20 Episode results for "David Brooks"

357 Teaser - Urban Guy vs. Flyover Man

Chapo Trap House

03:04 min | 1 year ago

357 Teaser - Urban Guy vs. Flyover Man

"I wouldn't even rank this among the top twenty five worse things he's done and I'm a supporter of listen people do you remember those months just remember you can order some I get it all right he said some stupid crap on a phone call but are you going to undo my vote for that trump not as supporters or the issues driving us your whole media is trump centric have to deal with the actual realities of life one mass immigration is changing my town region and state normal thing to say is trump oh centric well we became trump oh centric because his daily outrages undermine norms spreads in a phobia degrade public morality into the hinterlands to interview trump voters you read Hillbilly Elegy back when it was fashionable to say trump is just a symptom of a real problem in America he's the wrong answer families up and down my block to the left end to the right children out of wedlock young men with no dad when they when they're young and no wife and their life when they're grown town limit is we've we're talking beyond the greater metropolitan area to the cultural liberalism you preach but don't practice as leading to the breakdown do you think that because you have the kind of jobs that allow you to follow twitter all day who is a good point. I don't have that luxury so all that passing nonsense seems far away third it leak elite running government and the economy for itself and shutting out those of us who actually make things with our hands he does not make anything with this the right question it didn't take long to lose interest and all that now we're just a block of concrete you call his base now all you now you care about us Mike so bad things hey remember those months just after the election when people like you were briefly curious about people like me you sent you reporters out on wild safaris he's also salinas condescension which was also bad but in a different way I guess but yeah he he he's right though that the average David Brooks reader go through a phase where they all read and loved Shitty Book Heal yes he thought they understood it yeah but clearly that wasn't good enough so you say the whole meeting Oh centric is one of the best things you can get in Brooks's by what we need to do is go back to reading hillbilly allergy and pretending to give a shit about Eric we need we need more of the bullshit safari the man with no dad no young men with no dad when they're young and in their life when they're grown not only my town but my region the region care for the city please think of the region. Oh Man we know dad knew you know what in their lap underground.

trump twitter David Brooks Mike America Eric
David Brooks Says The Nuclear Family Was A Mistake. Is He Right?

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

46:48 min | 1 year ago

David Brooks Says The Nuclear Family Was A Mistake. Is He Right?

"From NPR and WVU ARE BOSTON. I'm Robert Siegel and this is on point. The Nuclear Family Mom Dad. Two and a half kids house in the suburbs and the white picket fence is arguably the American dream for it was. It's increasingly the dream of a bygone era American households and families very different today. They're more single parent. Households couples are getting married later if they're getting married at all and even our definition of family is changing the writing in the Atlantic New York Times columnist. David Brooks argues that the nuclear family far from being a venerable social institution enjoyed a brief time dominance after the old fashioned extended families broke up this hour on point. David Brooks joins us from Washington DC to talk about his article. The nuclear family was a mistake. Dave it's wonderful to have you on the program and good to talk with you. It's good to be on the air with you again. I should say that we should acknowledge straightaway that We spent many many many Friday afternoons with J. Dion Either Talking politics on all things considered me listening to my colleagues talk politics with you on all things considered into. I missed that. So it's and we also wants took part in a a small world experiment and discover that we have ten cent Morgan's of DNA in common so we have a common ancestor sometime back around the time of the of the black death in Europe or something. We are the extended family our family. Yes that let's start with the precursor of the nuclear family which you show us an example of it in your article from Barry Levinson's nineteen ninety film avalon. You started out me. You cut the Turkey but me come really big. Oh Ashley You're late gave hunger that gets ready. We couldn't wait your flesh and blood or your your talk Jay. That's it that's the last time to cover tanks Jimmy scene from a movie about What was it big extended family? I have to confess and one side of my family. There were two great uncles whose whose clans did not talk to each other at family. They would come but they wouldn't talk to each other. Tell me now what was so great about those extended families what was good about that. The families were messy of course but they were close and infuriatingly close sometimes in that movie. It's really about Barry Levinson's own family. He had five brothers come over from Eastern Europe and they formed a wallpaper business together and in the beginning They all more or less live together and support each other. These big sprawling tables and the thing Levinson emphasizes in those families. The grandparents were the storyteller so their stere- family lore which everybody was reunited by and then over the decades America starts to happen so some people move away in pursuit of opportunity. In this case they break the code of the family. The the guy who's saying you cut the Turkey without me. He was the senior male. He was the head of family and the idea of cutting the Turkey without him. To basically break up the family system and so F- family becomes less important speed and efficiency become more important and at the end of the toward the end of the movie. It's no longer big table with extended family. It's a couple with their kids watching. Tv on Thanksgiving on TV trays and then the very end of the movie. The hero is left alone in a nursing home wondering what happened and so basically the story of that is America moving from big extended families to have small families and then to know family. And that's happened to a lot of people I've got basically the story that I think has happened over the last century which has been fine for some people but disastrous for those a more vulnerable. We should point at one. Reason is that People had smaller families wise. I what they could The advent of birth control Another reason was that Women of became more empowered and having eight children of just made it pretty difficult to do any kind of work outside. The house Economically children long ago ceased to be a assets to the family mean. We Love our children but they don't bring money in when they're ten years old with it they didn't in Agrarian Day so so that family that that old extended family It if a died EDYTA pretty natural death. Well it sort of did But it died because farming ended as you say we couldn't make money off of Ah for children. In the roles of women changed and so with industrialization you see people moving to the big cities and basically starting nuclear families. Which is mom dad and one or two kids of start out with four or five? Now it's one or two And that is because extended families have a great strength which is their resilience if one relationship between a mother and father or between a parent and a child breaks or somebody dies. There's somebody around to pick up the slack in a nuclear family. The end of a relationship is basically the end of the family as we know it so they allow for greater openness but they allow for their much more fragile family structures and so when we switched to the nuclear family Because of a lot of reasons you cited for a little while at work in the nineteen fifties and sixties sort of worked. We had stable nuclear families. Mom Dad living in a suburban home surrounded by grass. And we had high fertility low divorce rates. But that's because every condition society favored that you had men making four hundred percent more than their fathers had at the same age so you could have a stable family on one income. You had Thai social capital high religious observance. You had everything to support. The family and the families were living in close proximity to another so they were basically forming extended families Anyway and basically. That was a brief window of time in the nineteen fifty s to nineteen sixty five when we formed our ideal of what a family should be but then in nineteen sixty five society went back to normal and the the security of those brief freakish ears vanished and since then the family has been falling progressively weaker and weaker. One one one change was that to maintain the extended family means Generations remaining in the same place. And we're a mobile society I think of in my lifetime To to professional decisions that were absolutely decisive. We're moving away from New York to Washington closing off to London to live for years You you can't do the same you can't have the same kind of Weaken work out relations with your with your family if you're living hundreds or thousands of miles away. Yeah that's certainly part of it America at least used to be a mobile society now much less mobile than we used to be but I think people left the nuclear family in part because they wanted privacy. They just want all. These people didn't choose in their lives and be. They wanted a little more flexibility And the market wants you to be a small family where you don't spend a Lotta time on relationships where you can spend a lotta time on work emails. So nuclear families make you richer and societies with smaller families are richer families. They happen to be less connected families and the story I tell about the last fifty years really is a story of these families. Falling apart it used to be like seventy percent of Americans were living in a nuclear family. Now it's like a third fertility rates are way down you have twenty seven percent of young men having no contact with their dads. You have forty percent of of Americans growing up in a single parent home. And so what you have wound up with is a lot more fragile relationships. And you've wound up with say single MOMS. I've a friend. Who's a mom who's decided to stay home with their kids in a suburb of Virginia and she describes the life that is brutally hard and lonely? A lot of the time because there's nobody around to help You've got older people who are dying alone. My My newspaper wrote a piece in about a decade ago about a guy who lived in queens and he just died alone and nobody noticed because he had no social context so we are Y We live with more. Annemie in modern society where we are individuals And yet that choice as you say the allure of all of that was again to draw upon my own family. My mother is the eighth of Eight Surviving there was an earlier baby. Who died in infancy of those eight siblings? Four of them had one child and four of them had two children. Nobody to replicate the life in a brood of siblings and cousins although is very happy family but it just that was not being American. It wasn't assimilating. It wasn't Being modern for them and my family's pretty much the same and I would say just looking around the society That's basically fine if your upper middle class That people frankly in my social class we can afford to buy extended family and when we need labor in the form of Nannies or coaches or somebody to cut the grass. We can afford to hire that. And so the nuclear family has worked out pretty well for those of us in the educated class for people who don't have the means to basically by extended families it has not worked at all. And so you go to neighborhood after neighborhood where you see stress families and then you see people trying to cope and the story ends on. I should say on a hopeful note that Americans are adjusting and re attaching to to extended family so the number of Americans who live in extended families now twenty percent of the population sixty four million people. That's a modern high. And that's because a lot of parents want their children and a lot of adult. Children basically have no choice but to live at home and a lot of middle aged people want. There's their parents to live with them. And so you're seeing a return to a new kind of family form so we did go through that period which your family. My family probably did about the same time to smaller and smaller families but I think out of the wreckage of that for a lot of people in a lot of social classes. You're seeing new family. Forums actually raising a challenge of what kind of housing there is in America. And how can an extended family live nowadays if all the housing that's being built is is is for nuclear families homebuilders ask consumers. Do you want us to build an in-law sweet where either what they call a millennial sweet where the adult child can live or senior can live and forty two percent of Americans now say they want that and so I I do think there's a return to that and the second thing which is even more to me is what I call forged families or somebody close forge families and that's chosen families and chosen families emerged in the nineteen eighties in San Francisco during the AIDS crisis? A lot of gay men lesbians hadn't were cut off from their families going through this trauma and they really created this chosen family structure where they bonded together to really create kin like forms and a lot of people have been sort of cast off in the among some of the failures of the nuclear family. And they're forming new family forms. These chosen families and I see that was All around the country emerging people bond together and create family out of even though they're not biologically related in a few minutes. I want to return to that subject in hear more about the the forged family led me. I tell folks that we're hearing from New York Times columnist and Atlantic writer. David Brooks We're talking about his latest article in the Atlantic. The nuclear family was a mistake Were you raised in a non traditional family? Are you starting a non traditional family? What works what doesn't work in your case. I'm Robert Siegel and this is on point. Astrology is as oldest civilization itself. And today it's easier to access than ever before thanks to the Internet and smartphones this week on through line how astrology almost one extinct and made a remarkable comeback through line from NPR. The podcast. Were we go back in time to understand the present this is on point. I'm Robert Siegel and we're discussing. The American family with New York Times columnist David Brooks his latest piece in the Atlantic is called. The nuclear family was a mistake and joining our conversation from Winston Salem. North Carolina is Dr Andrea Hunter. She's a professor of Human Development and family studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Andrea. Welcome to two point thank you. You've you've researched The phenomenon of the of the family and the extended family in African American society. Which is it's a different story. described the role of the extended family in for African Americans Certainly well first let me say that. I've studied African American family systems over the last two decades. Unc Greensboro and perhaps Even more important I was raised in one in an extended multi generation household embedded in a Broad extended family and. I just wanted to say I that David certain points to the demands and challenges that families are facing today and I certainly agree that this nineteen fifties invention of nuclear family. chase under those demands. But I do want to offer a different kinds of lands based on my work with African American families as well as my own experience in these families and that is that the lived. Experience of families is not one where the nuclear and extended family. Or by if you're catered or on different polls rather they're really dynamically connected. In complex ways. In these connections exist you know within households across them they straddle them and so in these connections can be very fluid or more bounded And certainly there informed by cultural culture and tradition and so when we begin to think about the African American families Certainly has been a centrally important ways in which families have been organize. There have been a source of resilience as David Notes a source of cultural continuation and survival. It certainly has helped African American families on dill with a difficult social economic dislocations and social and economic marginalization over time and in many ways African American families marriage engender has looked quite different And has not approximated that nineteen fifties social invention so in that way. I think that African Americans reflect The ways in which these kind of family type can be critically important at the same time We can think about the ways in which the extended family and nuclear families. Sorta multi mutually constituted And Think about the flow and ebb so less likely to sort of think about the kind of decline in the nuclear family of The disintegration of it and the ascendancy of the extended family system but rather to think about them and very mutual Mutual ways as a resource through which individual family members and also nuclear family. Units can draw on for to build their adaptive capacity. David Brooks Sound right to you Yeah it's a beautiful way to put it. I I I can just way express myself and maybe even the article that I wrote I. I try to imply that. They're two different things. An extended family is a nuclear family. With supports of the nuclear. Family is not going to go away. We're always going to have moms and kids and Dad's But I think the crucial question is what you support them with. And in the in the nineteen fifties and in many of our minds stay. The ideal is to you. Know Kids with parents in a house that sort of detached and sort of sufficient. But that's a that's never been the case with the African American community with family forms that were necessary under slavery was family forms that were necessary under Jim Crow. There was a struggle to find ways that were much more resilient much more supportive and I try to mention in the piece that they've always been grandparents involved. There's always been aunts and uncles. I spent a lot of this week in Watson Compton in south central La which are African. American and Latino communities and I guess I'd say you see two realities one you do meet young men who say you know. I Hate my dad. He's not around for me on the other hand. You see people of all forms of an all over chipping in creating relationship with young men and women raising children in ways that are adaptive flexible and successful. And so I I'd say those two realities the sort of disadvantages that a lot of young people grow up with a real. The family breakdown is real. But the family up is also very Let's hear from from some of our listeners. Cindy is on the line from Sterling Massachusetts You here Things that relate to what's happened in your family cindy definitely My husband and I just left our community in the north shore. A Boston to move out to central mass to buy a home with an in-law apartment so that we could live with my mother-in-law and There is you know. Despite the classic angst between Mother Laws and daughter-in-law's I was really the ones who spearheaded this. I'd recently taken some time off work to stay home with my kids and I just found the isolation and the burden of taking care of my kids by myself Especially as a woman with like the mental load and balance like everything I have to take care of The assigned to me essentially. Because I'm a mom and a wife I just found it really stressful and We decided to to make the move and my mother-in-law's recently widowed and She couldn't take care of herself and her house anymore. And I'm you know thrilled where my kids are going to be able to be with their grandchildren. And we're GONNA be able to help her and She's going to be able to help us for generations under the same roof. Yeah Yeah and I'm just you know I'm I'm so glad about it because it was just I as a stay at home. Mom temporarily hopefully There's just too much like the the loneliness isolation like in depression I experienced. And you know so. I'm hoping that that's GonNa it's GonNa be great for all of us. Thanks for talking with us about that David although Cindy described Redeveloping recreating an extended family to lessen stress. Do I have it right? There's a there's a point in your article that in Japan There's a study finding that women who were in multigenerational families were more stress stash than other women. Don't do I have that right. That is correct. And so in the old extended family of Avalon. Those families were possible because the women were stuck in the kitchen making meals for twenty five people. And we're not going to go back to those days. And frankly were much more individualistic culture. We're not going back to extended clans of of fifteen hundred years ago. So what we're trying to do is find a new balance and I think we've sort of overshot the mark on isolation and separation. And what things I liked about these new forged families into these new Extended families is. They're they're not as crushing Especially for women as the old ones support. They're not as isolating as the nuclear family. We wound up on. And the flexibility is part of that on the other hand and Perhaps Sandra hundred you encountered this as well One when you're a perhaps have a parent come in. Come and live with you Because the parent was old or widowed. Both of those things. But it wasn't it wasn't just about nursing it. It wasn't a it wasn't a matter of of caring for somebody who's ill and that seems to be increasingly what's happening here but it's not just that mother is old but Mother is frail needs constant attending to. I think what you see an African American families it's extending lots of different ways under different conditions so you may have elder kin bringing in young families to provide that support You may have aunts and uncles as coming in as they make a transition to other points and their life or a young mother and you may have families working together to To support an elder Ken and one of the things that within this environment you share caregiving. You grow through this ethic of care and And I think one of the as someone who's who also grew up in one of these families I think about how deeply I've been shaped by those intergenerational stories and those intergenerational stories are about culture and identity and family but they're in butte with so many values around How tweet how we treat each other. How do we deal with these different difficult circumstances so So I would say one of the models that comes out of the African American family and then the ways in which people are creating new families is that we're doing it in different ways. There's a lot of complexity There's one study that was involved in and there were a hundred eight different combinations of adults living with children. Let's not even talking about the cousins. You know the minor cousins and Nieces and nephews and the Fictive Kin So I think we're in an age of possibility and I think that The ways in which you can think about family think about family. These expensive ways opens up. Not only the chosen. But I to activate this extended family. That lives alongside. Us OF VICTORIA JOINS US now from Cape Cod Massachusetts high high. Yeah I was calling in because I'm sure a lot of immigrants are in a similar situation but my husband is from Although of a small town in a small country in eastern Europe and he really came here with no family and we know a lot of other people from the same country and it just kind of naturally happens where we create a new family so we spend holidays with people from the same country. We get closer with those people Almost like we cannot spend time with our immediate family overseas. And you almost reach out to those coming from a similar background and you just you really do create almost this new kind of family Where everyone's in the same situation and most of the people that we know don't have any family here either So it's I. I'm sure that a lot of other people in my mom is also from Brazil and it's the same thing growing up We just seem to. You know people from the same area just gathered together and almost create this new community and Family David Brooks. This is something that that you write about. Which is people Who really even if they want it. You could not Reassemble their extended family It's just not around but who do then create an extended family they They construct one. I'm I'm in one myself. I wanted to hear about that. Yeah so I went over to house in DC Maybe six seven years ago now and that that couple named Catherine David And they had a kid was in. Dc public schools and he had a friend who had no place to live or read and so they said well. James can stay with us and then James had a friend in the he had a friend and so on and so by the time I came over there they were like twenty five kids around the table and a bunch of them sleeping in the basement and we have an extended family. Call it A-ok dc all our kids DC and. We had dinner every Thursday night. We celebrate holidays together. We vacation every year on CAPE COD as it turns out and we we basically do life together and frankly those kids are now years later. And they're now in their mid twenties and maybe they need us less intensely and missing that and I my wife and I talked about this. We've got to find another family. Another extended family to be part of David. If the nuclear family was a mistake it was one of the biggest. Most extensive mistakes in American history is bigger than bad wars. That we've gotten into it It included generations of Americans and for many people. Of course it worked out but if you look at the Doubling of the depression rates. You look at what took the inequality family form is responsible for about twenty five or thirty percent of the income inequality in this country. It's led to the wider inequality between African Americans and whites. It's had a lead to a lot of cleanliness in senior citizens a lot of hardship for MOMS It's hurt the most vulnerable more than us until about nineteen sixty rich families and poor families looked like They had the bakes same family structures same divorce rates as a marriage rates. Now they look nothing alike and so rich people have pretty stable families and poor people Have are much more likely to divorce much more likely to never get married and so we have these two different family regimes. And I think that's because we adopted a bad ideal and I just WANNA emphasize we're not getting into the nuclear family got but when we think about what life do I want. If you're a young adult should should it be to two adults in a home with a kid in the suburbs or should it be part of a more extended network like the African American families have have built in a lot of immigrant? Communities have built. And I would say if you haven't won an ideal and your head think the latter. That's that's just a better ideal away better way to Orient your life. I I should add here that I also experienced in my child. I know that another another place where our paths crossed not knowing each other. Then we at some point you lived in the same neighborhood that I did in in Lower Manhattan apartment living apartment house living. Actually connect you to a lot of people very closely. You may find a very close friends on the same floor of the building and It's an experience that my daughter and her family are are living through right now as they have have lived in a a kind of Most communal situation for several years with your neighbor So there's always that option to move into a move into an apartment. Think that you guys are lucky. Your neighbors and I I lived in New York much much in my life. We never knew her neighbors There was like a code of. Let's leave each other. What's give each other privacy and frankly a lot of the neighborhoods? I live in now if you knocked on. Somebody's door at eight PM. That would be considered an outrageous violation of privacy. Yeah Yeah and for that matter if you if you call them on the phone the phone after eight o'clock at night that might be considered not raises a violation of their of their privacy. I guess we have about a minute to hear from Kisii. Who's in Portland Maine? Could see tells us she's eighty one years old. I am at thank you. I grew up in a house a privileged white home in Cambridge Massachusetts. And I thought I was weird child because we always had other adults living with us and then when I was in college at Radcliffe Harvard. I came across Margaret Mead. The great cultural anthropologist who talked about how bad institution the nuclear family was and she highly recommended groups of maybe up to nineteen people living together and one of the things she said would be wonderful if some others are not with rather have a career and not stay home with kids and some men would love to stay home with kids and and do that and she said you could do that and support the entire family however large it was and I thought jeep as a child we I grew up with a bit of that and when I got married and had children and we found a way without even being intentional of having other people living with us it was so much healthier for the children as well as for me as a mother. It's a great story. We've been discussing the American family With David Brooks and also with Andrea hundred professor of Human Development and family studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Dr Hundred. Thank you very much for joining us in this case and we'll hear more from David. His latest piece in the Atlantic is called. The nuclear family was a mistake. I'm Robert Siegel and this is on point Are you sometimes confused by the economy befuddled by the financial system troubled by the trade war? We are here to help with the daily ten minute briefing on economic news of the day. Npr's the indicator from planet money. Listen now this is on point. I'm Robert Siegel and we'RE WITH NEW YORK. Times columnist David Brooks whose latest piece in the Atlantic is called. The nuclear family was a mistake Davidson comments we've heard from our website. Jabber machi rights winner. Take all killed the family. Men Change their minds. Why share anything when you can grab everybody's and start a new family or a fair at a whim and Emily Brown writes? This is interesting because my extended family is extremely close and extremely matriarchal. I actually think existence of such a allowed me to be far more successful than if I only had my nuclear family. I'd like to ask you what's the big difference. Do you think in kids who grow up in the extended family of of the kind of families we are described and kids grow up in a in an intact nuclear family. Do you think their their life skills. that One imports that. The other doesn't well You know I don't WanNa make a bifurcation or a generalization but I do think and I I would make maybe make the difference between kids who grew up in no family because I I think the problem with the nuclear family is not that if you can have a stable nuclear family doing great The problem is that's fragility and so it. Winds up with no family and kids who are latchkey kids who have one parent who have no contact with another parent and while we all know single moms and single DADS who are doing amazing jobs. Raising their kids on average of the kids who grow up in those homes They do less well in school. They have more emotional problems. They have lower life outcomes. Rush Chetty has a data that if you grew up in poverty with to married parents your chances of getting out of poverty eighty percent. If you don't your chances are much much lower in the odds are against you. And so I'd say those are the people we need to worry about. Most and I would say just in general across society. I think we've gotten less good at relational skills. I'm really puzzled. Over the the spike in suicide up thirty percent the spike especially in teen suicide up seventy percent or fifty percent or so The the spike in depression rates. Every college I go to the mental health facilities are swamped. I confess. I don't completely understand what's going on here but there's been something that has weakened our relationships and had the predictable effect on our emotional health and I think that somewhat related to what's become of a family forms you have been devoting a lot of energy in in recent years to Investigating issues of community of virtue of of kindness among Americans and And you've written also about very much the spiritual side of this for you and what's been going on in your life does the does the the forged family that you described earlier doesn't have a spiritual dimension For you is it. Is it a a something? You take part in And and do so with your your soul and mind Not just Your desire for conversation and company I mean I do. I mean I think when you get hopefully you stop being stuck in a stuck up middle aged white guy like I was and get a little more emotional and a little more spiritual and you discover the desires of your heart which is the desire to really connect deeply with others and desires of the soul. Which is to serve some good to feel in right relationship with the good and in my column everything. I was writing about came down to social isolation and fragmentation whether it was political polarization rising. Suicide Rising OPIOID. We're just in price of solidarity. And so I started something called weave the social fabric project. The Aspen in suit. You can go visit us. We Are Weavers Dot Org and basically we WANNA lift up people and learn from people who are just phenomenally good at building solidarity and they're not just building connection like warm relationships though. That's very important. They're building solidarity a sense of spiritual loyalty to other human beings and leading a life. That really is it's Corny to say but leading with love. They they the what the weavers do is. They treat neighbors as if they were kin. They treat non kin as if they were kin and though when I see all the fragmentation and hatred in our society I look at the weavers and they are the solution and I just tried to wish we change the culture so more of US embraced their values and embrace. Their lifestyle is just a better way to live. You find those invitations of of kinship like relationships are generally received or is it like the New York apartment to others you. You spoke of earlier. Who just as soon not be bothered. It's tough 'cause a lot of people they're trying to reach have been betrayed so much that they're instinct is. Oh if you show up in my life you're gonNA leave. You're going to betray me. And so they've been educated by very bad experiences and by betrayal. One of our weavers is a woman named Sarah Hanger who runs an organization called thread in Baltimore which really creates social networks around underperforming kids in the Baltimore schools and it takes a while before the kids will trust. And she says it's changing when somebody keeps showing up after they've rejected you at and it's but it's also a dentist. He changing to be the one rejected. And so what they do is that you create much deeper bonds relationship. You have to overcome a lot of fear and a lot of skepticism in order to get there. Because of what's already happened in our society you have wrote a written quite a bit about About your own life and I'm curious in in in. The one of us has been contacted by member of his community. Here I'm not sure who. It is but In the kinds of structures. That you're that you're now involved with do your now. I assume adult children are they attracted to this at all or or do they still feel. Hey you know we're part of what was a nuclear family. That broke up. Yeah I think we've when when they gave it the cover line. The nuclear family was mistake. I immediately texted all my kids. Hey not ours And so I think a they understood that and I would say that as they've gone through life and they're now in their twenties They've found their own versions at my daughter when she was five. She walked into a hockey rink and felt immediately at home. And she now works for the Anaheim ducks teaching hockey kids and I just visited her out there and I would say that team. And the team's she's part around those rinks They're really tight bonds of affection and they they T- speak and familial forms and so I I do think young people today including my own kids are finding that my oldest son served in the Israeli Defense Forces and certainly anybody who serves in any sort of military experience That's family and that's probably family. That's going to last you a lifetime and I do think there's a great hungering for really intimate bonds unconditional love and people are finding it in ways. Because that's how we're wired. Amy is on the line from Tampa Florida. Amy What's your reaction to all this a lot of resonance. I am an older mom of especially toddler and the nuclear families fragility is front and center. We recently experienced the flu. And as a family we were debating about whether to go to the ER. Because we didn't have any any help. And I believe we maybe relocating to DC metro where we lived before as a couple and also a single people we're going to be experiencing that region in a completely different way Housing astronomical since having This child I have experienced Typical you know New Motherhood plus medical issues and I've been driven to look into intentional communities and Co housing there are a couple in silver spring. And I'd like to hear your thoughts about how important that is in the face of an aging population and also in the face of Parents or parents of special needs children and children who will be ultimately needing as supportive living environment even after the parents passed. Thank you David. I read about Co housing communities in The peace and basically. They're they're usually a bunch of apartments together. When I write about this is in Oakland. Call to Michael Collins Which has twenty three people in ranging from age one to eighty three and they have a gigantic common kitchen. They eat together maybe twice a week together in the rest of the time they just eat within their own apartments. They have a Common Garden. Commonplace play area and in that particular cohorts in community. There's a a guy who's a nurse and one of the Moms told me you know I can knock on his apartment door one in the morning. put my have my kid held in his arms and say should we take him to the and the nurse is very happy to give that advice even in the middle of the night and so. That's the kind of support and the other thing that the some of the resins told me about that place. Was You have a lot of friendships across the age A woman I talked to Courtney. Martin has a little girl and her little three year. Old Daughter just has a wonderful relationship with one of the adult males in the. The guy loves the fact that a three year old daughter a three year old thinks he's fantastic and the girl loves the fact that She's got this funny guy who plays with their own time. And so this sort of multigenerational Connections that used to be part of life are are much more part of these co housing communities. Sally is on the line from haverhill Massachusetts. Sally Wicha High. I just want say I'm married into a a lovely large Italian family. We ended up moving away just because we none of our free time was never our own. It was always scheduled with family events. And they're wonderful people but it turned out. We just didn't have our own life. Yeah I mean David. There's that I Guess Sally is experiencing something a few decades. After a huge number of people have experienced that which was the notion is the big family the big multigenerational family. Can it be suffocating Do Children not get the kind of attention from their parents that they would in a nuclear family. And I'm wondering when you think of what What again what? The different experiences Do for kids. Who grew up in them? What what about that problem? Yeah I think they can be more suffocating for the adults. I think the kids are fine having squads of other kids to run around and play with but I think the adults can find it suffocating. You're basically forced to live with people who didn't choose Often their feuds and often like even we started with a stray of a guy who cut the didn't cut the Turkey at the right time That's a seemingly trivial thing can create years of feuds and so. I don't want to say that life in extended family is always neat and nice and a lot of the Weavers. We work with struggle with burnout. Because they're always giving giving giving and they don't have a sense of place to relax is t. a place to do self care and so. I don't want to totally romanticize these things and I'm a person I think our our values of change and I certainly live with modern values. Were I expect a certain level of privacy room in my own? A quiet place and those are often not around extended family so there are. There are pluses and minuses to both forms. I guess my argument would be. We've got a little too far over in the direction of privacy and separation and isolation And it's been especially bad for our kids we're talking about Family with David Brooks Whose article is called. The nuclear family was a mistake You know one difference between a nuclear family. Let's say and and a large number of people who come together to to live together for with a variety of connections is that they're they're at at the heart of the nuclear family was was a marriage and in fact when I was a kid they. They hadn't yet liberalized divorce laws so Divorce meant a trip to Nevada And it was really a privilege. The the poor just desertion instead of that A business now. People who come together in a variety of of of new forged ways haven't haven't stood before before their community and pledged themselves to one another what holds them together to people drift in and out Is it a different degree of association? There is a different degree of association. It's much easier to drift in and out in and they are definitely more fragile than marriages which are a little fragile. Any pretty proud and so I don't WanNa But I think people are looking but on the other hand I think the forged families are not just roommates and if you go on Pinterest or something and right in chosen families you see all these placards and other things for people who are in chosen families who say. The family isn't just blood. It's people who will be there for you unconditionally. And I do think a lot of these people who are in forged families chosen families. It's not quite as tight at tires. They'll blood tie but it can be a pretty tight tie And it's a sense of you know and if you go back and I mentioned this in the article if you go back through human history if you looked at the extended clans that humans lived in for most of our history. There were a Lotta `non-kinh there. They did kinship by being by eating together. And that gave them sense of kinship. They created kinship migrating somewhere together. They created kinship by being through an ordeal together and so our modern idea of kinship is not the historical norm for centuries and centuries and thousands of years. I'm just worried about the minute. We have left him. I'm I'm curious when you think ahead and another fifty years do you imagine a great for the formation of these of forced families re Recreated extended families And and a real diminution further diminution of the nuclear family Or do you suspect that it's you know. We're in kind of stasis right now. It's what's your view of wood. Will these situations like the one you're in be like you know the communes of the nineteen sixties or the salons of Paris at a different time or the or the main secular hippies and sixties but I would say one of the things when I spoke to so many families scholars for this piece family structures always changing. And there's no simple line you can draw through. It's always evolving and I would just say if you look at the history of family in over the last two hundred thousand years we're at the very extreme of smallness and so we eat at small tables and historically people have eaten at bigger tables with more people and I do think the trend right now and I think. The culture has shifted away from a culture of hyper individualism to a culture where people are really looking for connection and and I think they wanna find ways he heat at bigger tables. What what a Wonderful Image David David Brooks? Thanks for talking with us today. It's been a great pleasure to pleasure to be with you again room. Yes good to talk to you. A David Brooks his latest piece for the Atlantic is called the nuclear family Was a mistake. You can continue the conversation and get the point. Podcast at our website on point radio DOT ORG and you can follow us on twitter in find us on facebook at on point radio We're taking voicemails also for our Friday news roundtable and we want to hear from you. Do you have a question about? President trump issuing around of pardons or former DOJ prosecutors calling for attorney general bars resignation or the democratic debates. Leave us a voicemail at six one seven. Three three zero six eight three. I'm Robert Siegel and I've been sitting in this week. On point for Meghna Chock providing she returns to the program on Monday on point is produced by Anna Bowman Jesse. Down I lean Amata Steph. Its own it's Brittany knots West Martin James Ross Dorey Shumur grace tattered Adam Waller and Sydney Wertheim with help from Kierra love and Bradley Noble. I'm Robert Siegel and I'm retired again this point.

