23 Burst results for "David Byrne"

Large protests and looting in Chicago’s Wicker Park

Roe Conn

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Large protests and looting in Chicago’s Wicker Park

"Governor Pritzker is deploying two hundred fifty National Guard troops across the state and three hundred state police officers your state police assistant deputy director lieutenant colonel David Byrne on a personal note I would like to say that as a black man that the tragic death a total disregard for life in regards to Mr George Floyd has hurt me extremely it's not clear at this point where the guard members and state troopers will be sent we're getting reports of large protests in Lincoln Park in boys town also reports of shots fired and looting taking place in Cicero as well as looting in wicker

Governor Pritzker National Guard David Byrne Mr George Floyd Lincoln Park Cicero Deputy Director
What to know about the "designated survivor" and State of the Union

Dave Ramsey

00:19 sec | 6 months ago

What to know about the "designated survivor" and State of the Union

"The designated survivor from the cabinet the one member of the cabinet who does not attend the state of the union speech in case of a disaster this time around interior secretary David Byrne hard ask if US senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders were on hand for the state of the union speech they were not they were in New Hampshire campaigning this

United States Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders New Hampshire Secretary David Byrne
"david byrne" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

05:38 min | 7 months ago

"david byrne" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"The post office again now on Broadway David Byrne the one time talking head who staging a one of a kind of musical spectacle listen up your Serena Altschul take in David Byrne's critically acclaimed show on Broadway and you might ask yourself how did David Byrne get here we're gonna take you want a whole journey it's not just a bunch of songs in gonna have a party but it is actually going to you're going to be in a different place emotionally and intellectually or whatever by the end the show American utopia takes its name from burns last album for which he developed an innovative and unusual stage show drawing on more than four decades of making music and while much of the music is familiar it's clear burn is marching to a different the show begins with Bern contemplating how a child's mind develops baby's brains have hundreds of millions more neural connections then we do as adults and told us why as he prepared to take the stage with all the vocals on the crime all out let me see gradually they realize these are the ones that mom and dad used to talk to one another and if you're wondering well David Byrne is now a granddad burns only daughter Maloo burn gave birth to a son in two thousand eighteen so he must be the great joy of your life thanks a lot of fun David Byrne himself immigrated to the US at the age of Scottish parents I felt like a little bit of an outsider but I realized that the world was made up of people there were different and but we're all here music helped a young David Byrne find his voice even though I was painfully shy I put myself on stage and perform and do really sometimes wacky things I know for your on stage and then coming off the stage and had frozen as far as social interaction I love the way you kind of describe yourself as painfully shy it's it's hard to believe we change thank god we can change firm wanted to become a visual artist but fell into playing music with college friends Tina Weymouth and Chris Brown that band would become the Talking Heads but almost from the beginning the band fought over song writing credits and creative control if you could kind of time machine back to the seventies in your early days what would you say to yourself don't worry David Byrne is going to be okay you don't have to panic do you feel more controlling back then absolutely the only radio news apps for breaking news CBS news radio a good response to Ford's new electric vehicle this is Jeff Cooper with the core chronicles Ford says the high yen first editions rooms of their new Mustang Mach key or sold out no word exactly how many people are put down that five hundred dollar refundable deposit but for director of electrification Ted Canice says the timing is certainly right the cost of the technology's gotten better the power of the cells takes less space in the vehicle Ford also coming to market with his vehicle as some competitors started losing their federal tax credit we think it the cars sold well positioned for some of these premium electors that have come out more recently we know we're in great shape the Ford Mustang marquee expected to be out by the end of the year what the court chronicles I'm Jeff Gilbert CBS news when you need to know turn to CBS news radio I'm in marine green most people can only dream of owning a super car but for those with deep pockets and the need for speed even exotic cars won't cut it the hyper card is where it's at as you leave reports from eastern France this exclusive chateau in Molsheim France we enter the world of hyper cars some of the fastest most expensive most luxurious in the world the whole Johnny to see what a three million dollar she run sport is packing we get behind the wheel with legendary race car driver and the wall we.

David Byrne
"david byrne" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

03:28 min | 7 months ago

"david byrne" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Take in David Byrne's critically acclaimed show on Broadway and you might ask yourself how did David Byrne get here we're gonna take you want a whole journey it's not just a bunch of songs in a party but it is actually going to you're going to be in a different place emotionally and intellectually or whatever by the end the show American utopia takes its name from burns last album for which he developed an innovative unusual stage show drawing on more than four decades of making music and while much of the music is familiar it's clear burn is marching to a different the show begins with Bern contemplating how a child's mind develops baby's brains have hundreds of millions more neural connections then we do as adults and told us why as he prepared to take the stage with all the vocals on the travel out let me see my mountain dew actually they realized that these are the ones that mom and dad used to talk to one another and if you're wondering well David Byrne is now a granddad burns only daughter Maloo burn gave birth to a son in two thousand eighteen so he must be the great joy of your life thanks a lot of fun David Byrne himself immigrated to the US at the age of Scottish parents I felt like a little bit of an outsider but I realize that the world was made up of people there were different and but we're all here music helped a young David Byrne find his voice even though I was painfully shy I put myself on stage and perform and do really sometimes wacky things I know for your on stage and then coming off the stage and had frozen as far as social interaction I love the way you kind of describe yourself it's painfully shy it's it's hard to believe we change thank god we can change firm wanted to become a visual artist but fell into playing music with college friends Tina Weymouth and Chris Brown that band would become the Talking Heads but almost from the beginning the band fought over song writing credits and creative control if you could kind of time machine back to the seventies in your early.

