peninsula state senator Jerry hill is pushing new legislation aimed at preventing workers from hitting underground utility lines gas power or water it's aimed at bolstering the campaign to get people to call eight one one before they dig Tony Marino with the state dig safe board says more education and communication is needed to prevent digging accidents especially among homeowners they don't quite understand why gas line or some other line would be know why they would hit it with a shovel we can expect gas line to be deep even though they're not necessarily the Marino says there about five thousand incidents where people get gas lines while digging each year in California since two thousand four five of those have been fatal I'm Brian white KQED news support this morning comes.

David green
"david green" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:13 min | 9 months ago

"david green" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news I'm David green and I'm no well king in Portland Oregon jury selection is under way in the trial of the man who prosecutors say went on a stabbing rampage on a light rail train in two thousand and seventeen the man Jeremy Christian is charged with murder Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson has the story and a warning this story does contain some disturbing and offensive language on the day before the stabbings Jeremy Christian was ranting well the road to Portland Max light rail train your muscles stand for this cell phone video was first reported by the Portland television station K. A. T. U. that same day court documents allege Christian assaulted Dimitri Hester she was riding the light rail train on our way home from work and told Christian he was being offensive and he replied you do not have the right to even be on this train I built this country you don't have a right to speak you're black you don't have a right to be here Hastert who is black says Christian who is white was also shouting profanity and threatening her at a news conference months after the attack pastor said Christian lunged at her and hit her in the eye and I grant my maze inspirada him in the face with mace police arrived but Christian slipped away the next day court documents say Christian was on a similar rant this time it appeared to be directed at two young African American women on the light rail train one was wearing a head job there was shouting shoving the situation escalated court documents say Christian pulled a folding knife out of his pocket and stabbed three men only one of the men survived prosecutors charge Christian with two counts of murder in the first degree and one count of attempted murder as well as a salt and intimidation in court Christian has denied any wrongdoing not guilty of anything but a friend of myself but there's video of the attacks and multiple witnesses even if your evidence seems very good it's still we still have to be very careful Katie silver is the deputy district attorney in Marion County Oregon she's not involved in Christian's trial but supervises her offices major criminal cases like murder even if your absence seems really god the defendant can still raise all possible defenses particularly as it relates to a mental state to commit a crime records from Christians previous arrests in interviews with people who knew him since childhood indicate his mental health was clearly declining for years leading up to the attacks the law places a great deal of focus on the why question Jeffrey Ellis is an attorney and co director of the Oregon capitol resource center he's not involved in Christians defense but says that there are a lot of factors that can go into defending against and tent like negligence or diminished capacity in other words you were suffering from a mental illness that was so severe that you weren't able to form the intent even years later for those in Portland to take public transit the murders of had a lasting impact.

David green NPR
"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:29 min | 10 months ago

"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News I'm David green in Culver city California and I'm Rachel Martin in Washington DC when it comes to the Russian government there's really only one name that counts of course we're talking about president Vladimir Putin so even though as of today Russia has a new prime minister it's still really all about Putin we've got in here is losing came with us from Moscow to explain what's happening there hi Lucy in the morning all right the entire Russian government resigned to can you just explain what is happening explain the changes that apparently Putin is proposing sure I think it's it's good to look at sort of the sequence of events I mean putting yesterday delivered his annual state of the nation address and he said there were a lot of urgent changes that he want to implement changes to the constitution just a few hours later the whole Russian cabinet led by prime minister Dmitry Medvedev unexpectedly resigned and then if that wasn't surprising enough putting the nominated the head of the tax service as the new prime minister so in some ways it looks like the news is the Russian government resigns buying I would I think the real news is Hooton lays the groundwork for staying in power indefinitely hi okay so let's talk more about this first a name you just said is gonna be familiar to some people Dmitri Medvedev he used to be the president and then he was the prime minister and now he's out well first of all he's very unpopular and in some ways he's scape goat number one for all the economic hardship that Russians face today so you know Putin by getting rid of midriff maintains a certain aloofness as a leader in charge of of the way Russia is seen in the rest of the world magenta fears taking the fall for Putin and it also helps make the cell the point that something is actually changing in Russia what's interesting about mid Vitus fate is he's going to be called names the deputy head of Russia's the Russian security council of what's surprising is this job doesn't even exist formally so it kind of shows there has been some hasty ness and Paula there's an element of surprise in this there's a lot of speculation of course what this new position for mid if means it does this mean he's being retired for good or doesn't mean that he's just being kind of put in this holding position so that Putin can you know kind of pulling out later if you need some in a few years and it was widely understood that will even when he was president was putting who's really pulling strings yes exactly what more can you tell us about the person who is the new prime minister well his name is Michele mu Shu Stan this is not at all a household name I think even if it's just yesterday most Russians would not been able to tell you who he is he is seen as a technocrat he has a reputation as a good manager and really he's he's implemented one of the successful changes in Russia he's made the Russian pak service one of the most advanced in the world he's done that by bring digital technology to tax collection tax collection I think what's also significant is his name is not well known and so if this is not some ambitious high flyer so the question is how much is this really going to change how Russia is run I mean Putin was in charge before now the government's change Putin is still in charge well if the Russian stock market or the exchange rate of the Russian ruble are any kind of indication the market is not at all worried the fundamentals of Russian governance aren't changing Hooton has only shown quite clearly how he plans to stay in power in many ways what's happening now should be looked at as sort of a technical adjustment everybody expected Putin to stay in power and now he's sketching out how he will do it and here's a scene camera from Moscow thank you we appreciate it thank you the nation's disaster relief agency FEMA is having a public relations problem in northern California it is spent billions in recent years providing relief to survivors of wild fires caused by the bankrupt utility PGP but now FEMA's being criticized for trying to recoup that money from the very people it is supposed to be helping lily tamale of member station KQED has more from paradise California here in paradise P. Jeannie has spent the fourteen months since the campfire rebuilding the.

California Rachel Martin president Vladimir David green Culver Washington
"david green" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:17 min | 10 months ago

"david green" Discussed on KCRW

"No well king and I'm David green good morning the FBI wants apple to unlock iPhones that belong to the shooter at a naval base in Pensacola Florida last month apple is resisting this and now the attorney general's complaining that apple's not doing enough to help law enforcement in its investigation this is just the latest in an ongoing fight between the US government and tech companies over how to balance privacy with public safety we have an pairs technology correspondence and bond with us hi Shannon he David what exactly is the government asking apple to do here well the the FBI has two iPhones that belong to the gunmen in Pensacola who is a Saudi airforce cadet and law enforcement has a court order to see who he was communicating with before the attack but the phones are locked and their contents are encrypted the government's asking apple for help but apple has said for a long time it won't unlock devices and break encryption and that's frustrated the Attorney General here's what William Barr said on Monday so far apple has not given any substantive the systems this situation perfectly illustrates why it is critical that the public be able to get access to digital evidence once it is obtained a court order based on probable cause so what exactly is apple's argument for not helping here well apple at first I was rejecting bars characterization in a statement it put out on Monday it said it's already turned over gigabytes of information to the government things like I cloud backups and transactional data because they're saying they are helping right with the F. B. I. wants the communications on the phones apple says to do that would require building a backdoor that would compromise the security of all iPhones I spoke with Susan Landauer a professor of cyber security and policy it tops and she says that kind of back door would make it easier for criminals to access personal financial and health information the risks are that it becomes easier to open anybody else's phone the whole reason apple went to the model of making the date on the phone more secure is that hackers were taking data off the phone and then using it for identity theft and that's pretty much what apple said on Monday it said quote there's no such thing as a back door just for the good guys this I have to say sounds familiar I mean are these the very issues that came up back in twenty fifteen after that tears attack in in San Bernadino California that's right that was this is pretty much very similar conflict in play in in the San Bernadino case that people might remember the government actually sued apple to force it to unlock the phone apple resisted there was a really tense standoff with the Obama administration but the government wound up working with a third party contractor to get into the phone and since then apple has reportedly improved encryption and software to make its devices even more secure and harder to get into now than they used to be then so how do these larger questions get resolved if if they do all right so first of all experts say that really we need Congress to weigh in on the lot I spoke with Jim Baker he was general counsel at the FBI during the San Bernadino case and he says there's no easy solution to balance these questions so what you have then is a situation where the country through its elected representatives in Congress needs to make a choice does it want to give law enforcement more access and create more cyber security risk or doesn't want to do something different the other places to end up is back in court and if the government gets a court order then the question becomes will apple comply with it NPR's Shannon binder covers technology for thanks so much and thanks David this is NPR news you're listening to morning edition right here on KCRW support comes from the LA bill presenting tune yards at both Disney concert hall on January thirty first Meryl Garbus pursues a hyper rhythmic synthesis of sound from around the world with elements of our and be fun house.