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David Brooks on the future of politics and community after COVID-19

The Munk Debates

54:25 min | 8 months ago

David Brooks on the future of politics and community after COVID-19

"Welcome to the munk. Debates podcast every episode. We normally provide you with a civil insubstantial debate on the big issues of the day, but our world as we know, it has changed, and so has our format for the next few weeks. We're bringing you. A special series called the monk dialogues. We invite the sharpest minds and brightest thinkers for one on one conversations live on facebook to reflect on what our world will look like. After the covid nineteen pandemic, these dialogues provide you the listener with original insights into the pandemics impact on everything from our shared values to the economy to international affairs. This week. We bring you new. York Times columnist political commentator and bestselling author. David Brooks in conversation with Rudyard Griffiths. This is an edited version of the live event recorded. Thursday may twenty eight. Hello and welcome to the monk dialogues project of the Peter Melanie Munk Foundation presenting sponsors, Gluskin Sheff and the onyx corporation. My Name Rudyard Griffiths and I've had the pleasure over these last number of weeks of spending an hour with you every evening to talk about the effects of covid nineteen on the broader issues and trends that are shaping our society and tonight. We're have a real treat for you. He's a writer and author. A bestseller books from around the World David Brooks I've read them regularly as you do in the New York Times. On the PBS Newshour where he comments on, American politics with great sagacity, teaching, Yale and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences also doing some really interesting work with the Aspen Institute around his Weavers Project that we will get into this evening so. We. saw each other December here in Toronto and the monk debate stage for your buck debate on capitalism. It's great to be speaking with you virtually this evening. It's it'd be back with the monk community so pleased while great. David as I said, the purpose of these dialogues is to kind of stretch our minds into the future and try to think about how this pandemic is affecting US individually, but your expertise also is partly thinking about things in the context of community, and how we act, or don't act as a community in the twenty first century confronted by technology confronted by our economy. Confronted by our politics and the divisions within them. So what do you see? David is lasting implications lasting impacts of this pandemic on our politics. Maybe specifically our attitudes towards government I'd love to hear your views on that. Yeah I take a maximalist view on how much this is going to affect us, you know sometimes a big event happens, and it doesn't only a temporary effect in the US. Nine eleven had an effect on people, and they went more religious attendance. They more volunteering gave more blood, but that only lasted nine months and after. After that everything was back to normal on the other hand world, war to the people who grew up in world, war two, era had a very good sense that we work together, and that was true in Canada in the US. We work together. We can trust each other. Social Trust was very high in both countries, and now added sixty years that whole mentality, and so the reason I think this is a big event and we'll have a pivotal effect is not only a tragedy disaster. That's hitting us, but is hitting us in the. The middle of a social crisis we already had a social crisis. divisions, a rich and poor divisions, white and black, all sorts of social divisions polarization, and so we had this earthquake, and the earthquake happened, and then the pandemic hits us like a hurricane, and so it's a hurricane in the middle of an earthquake, and the hurricane is coursing water down through the ravines that were already split open, and so to me. This is a very unusual period where we have to sorts of crises happening at once, and it makes sense to. To me that that has a big social vet, and the keyword would pick up on in this circumstances, precarity precariousness that people already felt very precarious. Their incomes were moving up and down. Their employment was precarious. Now they're helped his precarious, and so to me. There's going to be the key word as people go forward will be security. How can I be secure? How can I feel myself? Surrounded by some sort of order, and so in that Kinda climate? I think you see a big shift in attitudes toward government, a real desire for. More active, so you could call it. A shift left, but I think it is a shift that's conservative left so government will be active, but maybe socially a little more conservative ideas of immigration ideas about social experimentation, and so to me that make sense, and that would be the mega shift I see the minor shift I see micro shift I see and I'll just speak about the US for right now. Is just the falling fortunes of the trump campaign I look today at numbers of how Hillary Clinton poll in certain key states how Hillary Clinton did in certain key states, and how Joe Biden is now polling in those states and Joe Biden is way above where Hillary Clinton polled were Hillary. Clinton did by seven or eight points states like Pennsylvania Michigan Wisconsin all the swing, states, and so find the trump campaign. It looks ruinously bad right now, and I will say from my conversations with Republicans and especially in the Senate. They're extremely. Right now the expectation now is trump loses the robins. Lose the Senate weirdly. They think they'll pick up a few seats in the house, but not enough to carry a majority so. The macro trend I think really is toward a different sort of political order than we've been used to and the micro ten short-term is certainly bad for Donald Trump in the US David a great way to set this up because I think that's exactly where I want to go with you for this hour to talk about the macro and micro. Let's talk start with the macro. Written interesting column I think it would resonate with a lot of Canadians here north of the border. which is this idea that the pandemic in a sense is North America's first invasion. You'd have to go back to the were eighteen twelve before Kennedy United States decided to experience an invasion. At least we felt like it was I. I think we actually won that war, but. You might still still disputes. But no it all series though I think this is a really important insight that we in north, America have lived privileged by geography for the better part of the entire postwar period, and while our governments, and at times, our sense of security was heightened by international events, certainly during the Cold War nine eleven. This is fundamentally different. This is something that came into our societies into our nation's that permeated our borders that brought the world's insecurity into us in a way that we've never felt in North America. Can you expand on that? Because I think that's really important understanding, maybe the psychology of North America going forward from this pandemic. Was Reading a book. I'd been in college called the American mind and there was a sentence in there that said nothing had ever succeeded like America and every. American, knew it and I think that's true of Canada as well. My birth country. US and Canada had the benefit of the privilege of not being invaded too often. We were surrounded on two sides by groping oceans. And candidates, the north by a gigantic frontier, and so we had security, and out of that is essential security. We had plenty. We had these vast resources at our disposal, and both countries prospered and that assumption of prosperity that assumption aplenty was the backdrop for everything else that followed him, and it followed in different ways for different countries, individualism plenty welcoming of immigration. It was that existential sense. Sense of security, and I think that as essential sense of security has got to be affected invaded now by this pandemic. This is the first time in both countries that daily life has been up ended of course war team twelve happened nine eleven happened, but it was not a daily upsetting of life, and so to me something changes when you suddenly get awakened to the fact. We could get invaded in the first thing that gets wakened this. Hey, welcome to the rest of the world, most countries have been invaded, but then you get this shift in mentality, and there's a university of Maryland psychologist Michelle Gulf on, and she has studied different countries in their various cultures, and she says some countries are tight, and some are loose, and the tight ones are those that have been invaded by foreign powers by foreign pathogens by diseases, and the constant set of thread has given them the skill, the experience of tightening up and following rules, and so that would be countries like Germany and Australia and South Korea. And so there's a great deal of order in those countries and maybe a little conformity. And then there's some countries that have never been invaded of not have that sense of threat and they. She calls them loose. Countries and Canada would be one US. We want Australia. It'd be one. And we're just a little more creative with a little more disorderly in some ways, a little looser, and so to deal with pandemic. It really helps to be tight, and you can do it as a as a loose country, you just have to adjust your behavior, and at least in the US it's taken a lot longer, and if you look at the countries around the world that have tended to do well. They've been tight countries and the ones that have not done as well have been looser, but they've also The key measure to me has been social trust. Do you trust government. Do you trust people around you? Low social countries have trust. Countries have struggled and those include us. They would include Italy. They would include Spain and it's just because we we don't do coordinated action as well as others and I don't think cultures destiny. Loose country can do what South Korea's done in really done track and trace, but it's harder cultural lift, and so far that's been the case in a lot of these countries David does does the pandemic change that? Feeling, to our culture that looseness that privileging of individualism or those things so hard, wired in that, regardless of the effects of the pandemic over the short term that that original culture will reassert itself. Yeah, this is more of a guess, but I do think it changes if you look at the individualism that swept over north. Maybe the entire West it really started in the sixties. It was a sense that in the fifties life was too conformist. It was too dull. It was unfair to African Americans. Unfair to women. And, so you need to shake the culture up. And so, we had the Great Bob Dylan all the songs I grew up with a youth foreign to run. Ramblin man free. Bird it was all about freedom. Freedom was the word and liberation. and that happened in the sixties, and frankly I'm glad I did. We became much more open. Societies nothing Silicon Valley in a Lotta the creativity that we've experienced could have happened without that unleashing again in their rebellion against conformity. And so we had a left wing version of individualism. which was you have any lifestyle you want? We right wing version, which was, you can have any economic policy you want you can have. The solitary entrepreneur can be the hero. But for sixty years, it was pretty much straight individualism. And to my mind we've overdone, that. And that if you have sixty years of straight individualism, you weaken the bonds between people you weaken the sense of common good, you weaken the sense of community, and we are sort of seeing the strains of taking a good idea to an extreme. And to my mind we were already beginning to shift in the culture was much more going to be about connection and I think we're beginning of that, but the pandemic accelerates that. And so the reminds us how interdependent we are! And reminds us how we have to act together to collective problem. And so to me it takes a culture that was already rebelling against individualism. And accelerate the move toward community and David. If you think about coming US election, one of the concerns, I think that has been repeated on these dialogues in our conversations with people like Neil. Ferguson Samantha Power for AIDS Ikaria Malcolm glad well is this. Idea that that there is a often these crises that the reaction is to embrace her. Seek out a more authoritarian view of the world of you that has offered to the public on the basis that it provides some sense of security and certainty. I, maybe even more so in as you say a society that has lost those tissues of community that might have allowed self to bind itself together to heal in the consequence, the aftermath of a truly culturally pandemic event like the one that we're going through right now. Do you see that impulse right now in American politics, and and again at one might think instinctively that that could benefit trump in the upcoming presidential election. Things I've learned researching social trust is that it doesn't correlate to being a democracy or not the highest trust country in the world where people have the most trust in government and the most trusted each other is China. And that's because China has produced tremendous economic growth over the last few decades, and if you produce growth in prosperity for your people, they trust you. And they're willing to tolerate a lot. I would say the US. You would think that would be danger and it could be if you look at pandemics through the centuries going back to the periclean Athens plague. They tear societies apart Daniel Defoe writing about the plague in England in the seventeenth century, talked about how everybody betrayed each other when they didn't know who was sick. Even members of their own family they would lock them away. Get rid of them. Because social distrust torn apart, and frankly when this started expected a lot more of that, I'm not seeing it. And in the US to the extent, there is an authoritarian impulse were blessed by the fact that the person who is most of their tearing is also completely incompetent. And so I think he's giving authoritarianism a bad name which serves. And so all I can say is. I can see how you would want to go to an authoritarian right new look at the polling. Senior citizens who supported trump are beginning to flake away from him. A young people to the extending had any are beginning to flake away from him, and so there's not seeing competence and therefore I i. think it's a it's a concern, but I just don't see it as a reality I. Just don't see evidence of that reality right now, right? So, what do you think could be? The political fault lines engendered by the pandemic once we come back from the summer and you know the campaign. That crucial final eight to ten weeks stretch I mean. Are we GONNA see? relitigate of what happened and the government's response will that be the focus, or do you think it's going to be more on the agenda to come how we are going to put? A ravaged economy back on its feet. One of the things that's interesting to me is where we're suffering in all. Our countries around the world is incredible economic decline of whatever twenty five thirty percent. In the third quarter we might see. Hopefully a rebound. You could twenty four percent growth. And, so a lot of people said to me well. If there's sprinkler percent growth, people feel the growth and they'll think oh, trump's doing a good job. We're coming back. I'm a little dubious about that. Because even get twenty four percent growth. You're still down net nine percent, and that's worse than the financial crisis. Second people don't notice. There's a lot of political science research on this. People don't notice the growth that happens after July. You don't begin to really feel it until six months after actually happening so I doubt trump will get credit for that as for whether what we want going forward I personally think Joe. Biden is running the ideal campaign right now. He's in his basement. He's not making that much news. He nine trump is getting like ninety five percent of the news coverage right now, and you would think that would classically be bad, but the polling number is simply suggest that trump is suffering right now and so I if I were in the Biden campaign I'd say why change a good thing, and whether they want to go ahead and proposed sort of a set of new deal policies to me that that's a risky proposition. Because in the US I think there's a great desire for security. There's still such great distrust the government, and this is what has kept the Democrats back. They're the party of government and they have not won because they're still that distrust I. think that trust has to be earned gradually and the one thing worth learning from the new deal. was. At no point, maybe nineteen thirty seven for brief window with no other point Franklin Roosevelt seem like an ideologue like he wanted to do this. At some grand vision of remaking America. He played up in all the new dealers played up. The sense were just trying stuff out here. We're GONNA try this. If it doesn't work, we'll try that. There is an intense atmosphere of pragmatism and even a temperamental moderation today. The new deal was unfurled leaving while they were taking pretty dramatic action, and if I were Joe by now would be a a good atmosphere that I'd WanNA learn from that we're. We're GONNA. Take some action, but we have no ideological priors about. We're not some scary. Bunch of Socialists were just GONNA. Try to do stuff that help people in concrete terms, because right now people are. Just at the tail end, at least the US of the subsidies, beginning to wear out and the unemployment checks beginning to wear out the state, governments are hurting, have no revenue. and so things have to be done. But I think I would hope that their sponsor be okay. We're responding. We're not. We don't have some crusade here. Because the crusade will scare, people dared before we go to audience questions just one I. Don't want to build on that point because it's important I mean to what extent do you think there could be pressure on the Biden campaign and more importantly if it happens a Biden government to look and be inspired by some of? Of the thinking around Bernie Sanders and his campaign, and the reason I say that is that we're at a moment here where you have thirty million Americans filing for unemployment, you've millions of Canadians doing the same yet the world's top billionaires, or about half a trillion dollars richer, the stock market thanks to extraordinary action on the part federal. Reserve has soared back to. It's twenty nineteen levels. I mean it looks like a recipe David for. A lot of the things that people really didn't like. This pandemic, which was spiraling economic inequality divisions between rich and poor, a sense that the system was set up to benefit the equity owning class versus everyone else. Do you see those kind of sanders impulses now is something in the rear view mirror, or could they reemerge as a result of the the dynamics of this crisis, its economic divergence that it's created. I observe that they are still the intellectual energy of the Democratic Party if I could step back for a minute, in August of nineteen, ninety-one I covered the coup against or shields in the Soviet Union. And then I went down to Ukraine where there's an independence vote which Canada was deeply involved in and to me, that was the high water mark of post were idealism. That, globalization was gonNA work. Technology would unite us that everyone would prosper in a globalised economy. That! The world was coming to a peaceful end and I was in the middle of that and I believed it. I covered mental commander prison the Oslo peace process in the Middle East all good news. And that was an era of a naive globalization. Now which I guess I was a part of. And it all began to crumble in a bunch of early steps in then big steps in crumbled with Yugoslavian civil war, it crumbled with Russia, and China turned into. It crumbled with the financial crisis. It crumbled with the Iraq war. And were living in the shadow of naive globalization and the energy in both parties in the US and I think everywhere. Is In okay. What do we do next? And Sanders offers a clear alternative to globalization, and that ideology of the nineteen nineties and frankly sodas burning trump said with a lot of people around the world. And so right now the energy in both those parties in those two wings I. Don't think Bernie Sanders is going away, but I I would say there's a reason. He lost the primaries, and that's because while people don't like inequality. And I be completely happy with an inheritance tax. It's precariousness. Come back to this is what I really don't like. A Don't hate bill, Gates. They don't hate Warren Buffett they just WanNa, feel secure, and so some people wanted universal basic income. Some people want some sort of wage subsidies. What we call earned income tax credit, so if you work, you get a living wage the if I were the bind campaign, I emphasize that that's the thing people feel when I travel around the country. Frankly they never talk about. The Wall Street. They don't like it. But it's not uppermost in their minds. Uppermost on their mind is can I provide for my family. Can I get a decent life? And so I would be cautious of inheriting of absorbing too much of the Sanders Mantra into Biden administration, but the Greek blessing well, there's not a blessing but the reality. Is that you don't have to have that fight that the moderate versus left fight. That was part of the primary. It's over because the pandemic is crest us into a recession or a depression. And so now we've got to have not redistribution versus moderation. We've got have growth economics. There has to be a democratic growth and job creation agenda, and that gets US beyond some of the things that really divided Sanders in Warren versus Biden in some of the others, and so to me the future the left is less class left and more or less, let's go. Let's create jobs. Jobs, and that if handles that, well I think it's it's a way to avoid some of the ideological fights that have been dogging. It I really think that the world post pandemic is not going to be about. The debates got started fifty years ago or a hundred years ago. It's going to be about something else. It's going to be about. How can we provide a secure base? Base from which people can have decent lives. Great insight, great analysis, David, let's go to audience questions because of preparation for this evening. We've had dozens emailed in. We've also going to be taking questions alive from our facebook. Audience is watching right now. So this comes from Charles in Beautiful Victoria British Columbia in the past. You've commented that America's seems to have lost its way in some. Some respects. Do you believe this pandemic has done anything to help American society? Refocus on what is important for individuals and for society as a whole data. This goes to your weavers project with the Aspen Institute something. That's very dear to your heart of trying to find ways for local communities to knit those tissues of community back together. I mean they've been pulled asunder by this pandemic. Those communities are now going to struggle with a very dark at picture for a period of time. I sense that you're optimistic, though and I'm just wondering why. I started this thinking. It would make us break us, and I thought break is in a very likely options. Sylla's but I've been on the phone now for three or four months pretty much all day and the first thing I would say my weavers is that we've is based on the idea that social disconnection underlay a lot of our problems, but community is being solved on the local level all around the country and I've become friends with Paul born or the Tamarack to WHO's done so much to alleviate poverty in Canada by building community by building networks of local citizens, and as I look around and call the people to know through this project. A couple of them have said to me, you know I was born for this moment. They are the sort of people rush into the hurricane, and so in Baltimore. They're creating new food. Distribution Networks I spoke to a young man in San Jose California who's got a program called springboard where they're providing decent education options online education options for families over the summer break, not education options that oppress the parents into being there twenty hours a day, but our humane realistic about what people are going to do, and so I met so many people who are expanding, and then I've met so many people who think you know my life is more local now. And I feel more united I spoke to upholster this week. And this is in the US he said, are we more united or are we more divided than they were and twice as many Americans think we're more united than we were before, and there's a whole raft of polling data on this, so there's been some sense of of coming together. There's been a a renegotiation of values before the pandemic. Had you become successful? How'd you get prestige in America? You got great in high school. You went to college. You got a fancy job at Goldman Sachs. that. Prestige ladder has been flipped. And now the nurses have more precise now. The grocery store workers more seized the breast drivers more stage, and so you see a trans valuation values and I. Don't WanNa get too carried away, but i. do think things are shifting, and there's just this universal sensory can't go back to what we were before. We have to reset I'm more hopeful than I was three months ago. That that that's a possibility. Yeah, now the whole term I think essential worker has made us much more aware that many of the people are working frankly and low wage jobs are essential. Essential and they need to be supported. They need a living wage. They need a society that works for the. Let's take some more questions here. We'll see if this one's coming up from our email or facebook another email question. This is from Reverend Mark. Wilkinson from Winnipeg Manitoba says, I'm an American pastor a former Republican now senior pastor a church here in Winnipeg. How do we get back to choosing the greater good over winning at virtually any cost, the national interest over personals ambitions David on that same theme of the last question and part of our conversation tonight. Are there specific policies that you could see that would help in that transition were. Is this literally something in your view? That has to come from the bottom up that it isn't the domain for national governments to create legislative tools or programs that can bring about this flourishing of community. I think it's both of the eighteen nineties about this a lot. You had a a big economic transition. Industrialization waves of immigration. You had deep urban poverty, good wide inequality, concentration of wealth, a lot of things going through, and their countries turned around. The culture turned around in three ways first there's a cultural shift in the pasture will be aware that the Social Gospel movement replace social. DARWINISM SOCIAL DARWINISM super competitive. Social Gospel Movement was communal settlement houses and things like that, and then you had civic renaissance, eighteen nineties than boys and girls scouts the boys and girls. Girls. Clubs the unions, the Environmental Movement, the temperance women the Settlement House Movement, so you civic renaissance, and then finally you had the progressive women political movement, so when cultural civic political and I think we're short on through like that I think there's cultural movement which I talked about earlier I think we're seeing a civic renaissance of all sorts of organizations that are just springing up a try to serve local community. They're not scaling unfortunately and lyrically you know the in the US think the policy that is seems blindingly obvious to me. Is a national service program. Where you make a right of passage for young people to serve their country somewhere other than where they live right now we need a three hundred thousand workers to do the track and tracing. We have an entire generation class of people who are graduating from college and high school with no jobs for the most part, no educational prospects, no chance to really travel. and. We take that workforce in. Give them Sunday. And I wrote a conscious a few weeks ago, and since then in the US Senate not because of my own, the cases so obvious. There's been real movement. There's been a whole raft of Democrats. Even some Republicans are beginning to sign on a lot of Republicans privately upset. If you can get it going out, be there for you. And so a real unblocking, so that would be the one obvious policy. I think just to get I. Don't know what service they do just to get kids from Berkeley in the same team with kids from mobile. Alabama would do a lot in this is true in Canada to imagine getting kids from East and West, just having that life experience together. That would go a long way I should say. We're speaking on a day when we've had riots in Minnesota. With two cases of of real racial prejudice, killing of a young man in Minnesota. Thing in central park, but in the US, the legacy of slavery is just an ever-present legacy. And it's hard to really talk about unity without addressing that subject, and that requires national leadership. And there are a lot of different ways you could do it i. have been converted lately to the idea. Reparations I now support them. Just as a show of dignity to what African Americans have suffered in this country. It's hard for me to see really unity as a country. Until we make some CIGNA progress that and that takes some sort of traumatic step and to me. That's a national step. Create words okay. Let's go to our next question. Here will put that up on the screen from James Jones, he says what vital issue do you think will be forgotten in the upcoming issue, due to the massive amount of attention, being paid to the pandemic, so what could slip through the cracks here David that you think warrants real attention, yeah, the one that leaves immediately to mind is education. Do think online learning is not working. It works for like the tiny sliver Piper motivated students, but for most it doesn't. And I know you know. We were all calling people around checking on a friends and my friends. Their emotional health is entirely dependent on what age children are. And, so those who children are grown. They're doing pretty well. Those children are young. They're fine. They were going to be quarantined anyway. those children who are ten eleven school. There's a lot of stress there and what I worry about is those children who were already disadvantaged, educationally falling further behind losing basically the last half of their school year, losing summer and sort of just falling further behind, and we haven't quite solve the problem of online education, and so I worry about that being lost I do think there's a movement afoot that I've come to be intrigued by which just educational pluralism. At least in the US, we took this industrial model. Say High School, or elementary school and plop them down all over the place in schools pretty much look alike, but the creativity that I've seen in the educational landscape has been from small schools, really idiosyncratic schools schools with a distinct culture, and when I ever I go to a school where I think of that's really leaving a mark, student. The school is not afraid to be itself. And I'd love to get to a world where the schools were probably a little smaller, but they're allowed to be more distinct, and they're allowed to really reflect the community and be rooted in the community, rather than being these islands pop down in the community where the teachers and the parents don't have that much in common where the principles are not community leaders. And so I'd love to see a little more that I. do worry that that's the issue. That's GonNa get overlooked and amidst everything else. You're listening to the monk dialogues special edition of the Munk. Debates podcast where we invite big thinkers to reflect on what our world will look like after Cova nineteen. This Week New York Times columnist David Brooks. Now on how the pandemic will change politics and society. David lead side Gut to some more questions here. There were a lot for you, so we'll answer those that we can. The next one up is from. Visual. He's asking Joe Clark the former Prime Minister of Canada. As talked about the competitive bandage that we have in Canada given our internal unity relative to the United States what are your thoughts about Canada and its leverage on the global stage in this new World David you did have a long career as a foreign correspondent, you spend a lot of time in the world's capitals and points in between you know candidate right now. Now is feeling pretty uncomfortable. Squeezed between China and the United States and the growing great-power rivalry between your country and Beijing, what do you see potentially as a path for Canada in this world that the pandemic in some ways as you said has been an acceleration of these tensions and trajectories that were kind of already set on course prior to the viruses up break. I now toggle back and forth thousand Canadian conversations, American conversations and I always think Americans are so beleaguered the division. The culture war is just so much more acute. And will we have in this country? We don't disagree more than we used to. Intellectually we just hate each other more over those disagreements with the political scientists call effective polarization, emotional position hatred is much higher and I. Don't detect that when I crossed into Canada, quite as much though you have a fair share. What I would say is that I mentioned knife, globalization and that we. Either it was betrayed by bad people or we were naive about it. But among the countries that has benefited the most from globalization that has succeeded. The most from globalization done the best, I would say his Canada. Both immigration policies in trade policies. Even guys managed to mostly avoid the financial crisis. In, so I would take Canada as much as any other country. Has hasn't instead in figuring out a solution to globalization that has not victor on, and that is not Bernie Sanders, and I would say that's been the case with Canada. I practiced in a different way with the Scandinavian countries one of things. That's really hit home for me recently as we had this debate. Often around the world. Margaret Thatcher! In your countries well where you either for the market or for the state, and the market was the right state was the left, but if you look at some of the countries with the most successful societies and I would include Scandinavian Canada in that. They have pretty strong markets. An pretty strong states. It's not one of the other. And if you look at Sweden Denmark and Norway, they can afford their generous welfare state because they have very free markets. And so finding that sweet spot. And so we can have continue globalization with immigration of free movement of goods and services. Is Sort of the the panacea for all our country, but I would say candidate is further ahead. That had more dependent on keeping the global system working, and not having us retreat to sort of great power politics of the nineteenth century where it's the US hating China China hitting the US. And Russia doing its thing, and you're basically splintering each other the return to nineteenth century, great power politics would be a disaster for all of us, but I think in particular for Gannon. Something we need to avoid but hard to see how those tensions aren't going to grow at least in the short term. Let's take another question here. From. Our viewing audience from Jan craft. She's asking. How do you think the experience of the pandemic will affect? US citizens attitudes towards more universal health care I mean I think one of the things we've seen David in this crisis. It's been very point. You just mentioned the legacy of slavery in the United States. The extent to which minority communities African Americans Hispanics really have borne the brunt. Of this virus and I'm sure you would agree many other Americans that would suggest some kind of moral imperative towards a greater role for the state and the delivery of healthcare. Do. You think there's any. New. In that in the US, it has been again one of those issues that has divided the country. At the House. Republicans who are just anti state was the choreography I think we've crossed that hurdle. And so the future of the Republican Party is not gonNA be Libertarian. Milton Friedman Party. If you look at the the rising young Republican, senators are people like Josh. Holly from Zuri now. Marco Rubio and they are. They're working class conservatives. They look a little more like the British Tory party does under Johnson. They they WANNA use the state to help working class. And so extending some sort of health insurance i. Would not be alien to a Republican Party five years from now. Problem in the US is is just a transitional one. We through freak circumstances in World War Two, we developed this system where we got our health insurance from our employers, and it was just a little regulation when we had wages controls that we. We said you can't give. People raises being new health insurance, and then out of the spoon. You get this unintended explosion of private delivery health insurance something that made no sense at the time nobody plan. But now you've got hundred eight million people on private health insurance and very happy with it. How do you transition them off? And that has been the problem along. Frankly, that's a structural problem. It's hard for me to see go away. You could expand Medicaid and I think what Joe Biden is. Promoting is an expansion of Medicare expansion around that private system, but sort switching people to universal medicare for all system i. just think it's a political on starter and that's not a judgement on value. It's just the judgment of. How do you make the switch from one to another? I don't think that's changing. I will say if Biden does get elected I would caution him to do healthcare later. It's like Republicans always WanNa do social security. Medicare reform entitlement reform, and a lot of people walk into that battle. Nobody walks out, and when Democrats do healthcare's even when they do it successfully like Barack Obama they suffer. Electoral consequences that are terrible and so to me for Biden the number one agendas, jobs, jobs, jobs, and then expanding healthcare would be something of value down the line. Just a slap in our a quick question David Vice, presidential, running mate for Biden given always talked about I mean. Who Do you think is the right candidate? And then? Who Do you think he's likely to actually choose? Democrats have a tendency to rip themselves to shreds over disputes, and so the first qualification to me. Me Is pick somebody who will not be opposite pole in your administration creating a divided administration pick somebody with character and discipline to be completely loyal to the president, and so it has character has to come first. Somebody is able to disagree well and be loyal. The second I would say somebody who has the ability to move with the times and to understand where knock can have the same left-center debate divided the Democratic Party we're GONNA try to transcend that because of the circumstance. I, highly Elizabeth. Warren but. The problem with her presidential campaign, she ran the same. She could run for years ago or eight years ago. She didn't move with the times and that's certainly true sanders. I would personally love to see Amy Klobuchar to experience legislator. She's our Democrat from Minnesota. More moderate. Probably in the party is a Comma Harris Center from California did not run. A great campaign was a little disorganized, but she's a person of a strong forceful character and offend tastic presenter and also I. Think has shown herself especially since campaign to really be in. An excellent democratic fewer put it that way so those would be some of the people. The final thing to be said is I think America's really ready for a boring administrator. Somebody just get stuff done our governors now phenomenally popular, and if abide, WanNa pick the governor I I think that would sort of short circuit, a lot of the ideological fights that are the national level, and maybe reassure a lot of people. Well. Let's see we will see what happens in that announcement. Coming up before the Democratic convention, an online convention which would be interesting to see both parties put that together. Okay, let's take another question we've got about ten twelve minutes left on our our with David Brooks of the New York Times from speaking about. The effects of covid nineteen pandemic on our politics and our shared values. How will it change our sense of community or sense of collective purpose? This question is from Sandra Yard. She's. What might we expect from the religious right in response to the pandemic David again? We've seen this pandemic unfortunately become. My. Couldn't only but become a political football. It's become a political football also within the Ben Jealous. Community around rights to worship, versus has the ability of states to enforce stay at home and other quarantine orders. Where do you come down on that debate? Because I think it is an interesting one, it goes to the heart of one of the great perennial debates. The freedom of religion, but also do you think it potentially energizes those communities in the upcoming election? If! You looked at a lot of media coverage. You would get the impression that. Democrats think this and Republicans all think this about staying at home, but that's actually not the case so seventy seven percent of. American support staying at home eighty two percents sports regulations in their local area. And so in a polarized society, we've never seen numbers like this answer to me. You've got the political class which is emphasizing the division, and there's a few completely unrepresentative people on the fringes who are marching on state capitals in carrying guns in waving confederate flags. But if you look at the actual behavior of people, they use cell phone technology to measure how people are moving. There's not a big difference between Democrats and Republicans. Democrats are a little more stay shut, but that's because they're living in in urban areas where the pandemic is the way worse I. If you look at WHO's handling this more effectively, red states and blue states, there's no vast difference or some super effective red state, some super effective blue states. And so to me, the polarization is more a surface phenomenon now among religious serves. There are some like Franklin Graham. Who are always going to be the culture warriors, but the vast majority to me. The big story out of this is that regular Republicans regular religious conservatives are not with culture warriors on this. They're like looking around at their neighbors. They're not making their decision whether. Whether stay home based on what some national clergy says or what rush? LIMBAUGH says they're looking at their neighbors and figuring what's right for here and my attitude on the debate between open up in lockdown as there's no national answer to that question, it's a local issue that depends on local circumstances and the more we can make that locally less Louis. Make ideologically the better. Trump came out. And said Rangan declared churches essential services something in no power to do last week, but then it was just a cheap political ploy of when I talked to pastors and people go to church. No not yet I'M NOT GOING TO CHURCH RIGHT? Yeah, and when I talked to clergy. They're kind of impressed. The online participation is very high. And so I think people are basically behaving sensibly, and they're trying to strike a balance between rival goods between safety. Economic Survival to me. It's the we air. We think we've really got a country on this front. Because we do not, that's that's an important clarification. And some reason for hope. Let's take a couple more questions. PIPPAS, asking what's going to happen in the Middle East host covert with Israel David? You've covered the Middle East as a foreign correspondent, this president has really gone out of his way to provide the government. Benjamin Netanyahu with many of its key policy and international demands. Israel has probably of any country in the world disproportionate effect on US politics. What's going to happen in Israel? And how do you think that could play back into the campaign in the fall? I, am I can listen I probably been Israel in the Middle East, Jordan and countries around there probably twenty five times three times I've spent a Lotta time there, but I had been there two years so I. Always think you're gone six months. You don't know I used to cover peace processes than I. Would I remember in the early nineties? Really getting my hopes up that there would be Israeli Palestinian settlements. Don't really have that hope right now or I'll see at anytime maybe in my. My lifetime to me the big change in the Middle East has been the pivot away from the centrality of Israel Palestine is the key divide and the pivot toward Iran vs Saudi Arabia's key divide, and so a lot of the Saudi, all those countries now somewhat friendly to Israel and I think that divided still key divide I have to say two or three years ago. It really did seem likely that we would see some weather or Iran versus. Arab, we really see an explosion. In Italy says away of muddling through in a completely unattractive fashion where they don't make real progress. But they do deals with each other. That's something I've covering that region with some military commanders in they were in southern, Lebanon and they were bombing a village that is traditionally an ally, but the village had done something wrong. And I said well. Don't you think if you this Israel troops? If you bomb, the won't that hurt your relationships with the village over long-term. Names like. A long-term here. We're just playing chess. And that was a good lesson for me that the people even though they can be sworn enemies, they play chess. and. Bet. Chess game is now. Intricate in stagnant as far as I can see but I confess been there in a couple of years, so I'm not the biggest expert in the world on well, thanks David, good good insights, regardless I is, you bi on the table or is such an economic social investment. Untenable I. Guess you know this is a hot issue here in Canada to David this fact that we've just gone and done what we've done, which is provide millions of citizens with direct financial support, not tied to. A specific housing or childcare social assistance, program Do you think there's a real hope for you? Be I again? WE'RE GONNA we've amassed credible public debts and deficits as a result so in some ways maybe is the hope of you. Be I even further off than ever before. I would say I saw a poll in the UK about a week or two ago and support for you be I was off the charts. He was like in the seventy percent tile I. Think a lot of people take day. A could use the floor. I can't speak to count on this, but I can speak to the US. And speaking to a lot of democratic politicians, their view is a core value and I think this is true candidate core values work. That you work for money. You work to provide your place in society, and then if you're going to time, wage benefits and wage subsidies, you tie it to work. And that if you don't tie it to work than people begin to pull out of people say that's not for me. And so I do worry that you be. I would drain the work ethic. At the time of crisis, it's different. There's no work and so giving people money nothing is is the right thing to do, but over long term I would worry about the cultural effect of basically giving people an option to not work or or to try to work on the black market, and then get you bi, but I would support. Subsidies so people were working forty hours. A week can live at a decent level, but I I think it's at values work. That is really the big divider there yeah the dignity of work and the effects on communities and individuals who are denied the dignity of a job, and as you say more than just the material benefit, but the central social standing that comes with employment is absolutely critical. Let's take a final question will squeeze this in a under our one hour with David Brooks Let's see who our final question is. Cynthia from Salisbury she's asking everyone thinks covid will finally wake people up to the gross inequalities capitalism. How can we make the needs of our most vulnerable of real prior wordy in our politics and culture, so I mean David? Maybe that's just an opportunity for you to. It's a nice. Nice broad question. It summarizes a lot of the themes that we've discussed with you over the last hour. Maybe that gives you an opportunity to leave us with some of what you think are the key points to reflect on as we try to think through. How will this pandemic change? Our politics change our culture change our society not next week, not next month, but as we discussed the years and maybe the decade to come. I think we've done a good job over the last six years ago, people at the top of society room to run giving them educational opportunities giving them open space to do their thing. And unfortunately the top twenty percent have out competed. They build structure, so it's hard for the bottom eighty percent to get into certain schools to into certain jobs, and so you've just had a a mass of people, Super Top who are sort of insulated from risk and the people in the bottom eighty percent have high risk and low reward. And this shift in risk to me is the the key thing that has emerged, but maybe through some people's fall might be through nobody's fault. People competed. They cast their advantages down to their kids, and so they built a shelter for people in the educated class. At which you know, of course I'm apart, but shifting that so that there's higher risk in higher reward and lower risk for people in the bottom eighty percent has got to be the agenda for the future. And rethinking meritocracy and how we do that has got to be an agenda for the future rethinking government. We have a free market economy where it can work their way to be a capless. But. Everybody has a chance to be a capitalist I. DO think we've just come to. Didn't that has been recognized both on the right in the left in different ways, and that's why I think change is coming, and it could be terrible, but I think it's needed, so it'll be exciting ten years well David. It'll be exciting ten years to keep reading your column. Column to Watch on PBS TO HAVE YOU UP I hope for future munk debates when we can all get together safely on a big stage in downtown, Toronto, so David thank so much for coming on spending this hour with us. It was a terrific conversation. I've learned a lot. You've shared your wisdom with our audience so much appreciate it. It's a pleasure. Love to see you in Toronto face to face again. Ladies and gentlemen that was David, Brooks are eighth participants in this a ten part on dialogues series. We're going to continue the series for two more weeks. You've got some terrific presenters coming up next week. In rammer the geopolitical commentator strategists, the founder of the regime group Wednesday June third at eight PM. We can talk about. China talked about Canada's role in the world, some questions that were along those lines to David in that. We've revisited in past month. Dialogues do not miss him Bremmer on June third I just want. Want to sign off by recognizing the two organizations that have really helped. Make this dialogue series possible the Peter, Melanie Monkey Charitable Foundation that liked the munk debates underwrites all of our activities through their charitable good works, and their sister foundation the Oria. Foundation, so again. Thank you for tuning into this dialogue with David, Brooks. We'll see you next week Wednesday night. APM for Ian Bremmer in the meantime. Let's keep talking. Let's keep dialoguing. Let's figure out covid nineteen in the world. After as we have these conversations I'm Roger Griffiths. The munk debates are by Antica productions and supported by the Monk Foundation rudyard Griffiths Ricky, girl wits and Debbie Pacheco are the producers. The president of Antica productions is Stuart Cox. Be sure to download and subscribe wherever you get your podcast. And if you like us, feel free to give us a five star rating. Thanks again for listening.

