9 Burst results for "David Gamble"

"david gamble" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

Reasonable Doubt

01:45 min | 3 months ago

"david gamble" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

"I thought you got these sloppy sesame. Sunflower them behind. And i said well the epa you love tori amos. Yeah but. I don't want flowers. I love torah apis. But the two do not intersect. That's what i'm saying. And i'm saying if you got like a paperweight from judge wapner you. A clarence darrow. Right i just put in. So that's how women are wire. They love not that. I love tori amos or that. I love flowers. I love you burning calories. Exactly i so funny i just we bring up judge wapner. I just i coached a Prosecutor out of the. Da's office young. Buck who i think's got amazing talent. David gamble and so david just put him in an office. And i walked in and like there's nothing on the walls because we just painted. Here's your new office. So i handed him one of my prized possessions. Which is a judge wapner portrait. That judge wapner had given to my father because my father was a. Da judge walker's house real judge and i put it on gambles wall and i said here you go so when you go into judge. Wapner sons courtroom fred. Who's a judge down here in the criminal department. I think he's in department one fifteen. I say you tell you told judge wapner that you've got his dad's picture on your well but it is one of my prized possessions. And i'll tell you guys about And then i'll teased s but a lot going on with oj oj billon auspey. We gotta be ano- j yeah well the owned durandt. Will you do one or the other..

judge wapner tori amos David gamble clarence darrow wapner epa Wapner Buck Da david walker fred billon auspey
"david gamble" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

09:58 min | 1 year ago

"david gamble" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Listening to game seven of the twenty ten finals and the Celtics are leading the Lakers midway through the third quarter a thirteen point lead has been sliced to six but Kevin Garnett said that Boston team was good at staying cool and calm this is a very tight close knit group no were brutally honest with each other we can speak to each other in our different ways we interact with each other a lot I have a different scene so where other donate other than eight hello guys were even closer so the United makes a huge difference Boston's lead down to fifty one forty five with five thirty eight to go in the third on the call Jim Durham Dr Jack Ramsay and Hugh B. Braun but give the Lakers a little credit here now they started this quarter one for six they tightened up defensively and now they've scored for either the last five possessions so maybe they're coming out of the bunkers I think the Lakers defense has been quite good yes they're trying to get ray Allen open rules based on history Derek Fisher is chasing him blocking for a league take a look Celtics at the front is it one point guard at what's the other way finds Allen and missed a long jumper but Rasheed Wallace the rebound back active hills five eighteen for the third still fifty one forty five Boston first of all taken away Japan's the wall was three the Kobe Bryant circle drive suite defenders Friday solution rondo is still rondo into the Boston front porch there is a straight away three good here is lined it up drilled a smooth transition defense by the Lakers and Paul Pierce not did back alright ladies for the Celtics on the right side is fresher now all of them at the top finding Brian against the circle Brian don't miss the shot rebound taken down by Wallace number she'd Wallace's has to come out of the game that's why babies Davis is that the scores Wallace has set up front here's the ball on the circle line right if the shuttle eight zero back from Wallace drives our tasks where people remaining and the Lakers the rebound show me grows over three fifty two for the third still Boston by nine I cruise to within seven now we know we can take you off the dribble as soon as he turned a corner he knew he could be guarded to the room right out of the office right Wallace left recede Wallace Dr Jack has not stopped yes indeed many saw it depended cryo room no we could get the shot off as it beyond to strive for the right amount to Brian at the top Kobe driving into the lane that was a difficult decision because once he got there he was looking for the shot clock what he saw was it there we just celebrated well received Wallace is hurting he's got a bad light and it happened three plays and he's also got the fact that he's had in the playoffs Mrs these from the Lakers back New Delhi on the way to the room all will be suiting to receive Wallace that's a situation where the transition game played off by Gonzalo swing beginning in a post area in all cases give up the ball so that you can get the tear movement early on the clock I see little evidence that petite we talked about not only with Wallace put cagey bending over hands on the knees I think video players I felt that there would have been a time out taken normally at this stage of the portal you would have gotten a time out but they're not taken in the third quarter two free throws for produce all closer to tonight two thirty seven left in the third free throw good by this all now this all with nine points the Lakers are creeping back in there down now by six which led by as many as thirteen earlier in the third this is mark Kester sure you're listening to a special presentation of the NBA on ESPN radio featuring game seven of the twenty ten NBA finals between the Lakers and the Celtics we rejoin Jim Durham Dr Jack Ramsay and Hugh B. Braun with third quarter action the Celtics still have the same lead this one same lied that they had less one at the beginning of the third period how this all making that second free throw rondel locking the front door as it operators between the circle spins in the lane it means and the Lakers Kobe takes it down brings it into the front court Bryant right away and had the ball taken away rondo is still the room is stolen by former brown the reason for all I will be over past the creative turnover rate John Rago beta very strong brown David gamble by Greek she ever even if you get the whole situation they usually will give the false ceiling free throws the first one that means he is now five for eighteen in the finals not good for us though from the free throw line so far in this series J. and the second one misses but Brian Davis cancers only brown while Ms our tennis so the Lakers down by all in the third March twelfth two and then he stepped on the on line turned it over now the coaching staff has got to be upset we please pass the ball into the solid yet has been on his back the Florida border printed knit console reposted an artist who's right into a turn over one fifty for the third quarter fifty seven fifty one the self takes the lead on the ball rondo brings it up rondo at the top of the circle Brian is going to defend them Shannon brown facing rail on off the ball tend to shoot the cashier no good on the left side and goes all planes the rebound one four nine eighteen at this point all right side of the ball Joe Crawford with a call yeah from underneath he's got a following Davis one console box from the left lane across and pulls up baby Davis is going to try to root out with his forearm and he got caught in that situation or do you follow the Celtics the Lakers have an implied Davis lose first photo driving into the lane please support this all this data hello Mrs if this gets a piece the red headed old ball for seconds left in the third rondo's the Davis Davis against Oldham suits and upgrade no rebound probably sold this makes it a two point game one to the right side is he is picked up now is it right nobody in the line right side the long one is on the way no good and the rebound tipped out of bounds by LA twenty seven point four left in the third Celtics ball yeah you might consider going to the polls expect anytime you could still get the balls up good things happen for you doc rivers buying some time for Kevin Garnett has Scalabrine eight in the game with twenty seven point four left in the third Jackson Brian time for probing his farm are and they're not going to be a battle of attrition J. you're right these guys are all spoken when rondo with a five point about three different rondo was standing trouble on the right track market eight you take a.