David Byrne Bern Maloo US Chris Brown Tina Weymouth
"david byrne" Discussed on The Current

The Current

09:42 min | 7 months ago

"david byrne" Discussed on The Current

"I just want to push a little bit on this because it could be seen as is the epitome of privilege to filter your reality to get at the cheerful stories because a huge part of the world is living living through awful news and and they don't get tune it out that's a good. That's a good point I went well. Yes I I would say that Some of the stories were doing. They do. Not all about initiatives in kind of first world countries. There's things going on all over the place so my My hope is that we don't limit ourselves to things that affect our own our own selves in our own kind. So it's not just about making smile it's about maybe making change. I think so. Yes on hopes. When you first started collecting these stories you were also so making a new record American Utopia and it's your first solo album in almost fifteen years? I'm wondering how one project informed the other. Oh they definitely did. The songs on the record weren't written to be like the the pop music equivalent of reasons to be cheerful. I think of the songs as being maybe a quirkier version of this that they express a collective yearning and the collective hope that things could be better and hence the name American Utopia can tell me about the cover. Art that you chose. I chose A painting by a guy named Purvis young who is Kind of outsider artists. You might say from Miami. His his paintings The people in them in some some of the many way. Look very and Djelic. But they're presiding over it Kinda decrepit urban landscape. Sometimes there was something about that I thought. Oh that's that really expresses. I think what this what this music is trying to say someone imagining the world that could be yes. They're imagining the world. Could there are also being realistic about it. With American Utopia you approached different communities to take on their own versions of your songs. And I I listen to this beautiful well cover of everybody's coming to my house that was sung by the students from the Detroit School of Arts. I'm wondering what your reaction was the first time you heard it. Oh for the first time I heard their version. I was stunned and I realized immediately that although they didn't change a single word of the song it had a different meaning at least I heard a different meaning my version. I sound the song the song is everybody's coming to my house and I sound like I'm not totally thrilled. The idea there version although they didn't change anything has a feeling of welcome and inclusion invitation and I thought I think I like their version better it is it is quite quite simply feeling like it's great to have everybody over. Use this show that you took on. The road has been called joyful joyous a joy to behold life-affirming exhilarating a wonder of imagination and it also hopeful and. I'm wondering how important it was for you to build the joy in the hope into the show. It's it's not entirely conscious. It's sort of my general instinct to make a show that expresses that and it's also the community of musicians and players and crew and everybody that we we put together that you want to create a little community that kind of appreciates and really love one another and that makes it a really pleasant experience. Of course my songs are yes sometimes kind of quirky and unusual but I think in the way that they're performed in the way that we do them yes that certain kind of joy and It comes across. There's one music critic who put it that you create art that feels like a means toward empathy and understanding and one of the songs on the album is even written from the view of of a chicken. Tell me about that well. Yeah there's there's a couple songs that are like that at least Where you're not all chickens for instances another one where I talked about looking at things from the point of view of a dog and how a dog can't imagine what it's like like to drive a car? That's one of the lyrics but we're also limited by what what we are and I thought there is the point of a lot of that looking from an animal's hamels point of view that to to kind of say we're is biased and limited in our view of the world as any animal. Well isn't some the and of course we all know that. Say Dogs can smell a lot more than we can and Birds can see better than we can but so we have our limitations and we can do the best we can and so today The chicken I feel that come on what would happen. Be Too with chicken. Imagine from chickens point of view. Well if from chicken yes yes. There's plenty of roosters there and lots of coal just kind of true if you only have to ask the question in the answer it kind of comes comes right there. The Joy of simple pleasures then. Yeah yes realizing that. Our point of view of heaven or anything anything like that is completely human. CENTRIC that that we've you know we've made a Taylor to us to a chicken. That would be something completely different. And now American utopias going to Broadway. You've done just about everything else. There is to do this film and Opera and and concerts and I'm wondering how big a deal l.. This is for you. It's not something. I grew up longing for our no. There are there. There are people who from a very young age aspired to Broadway Broadway That wasn't me but the people saw this this show over a year ago and I mean a lot of them said this this needs to go to Broadway. This is very theatrical. It has kind of arc or narrative to it almost and so I thought Oh that sounds really interesting challenge. I I wouldn't have thought of that because it's a very different audience. People come with different different set of expectations. They don't expect just a concert. They don't expect Judy. Just get up there and play the songs and that's the end of it. They expected a little something a little richer than that and so I thought good. That's let's try try that let's see if we can do that without giving too much away. What are you going to give them? My friends told me that. There's kind of an inherent narrative arc in the show. Oh and I thought okay. Let's try and bring that out a little bit more so we've kind of adjusted the beginning. I talk a little bit more about my perception of on on different things and it kind of leads us on a journey that lead character that would be me takes kind of through his life. Is it about David Burns life. It is but not in a typical autobiographical way. It's more like a life journey of ideas so it seeing the world from David Burns point of view. Not The chickens and other you you just want to tie all of this together because with with the magazine. The online magazine with the album. Now with with the the theater you you you're settled. This isn't about a moment fleeting joy. What does being cheerful mean to you? I think I mean there's momentary pleasures assures obviously we all know that But I think it means having a sense that you belong that you're accepted And that Sousse kind of hope and possibility in that. And what do you want this to mean to others. I I won't people do occur CC The world from a slightly different point of view. And I think I'm achieving hat And to see how the importance of a community and then the importance of spy. Let's say civic engagement the importance of engaging with the world beyond beyond yourself in your little community and I think that's that's what a lot of it's about people go home and I think they they talking about trump probably trying to figure out some of what they've seen. Well I can guarantee you that you have certainly made me smile through chatting with you for the last a little while I wanted to wish you. Good luck with with The theater project and with the online magazine and we'll we'll be watching and listening. Thank you thank you very much. David Byrne is a musician artist and founder of the online magazine reasons to be cheerful. I spoke with him from Boston. In September. That's our program for today. Stay tuned to radio one for q when rock icon sir. Elton John Joins hose. Was Tom Power to reflect on his fifty year career. Now during my conversation with David Byrne we discussed a high school choir from the Detroit. School of arts the Cupboard and one of his songs. We're GONNA leave today with its rendition of everybody's coming to my house. I'm Laura Lynch. Thanks for listening to the current and happy new year..