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311 Teaser - Toon Bullets

Chapo Trap House

02:34 min | 1 year ago

311 Teaser - Toon Bullets

"There's more fucking I tell. Yes. Yes. Yes. This is what I'm fixing nut right now, the bubble by they married the second mountain purport purports to describe hyper individualism, Bubba, it would not be probably to say that it is also both explicitly between the lines a gushing Payan. All right. Gushing pants squirting to romance. That's that's Joe dirt. I got the pain on me gushing pay an to romance from gobsmacked man happily rediscovering sex as such it is full of cringe-worthy aphorisms boy love rights. Brooke writes, Brooks plows open the hard crust of our personality and exposes the fertile soil. I love thinking about this. Absolutely David Brooks taking the crossed off his dick. He's just he's on a fucking like he's on one of those tucked in hotel beds. They haven't even taken the sheets off, and he's got the soccer's on and just go into town on him. David Brooks taking his dick out of his khakis and talks to him like like the bullets in who framed Bronx. Taking spin. Again, hop boys. Oh my God. Has the same wire fame classes shit. Fuck I'm not gonna think of anything other than that for the rest of my life isn't the one one of the bullets like a prospector. There's going into her Goltz Marvin golden that Dr second mountain. This. Oh. A few more here. This is again, the details about their love of Augustine Dorothy day are repeated in the Washington Post, New York magazine and the New Yorker, it's just like why don't you need three people the right? This guy fucking amazing out it also every time he fucks. It's like it's like every time we talk like there's just like seventy five international agencies that are like who who came first, David.

David Brooks Joe dirt Dr second mountain soccer Washington Post Brooke New York magazine
David Brooks: Climb Your Second Mountain

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

11:42 min | 1 year ago

David Brooks: Climb Your Second Mountain

"Today we close out our summer inspiration series where we've been looking back at. Some of kindred cast's most exhilarating moments and what better way to wrap things up than with new york times columnist and bestselling author. David brooks lion tree three ceo r._a._m. Borakove spoke to him on the eve of the release of his latest book. The second mountain the quest for more life and david laid bare the impetus behind hind what has become his newest bestseller to hear the full show checkout episode fifty also be sure to subscribe wherever you listen to your podcast so you never miss a new episode apps out when we return in the fall. I'm honored to be sitting here with with david brooks. Who's the award winning new york times op ed columnist and also the author of one of my favorite books the road to character. It's been the source of a lot of life lessons for me. As i built my life my family my career here at lyon tree and i really appreciate your sitting with us today. Oh it's a pleasure turn. Thank you for the kind words about the book mental meteorite it. I missed that book. I was fun to write that book so i miss work in but you actually say in the manuscript that i read for a forthcoming book that you you have coming out in april. Call the second mountain the quest for moral life that the rotor character left you satiated but a bit unsatisfied an approach this next book so tell me about that a little bit yeah so the road character was about the core idea and that was the difference between the resume virtues and the eulogy virtues the resume virtues of the things that make us good at our job and eulogy virtues of the things they say about us after we're dead whether honorable courageous capable of great love and we all know the eulogy virtues are more important jordan who tend to be more intentional the resume and so like how do you build up those eulogy virtues and the core argument of the book was that you figure out what your key weakness and you combat combat so if for dwight eisenhower was one of the characters in the book was anger he was just an angry guy a lot of hatred a lot of passion and he worked on that every day to be cheerful leader an optimistic leader and he really worked for him. He built a new personality and i think that is part of character development but going through stuff in my own life you learn more. I came seem to think that book was too individualistic that most of the what we do and the way we form our character is by our giving ourselves to others and not paying attention to ourselves and the internal l. drama ourselves but by simply giving ourselves to others more selfless and i mean that not just being selfless but making specific commitments to specific things so for example. I kid i sent him joshua. He was born many years ago now but when he was born he had a super low apgar score. We didn't know it was going to happen to the kid and so that first night was very scary. Sorry i remember asking sposi doesn't live out tonight. We'll have been worth it for his mother and i have a lifetime of grief and before a kid i would've thought no way he would not even aware of his life. I for thirty minutes. Whatever but after born you you get sucked into a commitment that you didn't even know what's possible right and so you want to be there for the kid you want to do things for them taking out for a walk and you suddenly become because you're captured by a commitment. You become a slightly better person overtime. That's earning does right so before we get a second. Let's talk about the first mountain and you are very very prophetic when it comes to the stages of life and this first mountain we can all identify with because we're building. We leave school university. You come out of school. You build a life yourself. The big family build a career. You try to excel that. We're we know so many high achievers and then you start to think about things and we'll words that really gonna take me and and you get to a point in your life were you valley heating your thesis and that valley can be personal midlife crisis speak it could be professional rational. It could be societal and i can't think of a better time right now. Then today will were hitting the valley in so so many ways like what's the political system. Look like really this is tough. Everyone wakes up a bit of a heaviness. What's the media look like it's all transforming where the technology platforms really stand for. What's our society really about and so i feel like we're in this valley so obviously you've time the book perfectly getting close. I was wondering how it would feel but i i think the timing is pretty good. Partly you know even the michael cohen. Hearings people are like i on political level which our political system going on a social level you know the rise of suicides the the right of opiate addiction the lies of loneliness and distrust rising mental health problems and then just as you say people just feel heavy that lack of trust in our institutions and i think it's a member of media institution you know the industry than i do but we struggle with getting people to trust us so we're not fake news and so just this tide of alienation and and i think you know one of the lessons of the book is when you're in a tough time you're either broken or your broken open and if you're broken you turn scared and angry and bitter. There's a phrase i love have pain that is not transformed is transmitted so if you don't know what to do with your own pain you tend to pass it along to the project but when you're broken open then you go go deeper into yourself and you realize what's at the core of yourself which in the book is your heart and your soul your desire to attach to other people designed to attach to an ideal and you realize those those are the desires of the most important desires and you say my first mountains great. I'm not against i but i found something better and i'm gonna have a second man and that second mound when you start to climb i'm out of the valley on that second mountain that really dictates where you're gonna end up not where you came from and dictates the sort of transcendent ideas and ideals the deals they really stand by. It's challenging me. Is it too late to start the second man or is it too early or what part of your life. Do you really begin that journey. I think it's never too late or too early. You know i i <hes> about two tomorrow. Who's dead was killed by his mistress window. Kid was nine and so he went to play football georgetown and now now he creates summer camps show young african recommends will have father figures which he did not have and so for him you would say the valley was at age nine and other people. It's in their eighties. I have a friend she he owns a business. I shouldn't say she has a lot of farms in central valley of california and she has built a great business but her joy now is creating daycare centers. There's for the people that work in our farms and fighting diabetes among that community building healthcare systems and so it's not like she's left her business. She still at her business but her passion when her eyes light up. It's about giving back not about acquiring right right. Do you feel like there's a catalyst that takes you from the first round of the second round or does it happen just naturally well. It happens in a lot of different ways some people they just achieve success and it's just kind of unsatisfying. I met a guy in kentucky recently. Use a banker verse successful and just didn't get them his juices. This is going in the morning. That's shocking to me and so now he <hes> helped men come out of prison up some transition again his eyes light up the good thing about second people. There's they're completely joyful with this book personal much more personal. There's a lot of personal stuff in it and i i sort of felt. If i'm telling people to connect on a deep level i have to be honest. And how do we build trust. It's through vulnerability. The early drafts were not and my friends and wife said nike you gotta live you walk it right so i was a lot more personal than i was comfortable with but i found people appreciate it because in my life i'm in my job. I'm a grey lady. I'm at a newspaper that is somewhat stiffened formal and to just show. I'm just a mother poor. Broken bastard like everybody else is useful thing for people yeah yeah well. What's your advice to a lot of the executives that listen sit into our kindred cath podcast which are in the medians technologists reader investors. They're trying to innovate and they're trying to grow all all the time and there are various ages in different positions in their careers. What your best advice to them. Yeah i would say the two things to look out for are the aesthetic life which is treating life as just a series of experiences that donate up to anything and then the other is what somebody called the insecure overachiever that you've got a problem in the foundation of your life. You don't know why you're doing this. So you try to build a magic story up on top of the building for the problems down the foundation and sooner or later that will bite you in the ass yeah so beware that and then the second thing the second mountain life it is a committed life and our lives are defined by our for big commitments for most of us. It's a spouse and family of vocation philosophy your faith and a community and so bring yourself and making those commitments maximal commitments. There's a joke you reminded me of that as a businessman drive around los angeles which is obviously notoriously famous for lack of parking spaces and really go into the most important meeting of his or her life and their late because they can't kinda parking space and it's like five minutes ten minutes or two minutes at this point the person's sweating waiting for the parking space and finally here's no other choice but to look up to god auden say god if you help me find a parking space right now i will obey all of your rituals. I'll be all of your structures. I'll be most loyal servant on earth here please. I just need a parking space. Just any looks down at a parking space. Appears looks up and says never mind. I found that's tried that the original human condition so these perspectives are fleeting sometime in the moment you need the book or the moment you need the lesson. It's right right there for you and speaking to you but then like things get joyful and you put all those things assign and so. How do you keep that perspective as a daily thing like i write about this. How you don't get obsessed with your career. My hung out tuesday friday. I checked to see if i'm at the topmost red lifts and i feel horrible if i am it's like no joy at all. If i'm not and i'm like that's column must've stunk and so we've got all these data we try to and it really is better to say it's not about me. I'm just going to do the best column i can and then it's it's not about me but that is just a daily struggle. Yeah life has a way of bringing us to equilibrium right. You can't live in the highs and lows you have to find your own path early and be truthful. Yeah and i've spent a lot of time in the last couple years traveling around the country just meeting people who genuinely selfless who serve their left to the community that servant leaders at work and and they radiated joy that just lifts you up and makes you feel well be more like them so i find surrounding oneself with people wanna be like is just crucial and the last point i'll make the leadership concept which is a lot of cases designed like the egyptian pyramid structure where you have the masses of people there to serve the leader at the point at the the top of the pyramid but in reality the inverse is true with leaders sitting really at the bottom and supporting a scaled company and serving that company and all of its employees and that's really the better perspective of everything if you can do it right if you don't love serving other people won't enjoy leadership and i've only begun to manage but it's really like how can i make them sign. And how can i speak last at the meeting. Thanks appreciate being here. Thank you hope you enjoyed our show today. If you wanna check out any prior episodes you can find us on apple podcasts spotify or wherever you listen feel feel free to leave a review there as it helps people find the show you can also follow us on instagram twitter and facebook at kindred cast for behind the scenes photos and info how keep listening and see you next time.

david brooks new york times lyon tree Borakove dwight eisenhower ceo diabetes nike california los angeles sposi football michael cohen kentucky instagram spotify facebook apple auden
Waiting for the Mueller Report and examining five cultural lies: Is your Savior your Lord?

The Daily Article

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Waiting for the Mueller Report and examining five cultural lies: Is your Savior your Lord?

"Really? Waiting for the Muller report and examining five cultural lies. He's your savior. You're lord. This is Dr Jim Dennison's the daily article podcast for Thursday, April eighteenth, twenty nineteen America's waiting for the redacted version of the mullahs report to be published later this morning. We will not be able to read the report in its entirety since it contains information that was presented to a grand jury and is therefore subject to secrecy rules. In addition. Intelligence officials will redact information that could compromise sensitive sources and methods or hamper other current investigations. And the Justice department will redact information it believes unfairly infringes on the privacy of quote, peripheral third parties in quote in damages their reputations. What difference than will the report make not much in the minds of most voters? Apparently recent survey found that the report may not change the minds of many Americans about the president barring a bombshell. Revelation voters are likely to view the report through the prism of their partisan identities. Now, let's consider five lies that explain our culture from New York Times. Columnist. David Brooks, pick a subject from the president to abortion to gender identity to the environment. Can you think of a single significant issue on which Americans are largely agreed? What is causing our nation's cultural divides to grow ever deeper and more vitriolic? Writing for the New York Times columnist David Brooks offer, some diagnoses of our cultural condition that merit significant attention and personal application is bottom line. We've created a culture based on lies five of them to be specific. Do they are one career success is fulfilling Brooks notes that such success alone? Does not provide positive piece or fulfillment. If you build your life around it your emissions will always race out in front of what you've achieved leaving you anxious into satisfied to I can make myself happy. This is the live self sufficiency in the deception that happiness is an individual accomplishment by contrast, Brooks rights happiness is found amid thick and loving relationships. It has found by defeating self sufficiency for state of mutual dependence. It is found in the giving and receiving of care. Three life is an individual journey people who live best invest in people and community. Then ag- is Brooks rights by planting themselves in one neighborhood one organism. Or one mission. They earn trust. They have the freedom to make a lasting difference. It's the chains. We choose set us free for you have to find your own truth. According to Brooks, the reality is the values are created in passed down by strong, self-confident communities and institutions five ridge and successful people are worth more than poorer and less successful people. This like claims that you are what you accomplish in that if you perform well, people will love you Brooks concludes. No wonder our societies fragmenting we've taken the lives of hyper individualism, and we've made them the unspoken assumptions that govern how we live. We talk a lot about the political revolution. We need the cultural revolution is more important. I agree completely. But I also believe that behind such a cultural revolution lies, a spiritual. Revolution we need. Even more today is Mandi Thursday tonight. Jesus will pray in the garden of get semi so fervently that his sweat will become like great drops of blood falling to the ground. This night. He will choose to take our collective sins on his Senlis soul in diner place as our atoning sacrifice. What happened in the garden of gas? Simi is the remedy for what happened in the garden of Eden. They're humanity believed the lie that we can be like God that lies the foundation of every light David Brooks exposed in every Tim tation we face. It is the lie that we have the right to choose whether unborn children live or die that we can decide are gender in view pornography and have sex outside of heterosexual marriage and ignore the poor without consequence. It is the lie that are lies aren't lies that truth is what we say. It is in God is who we believe him to be Jesus's. Death reveals the lie behind our cultural lies, if we could experience abundant life in any way, except through the cross the father would not have sent his son to Calvary to be tortured and executed if we could be fulfilled and happy without God. We can do life on our own find our own truth and do enough to be truly significant Jesus would have made a different choice in guests semi. I invite you to review David Brooks. List and see whether you're living by any of the lies. He exposes the night. Invite you to choose a garden Eden or gift semi will you be your own God today or will you make your savior? You're lord. Will you submit your data his spirit and serve him in gratitude for his grace which garden would say you inhabited yesterday, which do you choose today? Did you consider sharing this podcast with a friend family member or co worker in order to help build a community of culture, changing Christians? Thank you for listening to the daily article podcast today.

David Brooks New York Times president Dr Jim Dennison Muller America Justice department Jesus Simi Tim tation
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

GeekWire - Geared Up

21:31 min | 1 year ago

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

"Do you think that politics and specifically president trump's stated objections to Amazon based on what the customer's needs are are really stood out that is Sachi Adila one of the comments the Microsoft CEO made in an interview with Geekwire in advance of the November fifth. I two years ago I'm geekwire editor Todd Bishop and I sat down with Saatchi and since you came out with your hit refresh and the paperback is coming out on November fifth after I achieved this milestone and you write in the new afterward that people at such an aspiration for us to say we WANNA see differently in success has to have come from some sense of purpose a bit mission and business model is dependent on others being successful so eighty nine thousand nine in particular as attack company I think that the excessive celebration gosh create more equitable growth in all communities in all countries and that means our times columnist David Brooks from his book Second Mountain in which he says that uh-huh David Brooks in his book second mounted exactly and his declaration energy of looking Microsoft is when I go to any place in Atlanta entry lead to a small business becoming more productive how do in house health outcome being changed educational outcomes because that's the opportunity people at Microsoft anecdotes so stories those people that's what it's all about and so it comes through in the afterward to the book is that you are not just trying to create technology about the number of suffering genius a digital of capable really capable last year and a half or so and so now that means everybody is a software company and so I afterward and that was this the sentence borders are realities we should acknowledge in a geopolitical context it sounded to me like a capitulation to nationalism did we have to recognize is the first phase of globalization if you what have you know was created and in fact I would say a middle class as of globalization has to tackle though that inequities that got created in every all elections are all local people have to be able to sort of really create I'd say hey you know it's all about sort of the top people of the country participating on behalf of Global Maxima it has to have a local reality the question but every community has equitable growth that is the interdependence for us to recognize after every part A. Does have a comparative advantage every part Canon fact and even in at least national if not global norms in areas like artificial intelligence facial recognition the take her energy transition we share global resources Ed the globe trade still needs to happen in order for us unity those are the things that I think ethics same country should care about that and so therefore I think if you put even our own entity speaking of economic forces this is the Samsung Galaxy note ten plus since switching from a Mac to win back to windows and this is Zhou to Samsung an android over an iphone. I mean it just it's Nia platform company we have to put our users thank you for using windows he's what you care about not some corporate agenda of mine and because that's sort that core capability so whether it's surface do or the partnership with Samsung pelling ways well I will have some user feedback I think I can share off line on the your phone basing the new afterward in the paperback edition of His book hit refresh serving a pulse lubricant or massage oil directly to your hand with no mess pulse warmer and Pulse Pod Code Geekwire Twenty five for twenty five percent off your purchase at explain what the coming wave of dual screen devices will mean Sir That can help in innocuous we get a lot about how do we ensure that in the the of attention and this jewel screens to me is a beautiful expression in And I want to carry it with me everywhere I wanna be able to open it up date notes we wanNA build versions of it one on windows one on android and of course it's all about you have been using the prototypes yeah how has it changed what you do in a meeting or in fact this is the first time where I can walk confidently to communicate even on teams meeting That sort of a game changer I can take notes on my one note and that combination is super productive one other thing that really stood out to me in the book was a phrase that you also used ethics of the company and that there is a gap there and that as you've addressed and embraced their commentary why is that gap not which is really what's that Em- beedon so distance between what is the spouse elaborate some destination that have reached as far as dot cultured and even a single employees conclusion behalf to make progress on representation I and about is let's invest even in helping our own employees and managers the necessary conditions if you will and one of the things that I'm thrilled about as manager training so you know this is one of the things about human nature is all of us want change except we won the other person to J.j the thing which is we have to confront that distance and then bring about change and that's what we want to stay speaking out about things such as relationships with government entities that they might not put important for anyone like me is to on a thing you can learn a lot from all of the various points of view and in fact when you go a senior leadership team are you taking those seriously I you deliberating and then men are being transparent about what decisions we're making and and the principles war liberal values that's what that's the dialogue that needs to you know we are developing I think a good sort of set of practices you're listening the key trends that the fundamental shifts that are taking place in a quantum act the US Department of Defense Jet Cloud contract beating out Amazon web services up to me again I go back to mission right if we don't celebrate I feel good about the fact that we were able to submit our proposal six and specifically president trump's stated objections to Amazon publicly played any role focused on what the customer's needs are and there are some core capabilities we have corredor design those are all things that I think are in the end in the end game are as I think what we WANNA do the Seattle sounders have a new ownership group of which you businesses we know are there any lessons that you've learned from even just this something which is How passionate sports is I think often asked to see what do you think of the sounders right now? How are you feeling attack before such an Adela left the room we talked about Microsoft's new industry experience she in partnership with its customers which prompted

Microsoft Samsung David Brooks Amazon president trump Sachi Adila Geekwire Second Mountain CEO editor Saatchi Canon Global Maxima Todd Bishop Atlanta Adela
Epiphany 3: Finding The Grace To Answer The Call