Celtics Lakers
"david gamble" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"david gamble" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Just doing a great job on those theater reports and I love the creativity that people are coming up with just to keep things going absolutely Hey we've got one more for you by the way while your while you're sitting at home reading the sound archy Hilton of Hilton as miss contemporary will be hosting a web series on select dates from April second through April sixteenth the first episode and that was so I don't know what that is elegant yeah someone going into the zooms from exactly each episode is accessible on help management's website and social media channels at Hilton dot has missed that contemporary each episode will feature a live conversation with an internationally acclaimed photographer or artist from around the world including Paul Nicklen David gamble who was on the show also David yaro was also on the show and and and we were supposed to have Paul Paul Nicklen and in his his partner Christina on the on the show but minimizer Marco near or telly and many more the conversations will cover and by the way Erica Hilton is connected to why is everybody and and and I I happen to catch the the first one without Paul and Christina and it was absolutely brilliant and done in their house but you know but but beautifully done he talks about his his iconic photography he's a nature photographer and and she's more of a cultural photographer known around the world but but you get done you get up close and personal with with both of them conversations on how they were conversational cover how they're being affected by the current pandemic and the impacts their scene in their part of the world adding positive touch to the chant the artists will give a tour of their homes and show off their personal collections and favorite pieces for fans and viewers to see schedule for the web series which is up in our our Facebook page of playtime with builder can carry can of for the web series that will be it is below and I read that in just a second and the release with artist bios photos and additional info that will we also have a.

Hilton dot David yaro Paul Paul Nicklen Christina Erica Hilton Paul Nicklen David partner Marco Facebook
"david gamble" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