FBI apple David green
"david green" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:51 min | 10 months ago

"david green" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm David green in Culver city California and I'm new working in Washington DC good morning tonight in iOS six Democrats who are running for president will debate it's the last debate before the Iowa caucuses at which point voter star to decide and here is Daniel correctly been is indeed Mornay Daniel morning so what's the mood there are people amp to caucus yes at which it which is not unusual head of the caucuses as it's cliche at this point but I would do take this very seriously and I would Democrats are very fired up about they're given candidates but you know the other thing I would say is there they're also nervous because any given one of them we've been hearing about electability any given one of them wants to pick the right candidate to defeat Donald Trump and a lot of the ones I've asked of said the door there it's hard to be certain that any given candidate is that candidate and this is probably the reason that at this moment there is not a clear front runners there no here in Iowa any given poll you look at these days it has those four people bunched at the top of the pack of Vermont senator Bernie Sanders former vice president Joe Biden senator Elizabeth Warren and former south bend mayor people to judge they've all traded the lead throughout this race but at least here in Iowa they have but no no one is really comes out quite on top here you know Sanders inviting have their high name recognition they have remained strong warning booted judge they are highly organized they have a lot of staff here which might not sound important but that is important because it could help them turn out people on caucus night which is of course a big deal the thing you got to do right we are hearing Danielle that the tone has gotten sharper among the candidates in the past couple of days what a fundamentally disagreeing over well you you have a few topics take your pick you know this is this is popped up on a few friends right I mean so first of all here's one Frank you've Sanders supporters in circuits who have gone on the attack against worn invited in particular now against bite and they're not necessarily new attacks but they're more aggressive with even going after him on first of all is his vote to approve the war in Iraq especially given the situation in the Middle East now it's sort of brought up new opportunities right to attack Biden for that and by the way if you're feeling deja vu it's because at this point the Iraq war has come to define democratic primaries think about it it's happened two thousand four two thousand eight two thousand sixteen it came up again now it's coming up again which shows just the the lasting impact of course it was it was an unpopular war at this point very unpopular and so this does keep coming up as long as there are people in these races who voted for or against it aside from that Bernie Sanders campaign cochair Nina Turner she wrote an op ed in a South Carolina newspaper this weekend saying that essentially for Joe Biden is not has not delivered for black voters but that Bernie Sanders can now of course that comes as a poll recently came out from the Washington post an Ipsos saying that Joe Biden is doing very well with black voters at forty eight percent Bernie Sanders was well behind that okay so some of the things about policy some of them are about electability and there's some stuff that's a bit more personal up until this point Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have avoided direct conflict but then that his change hasn't it yes most definitely we saw that come up on two fronts over the last few days political first reported over the weekend saying the Sanders volunteers were using the script the script saying that she can't really expand the base that she mostly appeals to highly educated voters for example she responded saying she was disappointed then we had this league story yesterday about a private twenty eighteen meeting where in which Sanders allegedly said that a woman can't win in twenty twenty and now the sourcing was anonymous but it to the people were links to the war and were they talks to warn after that meeting now Sanders has denied this but this has become another thing that has really blown up so we both of both Sanders and Warren will probably be asked about that tonight at the debate we'll see what they say ma'am and peers Danielle Kurtz leave in into more thanks to Anya yes thank you so at a time when TV and movies are focusing on the existence of two popes inside the Vatican the Roman Catholic Church is again roiled by controversy in what appears to be a case of life imitating art NPR Sylvia Julie reports the many church scholars are criticizing former pope Benedict for trying to influence the thinking of his successor in a sign of the times a building off Saint Peter's square is covered with a gigantic poster for the Netflix movie two popes of fictional account of pope Benedict and Francis.

California president David green Culver Washington
"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:04 min | 10 months ago

"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

"David green in Culver city California and I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington DC good morning let's pursue answers to a big question posed by senator Mike Lee he is a Republican from Utah he says he supports president trump but he told Rachel Martin yesterday that the administration has done a terrible job explaining its sanctions against Iran what I'm most concerned about is about where that goes from here what comes next is there another strike coming against Iran senator Lee asked that question after the administration gave the Senate an explanation of what is done so far a U. S. drone strike killed in a running in general Qassem Soleimani the strike dramatically escalated tensions and triggered you're running in missile strikes in response some lawmakers assert the administration failed to share intelligence to back up its claim that saw the money was planning imminent attacks on Americans though he certainly has directed them in the past Democrat Adam Smith chairman of the house Armed Services Committee told David green on this program that he questioned top Pentagon officials when you ask them okay well what attacks what what with the targets they now what was the time line there was no message they received or Intel that they got it was just a lot of chatter about targets that they were looking at and the desire to hit those targets sometime in the near future with those critics in mind we went to the White House yesterday and sat across the table from Robert o'brien he is the president's national security adviser a lawyer and former diplomat as we will hear he issued a warning to Iran and he also insisted the administration has done well in explaining the president's actions to Congress I've heard from a lot of people there was a fantastic briefing Michael is a friend of mine and and someone who I greatly respect the present really respects and so I was disappointed to hear that he wasn't happy with the briefing but I've also heard from other senators including not chairman not reach of the Senate foreign relations committee and I was one of the best reviews Democrats so there's a there's always mixed reviews and Mike Lee was especially concerned about where the president saw the limits of his power as you know the president ordered the killing of a very senior Iranian military figure and the hypothetical was asked in this meeting we're told with the president asked Congress before deciding to have the supreme leader of Iran killed what is the answer to that question what I want and that we never answer the search hypotheticals but I can tell you it's been a long standing presidential practice when you have a a military operations particularly sensitive so for example when president Obama took out to some of in line those those things don't happen with pre briefs Congress but we made that certain in this case the Congress was made aware of the military operation console Manaia immediately after it happened but we feel that were in full compliance with obligations for briefing Congress is important and the like to represent the people they should know what's happening and and that's so that's obviously present takes racers president did order the killing of a specific senior national figure who was not at that moment in the act of attacking someone you believe something was planned wouldn't the same logic mean that you would claim the authority to kill Ayatollah Ali Khamenei if he was planning something or you believe he was planning salt will look in the United States always maintains there the right to self defense United States military units and and the presence commander in chief and this article to power to it to make pain for the security the United States and and in this case with respect us all money I'm not gonna talk about hypotheticals about others soul money was in the the act of planning attacks against Americans we do that we had very good intelligence on that front if we didn't engage in this operation of the attacks of take taking place in many Americans would have been killed are there would've been a L. plenty of people that would criticize us for not having disrupted the tax deed you did you know the time and place of the attacks that were being planned now we we had very good intelligence that there was an imminent attack out of time in place and it was imminent it you know you never know the time and place of of of these things with perfect particularity but but we had very good information that they were there they were in the attacks there are a lot of people I want that intelligence released I wish we could but at the same time we don't want to compromise sources and methods of that allow us to protect Americans we interviewed Iran's ambassador to the United Nations he said Iran's retaliation is over but then added Iran is not responsible for what its allied militias in Iraq or elsewhere might do does the United States hold Iran responsible for what its allies may do a look when we made it very clear that when aranea proxies are corrected by around attack Americans that we're gonna hold the Iranians responsible and yeah that that's one of the reasons why we had to engage in a number of military operations recently remember these were not first shots fired in the United States the first shots were taken by the Iranians against and their proxies against the United States of America they killed American citizen wanted our servicemen the president it takes a very hardline against people that are that are planning or killing Americans or or harming them the conflict for the run obviously is more than forty years old this most recent phase of intense conflict seems to be getting rather long term also may last for years for all we know is this the best place to be putting this much attention for a long long time we we focus on all of the the entire world all the time so when we we have issues going on in Venezuela got issues going on in the deep E. R. K. North Korea were very concerned about full the rise of China the Chinese are spending a tremendous amounts of money building new ships and submarines every month for the new aircraft carriers so so that there are a lot of places where we have concern we're concerned about Russia so we got a lot of concerns around the world and and were watching all of them Iran is one of those and and we'll take care of business as it as it comes up the president has said he wants to get out of endless wars in the Middle East which can be seen as a large strategic thought to focus instead on things like China and Russia does the president's own focus on a run get in the way of his own goal no not at all at lucky are ran as a huge problem in the Middle East that the largest state sponsored terrorism there behind the genocide in Syria there supporting the Hutus in the civil war in Yemen they're closely aligned with special aside I in the the Syrian conflict which has claimed the lives of half a million people so one of the ways to to get out of the the Middle East and for the U. S. to why not have the forefront that we do there is to and the Iranian hegemony in the region and and to get around to start acting like a normal country if that happened that would that would hasten our ability to apply for for his house were not not tie stand don't you assume that would be a years long project at best because you have to assume that there there are many many things and in world affairs their years long projects I mean that was one of the problems with the chase away the J. C. P. I have a sunset clause the nuclear the the Iran nuclear deal that's one reason we got out of it we're gonna try to have a permanent solution back when I first has to come talk with you some days ago I thought it was quiet start to the year and we have an opportunity to thoughtfully talk about the year and what the threats might be what do you see as the biggest threat facing the United States over this year there's now begun well it's the biggest threats we face are laid out in the presence national security strategy and that is pure competition so we have long term threats the United States from competitors like China and Russia we need to be prepared your competitors because China has a bigger economy as the U. S. does Russia as a big nuclear arsenal that's what you mean right and their and their their authoritarian regimes they don't share our values on their very wealthy country they're plowing much of that wealth and over to new military equipment they could threaten the United States our allies at the same time there's a huge opportunity to work with the Chinese and so that the president just concluded a phase one trade deal with China we expect to be signed in next week so that's good news so those are the then the major challenges to the United States but there are some sitters challenges are challenges and and around their challenges and the North Korea DPRK their challenges in that as well so we'll keep an eye on all those as we we going to twenty twenty is it awkward that you ask the Chinese for help on something like a run even as you push back on the Chinese on trade and you worry about their strategic competition now that that look that's a foreign affairs works are there there are areas where we have common interests with the Chinese or the Russians or we have common interests fighting terrorism seeking to limit the DPRK nuclear ballistic missile program will work very closely with some other opportunities for trade with those countries so we want to have good relationships with those countries but where we disagree with them whether it's Hong Kong or the treatment the Uighurs are the the some of the crop practices taking place and Chinese development projects in Africa or or the Pacific islands of will push back there investor Brian thanks for your time it's great being with you Steve thank you national security adviser Robert o'brien spoke yesterday at the White House Australian magpies are known for being able to mimic the sounds they hear in the environment for one bird in Australia it's songs in recent times have turned to sirens replicating the noise of fire engines.