From Silence Something To Say

15:15 min | 1 year ago

Epiphany 3: Finding The Grace To Answer The Call

"Uh in the name of the true and living God the Father Son and Holy Spirit. mm-hmm seated won't you morning such a joy choice for me to be here again with you. I can't tell you how much I appreciate. Your rector father bumps dead. I'm not going to go on and on because he'll do the same to me probably but I And he will. But it's such a joy to be with you and I just admire father bumps it so much and and thank you for the public today and I'm glad I can help you out so here. We are on the third Sunday of the season of epiphany recall that tiffany means manifestation revealing unfolding of what of the light that has come into the world and that light is something which continues to call us and to inspire us and to motivate us to a deeper dimension of living just called the Kingdom of God. And that's what I I want to focus in on this morning in this beautiful texts which we have about the beginning of Jesus Ministry his I rock limitation is first sermon if you will and his calling of the disciples to follow him. There's a lot of light and hopefully we can get a glimpse without being too blinded by. It's what's speak to you then about this idea of being a follower of Christ iced how we can hear this call to move beyond the superficial levels of life that we're so familiar with and to see something of greater greater significance. We've all seen it. Maybe we've even lived a little bit of this philosophy called Yolo. You only live once right. And it doesn't last so lit up. Drink it down. Laugh it off Bernadette both ends you only live once and if then well that's not a philosophy of life that you WanNa maintain for a long time but what we are really looking for is the meaning of life and the significance of life the purpose of life just yesterday. Nancy and I were having a wonderful breakfast with some friends who are older older in years than we are. That's why be like people that are older and years and we are mixing feel really young and I asked my friend. So what are you doing for funding fund these days. And you know. Sometimes when you are in the conversation Oregon's circumstances you realize that there's something a little more going on here and God may be coming to me through this conversation and as you look back on it you realize God was coming to me in this way so anyway he says well. Here's what I'm doing he said. Are you familiar with David Brooks he is the OP ED columnist of the New York Times and lately. He's been writing some rather remarkable books and he's got a new book called the second mountain seeking to discover a more alive and he said doc it's really fascinating because he speaks about a metaphor of life call to mountains. Finding your second mount. Let me read you. Just a little taste of David Brooks Brooks in this book. Because I think it's great every so often you meet people who radiate. Joy seem to know why they were put on this earth who glow glow with a kind of inner light life for these people has often followed what we might think to mountain shape. They got out of school. They started career. They begin climbing the mountain. They thought they were meant to climb and their goals on this I mountain are the ones of our cultures endorsement to be a success to make your mark mark to experience personal happiness but when they get to the top of that first mountain something happens they look around and find. The view. Unsatisfying is fine and they realized it wasn't my mountain after all. Here's another bigger mountain out there. That is actually calling me. And so they embark on the second mountain and life moves from self centered orientation to other centered orientation they they surrender and I like this to a life of commit. What's going on on the second could mountain? They're answering a call now. The collect for today on the third Sunday but he is a grandson. Don't you don't you appreciate the fact that you worship from the book of common prayer. That has these colic's these prayers and you don't have to make them up. They're just they're just wonderful father and they mean a lot. Listen to this. Give us grace allured to answer readily the the call of our Savior. Jesus Christ and proclaimed to all people. The good news of his salvation gives us grace. Grace has got acting in your life to accomplish. Accomplished what you cannot do on your own. Give us that gives us grace to answer the call to answer readily the call to significance to commitment to something greater than ourselves. That's what the second mountain is about. And so my friend said well my first mountain. I climbed that mountain. I did very very well. And then found myself forced out of my position and then I had to say okay now what he found a second mountain and it was prison ministry in which he visited visit prisoners here in Florida on a weekly basis for many many many many years giving them the love of God teaching them being with them and community profound second mountain experience and it took commitment and he is a follower of Jesus and then he said but unlike David Brooks I think there's a third mountain and I think I found my third mountain and I said well what is that he said. It's it's my wife. We're at that stage of life where she needs my care more than ever and that is my third mountain. How beautiful is that? How committed is that? He discovered the grace to answer the call. And this is my main point answering the call of Christ in our lives is so filled with diversity and wonder and mystery but answering that call is the way to find. You didn't fill the central purpose of your life. Secondary Call is really kind of your career but the primary call underneath that is the call to follow him and to serve and to contribute to this world through all that you can and will do. We need this good news. And that's what the Gospel is saying to us today. Let's explore it just briefly. How do we become open to this answering the call every day of her life? We need good news. I picked this up. Actually from father father bumps dead's podcast this week With the sacristy shameless plug I tunes. Right I also have one but but in we won't get any of that. So father bump standing Father Ainsley are are talking about the Old Testament lesson which speaks about this image that the people who sat in darkness have seen a great light and those who sat in the region of the shadow of death. Breath light has dawned. Can you imagine this image of living in darkness and the shadow of death death like existence. Do you realize that that unfortunately describes the tragedy of life that many people find themselves in this kind of death like existence but a light has dawned. That's the epiphany of Jesus and he's walking by on the seashore of Galilee you and he proclaims these words repent for the Kingdom the realm the dimension. The domain of the living. God is now at hand and it's drawn near it is actually available for you to live in repent for the Kingdom of God is near that word repentance. Sometimes Times gives you a little shaking. You know it's going to like especially if you're raising a tradition where repentance kind of like the thunder and all that kind of stuff actually. It's a beautiful word. Metro Noah is the Greek. It simply means rethink the way you're living rethink your thinking. Get a New Vision. Get a new mind. Look at how you really living your life in light of this incredible opportunity. That is before you that you can enter into the life of the kingdom right now. Repent little story about repentance. When I was at the Shota House as second year of seminary I got fortunately fortunately a seminarian job at Saint Boniface in Wisconsin which is about forty five minutes from New Show House and so every Sunday we load the car Nancy An Iron and our little two and a half year old daughter Jenny and talking about the lessons you know. What's The Gospel Lesson for Today Day? So we were talking about it and it happened to be on the third Sunday was his gospel about repentance and about following Jesus we were talking about repentance and all this kind of stuff get to Saint Boniface pull into the parking lot. Get Out of the car. Little Jenny gets out of the car and immediately she walks over to an elderly lady eighty. WHO's coming out of her car? And she says we picked for the Kingdom of God and I thought and I lost my job so the moral of the story is be careful what you just discuss in front of your kids right okay. But anyway but it's an invitation to life at its very best. That's what the Gospel is. Yes it is the power of God. It's through the death and resurrection of Jesus we receive the forgiveness ascends. But that's the front door. And then we go into life in the kingdom and live in discipleship apple shipped to Jesus Life Change. That's what it's about a new way to live and you can live from it every day. Hey as you answer the call. Yes Lord I will live not only in my strength but from your strength today. Second Point Explore Explore Jesus after he announces this incredible good news says these words to these four fishermen follow me and I will make you fish for people follow me. I will transform your life that you'll become who you were destined to be your fishermen but I'm going to transform those skills and abilities and gifts into something that will have eternal significance -nificant and they were captivated really I think by Jesus and by this hope of transformation and they answered the call in a life of commitment. They became apprentices students learners of the way of Jesus Learning to be with him in order to be like him. That's what we're doing learning learning to be with him who loves US AND DELIGHTS IN US and offers us the unshakable Kingdom of God so that we can become like well. If you don't take my word take the word of the church. Father which further bumps over like this Saint Basil the Great. You like good call okay. He said at this way. This is how you articulate the good news. Christianity is the possibility of the likeness of God as far as possible for human nature nature. Let me say that again. The likeness of God as far as possible for human age. That's the Gospel. Let me conclude. I really do think that life's greatest opportunity that you will ever ever have is to be a follower student of Jesus and his way. I don't think you get a better off in this world. I really don't and no matter what mountain you may be on whether it's your first or second or third and there's always another mountain if you ask for one you can can do life with God not on your own. You can count on resources. That will bring a new and unending quality in species issue of life to you now not later but now the more you are living a committed life. Well the more are you answered the call of Jesus the more deep hope and joy will become your steady state. It really will. Yolo is just not how you WANNA live. Give us grace. Oh God too readily answer the call of our Savior. Jesus Christ

David Brooks Brooks Grace Yolo Jesus Ministry Nancy US Father Ainsley Jenny Oregon Joy Saint Boniface colic Bernadette New York Times apple Florida OP ED Shota House Wisconsin
The Candyman /// Part 1 /// 251