online magazine David Burns David Byrne Detroit School of Arts Laura Lynch Elton John Tom Power Boston Purvis Djelic Miami School of arts Taylor founder Judy Detroit trump
Ex-CIA officer jailed for spying for China

News, Traffic and Weather

00:26 sec | 9 months ago

Ex-CIA officer jailed for spying for China

"Former CIA officer Jerry Lee is just one of many people China has tried to pay this by these cases demonstrate the relentless efforts the Chinese government will undertake to recruit and exploit current and former members of America's intelligence community justice department lawyer David Byrne saying the CIA agent may nearly a million dollars selling China the secrets he's now sentenced to nearly twenty years in

Jerry Lee China Chinese Government America David Byrne CIA Officer Million Dollars Twenty Years
Interior proposes coveted deal to ex-client of agency head

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 9 months ago

Interior proposes coveted deal to ex-client of agency head

"Environmental groups and Democrats oppose the proposed federal contract with California's Westlands water district the nation's largest agricultural water supplier interior secretary David Byrne heart was a lobbyist for Westlands until twenty sixteen the year before he joined interior initially as a deputy secretary he was involved in negotiations on a twenty sixteen federal law allowing water district to lock up permanent contracts or water if they pay their share of the cost of the federal government's massive Central Valley water project a lawyer for the natural resources defense council calls it a sweetheart deal the proposed contract sixty days public comment period which began late last month ends over the Christmas holiday Tim acquire Washington

California Secretary Westlands Deputy Secretary Washington David Byrne Central Valley TIM Sixty Days
"david byrne" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

03:46 min | 11 months ago

"david byrne" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"I'm curt Anderson and this is the studio three sixty podcast. Hello Studio three sixty listener. Here's another show to check out it is called mogul is from spotify and Gimblett media and it's a podcast all about hip hops most most iconic moments toll by the people who live them. It's hosted by the hip hop journalist Brandon Jinx Jenkins and this season of mogul will take a Q. Down South to tell the origin story of southern hip hop and a big musical controversy of the late twentieth century the show is a rich and riveting mix of Miami Bass and beads battles over free speech and definitely one you won't WanNa miss the new season of Mogo starts with the story of two live live crew how they made hip hop nastier than ever and then find themselves on a collision course with the US government you'll also learn about the world of pirate radio and in here's some exclusive interviews with lots of Miami greats such as Trick Daddy Rick Ross Trina Flo Rida while she fire and more you can in stream the entire season of mobile on spotify now or listen to new episodes every Wednesday wherever you get your podcasts. Oh and a piece of advice. Get your best best headphones to listen to this one because there is a lot of base and great music. If I were to make a list of my I don't know fifty living and Cultural Heroes David Byrne would be on it. I felt for him in the late seventies of course when he was the front man for talking heads and Dan then I became more of a fan boy as his career evolved music producer music curator visual artists biking activists lecturer filmmaker theater theater maker now he's kind of blending most of those things together up from his resume and staging it and starring in it on on Broadway his show American Utopia opens a New York City this month it features songs from a new album called American utopia as well as talking heads songs James Plus a kind of story and choreography and other assorted bits of my talking heads. ALMANAC tells me there's another milestone coming up soon in October. The ninth is the thirty fifth anniversary bursary of stop making sense terrific concert film directed by Jonathan Demme. I have spoken with David Byrne a couple of times on studio three sixty most recently in two thousand twelve twelve when he and talking heads released a DVD set called chronology which was a collection of the band's live performances his audio and video all the way back to nineteen seventy David Byrne. Welcome hi good to be here. Were you surprised at the popularity that you had then this success that came out of this. ARTI little downtown band. Yes the no to be interested in the no okay you're interested in the know right so I have to be sort of immodest and say that like a lot of other bands artists everything else any period really you tend to think that the pervasive stuff around you is crap and your you and your friends are doing. We're doing the real stuff.