David green California Steve Inskeep senator Mike Lee Utah trump Rachel Martin Culver Washington president
"david green" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"david green" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news I'm David green and I know well king North Korea fired what is believed to be a submarine launched ballistic missile today if that's what it was it would be a big step forward in north Korea's missile program in a few days the US and north Korean officials are supposed to resume nuclear talks that stalled back in February and piers Anthony kun is on the line from Seoul hi Anthony I know well so what do we know about this kind of missile and and how significant it is. well as you may remember North Korea has been testing quite a lot of missiles and rockets in recent months but they've all been short range what was tested today was a medium range missile that can fly nearly a thousand miles today this missile went about five hundred miles up up. and then about two hundred and eighty miles over SO is aimed at a very high arc yeah and then came down and experts and in governments generally believe that you know for them to perfect and develop and deploy nuclear armed submarine launched ballistic missiles would be you know as you said a major advance in its military capabilities in a serious new threat but they are considered to be a ways off from perfecting it they could launch this from off shore from under water and that would make it harder to detect and to target now all of north Korea's land based missiles could be destroyed if they'd still have that additional deterrent in the water one in it's not clear whether today's missile was launched from a submarine it hasn't done that yet or from a submerged barge which has done before okay this missile came down fairly close to Japan what is Japan's and. well Japan is of course protesting at when North Korea was testing a lot of missiles back in twenty seventeen Japanese would wake up and hear about these missiles landing not far from from them and it was very nerve wracking and this is the first time something like this has happened in a while Tokyo says this missile may have actually split into two parts before hitting the water South Korea of course wants to know more about that and they've requested intelligence from Japan but they've done that under an intelligence sharing agreement that soul is about two quick next month so this is just an example of how internal divisions between US allies can undermine security cooperation at a really crucial time in their facing serious threats to another question on timing because the US and North Korea are supposed to restart nuclear talks really soon right. that's right a preliminary talks are supposed to begin Friday between the US and North Korea and then the main talks are on Saturday these talks have been stalled since president trump walked out on what he considered a bad deal offered by Kim Jong one in Vietnam in February and if the US sees this is a serious enough provocation it's possible it could delay the talks would die if those talks to do go forward what are the stakes there. well this is really a crucial test of whether both sides are willing to make concessions and strike a small deal incremental deal in which North Korea freezes and dismantle some parts of its nuclear program in exchange from some sort of sanctions relief indoor security guarantees North Korea has basically said this year is yet either the U. S. comes up with concessions by year's end or it will give up on negotiating and it could go back to testing nuclear weapons now president trump is facing this impeachment inquiry and while North Korea hasn't talked about it it could reinforce their conviction that this is the last chance for some sort of a deal.

David green North Korea NPR
"david green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"david green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On David green and I'm Steve Inskeep tomorrow night the curtain rises on a production of Verdi's Macbeth at new York's Metropolitan Opera starring Placido Domingo the opera megastars become the focus of allegations of sexual misconduct twenty women came forward to the Associated Press accusing the mango of groping on wanted kissing in a restaurant the singer is said to be believed all of these interactions over some thirty years were consensual to opera companies at a symphony of cancel performances with the mango but at the met the show goes on and yours understands yes you'll kisses been talking with some of the companies and singers and she's on the line good morning hi good morning Steve I gather that some people who are to perform with the mango been reaching out to you yes that's right and the allegations against the mango arrive not long after the Mets former music director about forty years James Levine was fired after being accused of sexual abuse by nine men so in number of Madame police told me they believe that given that history this opera house has a particular duty to treat sexual misconduct allegations seriously so for employees spoke to me on the record last week but they all came forward anonymously they feared retribution and they tell me that the power dynamic between them NATO and rank and file performers is in their view so distorted that it has created an untenable work environment one of the sources pointed out to me that in other situations like this very often the person being accused is suspended so neither he nor his co workers have to face each other and the Mets sources also told me Steve that there was a whisper network warning women at the house to stay away from him some even reportedly changed. our work schedules to that end and they lost out on professional opportunities okay so you're hearing these stories from inside from people that I think you said do not want to give their names but they're telling their stories in detail and you know who they are are there and are there investigations of the claims that have been reported by the AP. after the A. P. published at the women's allegations the LA opera where commando has been general director for more than fifteen years said it was launching an investigation and then earlier this month one of the unions with members who work in the matter it's called the American guild of musical artists are agama and they represent singers dancers choreographers another day now said it will be conducting its own independent investigation and that says it will wait for the results of both LA opera and Agnes investigation before taking any measures and those results aren't expected for months just try to keep all the straits we got multiple opera houses here multiple companies multiple accusations but the central focus here is positive to mingle performing at the met they say they're waiting for the results of the investigations as they say this as the performance goes forward what are you hearing from inside. well Friday afternoon the head of the Metropolitan Opera the general manager to Peter Gelb called a meeting for Saturday to discuss employees concerns after we published an article on Friday about all this and he said that he met with Matt quarry singers and orchestra musicians to discuss their anger. and there are those four sources told me again anonymously for fear retribution that and number of employees at that meeting told the Max general manager that they felt there was a big disconnect and how a drug policy is being applied in sexual misconduct allegations in short they said to me they feel like allegations from men are being taken seriously but not those from women very briefly what is that saying. declined an interview but sent me a statement.

David green Steve Inskeep fifteen years thirty years forty years
"david green" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"david green" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news I'm David green and I'm Rachel Martin good morning we're gonna talk next about the story behind the headline the headline in question long time film producer Harvey Weinstein and the allegations of sexual harassment and sexual assault against him it's been two years since the New York times broke that story and tomorrow at the two reporters who wrote it out with a book it is titled she said and the documents just how difficult it was to convince women to come forward also how hard one scene and his associates fought back Mary Louise Kelley host of All Things Considered it spoke with the two times reporters Jodi Kantor and make into E. and Mary Louise is in our studios this morning thanks for coming in I am glad to be here in the morning so the times published the once the investigation nearly two years ago as we noted of what new details do the reporters here in this book what struck me ritual were two things one the lengths that these reporters went to to get the story starting with they were trying to reach actresses who had worked with Harvey Weinstein how do you get Gwyneth Paltrow on the phone how to get Angelina Jolie on the phone how do you get their number and then once you've gotten it how did the first talk to talk to you about something that is private and possibly painful and as we know many of the women they were trying to reach had settlements barring them from speaking these non disclosure agreements that has been widely reported before but the way that Jodi Kantor and Meghan tree approached it was for going to keep this from blocking the story forever we have to make it the story we have to follow the trail answer that investigative journalism that is revealed here's is quite something really interesting to read the other thing is just their sources name here who have not gone on the record before it widens our understanding of exactly what may have happened and the details of the people around Harvey Weinstein who his attorneys and others who were protecting him enabling him there's a lot of details a lot of documents that have. it provided money that helped silence the women but that he claims that he believed Harvey when he insisted that these were extramarital affairs and nothing more and that there was a rationale that Bob himself kind of applied in this situation which was to believe that his brother's problem with sex addiction perspective that was actually informed by Bob's own battles with substance abuse over the years and his path to recovery and we also obtain this intimate letter that Bob rota Harvey in two thousand fifteen and which he's pleading with him to get help get treatment for his quote unquote miss behavior and we that's another document that we reproduce in its entirety in the book so that readers can sort of see for themselves you know what happens when people good glimpse of problem what do they try to do about it and how do people become complicit there's a stunning line from that letter from Bob Weinstein to his brother where where he rates if you ever strike me again or or verbally abuse me making clear of it the inside the Weinstein company and strike the Weinstein family this behavior was was known and documented that's right there was we we document a particular incident in which Harvey Weinstein had actually punched hadn't had physically assaulted his own brother there were other executives in the room you know and nobody did anything about it. so that's making to you speaking their ritual and I should note Harvey Weinstein has denied allegations of non consensual activity his trial is scheduled to start next year and he's pleading not guilty read the new book is by Judy cantor and making two of the New York times it's called she said breaking the sexual harassment story that helped ignite a movement you can hear Mary Louise's full interview tonight on All Things Considered thank.

David green Rachel Martin NPR two years
"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David green and I know well king good morning the world is running low on helium and this is not just about balloons you need helium to run MRI machines send astronauts into space and make cell phones among other things Sarah Gonzalez with our planet money podcast has the story helium is so special and so rare on earth that the US government once tried to buy up a bunch and hide it says sambar in yeah that was actually top secret work sambar and works at the US bureau of land management overseeing the federal helium program I'm quite the helium geek princess helium was first discovered on earth in nineteen oh five mix in with the natural gas index or Kansas when scientists learned that helium could lift things like balloons or blimps the military thought it would transform warfare in the air by the nineteen twenties the military is using helium blames to spy on enemies by the nineteen sixties NASA is using helium to test space suits for leaks helium is one of the smallest lightest things in the universe helium is an escape artist if there's a leak it'll it'll get out sneaky little element it absolutely is it was great for detecting leaks but it also made it hard to story the helium kept floating off so the US government decided to trap helium underground in the rock secretly under a field near Amarillo Texas it was like Cold War type stuff to protect the field from prying eyes first you just see a big open plain just a regular field and then you see the store yeah and then you open that door and you know look there's a well cellar there between nineteen sixty and nineteen seventy three the US that it had injected another helium in the ground for about a hundred years and the government has been selling off that helium ever sense but for years it was selling it to cheat and the cheap price discourage private industry from looking for more helium then in two thousand thirteen Congress and the guy it had to get out of the helium business completely by twenty twenty one sell off the whole operation yep yep computers desks all that stuff we're gonna take like a little bitty helium with no I probably better not do that just a little bit no I better not do that there is a little bit of helium left in the stockpile but the government is rationing get so people like Nick Snyder are stepping in Snyder started a company called north American helium means we drill holes in the ground looking for new sources of helium in North America their.

David green Sarah Gonzalez US Kansas NASA Texas Congress Nick Snyder North America twenty twenty hundred years
"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"david green" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Working and I'm David green this week issues important to native American communities will get attention in a presidential election really like never before eight democratic presidential candidates have signed up to attend a native American voter forum in Sioux city Iowa Elizabeth Warren spoke there yesterday I know that I have made mistakes I am sorry for harm I have caused I have listened and I have learned a lot Elizabeth Warren there was apologizing for her past claims of native ancestry which upset many native Americans and made her a target of ridicule for president trump mark tray hand is editor of the news website Indian country today he's been covering the form and joins me mark welcome to the program a good morning and we say you're also and seeing the form right you're doing some double all right well what can you tell me what it feels like I mean eight presidential candidates coming to speak there is is this really different in terms of of turn out in terms of tone from the past well certainly it elevates native American issues to a level that this has been part of that conversation before instead of having candidates to their normal stump speech they're really forced to address things that that don't get talked about very much like tree right and the role of the Indian health system and that sort of thing dig into some of this this is a little more if you can help me understand what what is really important to to a lot of a lot of voters who come to form like this sure there are some five hundred plus tribal governments that have a history that predate the United States and many of those tribes have direct crease with three United States that have responsibilities and every congressman every president talks about the role of priest but very few of actually said this is what needs to happen in order to have the treaties executed fully clothing for example full funding of the Indian health system it's the only direct federal system for healthcare in this country and in many ways when you talk about Medicare for all or something like that looking at the Indian health service would be an example of how to do it right and how to do it wrong what works and what needs work what what is the record of the trump administration been on issues like this so far and you know how in general that has the president done among native American voters well to put it in a bigger context the Obama administration kind of reach new heights they started a tribal nations conference that happened every year and had direct consultation with the tribes in a way that was unprecedented and so they set the bar really high and the trump administration has rolled back most of that and either not done the same sort of level of discourse we've tried or just ignore tribes were at the trump administration is put most of its energy it's interest or six traction issues and working with the tribes that have coal and oil for example was with warm moment like yesterday it was pretty extraordinary one of the things with their lives before story that I don't think it every time she appears before native group she has made some more apologies but more important she gets an amazing reception she was basically hundred everywhere she went up the form and received a standing ovation and so there's there is a group that really is concerned about her statements in the past but among both tribal leaders and people that she's out.