True Crime Garage

1:03:58 hr | 2 years ago

The Candyman /// Part 1 /// 251

"True crime garages brought to you by. You can't make this up a new podcast from Netflix that takes a look behind the scenes of documentaries and true stories. Everyone is talking about including making a murderer wild wild country, evil, genius, MandA Knox, and they can't ame- award-winning film ecus join podcasters, journalists and comedians as they chat with creators and get an exclusive. Look inside the process, explore the stories that they left out and find answers to your burning questions. You can't make this up available on apple, Stitcher, Spotify, or your preferred podcast destination go, listen, subscribe and review. Now. Welcome to cram garage wherever you are, whatever you were doing. Thanks for listening. I'm your host, Nick, and with me as always ladies and gentlemen back from south Florida, fresh off the airliner he is our captain. It's good to be back. It's good to be seen in good to see you. Thanks for listening. Thanks for telling a friend. Last week I had something for the first time called lunch pale ale brewed over at breaker brewing company garage grade four and a half bottle caps. Out of five lunch pale ale is a traditional American pale ale brewed with nugget and cascade hops. It's Hoppy, but smooth and clean. And today's beer was brought to us by first up a big, thank you to Davies and Harveys lake, Pennsylvania, and a big shout out to Eldridge and Blakely Georgia and a long distance. Cheers to belvoir salmon in side and the big shutouts at Tiffany and Maples Ville, Alabama. We also have Brienne parts. Unknown breed is a big fan of the captain to say the least and last, but not least we have Ajay in Quakers hill Sydney, Australia, and like you said, it's good to be back from a little mini tour, and he Largo I was on tour with see you in the funnies which is from Cincinnati, Ohio. And also the Nathan Witt ban which is from from where. From parts node from parts unknown. And that's enough of the b. Yes, sir. Everybody gathered around grab a share, grab a beer. Let's talk some true crime. True crime. Buffs all know the legends of the true crime world. The serial killers who have stood out leaving an indelible blemish on human history through their prolific violence and destruction. Casey Dahmer Bundy BT k. their names are synonymous with the word monster. They are often considered to be the worst of the worst. Before these notorious killers roamed the country and haunted our streets, leaving wakes of death and terror behind them. And before the term serial killers was coined. Before we knew about cereals, as we know them. Now. There was another monster. A mass murder so evil that he deserves to be in the same category as these infamous killers. A monster that still terrifies and haunts. Someone so cruel and diabolical that there is evidence. The perhaps at least one of these ruthless serial killers knew of his work and imitated him. This is the story of dean, coral, the one they call the killer Candyman. Captain. We're going to start off this week by talking about some pretty unhealthy relationships. I don't like to talk about my personal life on the show. Let's talk about a man in his thirties. This is dean coral who we will come to know quite well. This week he managed to worm his way into the lives of two boys from broken homes, taking on the role of some sort of twisted father figure as a result of that manipulation dominance. Both boys lives would alternately be ruined. Dean coral meant David Brooks. I Brooks also lived in Houston heights or simply the heights as its most commonly called the heights back then was a lower middle class area of Houston, a blue collar neighborhood that it becomes seedy and rundown. They met years ago at a candy factory owned by dean's mother where dean quarrel handed out free sweets to teens and children. So he's like willy Wonka. Something like that. Yeah. Now, David was born in Beaumont Texas and nineteen fifty-five. His parents divorced when he was five years old and he moved back and forth between his father and Houston in his mother in Beaumont coral started helping Brooks giving him money and a place to stay from time to time to get away from his father and generally supporting him. The two occasionally took trips to the beaches in south Texas. With other boys, David was smart, but he was small war glasses, and he was picked on a little bit by the other kids. So he was easily swayed by corals attentions. Coral had a lot of influence over the young insecure. Boy, Brooks said coral was the first adult male who didn't make fun of him for his skinny body and glasses. Pretty soon. David idolized dean, coral when David was fourteen coral, essentially began. Grooming David, and the two began a relationship whereby coral would pay Brooks ten dollars to allow coral to perform fillet. She, oh, on the boy, David began spending all of his time with coral and despite being a decent student, he dropped out of school and hung out with coral most days, even moving in with him at times his fifteen, he walks in on crawl, raping two boys. These two boys were tied to a bed. Now, later core would ask Brooks for his silence, and he would buy that silence from Brooks by giving him a green corvette and exchange for his silence. He told Brooks that he was part of a gay pornography ring and that he had been paid to send boys out to California. And I think that he included those two boys in that statement of sent those boys out to California, right? So he was running some kind of a sex trafficking ring. So we have Brooks, who's going to then introduce a kid by the name of Wayne Henley to dean quarrel. This took place in nineteen seventy-one. Wayne Hanley was described as an above average student with an I q somewhere between one ten in one twenty, but Henley dropped out of high school. In ninth grade, he had a lot of financial responsibility on his shoulders. He had to contribute to the income household income that his mother needed to raise his three brothers. So coral filled a need that Henley had financial security. Coral was constantly giving Henley and Brooks gifts, and in return was asking for favors or task. So do we believe that dean is getting his money from his parents owning the factory? Well, this is not like a huge candy factory. This is not like her. She's or Mars or any of those other really big ones. This is this is. They had a house. And at some point they opened up a candy factory out of their house, turn the house into a business, right? Like sweet Pete's. So this was a business that employed a few people, but above that, I don't know how much profit was on top of paying the people that work there, including his mother as it have a corvette that he's gave away. So yeah, he, he bought the kid a used corvette. They started becoming a thing. You know this, this group, this trio and eventually Henley became sexually involved with dean choral. They also started planning some petty burglaries. They would steal a lot of TV sets, and this is where I go back to. Dean, coral, not having a ton of money and not having a ton of money from his his work at the candy factory. Let's say. So he worked at the candy factory, but he also worked as an electronic. He had two jobs, and then on top of that, he's paying these kids and giving these kids a lot of gifts, right? So I think that he had to supplement his income by getting these kids involved in burglaries, stealing things and then selling them. So Brooks Henley choral became a motley trio, let's say, riding around town, doing drugs, partying and meeting up with other teenage boys. Brooks and Henley would help get boys into corals van and then take them to his apartment. The three hosted parties at corals apartment plan specifically to entice boys whom coral might like. And this would be young, white, thin and good looking teenage boys, Wayne and dean Saul. Each other nearly every day, coral was a frequent visit. Hitter at Wayne Henley's home and chat with his mother. In fact, he even worked on her car a couple of times. So this is not a relationship that's being kept secret from the teenage boys family, right? Mary Henley divorced her husband in nineteen seventy after he shot at her during an argument. Dean was so close with the family that even eight Easter dinner with the Hanley's. And as stated, he would help the Henley family out with some different things, but do the Hanley family to they know it's a sexual relationship now. Now not at all. They think that this is a friendship. So Henley he has to act a little older than what he is he's providing financially for his mother and younger brothers, right? And then we have dean choral, who is the the neighborhood basically thinks of dean, coral as a nice professional, clean cut guy, but a guy that kind of acts younger than what, what. He is. And so Deane would typically drive around in his white van with a head of black couch in the back Kersee wife, and they would say, do they all have white vans? Can we just stop making white van? Can we just can we disagree as a nation that we're not going to produce anymore white vans? Well, a lot of the neighbors would say that often you could see a dozen or so kids that would pile in the van and he would take them for rides. And we should mention that the three Brooks Hanley Indian coral from all outside perspective, they were inseparable by so. All right, captain about ten dozen red flags here. Right? We have a man in his early thirties, hanging out with two teenage boys very often, but a lot, a whole big group of teenage boys and taking crowds of kids for rights. Yeah, yeah. So creepy. He stuff. Yeah. And you would think that neighbors and people on the outside looking in would wonder what is David Brooks Wayne Henley and dean coral, you know what's going on with this? Trio of the problem is though there is no father figures. So in that case it's like people are like, oh, he's being good Samaritan. Yes, some type of mentor. Yeah. Well, we need to start talking about missing teenage boys, but this story is not going to be quite it's gonna be quite a bit more complicated than just one isolated incident because in nineteen seventy one seventy, two, seventy three, thousands. That's right. Thousands of juveniles were reported missing in or around the Houston, Texas area. Now that number jumps off the page, right? You say, whoa, hold on their Nick. That can't be right. We do need to keep in mind. This is a very heavily populated city. It's what today. I think it's the third or fourth most populated city in the United States back then I would assume it to be about the same. And we have to keep in mind that even in Columbus, even in our area captain. There are a lot of people that are reported missing and very quickly that missing persons report is filed away in a trash can because they turn up with an hour or two hours. Somebody panicked hit the panic button called somebody in missing. And a lot of times, especially back in the early seventies, a lot of juveniles would be runaways at this time. You know, we still have some people heading out west to California. We have a lot of these kids would be seventeen seventeen and a half year old kids that are just not where they are supposed to be. So most of these kids would turn up the ones that didn't sadly were still ignored by local law enforcement at the time because this was a time when police chalk them George of disappearances up to being runaways. But regarding three of the many that were reported missing and the last names of these three individuals Kabul Jones and hill Geist all three boys parents called the police when their sons disappeared, and they insisted that their boys were not runaways in all actuality, many teenage boys disappeared from the heights area in roughly a three year span and for no apparent reason and fact, almost fifty five, zero teenage boys simply never turned up. Again. One of these boys was David Hill guys who disappeared on July. Thirtieth nineteen seventy-one. David. Then thirteen decided to follow his brothers to the town pool on his bike, Greg hill guys, David's brother called home and ask for his mother to come and pick them up. His mother Dorothy was surprised to learn from Greg that David never showed up at the pool. The family rule. Like most families was the kids were not supposed to go anywhere without telling their mother. When David did not come home that evening Dorothy and her husband called neighbors. They called David's friends. They even searched their home and of course his room in his room. They found all of his belongings including his wallet and money. They started driving around the neighborhood searching for their son. Finally, at sunup the next day, Dorothy called the police police provided virtually no assistance to the hill Geist telling them that David likely ran away and would come home soon. David would be listed under the quote, runaway classification, and there would be no official search for the boy, Dorothy Hilla. Geiss was a protective involved parent who was close with her children, and she knew David would not have vanished of his own volition. She continued to canvas town looking for any clues fine. Finally, someone told the hill Geist the David was seen in the company of his sixteen year. Old friend Malley winkle, Dorothy immediately called MRs winkle to ask if Molly had come home MRs winkle told Dorothy that Molly called her just before midnight and said, we are in freeport mother. This is a popular swimming and surfing area in the Gulf of Mexico. MRs winkle asked what he was doing sixty miles away and her son replied that he was just with a bunch of boys and they went to freeport to go swimming, and he would be home later MRs. Winkle also heard from her brother Ben that he saw David and Molly get into a white van not far from the hill, Geist home, Dorothy plastered. The town with missing persons flyers went door to door. Looking for her son, a friend of David's named Wayne Henley helped distribute missing persons flyers. She traveled to other areas to search for him on the basis of tips. Unfortunately, the hill guys would deplete their life savings looking for their son, even hiring a private detective. That's a, that's a shame because you wanna do anything. He can Dorothy called the Houston PD constantly looking for updates on her son and passing on rumors. She heard and possible witnesses. That they should check into one day. She told the police that she had learned that Molly had a friend who drove a Plymouth GT ex and added. She has seen a GT GTS driving through the neighborhood. She even wrote down the license plates license plate t. m. f. seven to four. Now captain. She passes on to Houston PD. If an officer would have looked into the matter, they would learn that that car belonged to a man named dean choral. And even with all these leads, the hill guys are never gonna see their son. Again, let's fast forward to August eighth nineteen Seventy-three in Pasadena, Texas. The blazing sun beat down on this industrial city, which is an offshoot of the much larger city of Houston around eight am chief operator for the Pasadena PD answered a call on the other end of the line. A male voice said, I just show. A man. Again, the caller said, I just shot a man and I want you. I want you the operator interrupted slowdown and give me your name. The caller answered Wayne Henley I'm calling from twenty twenty Lamar street immediately. They're going to dispatch to please cards to that dress patrolman, Jameson and car. Three, six one was the first to arrive here is what he observed three teenagers standing on the sidewalk. One was a female in two. Others were male, all appeared red eyed and one was crying a white nineteen sixty nine dodge van was in the driveway of the home. Wayne Henley the crying. One identified himself to officer. Jameson Jameson later described Henley as a thin youth with light Brown hair and Brown eyes. He had the beginnings of a goatee. Henley handed Jameson a twenty two caliber. Or pistol the officer Harlem the he had the beginnings of goatee. Well, he's a teenager. Got that. You remember teenagers in some of the guys were like, yeah, I can grow mustache and you look at it and you're like, yeah, that's not a mustache, right? But it's like saying this had the beginnings of a douche canot. Well, he hands the officer, a twenty two caliber pistol in the officer observed immediately that the six chambers were empty. The other two teens were Rhonda Williams only fifteen years old, and she clutched Wayne Henley's arm. While they spoke to officer Jameson. The thirteen was Tim Curley, which just like his name. He had curly hair shoulder length hair, blue eyes, and braces and brief questioning. Wayne Hanley told Jameson the he had freed himself from some handcuffs and shot. A man named dean coral, Jamison looked inside the home and Saul corals body and return to the kids. He put the three teens in his patrol car and read them their rights, then detective molecule arrived at the scene. He. Opened the front door and entered the house. The first room, a living room was separated from the kitchen area by a long bar. Malakand slowly walked into the room and to his left. He turned in a hallway. He stopped abruptly taken aback by the site treacly down the hallway just beyond the door to the bathroom. Lay the naked body of a man. His face was buried in the beige carpet at the crevice where the wall meets the floor on the man's left shoulder and back were several tiny holes. His legs were entangled and a long telephone cord attached to a red phone, lying on the hallway floor. Having been warned by dispatch this, someone had been shot. Mulligan presumably wasn't surprised to find a body, but what he found in the bedroom, however, was another story in the bedroom. The beige wall to wall carpeting was covered by a large sheet of clear plastic on the. Plastic, lay a six and a half foot long by three foot wide pine board with handcuffs and straps fastened to each corner. The connecting chains running through large holes bored in the would a large knife and a wide role of plastic was in the corner of the room. And the only furniture in this room is a table standing against the wall mulligan called his Lieutenant in suggested that he take a personal look at this crime scene, which he did identification. The man was dean, coral the dead man, thirty three years old. He worked for the Houston lighting and power company as an electrician, right? Coral was six foot one inches tall and weighed approximately two hundred pounds. It'd been shot six times mostly in the back and shoulder, and once in the head, the bullet and quarrels head patrol did from the skull mulligan began his investigation of the crime scene. He star. Added in the bedroom. 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But recently had moved to Pasadena, coral invited Henley to a party Henley invited his friend, Tim Curley, and the two went to corals home at around nine thirty pm the night before Henley curly in coral, sat in the front room, drinking beer smoking pot and bagging paint, which is. The paint? Yes. So this is sniffing the fumes from acrylic paint, sprayed into a Brown paper bag. As some point Henley left to pick up his girlfriend Rhonda Williams according to Henley. He and coral and agreed to leave for Colorado in about a week and Rhonda was coming with them. Henley didn't tell coral he was going to pick up Rhonda that night. Instead. He and curly told coral that they were going out for sandwiches and arrived back at corals house in Pasadena around two thirty a. m. now, dean coral was not happy that the boys showed up back at his place with Rhonda. In fact, he was extremely angry. He had other plans in mind for that evening while, yeah, because girls have cooties coral seem to get over it and the teens resume, their activities of smoking pot and sniffing paint until at some point, the teens all passed out and corals living room. When Henley came to his senses, he discovered coral was handcuffed. Him curly in Rhonda their wrists and ankles were already shackled in their mouths were sealed with masking tape. They lie on the floor, helpless Corel launched into a tirade threatening to kill all of them. He brandished a pistol and a huge knife in his hands. He shouted to the teens that he had already killed some boys who had resisted him in the past and that he was going to kill them. But quote, I, I'm going to have my fun, but Hanley and choral. They had a long relationship. They had a special relationship. Let's say a stock call it that well, Hanley started trying to talk and coral, took the tape off of his mouth. Henley began to sweet talk coral he promised that he would help torture and kill curly in Rhonda if coral would free him, hey, could you imagine being curly like, dude, shut up? What are you doing. Help torture me. Why don't think at this time that curly or Rhonda were awake, but if they were, that's what he thinking. Oh, you just turned on us this quickly. Yeah, yeah, great friend. Well, maybe they were coming to because at some point, coral grant Henley by his wrist that were handcuffed, drag him into the kitchen area where they continued to talk apparently in the kitchen, coral and Henley struck some kind of bargain core would assault curly the boy and Hanley wood rape Rhonda. Then they would kill the two and be done with both of them. At this point. It was beginning to be light outside as promise, choral unlocked, Henley's handcuffs as Henley recovered himself choral picked up curly and disappeared down the hall. Henley heard a scuffling and clinking of handcuffs. Then coral returned picked up Rhonda and disappeared into the hallway. Again, Henley took a hit of paint fumes and. Headed down the hallway to the bedroom there. He found curly and Rhonda shackled to a long wooden board at their wrists and ankles coral was naked in on his knees beside curly. He nodded toward Rhonda signaling. Henley Henley took off his clothes and prepared to cut Rhonda's clothes off of her with the knife. Coral had handed him Rhonda, begged him not to cut the shirt. He cut her pants off and lay down beside Rhonda, but he couldn't bring himself to do it. Meanwhile, coral was trying to assault curly. The frantic teen was struggling to defend himself from the assault Hanley. Saul Rhonda was having trouble breathing. So he stripped the tape from her mouth, and she quietly begged him to get her out of this place. Coral stopped momentarily and removed the tape from curly's mouth. Curly begged coral to leave him alone, head. Only because see the pistol on the small table where coral left it. He got to his feet and toll coral, he was going to the bathroom. He went and then on his return, he picked up the gun and pointed it down at coral, he told quarrel, stop yelling, you've gone far enough dean, I can't have you killing all of my friends. Coral looked up at Henley, Henley warned him. He would shoot if coral came at him, but coral came up off of the floor in a lunch, trying to grab the gun in yelling kill me, Wayne kill me. Henley pulled the trigger twice. One bullet struck coral and the shoulder. The other in the head, coral, half fell half stepped through the door into the hallway, bounced against the wall as he did. So his feet became tangled in the cord to the phone that stretched across the hall into the other bedroom, still shaking. With fear adrenaline Henley, emptied the pistol and to corals back and shoulder. Coral stumbled and crashed to the floor. Then the police were called the body is discovered, and the teens were arrested. During the police question captain we're bringing other people here not just the teens that they found on location, but we have some of some people that know coral as well. And the first people that they speak to is his father and stepmother who are adamant and deny that dean quarrel was homosexual or violent saying that there was no way that he could have salted teenage boy, right? But did the cops say, hey, can you explain to us these torture devices? Hey, can you explain to us the seventeen inch, long dildo? Well, they these two would tell police that the three teenagers must have murdered dean in a drug induced frenzy. Yeah, they're, they're sniffing a bunch of paint walking around town with a seventeen inch, long dildo. Well, detective mulligan return to further question Henley. He was skeptical about the story, especially the part where Henley talked about. Dean coral boasting that he had killed before during this questioning hill Henley said that he knew coral had killed before. In fact, he knew some names of boys that were killed. Henley even knew where some of the bodies were buried. He said in an old boat storage shed somewhere in southwest Houston. Henley started rattling off some names, Charles, cobble mardi Jones and someone named Hila Geiss. He said, these boys lived in the heights neighborhood Kabul and Jones. Two boys age, seventeen, and eighteen were missing from the heights for two weeks seemingly vanishing without a trace and both boys parents received phone calls from their sons saying they were in trouble. Further the officers discovered that there was a file on a missing thirteen year old that disappeared while in route to a local swimming pool in the heights on may twenty ninth nineteen seventy-one. His name was David hillock Geist interviews with Tim Curley and Rhonda Williams backed up Henley story of the shooting. But what is clear is these two knew nothing of the other allegations that Henley was making about dean coral by homicide detectives were called in and Hanley was able to lead law enforcers. To a boat shed where he said, coral had buried some boys, southwest boat storage was a twenty stall dry land marina made of corrugated metal and shaped like an l the stalls, a sizable twelve feet wide and thirty feet deep, coral stall was number eleven yet had six foot wide double doors, and they're gonna be padlocked, coral, rented the space since November of nineteen seventy-one. And he was listed as a good renter who paid promptly. He had recently inquired about renting a second stall, but none were currently available according to the owner, coral visited the stall number eleven multiple times a week. Often seen unloading things from his white van officers used a crowbar to break open, the lock holding the doors, the stall had no windows. It was incredibly hot inside. So he has a creepy van and he has a creepy stall. Yes, yes, he does. And he's asking about renting a second credence today. Other stone, please