David Byrne Rick Ross Trina Flo Rida spotify curt Anderson Jonathan Demme Brandon Jinx Jenkins Miami US New York City Gimblett media lecturer Dan producer thirty fifth
Sen. Cory Gardner: Land Management agency moving west

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Sen. Cory Gardner: Land Management agency moving west

"Meeting the agency that manages federal lands could soon be located close to the lands that it manages the BLM intends to move from DC to the western slope of Colorado the announcement that the bureau of land management will be moving to Grand Junction that it will be headquartered in Grand Junction is a significant significant win for Colorado sender Gardner says most of the lands the BLM manages our west of the Mississippi River but there could be a snag in the process any move still has to be funded by Congress Aaron Weiss with the center for western priorities says the announcement was made before consulting with the chair of the house natural resources committee already has a strained relationship with interior secretary David Byrne hard so is David Barnhart actually wanted to make this happen you wouldn't be blind sided the guy he needs to sign off on it so all of this just reeks of a P. R. stocked Weiss also call center gardeners announcement the possible

BLM Colorado Grand Junction Gardner Mississippi River Aaron Weiss David Byrne David Barnhart P. R. Congress Secretary
"david byrne" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"david byrne" Discussed on Broken Record

"On. With stirring, emotions. Of him this gun in democratic fees. Phone national defense. To those who last you like. We'll be back with more on protests music with our guest David Byrne after this break. I'm just in Richmond producer broken record. The other day. I sat down with a host. Rick Rubin to talk to him about how he could use Lincoln to hire people. How does hiring work on urine in the past when I've had to hire people usually been more through word of mouth asking friends looking for commend Dacians. And it's honestly, not a easy process. One of the hardest things to do, but it's time consuming. Right. Absolutely. And you never you never really know notes. The idea that there's a pool of talent out there available and that we can connect to that seems like something I would like to use it sounded make a higher for your small business natural. You wanna find the best person for the job? Odds are that person's on late Lynton jobs makes it easy to match quality candidates who make the most sense for your role Lynton jobs. He's knowledgeable hard skills and soft skills to match you with the people who fit your role the best people come to Lincoln every day to learn an. Vance their careers. So Lincoln understands what they're interested in and looking for which means we knew us Lincoln to hire someone you're matches are based on so much more than a resume posted job today. A Lincoln dot com slash broken record and get fifty dollars off your first job post. That's Lincoln dot com slash broken record, terms and conditions apply. We're back with more David Byrne. I think I have an example of protests that sounds like a protest. Okay. Peter Gabriel Biko. It's a lament the chorus is searing personal lament is nothing. Pretty it. Is it is beautiful song? There is no way to listen to that song without understanding that it's a protest. Yes. But that, but the very fact think of only one is I think maybe proof of this point. Can you can you think of any others that are maybe Mississippi goddamn? Oh that that really reeks of protest. Yes. Just she announces the name of this song before she sings it and just go. Okay. Here we go. I know what you're in for. We were talking before. And someone forgot new my policies said there's a Charlie mega sung about governor pharma's of Arkansas. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Which she just does he just sort of? I have heard it fables fell this or Abel's afoul of us. That's right. Yeah. That would also it into the category of one with acuity. You know, this video that is going around done by this sweet Mason's of once in a lifetime pudding. Donald trump. Oh, yes. I've seen you know. So someone you tell they would tell us what you might have sent it to me someone sent it to me. It's a they've done that CG trick where they can put Donald Trump's face on top of mine, and I think just run the video all the way through. But instead it's with Trump's instead of me. And I thought this is actually pretty funny people are saying, you gotta tell them to take this down you go take this. This. No. It's that they they go through Donald Trump's speeches and take out all the words where he appears to be saying it. Yeah. So they have once in once in a lifetime. They have Donald Trump. They found a once they found in found an on found a lifetime. So he's actually seeing. It's like it's kind of a tastic. Very clever as he bounces up and down in that. Yeah. I don't know what what particular protests song category that belong stupid. We're deep into CGIAR knee at this point. I have a question. I think to myself now if I were to write a song that that with an issue of some sort like that that I would put it in someone's mouth as some of these songwriters singers. Do I would try and tell a story through character and have them personify an injustice, or whatever it had happened rather than me yelling and saying this is unjust this on fair. This is wrong. Whatever like that. You just tell the story and then let the audience make the conclusion which again could be so what does that about? But you would hope that it would be more moving because it has an era of two some of these people do that SeaWorld, Billy.

Donald trump Lincoln David Byrne Peter Gabriel Biko Rick Rubin Richmond producer CGIAR Dacians Vance SeaWorld Abel Mississippi Arkansas Mason Billy fifty dollars
Black Filmmakers Make History in 2018, but Female Directors Still Shut Out says Study

The Frame

04:32 min | 1 year ago

Black Filmmakers Make History in 2018, but Female Directors Still Shut Out says Study