David green
El Paso shooting suspect charged with capital murder

Morning Edition

10:51 min | 1 year ago

El Paso shooting suspect charged with capital murder

"And I'm David green in el Paso Texas a normally humming border city that took a severe blow on Saturday with a mass shooting that police are now treating as domestic terrorism in the morning as many parents were shopping for back to school supplies a gunman opened fire at a Walmart killed twenty people he left twenty six injured police believe he is the author of a racist manifesto posted online detailing his reasons for carrying out this attack he has now been charged with capital murder we begin our coverage with journalist Monica or tease or Rebay who is covering the story here in her hometown she joins us here in el Paso and I want to thank you for taking the time and for your work on this you're welcome David I'm what what are you hearing what should we know this Monday morning well we're beginning to know more about the families impacted there's so many heart wrenching stories one of them is a mom who died seemingly shielding her two month old infant from the gunman among the injured or three soccer coaches who were fundraising at the Walmart for their youth team in the hospital lobby yesterday a local pastor Michael Grady he's a former president of the el Paso and double ACP he broke down into tears as he hugged the county judge who was there visiting with the families I'm here today because my daughter Michelle Elise gravy was coming out of Walmart and was shot three times by a madman Michelle just turned thirty three do you live the he laughs Michelle was about to go into her second surgery when her father and I spoke he tells me bullets hit her hand and her back another ricocheted through her pelvis she's the second of three sisters and works helping military vets access there medical benefits he's just a beautiful beautiful a dog and we love her and we're praying again for divine intervention and we're mixing face and medicine together sold its hopefully she will be able to recover well hoping so it's a vision might make it but a lot of families in this position this morning I just wanna orient us like we're we're talking this morning from an upper floor in a hotel in in downtown el Paso which we can see the lights of Mexico from here this is a border community I mean this is a tragedy is affected people in two countries on both sides of the border yes so as of Sunday night Mexican officials announced that seven Mexicans are among the dead I spoke with the brother in law a forty one year old I have in mind sinal who was one of the victims I've been sold medical supplies in neighboring see the point is and he leaves behind a wife and nine year old son and a five year old daughter he's among the many many Mexican shoppers who contribute to the local economy on a daily basis of the Walmart is a quick fifteen minute drive from the border and walking into that store you immediately get a sense of the bilingual bicultural character that is all Paso when the what are we learning about the the shooter here well the suspect is a twenty one year old white male authorities are looking into a manifesto possibly linked to him that indeed expresses anti immigrant sentiments and refers to the quote Hispanic invasion of Texas this man is from a suburb outside Dallas the FBI believes he acted alone and he's currently booked into the county jail without bond facing a charge of capital murder I I know it it has to be an experience took to cover something like this in your hometown you know as we reported here together before on on immigration issues just reflect on this as as a resident of someone who who knows passes so well gosh well I mean I think I'm myself just as much as everyone else is trying to do our best to to hold it together and into our jobs I mean el Paso has had to show a great deal of resiliency lately it's been at the receiving end of thousands of central American migrants are fleeing poverty and violence and by and large the community has responded in the same way to both situations humanely last night el Paso wins gathered for an interface visual the vigil they delivered food and water to one of the ER's treating patients as well as to law enforcement out working the Walmart crime scene since Saturday a local fundraisers razor his raised at least two hundred fifty thousand dollars to aid those impacted by the shooting and in fact that figure is probably a lot higher by now journalist Monica or to use a rebate joining us and passes when Monica thanks for all your work we we really appreciate it sure thing David I want to turn now to the mayor of describing city DiMarco has been the mayor of el Paso for two years after serving the Texas house of representatives and joins us on the line mayor I I know how busy you are we're all thinking about your community right now and thank you for for taking a few minutes for us sure how have you been been spending your time since the tragedy who have you been speaking with and and what can you tell us to give us us some sense of understanding of of what's communities going through well first of all we had a briefing from our a and R. fusion center which is where the police in our office of emerging management monitors things up at the full briefing on on this particular individual who in my estimation is nothing but pure evil and you know on and his Missy there's diatribe related to where we will I've said on number of occasions I was at the interface service last night I was at the hospital yesterday I met the two and a half month old little boy who lost his mother protecting him right and I understand later is also lost his father this is a tragedy that that's just totally unnecessary it will not the final class so we are unique region people cannot understand what our region is like until they come here and we've been one region by national park cultural three hundred and fifty years a hundred years before the United States was even formed and we're at the we're region of two and a half million people and we are not going to let this defiance where does the investigation stand as of this morning if if you could update us well the break and I had the last week and I had was yesterday afternoon at all the attorney general's office is one pocket crimes against it which also is subject to the death penalty and in Texas we're going to file capital murder charges against him which is subject to the death penalty as well I think he's a coward a minute ago is pure evil you would never I have I do not believe the the trader would have ever originated in el Paso which not us our culture to our nature and it's just a tragedy that we will recover from but I'm not sure we're gonna finish or actually really start the recovery until we get through to the twenty funerals we know we're going to have to go through the next couple weeks how do you even prepare for that twenty funerals that then I'm sure you'll be you'll be trying to attend as many as you can I don't know this is something I don't believe any mayor could ever prepare for I don't think that there's a handbook for that irrespective of the of the incidents that occurred in the past I certainly wasn't prepared for that brother thanks thank goodness our police department was prepared for active shooters I mean they they got a call at five thirty at ten thirty nine in the morning they were there at ten forty five and eleven oh six he was apprehended we are one of the safest city in the nation we will remain one of the safest cities in the nation we will not let this stopper and as I said it will not to find it younique younique region and we will continue and pursue their this this angry Streeter manifesto that the attacker you know suppose we posted on online sets among other things that that his actions were response to an invasion of Texas by Hispanic immigrants the the hate in that document how surprised are you did did did you know that this kind of hate is is out there I probably a new it but now I've not been confronted by it I did read is that Dr I hate filled the machine baby if that is it I don't I you know I can't put my arms around it I'm not a psychologist or psychiatrist I don't know what's driving that but it's not what el Paso was about yeah we're we're eighty four percent or eighty five percent Hispanic but we're we're probably people cannot get over house Brinley and how how family oriented we are as a regional minimum wage I say were region two and a half million people in our everyday just thirty two do you do you think I am he deserves the death penalty if if if there's a trial that happens in at least that way I would say at this juncture he should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law and if that is the end result so be it we also spoke with the mayor of Dayton Ohio if this morning I mean it's it's it's stunning that another mayor in another city is going through a mass shooting this weekend she said it's time for people in Washington to take action on gun control at how do you respond to that well something's got to be done and it's one of my is a good friend of mine we both talked yesterday morning kitchen may condolences and I called ruptured wait a minute I need to offer you the sign and I'm sorry that we're both caught up in this together and and identified as such but you know it it's it's there's a whole lot to to our to what's going on in in America at this time and and we've got a we're gonna have to deal with it at all levels mark Trammell genre Margot is the mayor of el Paso Texas city recovering from a massacre over the weekend at

El Paso Texas Walmart David Green Two Hundred Fifty Thousand Dol Eighty Five Percent Eighty Four Percent Twenty One Year Fifteen Minute Forty One Year Hundred Years Fifty Years Five Year Nine Year Two Month Two Years
"david green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"david green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Edition from NPR news on David green that I'm Steve Inskeep how much of a difference could new gun laws really make democratic presidential candidates to debate this week have embraced them we need reasonable gun safety laws in this country starting with universal background checks and a renewal of the assault weapon ban red flag laws so that if someone pose a danger to themselves or to someone else there stopped yeah we can do the universal background checks we can ban the weapons of war but we can also double down on the research hello here is better Rourke Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren for of the democratic presidential candidates they're stances their contrast with Republicans who commonly dismissed new gun laws both for ideological reasons and because they say they just wouldn't work so what's the evidential Lisa Hagen is with us next she's from member station W. A. B. E. in Atlanta and she's been covering these issues and more for the guns and America reporting collaborative good morning morning Steve so let's think about a circumstance like that the mass shooting in California the other day or any number of other mass shootings were someone shows up with a rifle often an assault weapon the idea is to reduce the odds of one of those guns in the hands of the wrong person can gun laws do that right well I think first of all it's important to note that mass shootings while they are horrific and we hear a lot about them when they happen they make up something like two percent of criminal gun fatalities overall which makes them pretty hard to study and collect evidence about how to stop them so with an assault weapons ban no one really agree is on what the exact definition is which right off the bat makes it hard to make laws about what is an assault weapon sure okay right something that comes to mind for most people something like an air fifteen a rifle all black kind of scary looking and researchers I talked to get why voters worry about them but again mass shootings are pretty rare so is there given the difficulty in research and given that that in fact there been federal restrictions on gun research is there anyway to game out whether say an assault weapons ban for example or background checks would reduce the likelihood of mass shootings what I hear from researchers as that in of a ban on assault weapons is from what they know super unlikely to to reduce a lot of gun deaths with universal background checks I think a lot of why we hear about them is because they're really popular with voters so that makes it a pretty safe move for candidates but what researchers are finding is that in states that have comprehensive background checks they're not actually finding a decrease in gun deaths apparently what it does help with is gun trafficking although on its own yeah there's not much evidence that that either of those save lives but you said on its own you were starting a thought there if you combine background checks with other measures to they become a little more effective rate so what researchers are finding again is that universal background checks work to save lives when they're paired with something called gun purchaser licensing or permit to purchase basically that means if you want to buy guns you apply to law enforcement for a license that process includes a background check and researchers say crucially fingerprinting which is less easy to fake in the nine states that do this for hand guns they've seen significant drops in both gun homicides and suicides are we heard Elizabeth Warren there urging more research is there a desperate need for more reliable information you know the researchers I talked to definitely said that they were happy to hear Elizabeth Warren referred to that we have what's called sort of the Dickey amendment from from the mid nineties that stopped a a fair amount of research but also but there are options that can work is what I hear okay Lisa thanks so much that's W. A. B. E. reporter Lisa Hagen Atlanta she's part of the guns at America reporting live this is NPR news and this is W. NYC New York stay tuned coming up next climate change in Mongolia is fueling a population shift and that's causing a big pollution problem then later on morning edition British prime minister Boris Johnson says he's ready to follow through on brexit we will come out to the E. U. on October the thirty first because in the end Richard was a fundamental decision by the British people and pro brexit voters say they intend to hold Johnson to that promise we'll have that story coming up next hour we have a lease right now on NJ transit's Morris Essex line also two and five trains are delayed in both directions due to.