inside they find a dirt floor which is covered by two carpets. One green one blue and an old rusted car as well. A bicycle lean against the wall, and the left rear corner was a fifty gallon steel drum a dozen, large Brown water. Containers were scattered about the space. Two bags of dehydrated lime. Sat atop one of the containers beside the car was a plastic bag containing clothing and a pair of red shoes with high heels. After clearing out the stall, it was clear that there was going to be some digging and after a lot of effort and quite some time, the digging expose the distorted face of a young boy. They could see accord embedded in the boys throat, the smell of decay permeated the stall. Yeah, kind of. Remind you of Casey in the way? Yes. And as twilight approached in the digging continued police officers uncovered a second body. Meanwhile, the media began to get wind of what happened. I the shooting of dean coral, and then the search for what at the time was listed as the search for three bodies at this storage shit, right. Of course. It was just a matter of time before the media showed up outside of the boat storage shed video footage was shot of an anxious Wayne Henley making a statement about the shooting, and today this is on YouTube. You can see Henley on video talking on the phone to his mom saying mama, mama. I shot dean reporters saw that the excavation of the storage shed was unearthing human remains and within minutes. This story was on the six o'clock news. The body count was climbing and the sensational story. Of a mad sex perver- who killed boys and buried them in his boat, shed made national and international headlines within a day more than fifty out of state and foreign reporters arrived in Houston to cover the horrific story. The news of the mass murders in Houston, reverberated around the world, even the pope addressed the story, saying, quote, we are in the domain of Santa's them and demon ISM. Now as mass murder in Houston, author, John girl described it. Somebody's were shrouded completely in clear plastic in the escalators would brush aside the and turn away from the features that looked up at them. These were the more recently interred victims. Others were half protected by their plastic wrappings from their head down to waste. Their lower portions were shredded away by lime and time to stain fabric or leg bone. Owns intendant s- the others, those which had rested longer in their nitty in this isolated burial. Pit were just lumps of decomposition. The earth had all but claimed them as the bodies emerged from the dirt. They were laid on the ground outside the boat shed in numbered Wayne Henley spent the night in a cell at the Pasadena police station. Ray authorities weren't ready to declare him an innocent victim just yet police were beginning to wonder if the bodies install number eleven could possibly have been the work of just one evil man, right? So you have a situation where you have a teenager that just killed his friend dean, that supposedly was torturing another two teenagers. Then when they're brought to the police station Henley saying, hey, look, there's more to the story and and there's more victims the police don't buy. It because they don't even by that dean would have tortured the teens originally that were in his house. But then once they go to his storage unit, they start finding these bodies. Now we have these bodies, but we don't have the why or xactly who? Right. And I think it's a little more complicated because I think what we have here is Henley seemed content to just tell them that look, this guy threatened me and he was going to kill these two kids that were with me. So I, I talked my way out of the handcuffs and I killed this evil dude. Well, during the course of telling that story, he throws in there that dean said, hey, look, I've killed. I've killed kids before and I'm gonna kill you guys and I'm gonna take my time doing it right. And that's Gramma Thun before when like you know, when dogs, you know how they kind of. They perk up when they hear certain thing and their years go up. That's when the detectives ears went up and he was like, wait a second. That one line right there. I wanna know. What this kid meant by. I've killed more before I've killed boys before, right? And that's when I think after being pushed, he's like, yeah, he has killed. In fact, I know where some of the bodies are there in the storage shed. He's sitting there and they're wondering, well, eleven people. We found eleven kids, wow, buried in the shed. So we wanna know more in the questioning of Wayne Henley's going to continue. And while Malkin was interviewing Henley, he is interrupted by a phone call. It was a Houston, homicide detective. He told mulligan that a David Brooks was brought into the department by his father that the Brooks boy was giving a statement implicating Wayne Henley as corals, longtime partner in Loring Houston, teenagers into corals hands, right Brooks claim to be an eyewitness and that he had knowledge about coral and Henley mulligan hung up the phone and look. Over Henley. He said, quote that was officer Lieutenant porter of Houston, homicide. He just told me that a boy named David Brooks was making a statement there about you and coral in the boys. We have dug up the boat shed, but right, but Hanley Brooks and dean there were like a motley Crue according to mulligan Henley wheeled around in his chair and leaned across the desk toward mulligan and said, that's good. Now I can tell you the whole story shit Henley's confessions states that he met corps when he was about fourteen years old through David Brooks Brooks told Hanley that coral could get them in on a deal where he could make some money. Once they met Henley's. Confession states coral told me he belonged to an organization out of Dallas that bought and sold boys ran horse and dope and stuff like that. Dean told me that. He would pay me two hundred dollars at least for every boy that I could bring to him and maybe more if they were really good looking boys, he stated, I didn't try to find any for him until about a year later, and I decided that I could use the money to get better things for my people. So one day I went over to dean's apartment on Schuler street and told him that I would find a boy for him. Dean had a GTS at the time and we got in it dean and me started driving around. We picked up a boy at eleventh and stood word. I talked him into going to dean's apartment to smoke some marijuana. So we went over to deans, dean left some handcuffs laying out where they could be seen. And we had this little deal setup where I would put the handcuffs on and then I would get out of them. Then we talked this boy, I don't remember his name and trying to get out of the handcuffs. The only thing was. We put them on where the locks were turned in, where he couldn't get the key into them. Then dean took the boy down and tied his feet and put tape over his mouth. Henley said he thought dean was going to sell him to this organization that he belonged to. So he left then the next day, dean paid him two hundred dollars then a day or so later Henley found out the dean of killed the boy and found out the dean at screwed him in the ass before killing him. This was the start of the whole thing. And since then Henley said he helped dean get eight or ten other boys saying, I don't remember exactly how many dean would screw all of them, and then he would kill them. Henley stated that he had killed several of them himself with teens gun and helped choke some of the others, then they would take them and bury them in different places. He also said David Brooks was with us. On most of these kills Brooks confession stated in essence that he had been present when most of the killings happened stating, I was in the room when they happened, and I was supposed to help if something went wrong brook said in a somewhat passive manner. Once they were on the torture board, they were as good as dead. It was all over, but the shouting in the crying Brooks confirm that once Henley came into the picture quote, most of the killings involved. All three of us, he made it clear though that there had been murdered before Hanley arrived on the scene two years ago. He said there was a boy whose name he couldn't recall, but coral kept him alive for four days saying it really upset dean to have to kill this boy because he really liked him. Brooks told investigators at coral, moved almost constantly around the heights, never staying in one place for. Along in the murders occurred at multiple addresses around town. He said in all, I guess there were between twenty five and thirty boys killed, and they were buried in three different places. Brooks makes clear in his confession that he didn't do any of the actual killing. He said of the killings which he witnessed quote it didn't bother me to see it. I saw it done many times. I just wouldn't do it myself and I never did do it myself while he admitted to lowering boys being present for many of their deaths helping to bury the bodies. He never admitted to committing murder. He did, however, throw Wayne Henley under the bus telling police that Henley seemed to enjoy causing pain to the victims and that he had killed some of them. And one time Brooks told police Brooks talked coral and of killing one of the boys and choral actually let him go. This was a boy named Billy ridding her once Brooks made his. Initial confession after being brought into the station by his father, he was placed under arrest. So clearly captain Henley's confession went far beyond the accessory role. He had initially cop to right. He actually, according to his words, killed six of the victims at corals behest by shooting them in the head or strangling them. So based off a Henley, right? We have this confession, we have multiple murders, but then Burkes is also saying, hey, there was murders that took place before Hanley, but then we could then assume that before Brooks that dean possibly killed others before Brooks was involved? Yeah. And I don't think that we can understand the whole tale of dean coral unless we know the story of his background. What is really remarkable and terrifying about the choral was that throughout his life, there were no visible signs that. He would become a prolific serial killer and actually, no one knows how many boys dean coral murdered as you just stated. Dean, coral was active and involved in his community and by all accounts. Well, liked and friendly. He was born in Fort Wayne Indiana on Christmas Eve in nineteen thirty nine. His parents, Arnold and Mary where both twenty three. When he was born, we don't know or have much information about corals young life. It was apparently fairly unremarkable. It has been reported by many sources that dean was something of a momma's boy. His parents, divorce in dean was six soon thereafter. Arnold coral was drafted into the army and was based near Memphis, Tennessee. So Mary move to a trailer home nearby with her sons so they can stay close to their dad Arnold in Mary, remarried in nineteen fifty and moved to Houston. So they get a divorce, they decide to put on dirty underwear, get married again. Well, he goes off into the army. She moves to be close to him and his their sons can be close to him as well. Arnold and Mary divorced. Once again, Arnold did maintain a good relationship in contact with his sons and nineteen Fifty-three Mary married. Again, this time to Jim west, a salesman who up and moved the family to vied or Texas. The couple had Joyce. This would end up being deans, half sister while living there. Dean was an average student. He thrived in the school band and he was instrument who you know he was known to be quite a good trombone player of real trombone or people who attended vied or high school within they say that he was popular. He dated girls went to dances and drive ins and noted that he was extr-. Stream Lee close to his mother. Dean also raised rabbits and pigeons sometime in the mid nineteen fifties. Mary started making praline candies and dean went to work for his mother's candy business harvesting the cons to make the prey links packaging the treats and doing the deliveries in nineteen sixty two, Mary and Jim divorce. The family moved into the heights area of Houston, where Mary set up her shop, the family business was incorporated with Mary as president, dean vice president and Stanley, the secretary treasurer deans, half sister. Joyce also helped out dean had a good relationship with his father Arnold. And he decided to follow in Arnold footsteps and become an electrician. He got a job with Houston, light and power. So dean, as we said, made candy at at night, right? And worked at Houston, light and power during the day, there. Is a story reported in multiple sources that a male employee of the candy company complained to marry that dean had come onto him and Mary dean's mother fired the employee denying that dean would ever have done anything like this and nineteen sixty four dean was drafted into the US army to which he applied for a hardship discharge claiming he was needed at the family business. The army. Granted this request in dean left the service just ten months after his induction, according to army records corals service record was considered excellent. In nineteen sixty five. The coral candy company moved into a building directly across from the Helms elementary school. In the heights dean became the general manager, and he seemed to revel in being known as quote the Candyman. This was because this is as he was known to the. Neighborhood children while in this is because he would hand out free candy. When children would come into the store. He just kinda, you've seen you've seen the scene in willy Wonka. The candy man can well in the back room of the candy factory candy store, coral installed a pool table. So kids started loitering at the candy factory, hanging out in the back room and spending lots of time in the company of dean, coral as good investment, though the more they spin playing poll the more candidate by now. No one knows if anything affair is happened during this time, if any of the boys were preyed upon it has been noted that dean had a private room in the back of the candy factory where he would retrieve it if he was angry or in a temper, and he would then emerge later all smiles. This room was referred to and several sources as the pouting room. So perhaps I have to wonder, is there was he going into this room at times to kind of stifle urges having a hard time controlling himself in the presence of all of these young boys or teenage boys right now in nineteen sixty eight on the advice of a medium Mary, his mother dissolved the candy company and moved to Colorado. This was likely a difficult transition for choral. He never saw his mother and person. Again, although the two remain close talking on the phone regularly, coral went to work fulltime for the Houston, lighting and power company throughout the late sixties and until his death dean dated a woman named Betty Hawkins. Betty was a divorce with two small boys. Betty told the LA times after dean's death that the couple intended to marry in two weeks time and the two. Plan to go to Colorado to live in an interview after corals death. Betty said, quote, dean was one of the kindest men I ever knew if he had something and someone needed it, he'd give it to them. She said that dean was wonderful with her eight and ten year old boys ceiling. Now, she also told investigators that quote in five years dean, and I never really had sex saying they would hug and kiss. There were times that they came close, but never did it stating, he believed that you should be married. Betty said that she refused to believe any of the reports about dean. Yeah, you should be married unless your child. Well, she said that she had visited dean's apartment many times often road in his van and never once had she stumbled across anything as strange as what was being reported in the newspapers. Even when she dropped by. In on dean unexpectedly. However, Betty told Billy bulges mother. Billy was one of corals victims. We would later learned that that every time she went to dean's home, he had quote a bunch of boys around and she didn't think this was normal. Billy bulges mother told him to stop hanging out with dean choral. It is interesting though to see the dean coral seemed to have been capable of quote, a normal type relationship. You know this based off of affection rather than sadistic urges bright. But it sounds as though by keeping a girlfriend around and acting like an upstanding citizen, dean choral was attempting to hide who he really was or what he really was right. A sadistic pedophiliac serial murder. Now in nineteen Seventy-three. Captain we have. We're back to the. Point where we have all the news coming out about the serial killings of so many teenage boys that has rocked the heights neighborhood to its core and the Hillary guys. The family that we've discussed a couple times so far Bray, they're learning that their son, he possibly met his fate at the hands of this serial killer. So Dorothy Hilla guys recalled an incident that happened in nineteen seventy one on one day. David failed to return home when he said that he would when he turned up, he explained that he and Molly visited a man in the candy factory. This was the coral candy company right across the street. From the elementary school, the low poll went to the pouty room. Well, exactly. David told his mother, he said, there's a pool table in the back and dean coral, let's play pool and have free candy. Dorothy told David not to visit the candy. Victory again, but he protested. He wanted to hang out with his friends stating, but Molly knows him meaning dean and his mother molly's mother actually worked four forty. So she checked with some winkle and MRs winkle said she had worked at the candy factory, but she actually knew very little about dean quarrel who worked for the family candy business one way or another. A second time when Dave was again late coming home, Dorothy went to the candy factory herself. There. She found David's and molly's bicycles parked outside. She pushed the button at the door and a man opened it up. She asked for David, she told the man whom she presumed to be dean, coral that she didn't want her son to visit the store anymore. When the man told her that he knew MRs winkle MRs hill gas replied that made no difference. The man called David from the rear room MRs hill Geist bought a box of candy and she and David left. Furthermore, Dorothy recalled with horror something that happened just a few weeks prior to the discovery of the bodies, her son, Greg hill Geist was friends with a boy down the street named Ronnie Hanley. She let Greg go down the street to the Henley house to play member. Greg is the younger brother of David hillock guys, right when Greg returned. He told his mother that dean coral and Wayne Henley were there. And that quote, dean is a real nice man. Great told her adding that he told me that he and Wayne, we're going to take me and Ronnie fishing. One of these days if coral had gotten his hands on Greg, it's already suspected that David Hill Geiss would end up being a victim, but of coral had gotten his hands on, Greg, it would not. Have been the first time that he made brothers disappear, right? Even more horrible, was Dorothy recall that not only did the neighbor. Wayne Henley help hand out flyers about David being missing. He said to her, and this is from a book called the man with the candy. I really, really feel, you know, sorry for y'all in my heart just goes out to you. David could still be right around here. Sometimes the parents can't see the kids and the kids can't see the parents. He could be right under your nose and you wouldn't even know. Nutribullet balance is unlike any blender ever created the Bill in smart sensor scale sends nutritional information for every ingredient as added. So you can see his actually what you're putting into your body, whether looking to lose weight watcher, blood sugar, or whatever. The nutribullet balance will build the perfect smoothie for you. Every time had to neutral at balanced dot com. Slash garage for a special, offer neutral, balancer, nutrition, balance your life. Here's something really cool captain. If you love true crime garage, and if you love free stuff, hate it. True crime garage, and I hate free stuff. Well, then this is not for you, but I think this is for a whole lot of people out there. It's called the Stitcher app. You get the app and you get all of the old true crime, garage episodes for free. That's like two hundred fifty some episodes for free for free. That's right. So get the Stitcher app and tell them true crime, garage censure. Also we have our fantastic new show called off the record. The everybody loves and that's available on Stitcher premium, even I love it. That's right. All right until next week will see till next time until we'll be tomorrow. Yeah, we'll see you back here in the garage tomorrow. Hopefully the captain joins us until then be good, be kind. Don't let.

David Brooks Wayne Henley Mary dean dean coral Henley mulligan David Brooks Brooks Houston Wayne Hanley David dean coral Texas Brooks Henley murder Coral Arnold coral Beaumont coral Dorothy Hilla Houston officer United States Rhonda Williams
Kyler Murray makes history: The importance of finishing well

The Daily Article

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Kyler Murray makes history: The importance of finishing well

"Really? Eyler Murray makes history the importance of finishing. Well, this is Dr Jim Dennison's the daily article podcast for Friday, April twenty six twenty nineteen the Arizona Cardinals made Cuyler Murray the first pick in last night's NFL. Draft Murray is the first player to be selected in the first round by both the National Football League and major league baseball. He was drafted ninth by the Oakland Athletics. Last June Murray is obviously an amazing athlete, but history of first picks in the NFL is not entirely encouraging the first player ever drafted in the NFL was Jay Berwanger in nineteen thirty six the team would not agree to his contract terms. So he never played a down in the league. Tom casino was the first overall pick in nineteen seventy nine but he chose to play in Canada. Instead and never played for the team that drafted him. Steve ymt men was drafted I in nineteen Ninety-two but injuries cut short his career. Same for John Carter drafted I in nineteen ninety-five in for Courtney Browne drafted I in two thousand this. Trend shows that it's not where you're drafted. But how long and well you play the counts the same is true in life. I attended an event in Dallas yesterday morning, featuring New York Times columnist in bestselling author David Brooks, I have admired Burks his work for years and consider him one of the most significant public intellectuals in America today Burke, spent much of his time discussing the shift in culture, he has witnessed in the nineteen fifties. American life was communal people lived in neighborhoods in which they did live together family church and collective rituals such as baptisms, weddings and other life passages framed our experience in the nineteen sixties we shifted from us to me truth is what I say, it is morality is what works for me without harming you. According to Brooks. We've now run out the string on self-centered living and are facing an epidemic of loneliness as a result the opioid crisis. Escalating suicide rates in plethora of social ills. We face are symptoms of this underlying disease in response to the need for meaning in a culture that is adrift Brooks invited us to live for others in community. Find a way to be routed to place and people we cannot do life on our own or find meaning in ourselves this commitment to community as a central for others. But for us as well Burks, quoted a friend's observation you cannot only clean the part of the pool you swim in what happens to you happens to us all Brooks's latest book, the second mountain is a metaphor for his theme. The first mountain is success measured by popularity and possessions, but climbing this mountain never fulfils us. So we climbed down into the valley and hopefully up the second mountain of significance. We learned to give more than we get to serve more than we are served. In other words, we live long enough to discover how to live best. The writer of Ecclesiastes makes an observation that is starkly counter cultural today, but expressive of David Brooks is wisdom. Ecclesiastes seven one says a good name is better than precious moment and the day of death than the day of birth. The writer of Ecclesiastes then states in verse eight better is the end of thing than it's beginning on his way to Jerusalem and aware of the danger that awaited him Paul told a group of Christian leaders in acts twenty twenty four I do not account my life of any value, nor as precious to myself, if only I may finish my course in the ministry that I received from the Lord Jesus to testify to the gospel of the grace of God years later, looking back over his history, changing life and ministry, the apostle testify. I have fought the good fight. I finished the race. I have kept the faith that second. Timothy four seven Paul had been enormously successful in his early life. Then he learned to count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus, my Lord, that's Phillips. Three eight he climbed the first mountain of Tim success before discovering the second mountain of eternal significance. American culture is never embraced umbilical morality as it does today. Ten years ago. Would you have imagined that same sex marriage would be legal that Hollywood would be producing shows celebrating polygamy that women would be live streaming their abortions the more than one hundred million people would view pornography everyday. Our secular society will cheer us as we scale the first mountain of popularity and important success. The more we agree with cultural wisdom on moral issues. The more or culture will applaud us and the more our father will grieve. Conversely, the more we focus on the second mountain of eternal significance. The more. Our culture will caricature in castigate us and the more. Our father will be glorified. Which mountain are you climbing today? To subscribe to the daily Article V Email read any daily article, you may have missed this week or use any of our resources, please. Visit Denison forum dot org. Thank you. For listening to the daily article podcasts today.