"And of the filmmakers behind those movies only four point three percent where women and in terms of progress. Twenty eighteen was worse for female directors than the year before as their share of jobs plummeted from seven point three percent to three point six percent. And for those of you who understand Matt that's a drop of more than fifty percent right in. I think that when we look at female directors, and we look at the trends across the twelve years. I think what we're seeing here is a problem for women in general. But when we look to women of color, there were only nine out of one thousand three hundred and thirty five hires in sue we really have to think about intersection -ality when we talk about. Female directors because we're really seeing a floor effect, particularly with women of color, and it's also not just men who get jobs. It's white men almost all the time fewer than ten percent of the male directors from those twelve hundred films were either black or Asian absolutely now. One interesting finding that we do have in the report is that we took a deep dive on the last three hundred films over the last three years, and what we do see just over that shorter amount of time. We see a notable uptick from thirteen percent of all directors in two thousand sixteen or from underrepresented racial ethnic groups and in twenty eighteen that number jumps to twenty two percent. So we're seeing progress it's not as fast or a steep, perhaps as some of us would like to see, but I think it becomes really important to acknowledge the positive steps that Hollywood has taken and. And the giant leaps that still need to happen for particularly women and other underrepresented groups of behind the camera. You did a couple of things in this study that I was really interested in one is what all call the Sundance effect. And that is men who have successful independent films seem to have a much easier. Time moving from Sundance to big budget productions than women what are the numbers say about that? Well, what we're seeing really interestingly in the research is that there's a a one and done phenomenon for most women they get one chance across this twelve year span of time, whereas their male counterparts get more at bats. If you will, and this is really problematic because it affects the career sustainability for female directors in what if you really look at the data closely. What you see is that the studios are adding a few new women each year as opposed to going. Back to the the roster of talent, and including them in hiring decisions as well.

Sundance Matt Hollywood Three Percent Twenty Two Percent Thirteen Percent Fifty Percent Twelve Years Six Percent Ten Percent Three Years Twelve Year
"david byrne" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"david byrne" Discussed on The Frame

"It's interesting to if you go back and look at the music video for this. Their statistics about acres of rainforest being cleared and the number of privately owned, machine guns. But I'm wondering it's a song writer when you think about whether or not you're going to be ironic. What kind of tools of rhetoric you're gonna use? Do you think consciously about how are you going to structure a song? Are you gonna ask questions? They're gonna try to give answers. Do what a lot of people do and jot down ideas, and then I'll come back to those say a year later and look at them and go, oh, okay. And then with fresh, look, you can kind of see where there's something that needs to be organized a little bit more, and it something's trying to say something, but you can kind of say in maybe more interesting way, or in a way, that's a little less expected. I I do realize as I was confronting up. My record in this could apply to a lot of my records. I guess that. As as we do. I listened started listening to kind of regular radio in various playlists online, and this and that and I thought while you're kind of miles away from what a lot of songs are about a lot of songs about person's lives in their loves in their anger, and frustrations in those kinds of things without criticizing any of those things a lot of my song seem to be about kind of ideas and. I hope that they got doesn't mean that they're not emotional. But they don't seem to be what most of the world of songwriters is doing. And I thought wow. I might be on my own little island here. It's a good little island. You have a Grammy nomination for best alternative album. It's your first ever and a friend of yours any Clark records the Saint Vincent also nominated that category. You made an album together a couple years ago. Who else are you eager to collaborate with? Oh, wow. I'm I'm I'm not sure sometimes I just fall into those things. We'll see what happens. I don't have any immediate plans. I think Anne, and I are going to go as dates to the Grammys, which I thought that's a nice thing. We're both nominated in the same category. So at the better dressed person win. Oh, jeez. I'm not going there. Criterion. Recently released your nineteen eighty six film true stories, and to me, it feels like there's a real connection to the owl. Would you said they have something in common? And how would you describe it? Yeah. There is there funny enough. Yes. When I was doing that film and the album. It was it was kind of a love story. You know, a love appreciation about the kind of various accent free people in Texas and by inference by in United States of America. And although a lot of people. Perceived it at the time as being sort of ironic, and I thought how can this kind of new wave New York guy be Ashley kind of appreciating people in the middle of the country. People in Texas really enjoyed it. They saw themselves in their begin. I want to tell you a little story that I heard about Texas recently in a local heaven seem so God was working around the earth here trying to make it beautiful site. The rest of the world he had to knock off because it was nighttime. And he said I'll come back tomorrow and make it just as pretty as the rest of the world with lakes streams mountains and trees, and he got back the next day. And he saw that the grounded completely hardened that concrete and he didn't wanna begin over again. Oh in his infinite wisdom, he had an idea. He said, I know what I'll do. I'll make some people that like it this way they can laugh at their own strangeness and sentries, but they also can see their originality and their sense of be whatever you want to be and you can make yourself into whatever you wanna be. You can invent yourself. So in certain ways, it's very hopeful. It's very much a love letter to a lot of those people. And I think that that part of what I do hasn't really changed that much David Byrne. Thanks so much for coming to the show. Thank you very much. So..

Texas Anne writer Grammy New York David Byrne Saint Vincent Clark United States Ashley America
"david byrne" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"david byrne" Discussed on The Frame

"Then impress boys. Thank the praise it and any them one to say there's a photo of the two and then as and too. So I'm wondering it's easy to complain point of view of a song with the point of view of the person who singing at how close the two on this album, and maybe in particular on this song. I think of that song is it's it starts off painting kind of bleak picture of contemporary politics to be clear. It was written before Donald Trump was elected. So it's not that was my next question. Yeah. It was written before that. And so it's not specifically about that. But it's it's about the kind of general bleakness of our political situation. But what the song is really about. I think is how limited and blinkered our point of view of the world is because it kind of switches, and it starts talking about. How does what does the world? Look like from a dog's point of view is our perception in our point of view are biased view of the world. Just as limited as we think dogs view is and the answer has to be. Yes, what does it feel like to write a song that turns out to be that present you said you wrote it before Donald Trump with elected and yet impact of the song? I would say has changed materially since he was elected. What does it feel like to be the author of song whose reception is going to be changed so fundamentally by events? I felt like I was very lucky in some ways felt like, oh, Well, I I guess this has stayed relevant. It's it's a little bit tragic that you feel like well things haven't really changed. Have they in fact. This bleak picture that I painted as actually been very much realized. Tells me tastefully trust your instincts, your the way, you feel about how things are because you might be seeing something before it becomes manifest the rules. To a perfect shape. Coming up how David Byrne built his touring band to look like the rest of the country. Is. But is not. Chicken..