11:28 min | 2 years ago

"david gamble" Discussed on WGN Radio

"In zero pain about marijuana in Chicago in the state of Illinois John I'm not a pot smoker but there's a chain this is about the munchies topic where to get good snacks now they're all going to be toasted I'm not a pot smoker but there's a chain called insomnia cookies they're open until three AM every day they're great story that fresh baked cookies are delicious he I used to talk to them from time to time they would they started by going to college towns never heard of him yeah so I mean they're in in wicker park too but if you go to end of most college towns are many college towns you'll see them and that's where people go after the bars they'll go to insomnia cookies and more they deliver it three in the morning okay fine I just found out that I know that I just don't know how businesses make money sometimes how much does a cookie cost night hire a guide to put gas in the car and drive cookies to somebody and you can make money that way these are nice cookies yeah yeah I may are you must be paying a premium for all of that I used to eat a bowl of chili so anyway it says here I'm not a pot smoker but try insomnia cookies do they serve anything other than cookies just cookies huh but with it being called insomnia cookies and all maybe that's all they serve doesn't say insomnia chili John by the real chili by the looks of the lines at the dispensaries I've been by a twelve in the last two days Illinois might have the did Ted big tax windfall here in Jeez we might be able to pay off our bills what you think if he's gone by twelve in two days he's talking a little bit yeah what a coincidence Hey there's another one I think I'll just get out to give them a hundred and seventy dollars by the way remember yesterday we take a look at the the bill one of your techs did in what your receipt was for your pot purchase it was three times seventy one it was two hundred and two hundred and twenty dollars that's what it was was two hundred and twenty dollars was the cost of the marijuana the edibles whatever they want three three different things kept to under twenty Bucks with tax it was three hundred and five dollars they paid over eighty dollars in taxes for their just over two hundred dollar purchase voluntarily this doesn't sound like it's going to help our obesity crisis in the state of Illinois John thank you six serial and finally six three oh yeah we refer to this one earlier munchies is another reefer madness concept John new users get munchies tolerance builder built users don't in fact they're known orders of monks who have used it as a hunger suppressant those new to it are you have to learn the magic of this natural medicine mark bays are does a stand up talk show at the hideout it's called the interview show it's also on channel eleven and new episodes are coming up now after the first of the year mark just strolled into our studio Highmark basin how are you thanks for having me care to comment on reefer madness hitting Chicago we we are acting like people who have never heard of it but I I'm very ignorant on the topic but this topic is overwhelmed Chicago last couple days yeah I thought I had to find the media coverage obviously media has to cover it but I find it interesting that two weeks ago or a year ago let's say the media wouldn't cover how to smoke but if it's legal don't do all these guides to it well there was the lieutenant governor of this state showing her edibles yeah the lieutenant governor of Illinois is standing there and she's a lovely lady of matter but she seems to you know have the best interest of the state at heart and that's that is interesting this is my that be like her holding up a bottle of Jack Daniels that's exactly the point I tried to make to the mincing wrestler Jim beam like pulling the Cork out with their teeth yeah real hard school about it but I'm like the state of Illinois benefits by you smoking marijuana in our eating the edibles they are so encouraging you to do so why because they want the money and it is just something to me bizarre maybe just because it's new that the state is pushing this drug on the people to pay the state what does that mean I've seen going around which is when you're broke you start selling drugs yeah welcome to Illinois welcome to Chicago no no how are you my friend I'm good and great are you user by the way now this question which used to be kind of a wink is now a completely legitimate question for instance asked me if I had a Manhattan yesterday but I know the answer to that probably yes I did not day they before I did and I found it I'm going to have one tonight I I am definitely gonna have won tonight down because I'm celebrating tonight would you celebrate I'm suffering the fifth the fifth season our show of the show on TV on a beauty to W. season five I can't I can't you don't owe me anything mark but it was the first one to retreat to WTTW announcement of it all I owe you would you want what you want edibles over Manhattan yeah given my druthers I'd take the Manhattan thank you for doing that so five seasons you've been on T. five seasons on TV now many years have you been doing your interviews show at the hideout twelve twelve yeah wow yeah the leaders in multiple seasons is to have few episodes Percy like it would be like a half of a Chicago PD season right more like an eighth of a John Williams an eighth you know to use marijuana terminology I get it yeah but yeah I know we're excited it's we've got a new set we've got some new gas obviously so you record on you you video the show's down then you take what the best of them and put them in have you had it out the things that I don't like that I said then put up the rest so you have the whole like what's the time lag between when they were on stage at the hideout and they appear on to that's we've gotten a lot better at that we and part of it is because the culture is so fast now that we used to say we could do an interview and it would be pretty evergreen and then that aired even three months later who cares but politics culture whatever it is everything's going so fast now that we've our our turn around time is isn't to turn around time is now sometimes within a couple weeks sometimes a little longer so it's we're just we're just I mean that's obviously like if you're if we had we all day jobs yelled I have other things that we're doing but obviously like Stephen Cole bear tapes that day goes on later in the evening same thing with any most talk shows you don't have that luxury has a staff of two hundred people yeah right so we don't have that luxury you have a couple of guys we got a great team but the you know we all and where was working in other but soft but we can't get it up the same day I am patient zero for that concept of can we record this and still make it play on TV because you had me on just before the election that won the six that might have broken broken the model I'm going to do this was in the fall of twenty sixteen yeah that's right and you said okay come on and talk to me about doing a talk show in Chicago and what do you guys talking about in the fall of twenty sixteen but but if you talk about Hillary Clinton Donald Trump do so in a way that we can play it in November December after the after the year well at the time I and everybody else in the room thought Hillary was going to win so while I respected yours request as best I could I I kinda lean into but we all know what's going to happen right it was very good the first time in my life my paranoia pathos right exactly that we sort of because of a little bit help that help you out we've got a we've had even worse than that we had a guy from CNN on last year talking about the mother stuff and I thought it would be fine and then when it came time to air everything was kinda still accurate it wasn't that it wasn't it was just that everybody moves on I mean what I would like today everybody's obviously talking about Iran will next week one kind of hopes we aren't you know if we are which because stuff has happened you know the missing rascals podcast that we do on Thursdays you've been in the gaggle before yeah he's to be invited him on several times and you'll get the invitation again but when we record that I always say today is Thursday it is January second this is what I said yesterday it's twelve thirty in the afternoon yeah I give the timestamp because by the next week that's completely dated by the next day ended the day sometimes it's stated to lease you know the context in which ever had a poor one back nobody will while we were been doing the podcast events have changed literally as we were doing it you know per trans looking his phone or something goes wait a minute we got a yeah we imagine this conversation now because we are talking about fairly current things I was playing solitaire though I let I let the crew do that at least two of them have lately been putting their nose down into the phone while we're recording the podcast but I'm thinking a they're journalists there yeah paying attention to things and be I'm not paying them just like high schoolers with their laptops it's kind of off putting and I think Hey we're all in the room together doing this thing I'm just looking at your phone I didn't know that bothered you because I do it all the time well I thought I think what do you what do you doing that's more important than the actual broadcaster podcast we're doing right now well if they're looking at a photo if you do not doing that mark I tend to think of the most interesting person on the podcast and so the others are taught you have the luxury of check in now with a last I listen to what I said right right I got a minute I'll talk to after the news but just before we go to the news on the so when does the interview show where this tonight eight thirty PM hello first at ten eleven PBS and our first guest is wonderful she's a woman name Abby mac and Anne and she has a show on Showtime called work in progress and it's kind of loosely based on her life yeah it's takes place here in Chicago it's it's awesome come again in your interviews great too I'm but the show is really good who else is on this episode guy named David gamble is a photographer and artist who back when Andy Warhol died he was passed by any war house manager to take photos of anyone halls apartment for reasons having to do with what they were going to how they're going to sell his paintings later in auctions and stuff like that and the photos are super interesting because on the one hand he's got a weird mix of eclectic stuff that you'd expect any war hall to have in it you know New York apartment on the other hand he has a medicine chest that has everything that you would have been in the medicine chest in there's something about that analogy that is what is the medicine chest displayed as hard or is this just as medicine it's well I mean what what what it's just the medicine chest but one because when it's a photograph of medicine chest does become art I don't know I'm still trying to figure out the tomato soup cannot you get high enough don't eleven thirty I had another question but a guest you had on and the story from a very famous Chicago and after.

marijuana Chicago wicker park Illinois
"david gamble" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