David green Steve Inskeep NPR two percent
America Is In Full Employment, So Why Aren't We Celebrating?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:29 min | 1 year ago

America Is In Full Employment, So Why Aren't We Celebrating?

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the university of Maryland where the founders of Google Oculus and squarespace got their started. Find out how you MD can start up your next adventure at you and you MD dot com. That's why oh you and you MD dot com. The US job market. Sounds amazing right now with unemployment around three point six percent. But what's it feel like to be in that market all this week? We're asking what this economy means for people looking for a job or looking for a better job, or looking for a raise wages are rising and some people who'd given up seeking work at all or coming back, yet, some old economic divides have persisted NPR's, Scott Horsely spoke with David green. So how tight is this tight labor market right now? It is tight across the country, but is really tight in some places on my NPR colleague, Jim zarroli is going to take us to Ames, Iowa, which has the nation's lowest unemployment rate. It's just one and a half percent. And that means people like restaurant manager Elizabeth Kopetski really struggle to find and keep good help. We lashed your head a call from a restaurant down the street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share. That's how bad it's getting. What did you tell them? We didn't have enough ourselves even though wages have been going up in Ames. They still have trouble attracting workers. There just aren't a lot of people moving to I'll despite the healthy job market. We did find though, people are moving to opera -tunities in other parts of the country, like where we're the opportunities right now. People are moving to places like Atlanta Tallahassee and Charlotte, North Carolina. We've seen an influx of workers from up north, looking for better jobs and also for more affordable housing in particular, a lot of African Americans are making this move sort of the reversal of the great migration. We saw in the last century NPR's Danielle Czeslaw spent some time talking with African American workers in North Carolina, both newcomers and some longtime residents, like Nicole muse Dennis, she's a single mother of two who says she's working. Fifty five hours a week and just barely getting by. I'm what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it unemployment. Among African Americans David is six point seven percent. That is low by historical standards. But it's still nearly double the national average. Well, Scott, we've been talking about full employment for a while and yet every month employers are finding more people to hire. So what exactly is happening? Give me the broad. Look here. One thing that's happened is that people who had been out of the job market altogether, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in. We have a number of stories in our series about, for example, women coming back in the job market. Sometimes fulltime sometimes in the gig economy and other groups that were sort of on the margins, for example, people with disabilities or a prison record those might have been disqualifying in the past, but desperate employers Christopher Dickerson say, not anymore. I don't care what your background is. I don't care where you came from care, what color you are care as long as you. Come to work every single day. Give me everything. That's gimme over the last couple of years. David about seven and ten new people. Finding jobs have been coming off the sidelines, rather than from the ranks of the unemployed, what is all of this mean for people's paychecks? I mean for a while we kept talking about even though the economy was seemed to be doing better and better wages. Weren't really keeping pace with inflation yet for a lot of this very long economic expansion wages did not go up very much, but they are finally picking up and that's especially true for people on the lower rungs of the income ladder, which is encouraging, there is no question, workers have more bargaining power now. And one of the things we looked at in the series is collective bargaining during the recession some unions, grudgingly, agreed to accept lower wages for newer workers, and that created some friction on the factory floor, when people were doing the same job for less money. We're finally starting to see some of that turnaround. I spoke with Courtney herring who works at the Kohler company in Wisconsin. They recently inked a new contract that phases out. That two tiered wage scale you could tell there was a lot of happy, people, a lot of them production went up people are wanting to stay for more overtime because they know it's worth their time now. So they're actually able to go out and do more things or save up for something or one of the voices in our full employment series, which is taking place. All this week on the radio, you can also find it at NPR dot Oregon. You'll hear more on this program tomorrow, been talking with NPR's, Scott Horsely. Thanks. Got. You're

NPR Scott Horsely Ames North Carolina David Green Nicole Muse Dennis United States University Of Maryland Squarespace Google Christopher Dickerson Elizabeth Kopetski David Iowa Atlanta Danielle Czeslaw Jim Zarroli
Eye Opener: Trump claims victory, Dems dig in

Up First

08:19 min | 1 year ago

Eye Opener: Trump claims victory, Dems dig in

"Like behavior what to Democrats do as the president claims victory. I'm Steve Inskeep with David green. And this is up. I from NPR news. Democrats have lines of inquiry. They wanna hear from this, man. The president was frustrated and angered by his seer belief that the investigation was undermining his presidency. What questions do they have for the attorney general also protesters finally forced Sudan's president from power, but their protests have not stopped. What are they want next? Stay with us. We'll guide you through this day's news. The bottom line findings are the Muller report allowed President Trump to claim victory. He does not face criminal charges. Many details. Give critics a lot of room for questions a heavily redacted four hundred and forty eight page document was released with the president legal team describing this report as a total victory. White House counselor Kellyanne Conway claim this was quote, really the best day since he got elected. And then this very accepting apologies today to for anybody who feels the grace in offering them. Now, Democrats have a very very different take on. This report. Here is House Judiciary committee chairman Jerry Nadler, the special counsel made clear that he did not exonerate the president and the responsibility now falls to congress to hold the president accountable for his action to vastly different narrative. So what does the report actually say? And what are the implications of these findings? We have a team that's been digging through the document, including NPR Justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Who's here either? Very good morning, Steve. So if the president is not charged. What would there be in this report to hold the president accountable forty used Jerrold Nadler's phrase? Well, there's this team the investigators actually wrote that after the thorough investigation. They conducted if they had confidence the president clearly did not commit obstruction of Justice, they'd say, so, but they were not able to say that there are a number of what investigators describe as disturbing incidents ten or more involving the president's attempts alleged attempts to obstruct Justice to try to jam up the special counsel probe to fire. The attorney general Jeff Sessions to fire Robert Mueller, the special counsel himself and to try to get people to change their stories before they spoke with the media or or other people including trying to dangle carrots or sticks in front of people who were thinking about cooperating with Robert Muller's. Well, I'm just thinking about one particular example of the many in this report it involves Don Mcgann was then the White House counsel. Let me if I get this wrong in any way, carry the president tells Mcgann in so many words to get rid of Robert Muller. And the reason that this act is not taken which might have been seen as catastrophic by the president's critics, and even his allies the reason this is not taken it's only because mcken refused and and threatened to resign. Instead is that correct? That's exactly right. That's just one of a number of incidents where the president directed people in the White House to do things in often, Steve they actually blew him off which turns out to be a good thing for their legal liability moving, I guess Mcgann. According to the report again as you put it blew off the president in another way because the president when this was reported when this was revealed by the New York Times that the president told Mcgann to get rid of Muller. Trump told Mcgann to deny that story and Mcgann said I'm not going to falsely deny it because it's true. Yeah. I make an told investigators apparently he felt threatened by the president that the president was trying to test his metal now attorney general bar is going to face some questions after having been the man who redacted this reporter oversaw. Aw, the redaction I should say. And who then described it in a press conference yesterday? The attorney general set to testify on may first and may second in front of the Senate and the house he's gonna have a harder time in house, which is controlled by Democrats, many of whom have already described a crisis of confidence at the Justice department. They say because the way that bar has handled. This report they think he's played down the findings and basically protected President Trump at the expense of this investigation. Are there also internal investigations within the department of Justice? There are Steve the Justice department is investigating. The inspector general is investigating the launch of this investigation. The Fiso warrants in the first place as well as twelve ongoing investigations, we don't know anything about the special counsel has referred to other US attorney's offices. Everyone's talking about the Faisal warrants. I guess we should be clear on that part. This refers to I guess, we could say the Republican narrative of the Republican view of this investigation. Which is that it never made any sense. It never had a good basis, and they are questioning why. Some of the surveillance warrants were approved in the key in this investigation. Yes, the inspector general is investigating the investigators both in the US and some of the sources they were on overseas. Carry thanks for your reporting on this occasion, and many others over the past couple of years. My pleasure. Okay. So how's this report being viewed among members of congress, and what further lines of inquiry if any Democrats intend to pursue NPR's? Tim Mack has been taking a look at this. Tim, thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. Okay. Democrats have been focused on the question of obstruction of Justice by the president William bar didn't think that the evidence reached that level and Muller himself did not make that conclusion. Even though he didn't clear the president. What does that mean for Democrats will it likely means that in the house of representatives impeachment is off the table, the chair the house intelligence committee? Adam Schiff told NPR's all things considered this yesterday. The evidence would have to be graphic and spark a bipartisan consensus that it warrants the president's removal, given the fact that the public is a congressman on willing to stand up this president in any respect it's hard to see that changing here. But Democrats did signal that they intend to continue their aggressive investigations of the president's finances. His administration and the various episodes revealed by the Muller. Port and they're going to be keeping their demand that the full unredacted version of that Muller report is released ten when I was reading the report you get to the black sections, and there's usually a little tag an explanation for why something has taken out. It's either part of an ongoing matter or it grand jury material, which is supposed to be kept secret in virtually all cases, how likely is it. The Democrats are going to be getting those blackened areas removed. Well, a small group of house members, particularly those related to a DOJ oversight are gonna be able to see a less redacted version of the Miller report. But it's hard to say when the public would be able to see if ever it's going to be a long drawn out legal fight for a fuller version of that Muller report. Okay. Let me ask about what happens in congress over the next year and a half. I know the presidential campaign is well underway. But you know, there's congress and there are problems in the country and the president in his state of the union speech, essentially gave lawmakers choice as the president sought. You're either. Have warned investigation or peace, and and legislation is there any inclination in congress to actually legislate, what Republicans are echoing the president's line. They're saying, no collusion. Nope. -struction? They think all of these investigations are baseless Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell yesterday focused on what he views as Democrats is latest line of attack. That's on attorney general Bill bar Atrush. Bill bar other issue rather laughable, shade turn their guns on him. But that that's all they're left with frankly is to go after him Democrats say that they're doing oversight on a number of important issues. The characterize that there are a lot of troubling developments in the Trump administration and in the world of Trump's finances. They say it's a fundamental part of their responsibilities as a check on the executive branch, and they won't be stopping their investigations. Now, just because the mall report in that investigation is over Tim. Thanks so much. Thanks a lot. Okay. Those were key things you need to know. From the redacted Muller report. But of course, there is much more that we learned in those four hundred pages if you scroll back through your up, I feed you're gonna find that the NPR politics podcast published a special episode. We dropped just for you, deep diving on everything we learned.