Donald Trump David Byrne
"david byrne" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"david byrne" Discussed on World Cafe

"And I stop and go look at that or look at that person or what is that? What is that person feeling and why are they doing that. Oh, and the smarting on my way to. The train station was it or I went, I went to museum this morning before catching train. I saw. A little food cart. You know, pictures of what they were offering, you know, like egg sandwich and stuff painted on the side, and it was like a door right in the middle of the sin. That's pretty great adore, right in the middle of the sandwich. And then couple blocks further up in congress. I took phone pictures. There was a giant painting way up on a building of the Egyptian soccer star, the football star who I mean, they didn't make didn't win the World Cup, but they got pretty far and this guy, this one player is just like absolute national hero giant picture of him on side of a building in the middle of New York. That's pretty nice. And noticing things like that and bringing them to our attention through your art. Well, we really appreciate you doing that for us. We do pick a song of yours. Any song that you'd like for us to go out on as a as we go by together today? Goodness. This one from a number of albums back called everyone's in love with you. I was I don't often sing my own songs, but I was seeing that one last night. Why? What is it about the song. I was thinking to myself. I was kind of riding home from dinner on on my bike, and I was thinking, was that writing about myself or was I writing about a person was having a relationship with who seem much more socially adept than I felt the who seemed at ease with groups of people and very easy making conversation with everyone. And I felt a little awkward about that in the song is kind of about that and. But I'm thinking to myself could also be the way other people think about me. I mean, you're well loved celebrity. If I can use that word that that I think people would because I don't think of myself that way. But then I realized maybe other people think of me that way. Well, let's let's all come to our own conclusions as we go on the song. David Byrne I have loved talking to you so much. Thank you. Thank you. Two. And last us. Copy. That is everyone's in love with you from David Burns, two thousand and one album look into the eyeball picked that song. Thank you so much David Byrne for letting us spend some time with him and his incredible creative mind. Don't you wish that you had one of those bicycles and that you could join David Burns bicycle gang for a day. Year or the rest of your life? I do thanks to David. Byrne. Thanks to our producer John Meyers for all of his work on that session. Doug it until you Slinger and this is the world cafe.

David Byrne David Burns David congress football producer Doug John Meyers New York
"david byrne" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"david byrne" Discussed on World Cafe

"So there you go, you can hear the lyrics or chanted names of black Americans killed by police and by vigilant tease followed by the phrase, say his name or say her name. Why did you want to end your crate chill with that song? Why I feel that well, couple of reasons I felt that trajectory of our show. Implies. More engaged, more social and political engagement from me and possibly from the audience. But certainly from me in the band, just feel like this where we're at now and in the in the times that we live in now, I felt like. We're kind of obliged to be more engaged in that way and. Three years ago and point fifteen. I heard this song that she did and she did it at the women's March in Washington. I thought this is one of the most moving, whatever political, let's say, songs that I'd ever heard and I was surprised that it didn't catch fire and you didn't hear it everywhere. So in came thought, how are we going to end this show? It seems to be going in this direction. I thought, let's do that. I got in touch with her to say, I'd like to do your song. Does this? Does it seem weird for a slightly older white man to be doing this song? And she said, no, no, no, this is great. She was, did she say anything like, I'm so I'm so fascinated by by like, should belong everyone, right? She's everyone should be able to do this on. Tell me what you see from your perspective on stage when when you sing it, like, what do you see happening in the audience or people tending. Yeah. Yeah, as you said this. One of the beautiful things about the song is it doesn't. It's not accused of Tori. I mean, there's an implication that that there's that there is a lack of social Justice, but it's not accusatory. It's not accusing the audience is not pointing. Finger at any specific person or group it saying something's not right in. It's also giving tribute remembrance to these lives that are gone. And. Still audience has at that sort of at that point we've come, we've had the kind of high points of the show where they entire audiences dancing, and they're having a great time and we keep the group going, but it but get Bitta gets quite serious. It's. Ends. The show on vibe of this is where we are at in twenty teen. That's a fascinating just arc because I think about the way that you open the show, you're examining human brain alone on stage song here in pointing out all these regions on the brain and sort of taking us into this world rate where people can forget everything that's going on outside and be part of this amazing spectacle and to bring it back out at the end. You also in the audience a can't help it say the names along with you and the act of doing that. Just just remarkable. When you say the names, you can picture. These people, the people who were killed. It's, yeah, sometimes it's really hard to sing. David Byrne here on the road cafes, distributors called American utopia. Just one more question for you. I guess we've talked about. Many of the creative things that you're doing and we've barely scratched the surface of your creativity, and I was trying to think about what what unites all of all of the things you do, like collecting reasons to be cheerful and putting them out there. This stage show that you've done turning a building into a musical instrument, you know, art installations, interactive theatre all of that. And what strikes me, I guess about your artistry is, is that you seem to. Have a remarkable sense of all into sort of wanna put wonder in a frame, and I don't even mean wonder always in a positive sense, even like we're talking about about the way that your closing the ship taking taking taking something of note and putting it in a frame for us to see and that that's to me what you do as an artist. How do you see what you do? I think that's true. I think I often..