11:10 min | 2 years ago

"david gamble" Discussed on WJR 760

"In studio now is David gambling David is executive vice president of one of our newest partners is midnight golf David is the executive vice president of midnight golf in is served in that role since two thousand and one David was a global equity trader for two major Wall Street firms I also served in corporate leadership with two automotive suppliers so I'm gonna talk a little bit about that David leads programming for midnight golf by developing the mentors and facilitating the programs evaluation and making sure that they continue to help kids I've seen it first hand was so very very impressed that I said we need to make a grant which we've done David also focuses on developing relationships with partners like us that ensure the financial stability of the organization David earned a bachelor of arts degree in international business and French and also earned a certificate in community problem solving from the Kennedy School of government at Harvard University so a day welcome to caring for kids well it's an honor to be here thanks for having me I really appreciate yeah it's great to see you and our listeners may not be as familiar with midnight golf is is I am now and so can you tell us a little bit about midnight golf I'd be honored to again thanks for having me and we really do appreciate you being there the other day speed mentor is really important that's one of the few days we invite people from the outside right participate in and programming and and really haven't given the young people an opportunity to engage people professionally and and try to begin this you know this developing the skill of networking man I got started in two thousand one I started I I joined kinda six eight months after after okay is he getting there from just about the right about the beginning and really there to help I've been involved with youth development in Detroit for about twelve eleven twelve years prior to that okay mostly teaching young people entrepreneurship all right over the east side of Detroit at some schools and panic to surround the area though that's not what I was known for but met Renee Fluker who founded the organization and I have a mutual friend and thought I could be helpful and by helping her with the programming and the design and and helping to train young people that you know just certain kind of the stuff that I learned in so what happened is we end up you know when I got off don't play golf admin I put it right on the race on the the old model or the older programming model that was encompassed by midnight basketball which is sports and life skills could connected yeah and so we did it but just in a little bit different way so we spent thirty weeks training young people start with high school seniors helping them transition to college make sure everybody gets to college that they stay in college and graduate and that's key stay in that that is really rare our hearts are are real genuine focus enough our focus now especially and to make sure they have a career to begin our job to begin rent their careers when they graduate from college whatever that means it could be a master's degree we have doctors we have attorneys will in teachers and we have it we we have a whole cadre of professions that are evolving through these young people we work with over twenty five hundred probably close in on three thousand young people since two thousand one impacting lives so how does golf India because most everyone asks me that yeah yeah yeah it in this one of those things that's really interesting we still believe that that golf is and we don't believe it it's true that cough is still one of the top relationship developing developing tools you can have a business we talk to young people about god not to be Tiger Woods not a plan that house crofting the would that be a great thing to have in your bag of tools and there's I don't care who you talk to what young person that's where they make deals us were people meet each other right we do believe they caddy they see that first hand absolutely and they in our a if I have a caddy somewhere and they're just they're just watching every second when they're not caddying and they see relationships building so you're trying to make sure they understand the value of that precisely and it ends up in the rocks of metaphor like if they've golf is a tool guess what other tools you had had a Heidi right will speak will negotiate man is money right have a good resume get to college pay for it stay there are all those sorts of things we did over thirty weeks we'll talk with Dave Gammon executive vice president midnight golf one of our a children's foundation new partners and and Davis been talking about a little bit of the history of that and so I mentioned that we made it a recent grant and sewer who are some of your other partners so our listeners can say oh I didn't know that sex was involved because and and maybe they want to get involved to so we have a a lot of terrific grant making partners and lots of folks who just give individually but the Jamie that a second family foundation have right there there like are you know they've been just connected with us since they started many years ago and have consistently supported us very significantly less have been funded by the Skillman foundation for number of years we have received the money from Kellogg we're we're not being fought about them currently but they again have have supported our work along with the Dresdner foundation who's a big supporter and other we were not partner with them now that we've talked to them absolutely Kellogg we do partner with Jamie I've talked to about doing some things inside a nice a conversation with him the night I was there as well as afterwards in one of our really significant partners is the McGregor foundation and I had a great foundation absolutely so we were funded you know by the folks in town who really understand this new development space fairly significant I'm sure I'm forgetting somebody because a number the area banks in there yeah some corporations as well I I know that many of the mentors are from those companies they are they are our allies one of our big partners that are we have some answers that are from ally Serbia itself people want to get involved is there a way that maybe they can reach out and either by some financially supporting or getting involved in some other way absolutely really easy midnight golf dot org all right yeah and that's the connecting point for all of that for volunteering for mentoring for donations for events just to learn about the organization's pretty in depth in terms of how we do what we do we we've been very successful that you know helping more than seventy percent of our students graduate from college which is well above the national average for all students so hundred percent nearly a hundred percent of our students go to college we still pretty dramatically Detroit area students I want I want talk a little bit about that because I spent twenty seven years and higher read in enrollment in marketing at the university of Toledo and university of Akron and in the statistic you just gave prickly for first generation kids of graduating is it that alone talks about and says your success because of those numbers don't happen right without mentoring they just don't happen without mentoring and and not only getting a kid into college but keeping him in Colorado in on that path to graduate so all you need to do is state the statistics and people that know anything will say this is a good program right as for us a little bit about you you I mentioned you had a successful investment career and so how did you end up at midnight golf and doing the things you're doing yeah I was a an investment adviser and really became a global equity specialist for pension funds okay thirteen years with the water and their stars companies no longer operating I know that I but I know it was it was a great career and a one of my clients ask me the kind of after about twelve or thirteen years ago in a partnership with them running a automotive supplier and does so I did that for four years and it didn't work out so well we're kinda nearing the the two thousand yeah Sharon lash tried it again with another company then it didn't work out so well and so I spent almost twelve thirteen years in the civic engagement says with new Detroit okay file well following the the industry now path and then was able to really kind of hone in on kind of the skills and the the real caring about our community and and and thoughtfulness that you could bring to community if you really have the time to to be engaged in and were in the Detroit while you're doing great work speaking of new trade I was I'm old enough to know that I used to raise money for new try it when it was funded by the United foundation and one of my mentors and still friend is well Douglas without question one of the greatest yeah ever yeah and his son at is a friend of mine too so they they had a jaguar dealership in the soil for awhile that's how I got to know it so much so that's a great path of of taking your business skills and then using them to help young people in many ways change their lives and create a path to successful rewarding lives I'd completely agree I think that may be part of what's so unique about midnight off we don't come to the space kind of the traditional education youth development route but from the business perspective yeah I know how do you how do you create and develop and nurture talent regardless of your educational focus war just make sure everybody it whatever we focus on teaching and prepare how we prepare them it fits no matter where they and yeah where they end up and and so speaking of where they end up you mention the majority the kids going through the program go to college and then what are some of the places are going so it is on a website as well as there's over a hundred and I think a hundred fifty or sixty different colleges let me be clear more than half about half a will go to schools in Michigan okay and then the rest go everywhere from the universe we've got a student at Peking university peeking in China festoons you know Stanford brown and start although not not all but many of the ivy and a lot of a historically black colleges we have a number of students I gotta historically black rows adversely Howard in hand and how it's great can't can't leave any models think they come out right yeah let me get it in to the C. stick yeah and so the the folks in the studio that that are with me one central Michigan grad so I so we have seen you front room service and that's right I'm a data grad on another matter that in so you know what we're we're delighted that that were now partner with them so yeah we're honored that you guys funded this United she's you generally are you know if awful about what you've done and you know sauce and so to be you know hundred in this way we really appreciated that and don't take it lightly we can we look forward to yeah we see it as just the beginning because we're an independent foundation were more about wellness were more about pathways to success in the education is the best pathway completely agree particularly for for kids trying to break decades maybe of poverty and right its owner education so so I hope that it's.