Cuyler Murray National Football League David Brooks Jay Berwanger David Brooks Burks Ecclesiastes Paul America Dr Jim Dennison Oakland Athletics Phillips Arizona Cardinals baseball Courtney Browne John Carter writer Murray Steve ymt Canada
Are Public Impeachment Hearings Working?

The Argument

27:59 min | 1 year ago

Are Public Impeachment Hearings Working?

"When a woman commits murder she's often given a label she's the woman who snapped the black widow the angel of death do these as labels help or do they mask the truth behind these stories? I'm Tori Telfer and I'm hosting new podcast about the crimes that inspire these names why women kill truth lies labels presented by CBS. All access. Subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Michelle Goldberg. I'm David Brooks I'm rostow fit. And this is the argument this week. Are the impeachment hearings changing Anybody's mind. I never thought there was a possibility. Twenty Republican senators would vote to convict and so this will all end in the winter with trump claiming victory. Then when we talk tipping. Is it necessary. Is it immoral and is there a better way. I would also love to get rid of the tipping system. You kind of just his forces system where everybody can be paid a living wage and finally a recommendation when you're on the right you don't have the luxury of measuring your musicians by their politics. 'cause they all describe your politics in the public impeachment hearings have brought testimony about president trump's dealings with Ukraine into the open there the public doc airing of evidence that Republicans claim to want and they're the spectacle the Democrats hope will boost support for impeachment. David Leonhardt is out this week. So we're joined by our colleague. David Brooks David Welcome to the argument pleasure to be here so I'm hoping that you can play our persuadable American for for the purposes of this segment You are I think. Nobody's idea of a pro trumper but back when Nancy Pelosi. I announced the formal impeachment been angry. You wrote a column arguing. Basically that impeachment was a mistake. You said it was an elitist process that ran against the public's priorities that it would distort the Democratic primary Mary and entrenched trump is in the GOP. So here we are you know weeks later. The process is ongoing. Has Anything about what's happened so far. Far Change your mind. I'm vindicated in my own mind No I still basically think I understand why they had to do it. As a matter of just making a statement about what the rules are of American politics and statement against the sort of quid pro quo corruption. That trump has done. But I don't see any good outcome. I I never thought there was the possibility twenty. Republican senators would vote to convict and so this will all end in a whimper with trump claiming victory. I think there's no evidence that anybody's minds have been changed If you look at the polls when it started it was about forty. Eight percent approve the impeachment process and forty or so percent disapproved. Now it's it's about forty five percent approve and forty two percent disapprove. I was just taking the real clear average. They have like a bunch of ten or fifteen polls so if anything there's been a slight movement away from mm-hmm approval the impeachment process but no movement at all and so we've shown the public that Donald Trump is extremely guilty of this quick bro but people are not changing their mind. Well so the most recent polls actually show fifty one percent for impeachment and removal and seventy percent saying trump's actions were wrong. These things fluctuate depending on polling methods and wading. But I just. I don't think it's correct to say that. Support for impeachment has diminished. The most recent numbers suggests that it has crept wrapped up a little bit even if there hasn't been abroad change in people's minds but I think this was also the case I wasn't alive during Watergate but I've read a lot about Watergate including a very interesting book called the battle for public opinion which tracks very carefully kind of how public opinion shifted throughout the course of the Watergate investigations ends and my understanding. Is that public opinion. Didn't change that much after Hearings in the Senate Started to change more during the house hearings which I guess is a reverse of how it's GonNa play out here because they didn't actually ever have a trial in the Senate so for everyone listening. We're recording this kind of midway through what is supposed to be a very high profile week so but so far we've had about three days of testimony. It seems kind unrealistic to expect that there would be big shifts. We do know that the feared Republican backlash hasn't emerged. And so I just don't see what the downside is given the horrible position in which trump has put this country to airing the evidence of his his crimes and civic disloyalty to a population that reviles as president and mostly WANNA seem gone. I would say that one different sir. Couple differences I would make between now and Watergate I when Watergate happened trust in Americans to she was like at sixty or seventy percent and so people were genuinely surprised that this was going going on and there's nothing about Donald trump has done vis-a-vis Ukraine. That is a surprise. He's been this way sort of scandalous along. People have sort of baked that in second and Watergate Arab if your party lost an election. It didn't feel like you're in some sort of existential crisis but a lot of people now but because the country's so polarized feel at the other side takes over then it's an existential crisis for for the whole country the idea of Republican backlash. That certainly hasn't happened. I think the one downside for Democrats and maybe it's not a catastrophic vic downside is that I think the presidential race is actually quite interested in having a lot of debates and it's sort of being overshadowed. Yeah I mean I think what you said at the start David about about the idea that this could be a bad idea but maybe the Democrats had no choice is sort of how I felt about it at the start. You know you do. Have this situation right where you go through a log investigation and at the end of the day. It doesn't come up with the goods and wait. Let's back up. It doesn't come up with all of the goods. It doesn't come up with sufficient goods to persuade me important. Pundit and swing voter right. The trump should be impeached. I and immediately after this happens. Trump is engaged in some kind of act of corruption connected to the next presidential election and it just seems like in that situation. If you're Nancy Pelosi the Democratic Party. You'd probably have to respond. You don't want to escalate to the shooting shooting someone on Fifth Avenue Scenario Right. You need to prove that. There's some sort of cost to even business. As usual for trump. They in theory could have done on the sensor or they could do this and then move on. I think I'd love to see them. Get this out of the way in a week or two Mitch. McConnell may try to drag through January the Senate but at least public attention we'll have pulled off and and put onto the things that I think are actually much more important first democratic primary but second interesting fact that America is unpersuaded. Why is that back in Watergate? The presidential proves ratings rose and fall sometimes by swings of thirty forty fifty points. Often presidents at the beginning of their term would have seventy them near eighty percent approval ratings. And that doesn't seem to happen anymore. And that even goes back to of the Obama years and so focusing on that the underlying subterranean issue that the explains why people run persuadable as I think the big story here. I actually think that it's a big mistake for Democrats to wrap this up too quickly. I mean so far. It's been kind of all upside from my point of view and I actually think they're not doing their job if they don't plum the broader context in which this specific corruption takes place. Because we haven't even gotten to the fact that the to you know sort of low level thugs that were doing Giuliani's bidding in in Ukraine apparently on direct orders from Donald trump are being paid by this guy who is according to our own justice department a high echelon and associate of Russian organized crime. You kind of need to also publicize and dramatize that side of it. And I don't see what would be the downside to giving it a full full hearing you know through the Spring and kind of wrap it up in time for the general election. If those kind have threads don't end up leading to the moment when John Bolton stands up and says you know I was there when Donald Trump took a phone call from bladder and Putin and said yes sir. I'll do whatever you want if it just ends in this sort of spiral of foreign names and weird connections. That don't get you back to. Trump isn't isn't that the sort of miasma of the fog of scandal that David's talking about that doesn't necessarily help the Democrats. I think the Democrats tend to always approach these things from this kind of defensive. Crouch if you look at the way. Republicans are acting on this Impeachment hearing they could care less about persuading anyone. Anyone who isn't already steeped in Fox News are Cana- There's obviously structural differences between the two parties. But I do think that Republicans have actually actually benefited quite a bit from showing the courage of their terrible and corrupt convictions. I think that Democrats by and large believe leave that this administration is a font of absolutely unprecedented corruption and foreign compromise. And if these hearings don't go on it's not as if they get to then pivot to talking about Medicaid expansion if the TV news is not airing these hearings all day every day. They're not going to be talking about the Democrats preferred policy priorities. They're going to be shifting to whatever kind of madness trump decides to perpetrate train upon the country. Each news cycle well but won't they be shifting to the Democratic primary to David's point. You know it's now November even with trump's capacity to command the headlines by the time you get to December January normally. We would all be talking about Warren Buddhist Edge Biden Bernie rainy and so on right so there would be in a sense. This would be the moment when the Democrats in Congress would be seeding the floor to the theoretically more. You're appealing and transformative future leaders of their party. I mean look. The Democratic primaries way too long Oliver primaries are way too long and they end up just doing damage to party cohesion. I don't know that Democrats are so harmed by having the span of time in which people are paying really close attention. To this you you know kind of somewhat attenuated to sort of what would be a normal level in a normally functioning democracy. One thing that should mitigate do things for the Democrats is that on the campaign trail. Nobody's paying attention to this. That traveled to about two or three states every week and have for the last four months or so whether I'm in Kansas Nebraska Anywhere outside of a few highly educated areas on the coast impeachment is not talked about and I thought it would them freeze the democratic race because nobody be paying attention but I was sort of wrong about that if you look at the polls in Iowa the polls in South Carolina there's been a fair but a movement this Buddha judge surge has happened at the same time as impeachment. I think that's right. I mean I I think you're right. That's been my experience when I'm on the campaign trail but they do talk about it in town halls. I think people aren't going to ask about impeachment. Because it doesn't really differentiate any of these different candidates Joni Ernst was asked about impeachment. And about whether it's okay to ask a foreign government interfere in our elections at one of her town halls. People in the house have said that it's come up in their town halls but I agree that it's not something that the candidates are talking about. There's not much they can do you about it. And they're all basically unified on it. One practical way. It could interferes if McConnell decides to hold a trial and drag chart across January. Then all the senators sort of would have to stay in DC. I assume Yeah I think that's true. And I wouldn't WANNA BE CENTER WARNS Senator Booker Senator Global Chart Cetera in those circumstances so then just looking ahead a bit from where we are David Michelle. Do you guys have predictions for what happens with the politics of impeachment in the next couple of months. My my guess is that that support will inch up a little bit you know. And then meanwhile I think it will continue to torment trump and throw off his game. You know I've long since given up hope that there's going to be a sudden outbreak of decency your patriotism among Republican senators right. I think we're stuck with with that. And we're also stuck with a lot of trump appointed judges who are not going to follow any sort of precedent about enforcing subpoenas releasing in grand jury testimony as they did in Watergate. Our system is going to stay in this kind of stasis but anything that Democrats let's continue to chip away at that little by little things to me is all to the Good David. Is there anything that would prove Michelle wrong about Republicans. Is there anything that could come out out in these hearings. That would actually turn fifteen republican senators against the president fully. I don't see it. I mean trump is still got that eighty nine or whatever it is ninety percent approval rating among Republicans is just not possible to come out against him. I mean I think Republicans have been embarrassingly flailing in the hearing so from a Democratic Democrat point of view keeping them doing that sort of interesting but overall I guess the two things and why I still think they should wrap it up i. The congressional Democrats are not the most attractive face face. The party I think chef is doing a very good job but the most attractive face. The party of are the presidential candidates and getting them out front seems to be just the right thing to do for the Democratic Party a second. I think it's just always important to know what year it is. And so speaking to the top priority and giving America's sense of hope that this is going to be in ended through the democratic process us and that you can get a significant governing majority to AL trump. That seems to be the most important political project in front of the country right now and I would say impeach him as probably probably not the most important leverage point to advance that project. Okay we'll leave the discussion there and we'll be back right after the break. Hi I'm Mitch Smith. I report Portman National Desk of the New York Times. One of the issues I write about a lot is gun violence and the mass shootings that we see playing out across the country with really alarming frequency part of that's covering individual tragedy and understanding what happened but another big part of that. We've taken seriously as connecting the dots and understanding. What's happening why it's happening opening and then to stop it one issue? We've looked at is bills and laws in different states that would allow the police to seize guns from people deemed dangerous before perhaps they have an opportunity to commit violence and understanding the concerns around those policies which in some places have passed with. Bipartisan support fairly quickly and other places have stalled holdout. We know that gun. Violence is one of the biggest issues on voters minds in this election to read more reporting on this and other issues that cancer talking about go to ny times dot com slash last election. The American service industry relies on tips. Your server at dinner. Your Uber driver. Your hair stylist first. Tips are a big part of their income but tips in the. US Aren't mandatory. We're one of the handful of countries where gratuity usually isn't added in automatically likely or folded into the cost of service. It's something that for better or worse complicates the relationship between the worker and the customer. So David you recently wrote about how you used to be a big supporter of the tipping economy. But now you have doubts. What changed your thoughts on tipping sure? I'm a tipping flip lumper so I was very pro tipping and I thought A. It's a way for one to reward good service and we like to that be. I thought it was a small. But at least Lisa direct way to alleviate income inequality and see. I just wasn't made relationships in these encounters at a restaurant say just friendlier the servers. No that they need to be friendly to get a tip. They know that if they touch you on the forearm. They're likely to get a big tip. There's a whole science behind how you maximize your tips Having looked at the data though I've had to say I had to change my mind. The big shock to me. was that people who studied this. Say there is no relationship between the quality of the service and the size of the tip. There's a relationship. Between the size of the check and the tip second it increases the inequality between people who are at the front of the restaurant and people were at the back of the restaurant third. It's not racially racially fair. African Americans get a third less tips lower tips than white Americans do so it maximizes that inequality and then finally for some significant a number of male patrons. It's a leverage point to do some sexual harassment. So for all these reasons I thought wow this is not a great idea. So this is one of those places where I basically agree he completely with the conclusions and just really disagree with how he got there. I mean especially the part about it kind of encouraging friendliness. Honestly I mean it's been a while since I've been in the service industry but I worked as a cocktail waitress in college and I smiled a lot and probably occasionally touched people in the forearm. I worked to the jazz club. Most of the people served were men. I've looked into their eyes and it was not because I felt any sort of human connection with them. You know that said I would also so love to get rid of the tipping system you know and kind of just forces system where everybody can be paid a living wage. It seems like the kind of thing that you can't do piecemeal right as long as some restaurants try to do it. They're going to be undercut by other restaurants. Michelle when you were working at the jazz club. If the owner had come mm around the staff and said we're GONNA raise prices and get rid of tipping. Do you think people would have been in favor of it or against it. I can't remember I think people probably would have been an against it because it was like a way if you were and I certainly wasn't the cutest there but it was a way if you were a relatively cute young woman to monetize that you know and so probably people would have been happy to keep it it just it was you know I remember it as a pretty emotionally gruesome experience. I think there are people I mean there are people who are like you know excellent servers and pride themselves on it and are happy to be able to monetize that. I do think I think that it is you know when you go to Europe. It's true that waitstaff are just much less sir. Vile and customers particularly elite people who don't have a lot of experience. The United States experienced that as maybe less pleasant but it also strikes me that it means that there is less need to Grovel grovel in their profession and that it's probably a sign of a kind of a healthier social contract. You just in France and I thought the service was pretty pretty much on par with the American service of if there's a big difference I certainly wasn't noticing it second. I'd be curious to know how many people experience it the way Michelle does is my perception Shen in. This is true I used to be a bartender was that there are a lot of people who take the idea of being in the service industry of being a server on the hospitality industry. We want to put it use another word as sort of a point of pride. This is something we do. Well this is something I am a good host. It's my special magic skill so I wonder if there's some people who find it dehumanizing some people find it really a source of pride how good they are at this job. I also found the the people I worked with. We all thought we were above average and therefore we all thought we. We've because I'm so good at this will be rewarded. Well I mean the different people think is interesting because of course far from getting getting rid of tipping. It's actually becoming a much bigger part of the American economy at least in the industries that now run on digital credit credit card interfaces right because they're all kinds of contexts in which the coffee shop counter the cab ride where in the old days. You know the Cabbie ask for a fair. He doesn't ask for tip. You can give him a tip but it's not sort of their in your face whereas when you put your credit card through the cab machine now the first the question is do you WanNa leave fifteen percent twenty percent or thirty percent and the same thing it a lot of sort of non sit down restaurants and basically anywhere that a uses the various square apps for credit cards and so on so that sort of expanded the range of situations in which people are reminded to tip and therefore likely to tip while also creating zone of sort of greater uncertainty about what you're tipping four. If you tip at the coffee shop right who do you guys tip at the coffee shop. Always do I do. Yes who might tipping. I just feel like you're just sort of like bolstering. The wages of underpaid Baristas presumably they see in those places their collective so you tip the thirty percents David on it like a new spent five dollars at a coffee shop and you tip hip. That's so inexpensive that so it doesn't really hurt so I can feel like I've done a good thing for a very low price. Are you tipping more Michelle. Well I mean I think in general like there's a lot of things that women have to do as ordinary upkeep that men don't think about that you end up also tipping four right like. I'm sure you guys don't worry about about how much to tip the person who threads your eyebrows. The thing that I worry about with the expansion of the digital tip jars at coffee shops is is whether that ends up. Impacting how much people are paid right. If you can hire somebody for less because you sort of know that it's going to be made up in tips the whole ethos around it ends up hurting the very workers that you're hoping to helping them in the first place right. I mean the traditional tip if you're tipping in cash there's a directness to the transaction. which isn't just that you're sort of? This person has served you and you have sort of a personal connection to them. It's also that you can can do this. Sort of direct economic transaction that bypasses the structure around you the restaurant or or the hair salon or or anything and I said that makes me super uncomfortable. I mean I kind of don't like slipping money into someone's hands. I usually happier when there's a way to sort of do it in a hands off way because it does feel sort word of patronizing to me just like slip someone. If you bills and I mean do you feel like that. Don't you feel like it's sort of Oh Yeah Yeah. It's much easier to tip. Yeah Yeah it's much easier to tip with a credit card on screen. Do you guys ever tip below twenty percent now. My wife says the waiter would have to punch me in the face to get below twenty now I think I tend to think of twenty is the minimum. It's also much easier to calculate than eighteen. We're stuck in a bad system. I'd be happy changed. But in the meantime we can adopt some rules norms to try to make it lease bad and the first to those is if your meal is under twenty five dollars tip thirty percent and of over twenty five to twenty ninety percent. The second rule is if you're in a hotel room always leave a tip and this is something a lot of people don't do and I've in the past not done but the people are clean. Those rooms deserve tip probably more than anybody else in American society. I've read that's something that people skimp on Maga's because you don't have to be there to kind of breath face the person that you're stiffening. That all seems like good advice and I think the point about hotel workers that is the place where that is an infinitely more difficult and in its own way intimate form of work than making you a Lotta or even serving a meal and now to finish up. We're going to do our weekly recommendation where we offer you something that we recommend to take your mind off politics and the news and since we have David as our special guest. We've asked him to recommend something for us. David what you have. So this gives me the chance to assuage a piece of guilt. There have been heartburn for last year. Too I wrote a column praising chance the rapper for a piece of very genuine music music that he wrote an and the same column. I criticized Taylor swift for a piece of very genuine angry music that she wrote and this was a harmful hurtful counts myself because I had emerged as an early Big Taylor Swift Fan. But then when she hit about twenty three twenty four she got angry. She got angry in the way. You're supposed to get angry if if you're Puerto Wannabe counter cultural and assertive in the way that record labels likely to get angry but now with her new album lover. She's returned to form. She's returned to a genuine self off. She's bucked the corporate trend. And so Taylor Swift is back Michelle. What do you think of Taylor Swift? You know I mean I know this is supposed to be the segment that take our mind off politics but my opinion of Taylor swift is totally ideological in that. I sort of thought very little of her until I realized realized that she was quietly part of the resistance. And I feel like one of the strangest things about our era is that Taylor swift has turned out to have better politics than Kanye west and so you know seeing sort of them switch places in terms of righteousness has been kind of another thing that makes me think that we live in a computer simulation. That's gone wrong but I don't really listen to Taylor swift and so I don't really have have an opinion of her new album. I don't think I know any of the songs from it do you. Do you Russ not that many. 'cause I have a similar take to David. David where I was a big fan of these sort of early Red State High School Country Music Taylor swift and probably influenced by having girls who are are very much preteen and like a lot of Taylor's with music and her music seemed to become very adult and very corporate in a way that sort of you know took it out of our family Dr World but David what is your favorite Taylor. Swift Song It was still be to grow Or love story which is an epic anthem. And the one thing that as Michelle was speaking occurred to me that when you're sort of on the right you don't have the luxury of measuring your musicians by Their politics because they all disagree with your politics David. What is the recommendation for us again? To listen to Taylor Swift's latest album lover and not watch Kanye. West's appearance on Troll trollip scenes church on Youtube. That's our show for this week. Thanks so much for listening. Leave us a voicemail male at three four seven nine one five four three two four you can also email asset argument at NY TIMES DOT Com. And if you like what you hear leave us a rating eating or review on Apple podcasts. This week show was produced by Christian. Schwab for Transmitter Media and edited by Sarah Knicks. Our Executive Producer Greg Cohen. We had help from Tyson Evans. phoebe let Ian Persad Philbrick and Francis Yang our theme was composed by Allison Leyton. Brown's we're taking a break next week. Yeah Thanksgiving but we'll see you back here in December. So you're really. You're all plan if you see a tip jar you're gonNA put a tip and I will do anything for cheap self righteous moral high. That is why you are going directly to have an. I'll be stuck in purgatory.