David Byrne Washington Tori Bitta Three years
"david byrne" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"david byrne" Discussed on World Cafe

"And you. Beautiful. Diz. That once in a lifetime nj Kiko covering the talking heads song, I'm here with David Byrne on the world cafe so well, round talking heads. I wanted to ask you about about something that you said. Back in the eighties about singing and granted, you said it to a fake interviewer in a parody video that you were doing for for stop making sense. But you said and I don't wanna get the quote wrong, so I'm gonna look at it here. He said the better the singer's voice, the harder it is to believe what they're saying. And I think that's such an interesting thing to say, if you did, you believe it is that. So where are you still sometimes still believe it. I think we've all heard occasionally heard an incredibly gifted singer of professional gifted. They're singing tone. They can hit every note. They can do all the runs and do everything perfectly, but somehow it doesn't connect emotionally. They're just like going through. They can do everything perfectly, but somehow some essence is not going across. And that's kind of what I was referring to. Sometimes if it's too easy, if the singers just gifted naturally gifted in that way, they have to kind of push to reach some kind of deep replace, maybe not be perfect all the time and allow a little bit of slippage. In order for the kind of the whatever emotion and the kind of human connection to come through, how do you hear your own voice on that spectrum from from really believable to what you're just describing? I think my own voice is gone from a of an not totally comfortable thing to listen to. There's a lot of kind of galloping early on, although that wasn't the way I heard it. I heard a lot of my early singing as being. I was really doing the best I could. Did it bother you then that people heard it as that they heard. They heard it as dull this yelping and everything. And I thought I was trying to croon or singing kind of normal voice. I guess it's not coming across the way. I imagine the way I hear it in my head. Over the years. I think I have managed to. More closely debt to where what comes out is a little closer to what I imagine. So I can still do that which I still do occasionally. But I think now I have the range to be able to do other things as well. Let's play a little bit of of the song here. Now I feel like that's a really good example of this sort of melodic and I, I really love. I love the vocal performance that you deliver that song. That's okay. Yes, play at. A search. Extremely..

David Byrne
"david byrne" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"david byrne" Discussed on World Cafe

"That's dog's mind. Did you catch that lyric now? A dog cannot imagine what it is to drive a car and we in turn, are limited by what it is we are. I think that says so much about how David Byrne sees the world. There are times when I'm seeing that on stage or in rehearsals or whatever we're doing where I somehow, although that line sounds kind of funny, there's a little bit of humor in there. Yeah, but. Somehow I find that really moving, get choked up on that line about are trying to imagine our limitations as human beings that are perception are how we see the world things we prioritize are just as limited in our own way as dogs are. And we feel like we know dogs. We feel like, oh dogs or they like this in their gotten. This is what they see in this is this is, but we're, yeah. Well, that's kind of an an amusing way of saying, well, yeah, we're, we're probably the same. What I like about it too is when I think about your artistry, I think of you in my mind is somebody who is really able to to Nazi borders into Nazi barriers into to to try and empathize or connect with any type of creature or or non creature out there. And then there would be so much like strange beauty and a little bit of sadness in knowledge in that there are different ways that different people in different creatures experienced the world. I don't know. I just think it's really profound animals on this record. A friend set. David got too many chicken references and chickens show up in about at least two different songs. There's one where I think the lyric is. What is having to chicken? Well, there's plenty of Roosters and lots of corn. Oh, that's heaven to a chicken. It is. It is. It's kind of like the dog. It's like the dog thing, but it's got It's Bruce kind coming. of like saying, well, yeah, imagine what it might be for chicken. It's not what would be for us. It's Roosters gorham. It's certainly not. Where do you think you figured out how to be that kind of thinker. I, I don't know. Okay. Sorry. I don't know. Hope they get. You're onto a right now. And I guess being in shape and being active is a huge part of your job on stage in this stage show that you've got right now is so choreographed. It's so energetic and all the musicians up on stage for people who haven't seen it are holding their instruments, right? So they're not tethered by cords and cables. There might wirelessly and they're, they're not tethered so they can do all this choreographing all this movement. And I guess it seems really important to you at least in this iterative of your show that people can move around freely. Why is that so important to you on stage. I tried an incremental version of that on a tour. I did with Saint Vincent number years ago, not that long ago. Where the brass players, we have a bunch of brands players and they were all untethered. They could move forever and and I can take his further. It's a really great feeling. Can we do it with even the drums and the keyboards, everybody. Blue bit of experimenting and testing? Yes, you can do it. You've require requires six players to get the sound of a full drum kit and percussion and all that. But it's again incredibly liberating. It means that the stage is empty that we can. We can move anywhere and we do. We kind of face one another. We do all kinds of stuff. It's remarkable and seeing. It reminded me of, I think my favorite theater experience I've ever had which was seeing your show with fat. Boy, slim here lies love. Right? Which is like an choreographer really Oh, kidding. you're kidding Parsons? Yes. So that that show right? You took the story of the first lady of the Philippines Imelda Marcos and turned it into this like Elettronica musical, but but what it was was for the audience. We were all being ushered around the stage as it was moving and sort of like part of part of the action where you're not sitting, you're still and I just, I feel like it says a lot about the way that you approach our performance as something that is alive like it's not something to necessarily like be watched in a in a static sort of away..