executive vice president David equity trader hundred percent thirteen years thirty weeks twelve eleven twelve years twelve thirteen years twenty seven years six eight months seventy percent four years
"david gamble" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"david gamble" Discussed on WJR 760

"I also serve in corporate leadership with two automotive suppliers so I'm gonna talk a little bit about that David leads programming for midnight golf by developing the mentors and facilitating the programs evaluation and making sure that they continue to help kids I've seen it first hand was so very very impressed that I said we need to make a grant which we've done David also focuses on developing relationships with partners like us that ensure the financial stability of the organization David earned a bachelor of arts degree in international business and French and also earned a certificate in community problem solving from the Kennedy School of government at Harvard University so a day welcome to caring for kids well it's an honor to be here thanks for having me I really appreciate yeah it's great to see you and our listeners may not be as familiar with midnight golf is is I am now and so can you tell us a little bit about midnight golf I'd be honored to again thanks for having me and we really do appreciate you being there the other day speed manager is really important that's one of the few days we invite people from the outside right participate in and programming and and really haven't given the young people an opportunity to engage people professionally and and try to begin this you know this developing the skill networking man I got started in two thousand one I started I I joined kinda six eight months after after okay is he getting there from just about the right about the beginning and really there to help I've been involved with youth development in Detroit for about twelve eleven twelve years prior to that okay mostly teaching young people entrepreneurship over the east side of Detroit at some schools in Pontiac to surround the area though that's not what I was known for but met Renee Fluker who founded the organization and I have a mutual friend and thought I could be helpful and by helping her with the programming and the design and and helping to train young people that you know just kind of the stuff that I learned in so what happened is we end up you know man I got off don't play often and I put it right on the race on the the old model over the older programming model that was encompassed by midnight basketball which is sports and life skills could connected yeah and so we did it but just in a little bit different way so we spent thirty weeks training young people start with high school seniors helping them transition to college make sure everybody gets the college that they stay in college and graduate and that's key stay and that that is really rare our hearts are are real genuine focus enough our focus now especially and to make sure they have a career to begin our job to begin right their careers when they graduate from college whatever that means it could be a master's degree we have doctors we have attorneys women teachers and we have it we we have a whole cadre of professions that are evolving through these young people we work with over twenty five hundred probably close in on three thousand young people since two thousand one impacting lives so how does golf video because most everyone asks me that yeah yeah yeah it in this one of those things that's really interesting we still believe that that golf is and we don't believe it it's true that offer still one of the top relationship developing developing tools you can have a business we talk to young people about god not to be Tiger Woods not to plan the cows crofting but would not be a great thing to have in your bag of tools and there's I don't care who you talk to what young person that's where they make deals that's where people meet each other right we do believe they caddy they see that first hand absolutely and they you know I I if I have a caddy somewhere and they're just they're just watching every second when they're not caddying and they see relationships building so you're trying to make sure they understand the value of that precisely and it ends up in the rocks of metaphor like if they've golf is a tool guess what other tools you had had a Heidi right will speak will negotiate man is money right have a good resume get to college pay for it stay there are all those sorts of things we did over thirty weeks we'll talk with Dave Gammon executive vice president midnight golf one of our a children's foundation new partners and and Davis been talking about a little bit of the history of that and so I mentioned that we made it a recent grant and sewer who are some of your other partners so our listeners can say oh I didn't know that sex was involved good and and maybe they want to get involved to so we have a lot of terrific grant making partners and lots of folks who just give individually but the Jamie at any second family foundation have right there there like are you know they've been just connected with us since they started many years ago and have consistently supported us very significantly less have been funded by the Skillman foundation for number of years we have received a money from Kellogg we're we're not being fought about them currently but they again have have supported our work along with the Dresdner foundation who's a big supporter and other we were not partnering with them now that we've talked to them absolutely Kellogg we do partner with Jamie I've talked to about doing some things inside a nice a conversation with him that night I was there as well as afterwards in one of our really significant partners is the McGregor foundation and I had a great foundation absolutely so we were funded you know by the folks in town who really understand this youth development space fairly significant I'm sure I'm forgetting somebody because a number the area banks in there yeah some corporations as well I I know that many of the mentors are from those companies they are they are our allies one of our big partners that are we have some answers that are from ally so yeah it's if people want to get involved is there a way that maybe they can reach out and either by financially supporting or getting involved in some other way absolutely really easy midnight golf dot org all right yeah and that's the connecting point for all that for volunteering for mentoring for donations for events just to learn about the organization's pretty in depth in terms of how we do what we do we we've been very successful at you know helping more than seventy percent of our students graduate from college which is well above the national average for all students so hundred percent nearly a hundred percent of our students go to college we still pretty dramatically Detroit area students I want I want talk a little bit about that because I spent twenty seven years and higher read in enrollment in marketing at the university of Toledo and university of Akron and in the statistic you just gave critically for first generation kids of graduating is it that alone talks about and says your success because of those numbers don't happen right without mentoring they just don't happen without mentoring and and not only getting a kid into college but keeping them in Colorado in on that path to graduate so all you need to do is state the statistics and people that know anything will say this is a good program right as for us a little bit about you you I mentioned you had a successful investment career and so how did you end up at midnight golf and doing the things you're doing yeah I was a an investment adviser and really became a global equity specialist for pension funds of her out thirteen years with the water and their stars companies no longer operating I know that I but I know it was it was a great career and a one of my clients ask me the kind of after about twelve or thirteen years ago in a partnership with them running a automotive supplier and does so I did that for four years and it didn't work out so well we're kinda nearing the the two thousand yeah tried it again with another company then it didn't work out so well and so I spent almost twelve thirteen years in the civic engagement says with new Detroit okay file well following the the industry now path and then was able to really kind of hone in on kind of the skills and the the real caring about our community and and and thoughtfulness that you could bring to community if you really have the time to to be engaged in a land where a new trend while you're doing great work speaking of new trade I was I'm old enough to know that I used to raise money for new trite when it was funded by the United foundation and one of my mentors and still friend is well Douglas without question one of the greatest ever yeah and his son at is a friend of mine too so they they had a jaguar dealership in the soil for awhile that's how I got to know that so so that's a great path of of taking your business skills and then using them to help young people in many ways change our lives and create a path to successful rewarding lives I'd completely agree I think that may be part of what's so unique about the neck off we don't come to the space kind of the traditional education youth development route but from the business perspective yeah I know how do you how do you to create and develop and nurture talent regardless of your educational focus war just make sure everybody it whatever we focus on teaching and prepare how we prepare them it fits no matter where they end up here where they end up and and so speaking of where they end up you mention the majority the kids going through the program go to college and then what are some of the places are going so it is on a website as well as there's over a hundred and I think a hundred fifty or sixty different colleges but let me be clear more than half about half a will go to schools in Michigan okay and then the rest go everywhere from the universe we've got a student at Peking university peeking in China festoons you know Stanford brown and start although not not all but many of the IV a lot of a historically black colleges we have a number of students I gotta historically black rows adversity Howard in hand and how it's great can't can't leave any other models they could come out right yeah let me get it in to the C. stick yeah and so the the folks in the studio that that are with me one central Michigan grad so I so we have seen you front room service and that's right I'm a data grad and another man and that in so you know what we're we're delighted that that were now partner with them so yeah we're honored that you guys funded this United she's you generally are you know thoughtful about what you've done and you know sauce and so to be you know I added in this way we really appreciated that and don't take it lightly we can we look forward to yeah when I see it as just the beginning does because we're an independent foundation were more about wellness were more about pathways to success and education is the best pathway completely agree particularly for for kids trying to break decades maybe of poverty and right it's either education so so I hope that it's a long term relationship with maniacal like glass all right David thank you very much appreciated yeah that was David gambling executive vice president at midnight.