President Trump Robert Muller Steve Inskeep Attorney NPR Special Counsel Congress Don Mcgann White House Justice Department Tim Mack Department Of Justice Senate Jerrold Nadler House Judiciary Committee Donald Trump Kellyanne Conway
How Ketamine Treats Depression: It Acts Like an Opioid, Study Suggests

Jason and Alexis

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

How Ketamine Treats Depression: It Acts Like an Opioid, Study Suggests

"Him this hour on David green and I'm Rachel Martin President Trump hosted a dinner for evangelical, leaders and he warned of. Violence if Republicans lose in the, midterms we'll talk with one of Trump's earliest Christian supporters Reverend Robert, Jefferson a new book explores the self serving nature of elite level philanthropy and the biological benefits of being. Lazy it is, Wednesday August twenty nine a moment of glee for Liam. Machel the actor and singer turns thirty two. Today the news is coming up next Live from NPR. News in Washington I'm korva. Coleman Tallahassee mayor Andrew gillum has won the democratic nomination for Florida governor he'll face Republican Ron to Santa's in the fall from member station w. f. s. u. Ryan daily reports if Gillam wins he, would become Florida's first African. American

Senator John Mccain NPR Ketamine Washington President Trump Florida United States John Hamilton Tallahassee Union Nicaragua President Daniel Ortega Rachel Martin President Trump Governor Gillam Ben Adler Arizona Nafta Phoenix
President, South Carolina and China discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

02:04 min | 2 years ago

President, South Carolina and China discussed on Morning Edition

"After a very tight. Primary vote Kansas secretary of state Chris, comeback is narrowly leading in his bid. To unseat Republican governor Jeff Collier the results still aren't official but the. Tiny margin victory means there is the potential for a recount, Stephen Kuranda of the Kansas news service reports co box says he will. Not recuse, himself if a recount happens the race is still incredibly close with co, Bach leading by. Fewer than two hundred votes out of more than three hundred thousand ballots. Hundred ninety one votes what an exciting night it was when an exciting race that's co box speaking to reporters. The day after the election he's the state's top elections official and if, there's a recount co boxes he would not need to recuse himself it's. An issue that is endemic to, having an elected secretary of state and of course there are. Safeguards in there because the secrets State's office is not the sole office looking at. These co box says one of those safeguards is that much of the work. Is done by. The counties the. Secretary of state's office merely serves as a coordinating entity, overseeing not actually counting. The co Bach would also get to determine the cost of a, recount which. Would be paid by whoever, calls for it governor Collier is hoping the outcome could change when results are finalized he will not say whether he'll call for a recount or whether co box. Should recuse himself we're, not there yet we need to get ready. For the first count and we want to make sure that every vote every legitimate vote is counted. Chris Biggs is democrat and the. Former secretary of state that Bach defeated to take over the job big says oversee in your, own election is part of the. Office but if he were in this, situation he'd look for some outside help. To avoid any perception of a conflict of interest if there is a. Way to somehow get some independent referee or voice or something Involved that would eliminate any questions. I would certainly consider looking into that, it will be around a week before mail-in and provisional ballots are counted then there. Could be consideration of a

President Trump South Carolina China South Carolina Chamber Of Comm President And Ceo Walmart Governor Collier United States Bach Chris Biggs NPR David Green Rachel Martin Official TED Congressman Mark Sanford David Greene Secretary Eugene Parker
Elon Musk proposes taking Tesla private

Morning Edition

07:08 min | 2 years ago

Elon Musk proposes taking Tesla private

"Klansman from director Spike Lee, and producer, Jordan Peele based on the true story of the first African American detective to go undercover and infiltrate, the, Ku Klux Klan in theaters Friday This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green and I'm? Rachel? Martin tesla may may. Be in for a dramatic. Ride, on. Tuesday, the. CEO Elon Musk went on Twitter to announce he is considering taking the company private and Tesla's stock soared was that what musk intended, NPR's? Jasmine, Gars covers technology she's here with? Us now hey jasmine hi Rachel so he. Made this? Announcement on Twitter sort? Of unusual, for such an important announcement that pretty much? In line with how musk operates right yeah this, is what musk does he he takes on Twitter. And speaks his mind so why why did this happen I mean why did he make the suggestion. About going private musk has always expressed annoyance at the way tesla being a public company beholds him to investors the fact that he, has to do these quarterly earnings reports and explain himself in his every move he said that it puts unnecessary pressure on the company to make decisions that maybe Aren't good in the long term and he gets really annoyed in. Fact in. One earnings call this year he got so annoyed let me play you a clip board questions are. Not cool next that's musk? Calling? An analyst questions boring. And boneheaded he later apologized. But, you. Know, another. Thorn in Musk's side has been Tesla's short seller problem tesla is known for attracting a significant number of shortsellers these are investors who, bet? Against, the company right they profit when? The company's stock drops and they benefit from. Bad rumors? About the company musk? Has suggested, that going private would end which he calls? Shortsellers negative propaganda campaign but did did he intend, to do this as a test balloon so that. Stock prices would go up we can't we can't I mean if he did that that that would. Cause a lot of concern for investors and it could get him in hot water Harvey. Pay the, former head of the SEC yesterday, as he see the. Federal agency that regulates trading of stocks and bonds he spoke. On CNBC and he pointed out that, Musk's tweets could. Get him in. Trouble if he, tried to manipulate the stock so what is this whole thing. Mean for investors I mean it seems like people just. Can't look away from tesla as as investors, they're? Totally attracted to this situation well well it comes at a really pivotal time for tesla. You know they just release the model three sedan with which they hope to cross, over from being this luxury car brand to a mass market automaker and they're spending a lot of money? To achieve. It a. Lot is, at stake here and, musk has said he hopes all investors stay on board okay NPR's desma Gars makes jazz thank you The Ohio State University is dealing with multiple, athletic scandals it's football coach urban Meyer is on paid leave. While the school investigates whether he mishandled domestic violence allegations against an assistant coach in two thousand fifteen the school is also facing lawsuits tied to a former diving coach and another, set of lawsuits involving a now deceased athletic director as investigators have dug into the doctor's past they have found more than one. Hundred cases of abuse dating back to the nineteen? Seventies and, we should say it was an athletic Dr not an athletic director Nick. Evans of member station w. OSU. Has, more, Mike desalvo looks like a fighter in a black. Hoodie and, Jim short-sea curious himself like a loaded spring ready to jump back onto the mat he wrestled for Ohio State University beginning in the late, nineteen eighty s but he I met Dr Richard Strauss. Before that desalvo says Strauss was conducting a body fat study among high school athletes but Strauss. Went. A step further and did. A full Genital exam which was par for the course, from what I'd heard from cousins previously. That he was this was this was fourteen years old yes desalvo says the alleged sexual assaults continued the entire time he was at, OSU and he outlined the accusations against the former team doctor, in a lawsuit filed against the university earlier this year Since then, Ohio State, has launched an independent investigation the now. Includes athletes allegedly abused by the, doctor in fourteen different sports Strauss left the school in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight he died in two thousand five school. Officials. Refused repeated interview requests for this story and not granted. Interviews elsewhere either but at a June trustees meeting university president Michael Drake insisted students safety as their primary concern these are deeply troubling Allegations and we are committed. To get to the bottom of this and appreciative of our. Independent investigators in another lawsuit a different wrestler religious he. Complained about the doctor in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight desalvo's legal finally he contends. Strauss's behavior was widely known desalvo's claims have reached Washington, DC to, because of who was on the coaching staff at, the time Republican congressman Jim Jordan the conservative firebrand making a bid to be the next house speaker was the team's assistant. Coach in a statement last month the congressman said he never heard about any abuse yet another student at OSU Steven Snyder hill filed a complaint against the school in. Nineteen five he visited a school clinic for chest pain and says Strauss. Molested and during the exam after Strauss denied the incident a. School administrator wrote to Snyder hill telling him they'd only ever received positive comments about the doctor in a press release. The school says it quote, remains actively committed, to covering, what may have happened and what university. Leaders at the time Mhm may have known that characterization, but may have, happened frustrates Snyder hill if you've gone through this that is the most insulting language that you could use to, somebody and it, basically. Is another way in two thousand eighteen of invalidating me the same, thing that. They, didn't nineteen ninety-five and that's not fair. Anymore you can't do that I have a letter to prove that you knew OSU still has a strong pull, on Strauss's, accusers many look back fondly despite their interactions with the doctor. The Carly Smith a clinical psychologist at Penn State since when. An institution fails to protect its members from abuse the. Sense of betrayal cuts, deeper Smith says when people come forward it gets easier for others. And that means cases like these won't disappear I think, in fact, we're probably gonna continue seeing these waves of people, coming forward to report what happened to them and I think it just can be a real opportunity for the way our. Society and our, institutions handle abuse to really shift the university faces a number of lawsuits related to Strauss including two Class action cases investigators have already uncovered one hundred accounts of abuse and they expect to interview another hundred people at least for NPR news I'm Nick Athens, in Columbus Amateur saying.