David Byrne Imelda Marcos Philippines Parsons Bruce Saint Vincent
"david byrne" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"david byrne" Discussed on World Cafe

"So I got the chance to talk to David Byrne before a recent show on his American utopia tour, we do wonder behind the stage to go and find him for interview. This was an outdoor venue of festival show. So there are a bunch of trucks parked along the way the trucks will open. So you could see what was inside and as we're walking by first truck, some bands beers and their next truck. Some other bands gear. Next truck, twelve bicycles all standing in a row. We were like, this is gonna be David Burns. That's right. That's right. Okay. So do you get the whole band to ride bicycles around the city with you? Tell me about. Yeah, I do. I do this all the time when I tour and I find it so wait great way to get out explorer, the whatever city you're in, wherever you are. Have a feeling of freedom that your your, your own master. You can do whatever you want. Go wherever you want stop whenever you want. You're not trapped in a hotel room or backstage all the time or whatever. I just figuring all of you writing down down a road in in us city, like just all twelve of in a row like led by David Byrne. Let's go, you're like the pied piper of cities where we've all gone somewhere on mass and we're all have identical bikes and people go, is this some kind of club? Well, welcome to the club for exploration freedom, and a sense of off rule the day. David Byrne collects wonder from the world around him and set it to music, and it doesn't have to be big wonder. He sees the magic in what could be mundane. Like in this song called dog's mind, the dog show no concern. Now the at those dogs down in. Every win. Phase every desk stands piled with were. Now. And..

David Byrne David Burns
"david byrne" Discussed on X96

X96

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"david byrne" Discussed on X96

"Backbones nice talking heads and i went to see david byrne last night remind me of that the sequence of events of this that song or that was mtv on i was mtv on or was what was that night flight or whatever it was that's where i i saw talking that's where i i saw nightline's ozone was mtv on by that at the time or so.

david byrne mtv nightline
"david byrne" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"david byrne" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"So after the talking hands david byrne became a solo artist has that been a big deal to your inner on i think of outdated burns he's so prolific that you know he's been a solo artist but he's also done a million other things so even if you don't follow the solo music career there's a ton of other stuff that you could do what do you mean i he wrote a book called the bicycle diaries he's bay wrote an operetta he's been working with st vincent uh he's done just a ton of different things so yeah i mean my yet my favorite solo uh david byrne work is with brazilian singer kitano veloce and it's it was done live in carnegie hall and it just proves how eclectic he can be you know doing an album with a brazilian singer like that so i think by this point if you're a david byrne fanned you've been shouting at your radio i know i know i know for long enough and if you're not a david byrne fan i think you get the picture here's the new david byrne a little of the single everybody's coming to my house look well do the god this three sure dead did and me cop.

david byrne kitano veloce carnegie hall
"david byrne" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"david byrne" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Ugh serie sleep hurt her mom just basically kept it from her until she found out on our own thought that you're going to see here's the fun fact you know she had a child she moved and jamaica as she bought a firm and here's the address guys thank left coming in talk david byrne shot egg hey thank you thank you rain endorses the host of mornings on cbc music daria williams is the host a cbc music's after dr looking forward to hanging out you guys have been couvert great regard brand city were common to look in the mountain state mcleans going to be there to eleven great yeah that'd be fun i can't let them leave without listening to the full shotty track this hour of the universe yes.

jamaica david byrne daria williams cbc
"david byrne" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"david byrne" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Vincent here he's done just a ton of different things um so yeah i mean my yet my favorite solo david byrne work is with brazilian singer k town of alot so and it's it was done live in carnegie hall and it just proves how um eclectic he can be you know doing an album with a brazilian singer like that so i think by this point if you're a david byrne phanjoubam shouting at your radio i know i know i know for long enough and if you're not a david byrne fan i think he'd get the picture here's the new david byrne a little of the single everybody's coming to my house the well done you did there are this we thank god showed dead good and me now two.

Vincent carnegie hall david byrne
"david byrne" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"david byrne" Discussed on RobinLynne

"The liberal they will the united blows known upon the la by low the new blooming the powering melanoma donald ainu of the better becker firth powered by about out avocado david david byrne following the power donald standard eagerly to mlb meet which state tuesday his deputies entailed inputs i am out to see that i love i am a mobile humble an hour outrageous state not a single we say the panama manama cashed in on allies up on the apple jingles out mother even when your mouth is my do history to send me gone away that would be better not to be so pool likud all through the night his down a little conversation now is all all right right if they give following the normal nonama on that deng laura wool down day done it obama me creative they've ever think he's wbz day and make the dam apathy la la la land on a highway ageslike back date now single wagon was like if it's a panama on another times been on on on behalf of taking was not to be one is modern were said to be ghana word revert on ought to be so would you even though the you good all for me oh stabbing they look i was asian now we have found you do in a bow down on on the amendment they they may be doping the the fabulous dan thing the time frazee that is the wang they're now that they go where do we say yes a man i'm out of there.

donald ainu manama apple frazee david david byrne mlb panama likud deng obama ghana