David hundred percent thirteen years thirty weeks twelve eleven twelve years twelve thirteen years twenty seven years six eight months seventy percent four years
"david gamble" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:55 min | 2 years ago

"david gamble" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I knew Jim Nicholson my twenty years at the daily news overlapped with his time there, and I remember he always seemed a little mysterious he disappeared from the newsroom for months at a time. And never really explained why he was gone. He was a consummate gentleman always dressed in a dark suit. He had a thin moustache and a face describe this kind of a poor man's Clark Gable? That phrase came from his ability in the Philadelphia, Inquirer and daily news written by my friend and former colleague David gamble Korda. He knows where Nicholson was when he disappeared. From the newsroom turns out. He was interesting is the people he wrote about Dave welcome to fresh air. Thanks for having me Jim Nicholson earned a national reputation as an obituary writer, what did he do before that? So Jim had a pretty colorful life, even by daily, news standards. He was born in Philadelphia, and I grew up in south jersey, and after graduating with a journalism degree, he he sort of tried on careers almost like disguises, a dockworker a car salesman a private detective and even a police intelligence analyst before he got into the possible even stranger world of journalism. Right. And he didn't begin as an obituary writer he did reporting. What kind of reporting did he do? So Jim was actually a pretty accomplished investigative journalist so much. So that a lot of daily news and inquirer reporters from that era recalled being really impressed by work. He did in the nineteen seventies. Reporting on the black mafia for Philadelphia. Magazine and motorcycle gangs for the now defunct Philadelphia bulletin, and when he was hired by the daily news in nineteen seventy eight. He initially started out on that same beat as an investigative reporter. Right. So how did you get into writing obits? So an editor at the daily news in nineteen eighty-two. Tom Livingston took Jim to luncheon and wondered if he would be interested in writing victories. And I think to everyone's great surprise Jim agree to do it. But there was you know, I think a little bit of a caveat attached. Which was Jim set up shop in a deserted corner of a fourteenth floor office in the old inquirer. And daily news building at broaden Cahill streets away from the prying eyes of editors that he had unfavorable feelings towards and not only that. But he wanted the focus of his victory writing to to not be on CEO's and celebrities and politicians he wanted to focus on I think the the uncelebrated blue-collar men and women who really make up Philadelphia. And give it so much of its character. That was a new thing at the time. Did he did he have trouble selling that within the within the paper? I think at first the editors were just so pleased that he agreed to take this on the he didn't really encounter much pushback. If anything was more going to be up to Jim to make it succeed or fail. His eventually writing earned him a national reputation, but he had another life with the military. Tell us about that. For for Jim Nicholson journalism proved to really just be his day job. He joined the Marine Corps when he graduated high school, and then in the nineteen eighty s joined the New Jersey national guard and actually rose up to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the army, and that would be sort of remarkable all by itself, but it's the type of work that she did that really sparks lot of interest. He would leave for two three four months at a time on missions for the military that he did not really elaborate on at all with his friends and colleagues, and what a lot of them found out years later than in fact, most of them didn't learn until after he died he was doing a lot of counterintelligence work, even after he retired. He was still doing work overseas that I think would blow the minds of most of the people who sat near him, you know, in an old newsroom. A lot of time in Latin America. Right. Yeah. Yeah. He spent a significant amount of time in Panama in the late nineteen eighty s and early nineteen ninety s and you have an interesting anecdote about when he was there in nineteen Ninety-two on some narcotics related counter intelligence operation in the role. He played among other commanders. So one of Jim's former colleagues in the military recalled arriving in Panama and finding Jim really being in charge of this counter drug operation, even though he was not the top ranking official. In fact, he actually had people who outranked him working for him. And as it was explained to me, this is all possible scenario to find in military operations. You know, be very very rare to have someone taking orders from a person that they outrank the gym had this sort of no nonsense way about him and projected, I think he was just very. Much there for all the right reasons and was only interested in making their mission success. And that's somehow brought out in the in the men and women around him. You know, this willingness to go along and say, okay, I'm going to look beyond the fact that you're my subordinates, and I'm gonna say that I recognized you really know more about what's going on here than we do. He was summoned out of retirement by none other than David portrays. Right. And this is I think, you know, I had I had to sit down and write gyms of bitchy worry. I knew that. He was an interesting guy. And I knew he'd lived a fascinating life. But when I got to the portrays part, even I had to kind of stop and reconsider just what was going on here. As several of Jim's former military colleagues explained it at some point during the nineteen nineties and two thousands. He struck up a correspondence with David portrays and became a trusted advisor so much. So that in the middle of the Iraq war betrays asks, Jim if you'd be willing to come out of retirement, go over to Iraq. And and once again, men, an intelligence operation, and Jim was sixty six years old at this point. And and from everything I gathered from his friends and from his family did not really hesitate at all. And within a within a few months was was in Iraq and helping military track activity of insurgents in the area. Ran a whole operation in Baghdad. Right right, right in Baghdad what was his family life like gyms family? I think one of the the things that really stood out to me. And especially in talking to one of his sons Jim had had three three boys, and they did not really see him as this famous. Journalists store this famous soldier, you know, they they knew him is very kind and patient man who taught them the importance of treating everybody with respect and they saw in him a very real interest in the lives of pretty much everyone. He crossed paths with two that meant for Jim. Your Bank tellers and pharmacists got point set of plants from him at Christmas. And the garbage collectors in their neighborhoods, but get bottles of Coca Cola from him during hot summer months. And so that interest that he showed in in the lives of of the everyday people. He was bumping into. I think carried over into the work. He did at the daily news. The thing that's his son remarked on a number of gyms friends brought up to was the fact that he had been married for some time. And he and his wife. For separate. It's for quite a while in the late nineteen ninety s she was diagnosed with Alzheimer's, and Jim actually moved back in with her and took care for the remaining years of her life, and that blue all of them away, you know, that that's sort of loyalty, and dedication, even though their relationship had soured considerably, but he didn't hesitate, and as he told his son until his friends now he just believes that this was the right thing to do. And it didn't bother him. He didn't see it as a burden, and I think it really speaks volumes about the character that he had there's more than ten years. He's been there wasn't it. Yes. Yes. She was she was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the late nineties, and she she died in two thousand eleven so it was a considerable amount of time. David gamble. Thanks so much for speaking with us. Thanks, dave..