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How One Boy's Fight With Epilepsy Led To The First Marijuana-Derived Pharmaceutical

Morning Edition

06:46 min | 2 years ago

How One Boy's Fight With Epilepsy Led To The First Marijuana-Derived Pharmaceutical

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm. David green and I'm Noel king good morning the first medication derived from. Marijuana could be in pharmacies as early, as this fall the FDA recently approved it to treat two types. Of epilepsy cake Leslie mcclurg has. The story of one family's quest to get this drug Evelyn Nissenbaum used to watch her, son Sam suffer through one, hundred seizures a day when they, were bad they were once every three minutes Dan was diagnosed with epilepsy when he was four years old when it did ever seizures. Sort of everything went black kind of. For about twenty seconds just long enough to tumble down a. Flight of stairs at, his house in Berkeley plunge into a dinner plate crack head on window I don't, remember a lot of it really doctors tried nearly two dozen different medications to treat Sam nothing worked long term and the side effects for many were. Severe full body rashes fits of rage strange Fficials a Hillis name that my folks sheets came to life. In that holes in my body seven exhausting years passed and. Then Evelyn came across the study using. Cannabis dial. Or CBD to successfully treat seizures in rats CD is an extract from the cannabis. Plant that doesn't make you high and I thought my son needs. Access to that I gotta get this she dug around and found a. British pharmaceutical company that was making highly, concentrated CBD for multiple sclerosis patients the company agreed to let Sam. Try the drag in the UK. Under a doctor's supervision for two weeks after Wedneday his seizures were down to thirty after, two days they were down, to ten after three days he, had one seizure Sam is now seventeen the drugs still works and he doesn't have any side effects for the past six years the. FDA has allowed what's called a compassionate. Use for Sam along the way hundreds of other patients have. Tried the drug in. Clinical trials which eventually led to its recent FDA approval the brand name for the CBD drug is EPA dialects this is. What everyone asked about Dr Joe Sirven isn't Arale just at the mayo. Clinic in Arizona this almost had like instant name. Recognition he says his. Patient's read about EPA dialects studies on social media and then they'd begged to try it it showed. Really, really great results particularly with certain larger seizures the big convulsions now many patients are using CBD from marijuana dispensaries but, these aren't regulated and the dose inconsistency can vary. Widely still serving doesn't necessarily recommend switching I, would never change it. If it's working for. You if it's not thou here's an option EPA dialects isn't right for everyone it only. Reduces seizures in about thirty percent of epilepsy patients and the drug can cause. Side effects like fatigue nausea diarrhea rashes insomnia and it's not on the market just yet I the Drug. Enforcement Administration needs to reclassify CBD it's. Currently, a schedule one drug meaning at the legal, under federal law that's expected to happen by early fall so once that's, done it could potentially. Be in Walgreens or Rite Aid but there are still. Big holes there, are, big gaps in. The price has not been announced. Yet you will need a prescription and you Zimbabwe's insurance companies, may not cover EPA dialects it looks like we, were, for, ten, bottles, here for now San still gets his drugs at, the investigational pharmacy at UC San Francisco Their from please Someday Sam hopes he's the one prescribing EPA dialects wanna be. An, epilepsy doctor I the seventeen year old is going to get. His driver's license he was just cleared to get. Behind the wheel he hasn't had a seizure in more than two years for NPR news unless they mcclurg. In San Francisco so if you've ever been, on a diet but you didn't, lose the weight you had hoped to lose your gut bacteria might be part. Of the, problem NPR's Alison Aubrey reports on how the microbes in our guts may either help or. Hinder weight loss this is kind of an odd thing, to think about but the bacteria that live in our guts can actually do. Us a favor they eat. What we can't Martin Blaser is a professor at NYU. Langone medical, center he says consider what happens when we, eat an apple we digest, most of it but there's a certain part of the apple that. Can't be absorbed we don't have the right enzymes to digest every, bit of it but are bacteria can after the bacteria consume, what we can't, they Produce, byproducts that we can digest and that's another source of calories. For, us somewhere between five and fifteen percent of all our calories. Come from that kind of digestion where the microbes. Are providing energy for us that we we couldn't ordinarily get and times were bad if we were starving. We would really welcome that but these days, when many people want to lose, weight we may not want these extra calories the microbes give us researchers at. The mayo, clinic in Minnesota wanted to know if they could identify certain types of bacteria that might. Influence the success of dieting Purna cash up a gastroenterologist, helped to lead the study it included people who were enrolled in a one. Year lifestyle program they were. Counseled to follow a low calorie diet and agreed to. Be monitored, closely we started with the premise that people, have different microbial make-up's in, the in the gut and that good insurance how well they do. With dieting Richmond and it turns out when cash up and his, team compared the dieters who were successful with those who are. Not They, did find differences we found that people who lost, at least five percent of their body weight had different gut bacteria as compared to those who did not lose five percent of their body big for instance they found an abundance of bacteria, called dial Lister in the guts of people. Who did not lose, much weight and another type. Of bacteria was high in successful dieters cash up says, down the road if they can show. The same, results in a larger group of dieters they'd like to use this information to help people lose weight what do you hope to do is to be able to individualize care for people and we would also. Try to develop new robotics which we can use to change the. Microbial makeup but manipulating the mix of microbes in your gut is easier said than. Done according to NYU's Martin blazer it's complicated he says in part it depends how lucky will be whether the organisms that we think are beneficial we, can cultivate them well it said that they could become next years probiotic that remains on he says if it's possible It's still some years off. Palace and, Aubrey NPR news Support for your health comes from.

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Trump meets Putin in Helsinki with hopes of improving US-Russia relations

Morning Edition

04:41 min | 2 years ago

Trump meets Putin in Helsinki with hopes of improving US-Russia relations

"What is the mood in helsinki and what topics are the two leaders going to cover on david green and i'm new l king the president tweeted this morning that the relationship between the us and russia vote has never been worse so what plans if any does he have to improve the relationship and these brutal heatwaves that have baked much of the country this summer could be affecting our brains as well as our bodies it is monday july sixteenth happy birthday to stewart copeland tremor of the police he is sixty six years old today and the news is next live from npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly president trump is in finland for today's summit with russian president flat amir putin as npr's scott neuman reports there's no specific agenda for their one on one meeting in helsinki despite president trump's frequent praise for putin a few hours before the two leaders were to meet trump tweeted that the relationship between the us and russia has never been worse among other things trump has promised to bring up the meddling question again but suggested that there would be no perry mason moment when putin suddenly admits interfering in the two thousand sixteen us election even so putin is likely to get his best reception in years from us president many critics say trump's testing meeting with nato and is more recent comments about the european union being a foe play into putin's desire to see a split between america and its traditional allies scott neuman npr news the president of the european count council is urging trump and putin not to escalate trade disputes at their talks in helsinki donald tusk was speaking today in beijing following an annual e you chinese economic summit trade experts say canada's economy could be hurt if president trump imposes additional tariffs on china that's something he's threatening to do is prompting china to file a challenge with world trade organization dan carpenter chuck has more with the administration of president donald trump imposing twentyfive percent tariffs on thirty four billion dollars worth of chinese goods the gloves are off but more may be yet to come washington suggested that by the end of the summer a further two hundred billion dollars in chinese products could face tariffs that won't happen until congress assesses the implications of such an escalation it's not clear what products are sectors would be hit hardest by the us china trade fight but much of the manufacturing in canada relies on chinese parts trade specialists in canada's say their country should brace for more economic pain it's already coping with trump's tariffs on imports of canadian steel and aluminum for npr news i'm dan carpenter in toronto in addition to canada trump impose tariffs last month on us imports of steel and aluminum from mexico and countries in the european union stocks in asia ended lower today after china reported economic growth below expectations it came in at six point seven percent in the latest quarter stock markets finished in negative territory in china and hong kong later today wall street gets a look at new numbers on retail sales in the us a new survey from the national association for business economics suggests hiring and salaries in the us will continue rising over the next three months along with corporate sales among the wildfires burning in the western us is one in california near yosemite national park it broke out three days ago and has burned at least seven square miles of brush along the park's western edge it left one firefighter dead over the weekend this is npr news from washington authorities in new mexico are investigating a deadly crash on interstate twenty five north of albuquerque it involve four vehicles three people were killed a car slammed into a pickup from behind early yesterday a commercial passenger bus swerved to avoid those vehicles and ended up on its side and tractor trailer than sideswiped the bus some members of charlotte north carolina's city councillor questioning the city's bid to host the twenty twenty republican national convention david borax with member station wfan has more charlotte mayor vials has promoted the city's bid since february but in recent weeks fellow democrats on the city council with question whether it's a good idea the mayor sites economic benefits of the event noting that the city how the democratic national convention in two thousand twelve but councilmember luana mayfield's has president trump and republicans don't fit the city's values because i don't think it's the compensation that fall economic is a moral compensation and that we need to have as far as what type of city are wing leaders of local democratic groups plan to hold a.

Helsinki David Green President Trump Thirty Four Billion Dollars Two Hundred Billion Dollars Seven Square Miles Twentyfive Percent Sixty Six Years Seven Percent Three Months Three Days
Judge to weigh new rules for U.S. reuniting of migrant families

24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Judge to weigh new rules for U.S. reuniting of migrant families

"The listeners have it's morning edition from npr news i'm david green and i'm rachel martin we've got an update now on the children who are separated from their families after crossing the us mexico border a federal judge in san diego will decide today if the government is doing enough to reunite these families the trump trump administration said yesterday that all of the quote eligible children under age five had been reunited with their parents but nearly half of this very young group forty six kids were deemed ineligible by the government for reunification joining us for more john sepulveda's of member station k q e d who's been covering.