Jim Nicholson Philadelphia Iraq writer Clark Gable editor David gamble Korda Inquirer David David gamble Panama Dave Alzheimer Baghdad investigative reporter Latin America Marine Corps New Jersey intelligence analyst
"david gamble" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:57 min | 2 years ago

"david gamble" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I knew Jim Nicholson my twenty years at the daily news over lapped with his time there, and I remember he always seemed a little mysterious he disappeared from the newsroom for months at a time. And never really explained why he was gone. He was a consummate gentleman always dressed in a dark suit. He had a thin moustache and a face describe this kind of a poor man's Clark Gable that phrase came from his obit in the Philadelphia, Inquirer and daily news written by my friend and former colleague, David Gamba Korda. He knows where Nicholson was when he disappeared. From the newsroom turns out. He was his interesting is the people he wrote about Dave welcome to fresh air. Thanks for having me. Dave Jim Nicholson earned a national reputation as an obituary writer, what did he do before that? So Jim had a pretty colorful life. Even by daily, news standards. He was born in Philadelphia, and I grew up in south jersey, and after graduating with it with a journalism degree, he he sort of tried on careers almost like disguises, a dockworker a car salesman a private detective and even police intelligence analyst before he got into the possibly even stranger world of journalism. Right. And he didn't begin as an obituary writer he did reporting. What kind of reporting did he do Jim was actually a pretty accomplished investigative journalist so much. So that a lot of daily news and inquirer reporters from that era recalled being really impressed by work. He did in the nineteen seventies. Reporting on the black mafia for Philadelphia magazine and motorcycle gangs for the now defunct Philadelphia bulletin, and when he was hired by the daily news in nineteen seventy eight. He initially started out on that same beat as an investigative reporter. Right. So how did he get into writing obits? So an editor at the daily news in one thousand nine hundred eighty two Tom Livingston took Jim to launch and wondered if he would be interested in writing pitcher worries and I think to everyone's great surprise Jim agree to do it. But there was I think a little bit of a caveat attached. Which was that Jim set up shop in a deserted corner of a fourteenth floor office in the old inquirer. And daily news building at broaden Kelly L streets away from the prying eyes of editors that he had unfavorable feelings towards and not only that. But he wanted the focus of his writing to to not be on, you know. CEO's and celebrities and politicians he wanted to focus on I think the the uncelebrated blue-collar men and women who really make up Philadelphia and give it so much of its character. That was a new thing at the time. Did he did he did he have trouble selling that within the within the paper? I think at first the editors were just so pleased that he agreed to take this on that he didn't really encounter much pushback if anything more going to be up to Jim to make it succeed or fail. His eventually writing earned him a national reputation, but he had another life with the military. Tell us about that. For for Jim Nicholson journalism proved to really just be his day job. He joined the Marine Corps when he graduated high school, and then in the nineteen eighty s joined the New Jersey national guard and actually rose up to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the army, and that would be sort of remarkable all by itself, but it's the type of work that she did that really sparks a lot of interest. He would leave for two three four months at a time on missions for the military that he did not really elaborate on at all with his friends and colleagues, and what a lot of them found out years later than in fact, most of them didn't learn until after he died he was doing a lot of counterintelligence work, even after he retired. He was still doing work overseas that I think would blow the minds of most of the people who sat near him in an old newsroom. A lot of time in Latin America. Right. Yeah. Yeah. He spent a significant amount of time in Panama in the late nineteen eighty s and early nineteen ninety s and you have an interesting anecdote about when he was there in nineteen Ninety-two on some narcotics related counter intelligence operation in the role. He played among other commanders. So one of Jim's former colleagues in the military recalled arriving in Panama and finding Jim really being in charge of this counter drug operation, even though he was not the top ranking official. In fact, he actually had people who outranked him working for him. And as it was explained to me, this is all possible scenario to find in military operations. You know, be very very rare to have someone taking orders from a person that they outrank the gym had this sort of no nonsense way about him. And and project that I think that he was just very. Much there for all the right reasons and was only interested in making their mission a success. And that's somehow brought out in the in the men and women around him this willingness to go along and say, okay, I'm going to look beyond the fact that you're my subordinates, and I'm gonna say that I I recognize that you really know more about what's going on here than we do. He was summoned out of retirement by none other than David us. Right. And this is I think, you know, I had when I had to sit down and write gyms obituary, I knew that he was an interesting guy, and I knew he'd lived a fascinating life. But when I got to the portrays part, even I had to kind of stop and reconsider just what was going on here. As several of Jim's former military colleagues explained it at some point during the nineteen nineties and two thousands. He struck up a correspondence with David portrays and became a trusted advisor so much. So that in the middle of the Iraq war betrays asked, Jim if you'd be willing to come out of retirement, go over to Iraq. And and once again, men, an intelligence operation, and Jim was sixty six years old at this point. And and from everything I gathered from his friends from his family did not really hesitate at all. And you know, within a within a few months was was in Iraq and helping military track activity of insurgents in the area. Ran a whole operation in Baghdad. Right right, right in Baghdad what was his family lifelike Jim's family? I think one of the the things that really stood out to me. And especially in talking to one of his sons Jim had had three three boys, and they did not really see him as this famous. Journalists store this famous soldier, you know, they they knew him as a very kind and patient man who taught them the importance of treating everybody with respect and they saw in him a very real interest in the lives of pretty much everyone. He crossed paths with two that meant for Jim. Your Bank tellers and pharmacists got point set a plants from him at Christmas. And the garbage collectors in their neighborhoods would get bottles of Coca Cola from him during hot summer months. And and so that interest that he showed in in the lives of of the everyday people. He was bumping into. I think carried over into the work. He did at the daily news. The thing that's his son remarked on an number of gyms friends brought up to was the fact that he had been married for some time. And he and his wife. We're separate. It's for quite a while up in the late nineteen ninety s she was diagnosed with Alzheimer's, and Jim actually moved back in with her and took care for the remaining years of her life, and that blue all of them away, you know, that that sort of loyalty and dedication, even though their relationship pet soured considerably, but he didn't hesitate and as he told the sun until his friends now he just believes that this was the right thing to do. And and it didn't bother him. He didn't see it as a burden, and I think it really speaks volumes about the character that he had there's more than ten years. He's been where there wasn't it. Yes. Yes. She was she was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the late nineties, and she she died in two thousand eleven so it was a considerable amount of time. David gamble quarter. Thanks so much for speaking with us. Thanks, dave. David gamble. Korda is a staff.