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"david green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"david green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News good morning i'm david green and i'm no l king michael chertoff was secretary of homeland security during president george w bush's second term turtle also helped write the patriot act which many privacy advocates think of as a vast government overreach into private lives so it may seem surprising that chertoff is now out with a new book about privacy and the appropriate collection of data i talked to him about the book it's called exploding data reclaiming our cybersecurity in the digital age and i asked him if he's changed his mind about the patriot act and it's not a question of changing my mind i think first of all people sometimes really misunderstand the patriot act much of what he did had did you sharing of information the government or ready held but was restricted in sharing among different agencies and some of it dealt with treating what was generated as communication via internet under the same standard as telephony but i will say this i became aware of the enormous pretend for good but also the risks involved in data collection and as we went through various iterations of government collection of information what we saw was people became concerned that maybe something was too generous to the government it was tweaked and it was maybe pulled back a little bit what does that look like so a good example is this program that existed under the patriot act which allows the government to basically collect where they call metadata metadata is who called who and how long it does not involve the content of conversation people got concerned about that so eventually what happened under the obama administration is change the rule and they said okay government can't collect metadata it has to stay in the hands of the telephone or internet companies until you get appropriate judicial permission to inspect it we know about the meta data because of edward snowden leaks not because the government came out and said you know we've been doing this terrible thing do you really trust the government to monitor and police itself actually i do trust our government first of all the congress knew about the collection of meta data and the courts knew and approved of it and although snowden may not have liked it it did comply with the law and it was being regularly reviews but nothing changed nothing changed until the leaks and until the public found out about it if we didn't know wouldn't it still be going on why do look i think transparency somewhat greater transparency would be a good thing because frankly i think if the government had made clear the scope of the program earlier and had released some of the judicial opinions richer eventually came out people actually would have been buying large okay with it so you're saying that the government does adapt to people's concerns remarkably the government's much more adaptable than the private sector to issues about privacy why is that do you think i think frankly it's the result of many many years of battle scars if you go back decades ago the government has has been in sometimes gotten in hot water over issues of collection and so over time the government has become sensitive i think the private sector for a long time was viewed as the good guys and i think where people have begun to recognize is that there's enormous value in personal data and that that is being harvested by the companies and then that creates the risk of misuse there's a section in your book where you sort of take a glimpse into the future and you imagine a us society where people know that their data is being collected and where they begin to feel as if they're always being watched and then they change their behavior is that the future that you think we are headed towards i think it's a future we may be headed for if we don't take steps now show look at all the data regenerate now if you.

michael chertoff david green
AT&T, Justice Department await decision that could determine future of media

Morning Edition

01:33 min | 2 years ago

AT&T, Justice Department await decision that could determine future of media

"This is morning edition from npr news good morning i'm david green and i'm rachel martin today may mark the beginning of some big changes in the american media industry a federal judge will hand down his decision on whether at and t is free to take over time warner time warner owns warner brothers studios and numerous cable channels at and t provides broadband and telephone services and also owns direct tv the justice department opposes this deal steve inskeep talked with npr's david folkenflik about what's at stake so why would the justice department be opposed the justice department has said that it's too big too big is too much that consumers are gonna be throttled by the idea of these it's almost two halves of the same industry the people who create the content the people who funneled to you getting together it's too much problems with it they want to protect the consumer that's the argument trump made that claim on the campaign trail and he also at times seemed to tie it to his critique of cnn which of course is one of time warner's major properties so the implied not quite explicit shit but heavily implied threat is that trump didn't like cnn's coverage and therefore he was going to go after cnn's corporate parent because they had this vulnerability they wanted approval for this merger that's right now to be fair the head of his antitrust unit is widely respected by lawyers on both sides of this case in both sides of this issue but even though the judge barred discussion of trump's statements on this it looms over the entire case with that said there is this real question right i mean the question of cnn or hp our tnt getting into my house over an at and t broadband connection and is that too much power in one place that's the issue.

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Film producer Weinstein indicted for rape: New York prosecutor

Morning Edition

02:13 min | 2 years ago

Film producer Weinstein indicted for rape: New York prosecutor

"And i'm richard hake on wnyc in new york a grand jury indicted harvey weinstein for rape and for forcing a woman to perform oral sex manhattan da cyrus van says the indictment brings the disgraced movie mogul another step closer to accountability weinstein's indictment yesterday came just hours after his lawyer said he would not testify before the grand jury because there wasn't enough time to prepare him weinstein has repeatedly denied any nonconsensual sexual encounters and his attorney claims that one of the women accusing weinstein of rape was in a consensual relationship both before and after the alleged attack acting new york attorney general barbara underwood says the offices marching full steam ahead under her leadership the state's newly confirmed attorney general held her first public media event yesterday following the resignation of former attorney general eric schneiderman earlier this month in the immediate aftermath of hearing the news everyone was stunned but we very quickly look started looking forward schneiderman step down on may eight hours after news broke that he allegedly abused multiple women underwood says she will serve out the remainder of the current term and does not plan to run for election to the post in the fall just seven percent of new york city's public schools have cameras located nearby to catch speeding motorists the mayor wants to change that wnyc's zoe azoulay reports if you're driving over the speed limit in a school zone with a speed camera you'll get a ticket in the mail for fifty dollars city officials say these fines have been effective in slowing traffic nair de and wants to double the number of schools down with cameras but that decision is up to the state legislature and the deadline is this summer if all but he doesn't act hundreds of thousands of children will be endanger the mayor's office say there's bipartisan support their opponents including democratic senator sympathetic there say that speak cameras are just a way to fill government coffers we do have a forty percent chance of some showers today patchy fog this morning otherwise cloudy with a high near sixty eight degrees this is wnyc this is morning edition from npr news i'm david green and i'm rachel martin there's one question parents rarely answer truthfully.

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Democratic women are winning primaries in large numbers, energizing other candidates

BBC World Service

01:17 min | 2 years ago

Democratic women are winning primaries in large numbers, energizing other candidates

"This is morning edition from npr news i'm david green and i'm rachel martin all of pennsylvania's eighteen congressional districts are currently represented by men after last night's primaries though it looks like that could be about to change at least one district will vote on race with only women candidates in november and several other races feature women with strong chances of winning this is all part of a broader trend of female candidates fairing pretty well in the twenty eighteen election for more on this and other takeaways from last night's elections in pennsylvania as well as idaho nebraska and oregon we've got pierced kelsey snell in the studio with us he kelsey hey good morning so what did we see from women candidates last night in the broader picture women fared very well in all of those elections but most notably in pennsylvania where we're expecting as many as four women could be headed to congress after this it's thanks in part to the fact that there was this court ordered redistricting something we've talked about a lot it made the entire states congressional mab more or less more favorable for democrats and democrats spent a lot of time going out and recruiting women who they thought would fare well in the general election in november though not all of those women one we saw some progressives make make some inroads here but in general this has been a really good set of election night for women.

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up first discusses rudy giuliani

Up First

05:08 min | 2 years ago

up first discusses rudy giuliani

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Cambridge Analytica and its role in Kenya 2017 elections

Morning Edition

02:03 min | 2 years ago

Cambridge Analytica and its role in Kenya 2017 elections

"The news of the world to audiences back home this is morning edition from npr news good morning i'm david green and i'm no l king allegations that cambridge analytica used facebook data to influence elections has lawmakers in the us and the uk demanding answers but this scandal also affects kenya cambridge analytica officials bragged that they basically ran the kenyan president's campaign last year npr's or peralta has the story out here in kibera politics is always fronted center essential when there are no politicians regular guys take to a podium i find your kunle shut listening and reading the newspaper cambridge analytica has been on the front pages but sharad jokes that he lost his phone so whatever influence campaign they engine neared probably missed so much fun i do get the access he thinks what cambridge analytica did it kenya probably influenced younger people but dozens of people were killed a drink postelection violence in this neighborhood and that he blames squarely on kenyan politicians they find as was created by themselves the company just how much of a role cambridge analytica played in kenya is still the subject of debate topranking company officials were caught on tape by britain's channel four bragging about having a hand in quote just about every element of president who can you had his campaign in an interview with vice news rafael to show the chief of the president's political party rejected the claims it would be far fetched he says to think a company could use facebook to determine the psychological profile of a kenyan voter for us in this particular environment issue for us last year kenya had to elections one was annulled by the supreme court for regularities the second was also contested in both instances the campaigns were ethnically charge andreas could soroush who worked for the.

United States President Trump NPR Peralta Cambridge Analytica Kenya Britain Facebook Andreas David Green UK Kibera
After late night finalizing, voting could begin Thursday on $1.3 trillion spending bill

02:17 min | 2 years ago

After late night finalizing, voting could begin Thursday on $1.3 trillion spending bill

"Npr news the story and kiki weedy news all ahead on fm san francisco and kiki we i f m north highlands sacramento mark zuckerberg's apology be enough to satisfy congress will ask democrat ed markey this hour i'm david green and i made sure martin lawmakers on capitol hill have come up with a massive one point three trillion dollar spending bill now they just have to pass it to avoid another government shutdown and our co host steve inskeep takes us inside a refugee camps for those displaced by yemen civil war it is thursday march twenty second birthday of comedian and actor keegan michael key he turns forty seven years old today news is next live from npr news in washington i'm korva coleman congressional leaders hope to start voting this morning on a huge spending package that will fund the federal government it's worth one point three trillion dollars congress has a deadline of midnight friday or else the federal government will partially shut down a bipartisan effort to stabilize the individual health insurance markets appears to be falling apart polarized by the politics of abortion blake farmer of member station w p l n in nashville reports the effort was supposed to be part of the huge spending bill the republican and democrat who lead the senate health committee came up with a proposal it includes money to help states ensure their sickest residents and restores subsidies to insurance companies that president trump terminated tennessee senator lamar alexander has spent months pushing for a vote viewing this is a last chance before insurers set their rates for next year he's appealing to voters we want them to know we have a proposal that will lower your rates by forty percent and we'd like for for them to be able to see who voted for that and who voted against that in recent days house democrats have rejected the final version because the fine print could bar private insurance plans from covering abortions for npr news i'm blake farmer in nashville a trial starts today as the federal government tries to stop the merger between at and t and time warner the federal government claims the eighty five billion dollar deal will hurt consumers and competition the companies say the federal government miss states who the.

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