Jim Nicholson Philadelphia David Gamba Korda David gamble Iraq Clark Gable editor Philadelphia magazine Dave Inquirer Alzheimer Baghdad writer investigative reporter Latin America Marine Corps New Jersey intelligence analyst CEO
"david gamble" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"david gamble" Discussed on 600 WREC

"The sanctuary some kids run out. But we love that enthusiasm. Don't we we're so glad that the have our children leading us in worship in so many ways. We also really glad to have all of you with us today for those watching by livestream or listening on the radio deliver just for the first part of the service today was the Reverend Elizabeth dick who is our interim outreach director. She has come aboard and has hit the ground running and is already active in a number of things. We're so glad they're able to be with us about three months or so as we rejoice Sierra, serotonin fishing, and we'll Christians son. Glad you're here do on what welcome all those who are here today as well. And we ask that everyone. Please find the friendship pads. They're located at the end of each year, we signed those and pass them down as I said before your job is not complete. Then if there's some people sitting on the same issue or round you, and you don't know them, please get their name and following service. We help that you'll get to know each other a little better, we do have a little reception time in the Tiki room the all over here to the right? We do want to let you know that we received members the third sunny, very Martin already some of you have expressed some interest. We'd like to talk to you more about that. If you wanna call from the clergy member this week, simply check one of those boxes also one very special friend that I welcomed this morning. Reverend Dr David gamble. It works for the theology and worship department there in Louisville denominational headquarters, and he was the part of a a preparatory wide preparatory wide accomplish the took place in north Mississippi the last few days, and David we welcome you as well to a worship and ministry here at Iowa. A few other Nassar's. We have do wanna remind you that are fine up times for our Linton. A small group discussions will be taking place next week or so you should receive the little car to remind you about that. But next week. Sign up for those. We've been doing that for a number of years now increasing are meaningful to a wide range of you. And so we hope that you'll be able to connect with a small group in that sense. I don't wanna remind you that some of you are already reading a small groups this wonderful book, the forgotten books in the bible recovering the five scrolls for today. Dr Williamson will be here the last Sunday, February it's a fascinating book. And if you aren't reading this in a small group, go ahead and order it. Because it takes a look at Atlanta taste in Ecclesiastes these Ruth and some of those and makes them meaningful for today. This how bible study ought to take place. So hopefully, you can take a look at this and be a part of the ongoing discussion, we are overjoyed. Once again have Elizabeth rouse. Who is on our building committee to give us a little update. Good morning. So almost one year ago to this day. I was standing up here on behalf of the building committee, inviting you all to come to a building dedication kickoff as we began the construction project next door in the Jones building at that time, you all wanted to know when would construction begin the most popular question today, though is when will this end, and when will we get to experience the amazing renovated building..

Dr David gamble Elizabeth dick Elizabeth rouse Nassar director Dr Williamson Sierra Linton Louisville Martin Jones Atlanta north Mississippi Ruth Iowa three months one year