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David Brooks on political healing

The TED Interview

1:09:14 hr | 1 year ago

David Brooks on political healing

"Before we begin. I just like to say thank you to click health for supporting this episode. Hello. I'm Chris Anderson. Welcome to the Ted interview. This is the podcast series where I get to sit down with Ted speaker, and we take a deep dive into their ideas. Today on the show David Brooks. And how to lead a life of meaning and move toward less polarized politics football than fifteen years, David has been a political and cultural columnist for the New York Times, and he's the author of several blockbuster books. The diversity helped shape shift, a lot of people's worldviews books like Bo Bo's in paradise the social animal, and the road to character traditionally, David's politics, have been seen as a little right of center. But what's most striking to me about him is how brought his thinking is more than almost any other. I know he has a talent for synthesizing ideas from different fields. So Allah, g history psychology politics economics, and then weaving them into clarifying insights, highly relevant to where we are today. David recently published the second mountain the quest for moral life. It's a book and could in his own search, for meaning following divorce six years ago, and in his Ted talk, April he made the case that the key to was finding a better, way forward in our divided politics is to focus on deeper human values and the rich connections between us. We no longer feel good about ourselves as a people. We've lost our defining faith in our future. We don't see each other deeply me. Don't treat each other's well. We need a lot of changes, we need economic change, and environmental change, but we also need a cultural and relational revolution. And to me, the weavers have found that language. In this episode David, and I again to explore how these new ideas, connect both the quest for personal meaning and the dream of political renewal anchored in a new focus on Abraham David will share why he's inspired by a group of people. He calls weavers for moral and political answers. David brooks. Welcome good to be with you. So I'm really intrigued by this conversation because I see you as one of the great synthesizes of different ideas. Whereas amazed me, how you can combine thinking from sociology psychology and philosophy and politics and economics, and somehow we've into coherent article at least the noth- for an op-ed for the day. And then you times, you'll just come out with this new book, the second mountain the quest for a moral life. I'm intrigued to hear you connect the ideas in that book, and not thinking through some of what you've been writing recently about the Malays in our current politics and society, and culture, generally, and what we might do about that. Methinks says a connection I think you think that I can collection deep connection. So let's, let's try and do that. I mean David start by just telling me, you know, the basic thesis of the book, well, critically this. Warning the book is about the central lie of our culture and that lie is can make myself happy that if I earned some success, if I have more exciting experiences that if I get a little thinner, I can be happy and fulfilled. And that's a useful. I to have it's ally. We have on the first mountain of our lives because it motivates us to start companies and take risks. But if you've achieved any success in life, you realized that is ally that success does not actually make you feel fulfilled that the only way you fulfilled is by giving love receiving love. And so on the second mound of life. You realize you're in a very different mode of living. It's not about earning an acquiring. It's about contributing giving back is your belief that most people literally have these two mountains where they spend the first decade or two of the adult life, somehow, climbing mountain one. And then they have this crisis moment of realization. They enter more a life of meaning, what preceded meaning I think most people live with the culture, wants them to live for some time, and it can happen at any age, and then they make this discovery. So they get out of college. Say and they have a career they're going to build. I'm going to be a doctor lawyer, and then they either achieve success and find that unsatisfying or their fail. They're not on their mountain or something bad happens. That's not part of the original plan a cancer scare or they lose a child, and they're down the valley. And in the valley, they realize that they're much deeper than they thought they were, there's a great Paul Tillich line that what moments of suffering when we have these valleys in life, they remind us we're not the person we thought we are they car through what we thought was the basement of our soul and reveal cavity below that and cargo that reveal a cavity below that. And we realized we're just much deeper and only spiritual and emotional food is gonna fill those cavities. And when you make that discovery about yourself while you really desire with the desires of the heart and soul. Then you're ready for the second mountain because you realize only spiritual food is going to fill that I've got live, very different life. I mean one challenge. I I'm sure that you have faced a will face is that people find it hard to talk about this. The second mountain. I mountain it's the currency is stuff that's out there. It was literally, the currency of, you know how to what you're earning. What you're making how much sure achieving employers or social entrepreneur, whatever, and it's the sort of the obvious things that you can see someone got a promotion, what you doing now. What you work you on. These are easy conversations easier to have with people the conversations around. Have you deepen your love feel neighbor or your partner, much more intimate, much, much harder to have? I mean, do you see risk slips people would just shy away bit and say, I'm not ready for that. No. You know, sometimes I'm hired to give speeches of big convention halls to corporate types, and so I'll walk into a room with four thousand people, and they looked like the most boring. Sixty three year old white men, you could ever imagine in gray suits, and I'm about to talk to. Them about the love life of George Eliot, or something really emotional in gooey. And. Woo. And I walk into that room. And I look all over all these board faces who've been talking about health benefits for the last three days, and I think to myself, this is not going to go well, and then I started talking about it, and they start talking about the, the hard moments in my own life. And there's a quality of silence. That has occurs. None of the other times, I go out and give speeches. And that's because people are really emotionally and morally starved for someone who's willing to be vulnerable, and someone who's willing to tell about the real truths of life, which are not part of the common currency. We are over politicized in our culture and under moralize, we're not used to talking about this stuff, especially guys, frankly, I mean, a lot of people have noticed the shift in you and your interests away from, you know, full for many as you were seeing as the set of the token, right-of-centre columnist, for the New York Times, who, who have the readership love to hate, and others bedazzle by official, but but you seem very much in that, that. Ends people saw you as Republican, and, and we're interested in these other pieces that you've brought to the table. And then there was this shift to more talk of, you know, Martin issues and meaning and people wonder whether this was more about you that, that you yourself going through some kind of transition twenty cent. Is that true? It's somewhat true. But I'm an a very average person with above average communication skills. So in two thousand thirteen I went through a tough period in my life. But it turns out, I was going through a tough period at the exact moment. A lot of people are going through a tough period, and it was the same kind of toughness, it was a loss of social connection and a sense of isolation. So in my case, I had gone through divorced, my kids left home. A lot of my friends were conservatives, but conservative ISM was changing. So I lost a lot of those friends. And so I'm living alone an apartment, you know, with vast nothing to do over the weekends because I had no friends of that, sort. But at the same time, America's gone through this crisis of isolation. So you've seen the number of people who say, no one understands them has risen the number of people who say they're chronically lonely is risen. Fifty five percent of Americans say, no one knows them. Well, and so, in the last few years, you've seen the spike up in mental health issues, spike up into pression thirty percent rise in suicide seventy percent rise of teenage suicide. And so the whole country is going through a crisis of disconnection and 'isolation exactly as I was. And so I just had a maybe a little head start. So I spent six years thinking about how do you get out of this? What do you do with these moments? And how do you, we commit your life to some sort of connection and my process is very much the same process? Millions of people are going through. So what do you see as the key causes of that growing isolation? Yeah. I think it's a cultural thing, a culture of hyper individualism and the nineteen fifties, we had a culture that was very communal. We had a face big challenges like World War, Two in the depression, and we the culture that basically says, we're all in this together, and there were very rich and tight communities. Like if you grew up in Chicago, you didn't say I'm from Chicago. You said, I'm from fifty ninth and Polaski because that was your neighborhood and that it was great. But it was also stifling. And so in the nineteen sixties people said I've been crushed by conformity. I'm being crushed by these social roles. I can't tolerate the racism, and sexism that is in this culture, so they smashed it in nineteen sixty to import your on statements, say of bunch of kids wrote unfree to be myself. I want individual freedom. I want to be liberated from restraint and that was important necessary to do we couldn't have had the Silicon Valley revolutionlised we had an individual culture rebellion and creativity. We've had sixty years of it now and we've sort of run out the string. And we've created a culture, where we think of ourselves as buffered individuals who create our own sense of meaning our own sense of purpose in life, and we've destroyed the connections between us and that to me is the heart of the problem is the possible that the, the generation days, the hippies and fellow travelers were successful, because they had grown up in a different situation had grown up with certain kinds of values infused into them, which which will kind of taken for granted, and it was actually you could throw off a lot of the ROY. Roles. But still, I mean, they, they believed in love. They believed in connection with each other. It was it was they just didn't want to be told, how to, to do it. Is it possible that, that, that generation actually did okay, but that what went wrong was that the kids, they raised were all raised not to think about really coming over sponsored -bility, but just about their own preciousness and specialness and the dream of finding that passion and go and flourish. That's part of what happened. Yeah. Well, I, there was a sort of left wing individualization, which was more social and lifestyle. There's also a right wing version, which is about economic deregulation and I do think the baby boomers say we're living off some of the social capital. They grew up with the communities and the two Sion's. But then when we came time, frankly, for my generation to pass it down to our kids, we gave them nothing I spend a lot of time looking at commencement address, because that's how our culture passes down more lessons. We hire a bunch of very successful people to give speeches on my success is not important, and they always tell you shouldn't be afraid to fail from what you learned if you're JK rolling failure. Is fine, but for us failure sucks. But the main thing you learn is that we have no moral advice to give to our kids. We have no moral shared norm. So what we say that they wanted to graduating hours, they wonder what do I do with my life, and we say be free enjoy your freedom, and then that doesn't help them define? So then we say the future is limitless take risks that doesn't help them. Choose, they ask where do I look for thirty wears wisdom found. And we say, look inside your cell, find your passion. You do you, but the U is exactly the thing that has informed. And so, basically, they're looking for a way to find out what to devote their lives to, and we have nothing to say except you do you and wonder life in the twenty s right now is a very hard life because there's no shared sense of this is what is most worth wanting. It is quite hard to picture, what the advice should be. I mean, I don't think we want to go back to the graduate and one word plastic. Right. You know, if is there one word like what, what, what, what is the advice that we should be giving if I had to choose one word it would be commitments that we're not going to go deference to thority, but we can organize our lives around commitment, so that the promises we make each other and being faithful to those promises, and most people graduating from college or high school in the fifteen or twenty years after they're gonna make four big commitments in their lives to spouse and family to a vocation to a philosophy faith into a community and the fulfillment allies will depend on how well they choose execute on those commitments social freedom socks. If political freedom is great and economic freedom is great, but social, freedom, not being committed to other people is just useless. You just the Freeman is the unrecovered man, because he's not committed anything and so you wanna be a plant yourself down on the other side. So. Understand that better because I think I passed some listening to that might say that's a little bit terrifying. You know you I I'm supposed to remain life through commitments. But how do I choose them like a commitment to the scary thing? It it's going to, you know control my life for the next is even even the level of to marry someone commit to a career. So how, how does someone get the point of knowing what to commit to? Well, the truth is the hard part, and then the executing is the second hard part, we have acquired human wisdom on these questions. And so, for example, say the marriages, which I think, is the most important decision. We make marriage is a fifty year conversation. Chew someone you can really talk to for the rest of your life, and you better have purity of communication the second bit of wisdom that I pass along. Choose agreeable nece, avoid eroticism the agreeable kind person may not seem to be the most exciting, but that's really what Horowitz leads to really good marriages, what kind of loved you have. For the person. Is it Phileas which is just friendship is at Aeros just sexual desire, or is it a GOP bay, which is selfless, love, you better have all three kinds of love? And so a motion is the second lens. And then the third lens is the moral lens love is gonna fade rise and fall, but admiration is pretty stable. Do you basically admire this person? And so you can walk through these different lenses and make a good choice. Yeah. I mean, that's plenty of wisdom that you and I both have been divorced. And as possible to think, you know, doing and, and get it wrong and actually find love much later in life as well. Which is what's happened to us? And people always think when I'm thinking about marriage decision. I should ask a lot of questions about the other person, but maybe s some questions about yourself. Are you really ready to do this love? And, and selfishness, don't go together. So are you still too selfish to really be in a loving relationship? There's a great Tim Keller pastor here in town describes what? Happens in a'marriage that about six months into the marriage for year a couple years, you realize that the person you married, who seemed so perfect is actually selfish and all sorts of ways. And as you're making this decision about him or her, she's making this decision, you and so you have two choices you can either have a truce marriage, when she both sort of agree to ignore the selfishness. Or you can say actually, my selfishness is the key problem here. We all have a tendency to think it's the other person's selfishness, but it's only our selfishness that we can really control. And if both partners agree to declare war on their own selfishness, then, you'll probably have a good marriage. I think on the baton has said that. The one of the case and making that decision is finding someone you can figure out how to resolve the inevitable unhappiness with each other that you're going to walk into. Here's a good line that before you're married or living with someone you can live under the illusion that you're easy to live with. And once you're winning someone you realize, I'm actually not easy to live with, like, I'd never shut the drawers. I don't turn off the lights, I've tissues everywhere. And you realize all the ways you are unpleasant to live with. So let's, let's talk about some other of the themes of this, this sort of quest, for meaning because I think a lot of it in the book is, is about reaching out into the community building relationships, and, and the sort of transition of trying to find something that's bigger than you are. What does what does that mean? Well, the, the one that's most engaged me. I think because of our social crises is the lack of community in. And so I've really come to admire people, I call weavers who live. For community. They lift a relationship not for themselves, and there's so many people like that they're Weaver's all around the country. There are movement that doesn't know it's a movement, and I find them inspiring because social change happens when a small group of people find a better way to live and the rest of us copy them. And these weavers have found a better way to live on sometimes they have very bad valley's a woman, I met in Ohio name, Sarah, her husband murdered their kids and himself. And she came home one Sunday evening and found the bodies and I can't imagine the worst thing. And she decided whatever that guy tried to do to me, he's not going to do it. I'm going to lead a life of purpose and meaning she operates in part out of anger that he's not going to ruin my life. And so now she works at a free pharmacy giving way. Pharmaceuticals, she teaches kids. She has a foundation. She leads a life of selfless service and a lot of people I've met around the country last year. And the travels is people who've had something bad happen to them and they're they turn. That into just selflessness and instance, Barrington be around those people. I was in Englewood in Chicago. I was with a woman, and she lived in this neighborhood, which was a tough neighborhood. And she decided she had to move out because it was too dangerous. The day she was moving out. She happened to see two girls playing with broken bottles in an empty lot across the street and she turned to her husband, and she said, we're not leaving we're not going to be just another family abandoned this. And so they unpacked all the boxes and she googled, volunteer Englewood had no idea what to do. And she started volunteering she got on some boards. She created something where the neighbor did watch documentaries together and have conversations. And now she runs up the called rage, which is the, the community organization Englewood, and that, that story is often so telled as this is transformation for the individual, but, but with these, we've is it sounds like it's also transformational for the community that they in fundamentally what they're doing is building connection. Creating pulse abilities for other people listening to other people helping other people find their own weaving capability, I've really come to the conclusion that the neighborhood is the unit of change not the individual. But friend of mine from Shreveport, Louisiana says you can't only clean the part of the swimming pool. You're swimming in, you got to clean the whole pool. So this, this really strikes me as an interesting idea, and perhaps, is the key to the later connection to some of some veal, political thinking, make that case that the neighborhood is the unit of change that one level fundamentally contradicts. The anchoring idea of neoliberalism, which is that it's about the individual that you build a society based on life, liberty the pursuit of happiness. That is really a statement, or it seems to be a statement about individuals and you, you give people as much freedom as they can songs up bump into others. That is how we should think about life. And to say no, we've got something wrong here. The, the UNICEF changes in April. So talk about. That. I do think that's right. We've taken individuals in too far. We've we imagine Uman creatures are these individual utility maximizing creatures motivated by money, says and power, and these weavers are not motivated by any of those things they wanna live by the real things that motivate us, which is to be an right relation with each other, and to serve some ultimate good. And so that's philosophically, the case in the social science terms just take, for example. The work of Raj Chetty, who is a great economist, who was dominating the world these days and what he shows is that the neighborhood you happen to be growing up in is a powerful predictor of how you do in life the neighborhood. So, for example, this is Eric Clinton, Burg's research. There was a heat wave in Chicago to neighbors, one across the street from each other completely identical in one lots of old people died in the heat wave in the other, nobody died. What was the difference when they had a library and the library, people got to meet each other? And if they get made social contact with each other, when it was a heat wave. They checked on the old people and they save their lives in another neighborhood. There was no library that didn't know each other the. Old people died in the heat wave. Presume it wasn't just the libraries. And all I can fix this property going to libraries, libraries, a symptom of a broader set of interest in social success and economic success flow from social, trust, frankly, uh skies. We talked we want to talk about the market and all that stuff. But there's no escaping the realm of the intimate. Because it re if you don't have those intimate connections. You don't have an economy, but the, the challenge with the view that the neighborhood is the unit of, of change. It's hard to know what to do with it. I mean, the neighborhood is a really complex thing. It's depends on local architecture. It depends on the local demographics, it depends on whether they're at church services and others going on. It depends on education. It depends on so many different things. And so you it's just very, very hard for someone to say, this is the fix from that viewpoint. What does it mean to try to make better? Well, there's no silver bullet where recording this. Fourth street. I think if you traveled a half mile west, you get to the neighborhood, where Jane Jacobs lived in the nineteen fifties and sixties the west village in New York City. She wrote this beautiful passage about the street as a ballet that in the morning. The garbage men come through in the then the moms are coming out taking out the trash, then the fruit man comes. And so there's always is on the street, instance organic ballet and that's the beauty of a community. It's like a ballet. It's very dynamic, and it moves or it's like a jungle and what we do as members of that is thick in the jungle and they're million ways to do that. You can invite your neighbors over for dinner, you can mentor a kit. You can set up a place like a dog walking parks where you'll meet people. The number of organic connections are infinite, I heard of a lady in Florida friend of mine matter. And he was he answered you have any time to volunteer. And she said, no, I have no time to volunteer at the moment yester- that question she was helping kids get out of elementary school, and walk across the street. She was sort of a crossing guard, and he said, are you being? Paid. He said, no, I'm not being paid. And he said, what doing after this swan taking food to the hospital for the sick people. And you said, you have any time to volunteer if she said, no, I don't have any time to volunteer and she didn't regard that as well in tearing. That's just what neighbors do. And I think one of the problems we've had in our country is, we've lost the art of neighboring and there certain set of skills norms that neighboring involve transitions when somebody moves in you. Welcome them in, if somebody comes out of prison, you have a ritual to welcome them back into the community, and we've sort of let that all strip away in our desire, for basically accomplishment, because we're so busy, and our desire to put privacy over everything else says that those are the drivers of that, that, just who we raised a generation to believe that they shouldn't they should be focused intently, on their own needs passions and potentials and just didn't encourage all old fashioned. But beautiful ideas like just show up be facade and so stop stop talking about yourself. So right now, I do think I wouldn't say, we raised, I think we're. Part of generation that is that is part of this problem. We've just buffered ourselves from each other partly over fear of intimacy. And so the way you bring it back, sometimes it's through formal organizations, one of the great, we've organizations is called thread in Baltimore. And there's woman named Sarah hamburger who saw lonely kids in Baltimore underperforming kids? So she surrounded them with four sort of mentors were volunteers, and then four more who grandparents, and then twelve more collaborators she built this intimate web of connections around these kids, and in part was to create structure for the kids. Somebody could drive them school. Bring a sandwich. But it was in part, it was to bond the adults with each other. And that's one of the things I notice about the weavers particular it's the radical mutuality where all broken we're all walking through this together as one of them from New Orleans told me, we don't do things for people. We don't do things to people we do things with people. And it's that complete sense of social equality and moral equality that drives these people. And I think they're part of the repair of our country. What if you could transmit your actual symptoms to your doctor online? No matter where you are in the world. The team click hells developed improved medical device that records and simulates muscle activity in consented digitally in near real time. One day, soon patients, and physicians will feel symptoms together leading to better diagnosis and care. It's just one of the ways, we're helping our clients deliver better health outcomes. Learn more about how click brings optimism to life at K L. I C K dot com slash Ted. You've written about how rapidly partisan, we are, and the magnetic ideas of right and left that have helped drive that. And possibly this, this, this idea of the neighborhood, could become a magnetic idea that, that draws people to the Senate talk mcnutt thesis. Well we're engulfed in tribalism right now. And so where does that come from? And it's all over the world, by the way in my view. If you leave human beings, naked and alone, which we've done in a culture of hyper, individuals, they do with their evolutionary roots, tell them to do. They revert to tribe, and tribes seems like community. It's bonding, but it's really the dark twin of community because community is based on mutual affection. Tribalism is based on mutual hatred of some other. And so the tribal mentality always making us them distinctions friend enemy distinctions. It's a scarcity mentality. They're out to take what we've got. It's always a wrecked walls perceived threat distrust, repel, others. And to me it, it comes from this. Loss of any animating idea to bond us together, we started out as a country in the US believing that God was the, the real magnetic idea that America was where God's plan for creation would be realized and then in the nineteenth century nation than American exceptionalism, and all that manifest destiny that this was the holy mission recently. It's been self the liberation of the self. And we as I say, we've sort of run out the string, and now we've got a bunch of paradigms that are competing with each other. I tell him the left at social Justice, the idea that we can defeat systems of oppression. And that's a real magnetic idea on the right? It's the tribe ethnic nationalism. I'm a moderate. And so, I believe the magnetic idea that really should motivate our lives is love your neighbor, building, these communities at the local level at the national level, having a national story, we can all believe in, and that process of love, your neighbors really something you can devote your life to. I mean, a lot of people in both those of the tribes on. Right. And left would would say they also believe in love your neighbor. That's actually what, what drives part of what they do a social Justice. What are they doing other than to look out for the interests of invisible communities and voices? You know, people who've years have not been properly acknowledged, you know, there is power to be redrawn, west. I mean you describe the battlers zero some sort of just a power shift between two different tribes. Why is it different from what you're talking about. Well, first of all, I I'm a moderate. So I think politics is a competition between partial truth. I think most real all real political movements have in central truth that they're grasping. And we're trying to find the balance my problem say with the social Justice warriors is the assumption that life is primarily about conflict that there's a class conflict, there's a racial conflict, and that there tends to be hard differences. If you listen to Bernie Sanders, or Elizabeth Warren, they tend to describe in conflict terms, there's the system of bankers the us versus them the rich versus the people oppression oppression, and I. Fundamentally. I think there's a lot more stupidity than oppression in the world. And a lot of our problems are just caused by stupidity. There's a lot of greed to don't want to minimize that. But I think I do think that we do not live in zero sum world. I don't think we live in a world where conflict is the necessity. I'm an American whig party that died. But I, I believe there's a fundamental unity to American. I mean, some people listening will say if come on, you know, he'll be out to white guys talking about this, you wouldn't even see it if you haven't seen what others have seen for their whole lives, is there an argument that I mean, the truth in, in some of the anchoring ideas that, that motivate the, you know, the that Dreyfuss social Justice? Would you argue that part of the problem is that the, the very language and the sort of the animation behind that effort doesn't give any choice either side other than to engage in the push? There is no talk about possibility about how how to sort of build something outside. Side that would create more possibility. It, it does become, it's essentially a battle for power between different tribes sometimes. But what kind of power? I mean, the civil rights woman, Martin Luther King, and Bayard, Rushton and Phillip Randolph, they believed in the power of love, and they'd be leaving the power of organizing and they believed in the power of redemptive. Love king has a famous passage where he says, you, you aggressively throw love people and you love your enemies and it, I, they'll hate you, and they'll fight back. But eventually, they'll crack under the power of your love. Because you're power of love has the power to illuminate. What's good, and what's evil? And so they believed in that redemptive power info saw as a tough minded virtue, Dietrich von Hoffer was fighting the Nazis in World War. Two he the exact same philosophy. Gandhi, a lot of the people actually believe in social change. And we're in some ways the toughest the idea of the beloved community is a king idea. What's the fundamental difference between his approach Martin Luther King Jaas, approach and social Justice as today, and you'll view he always extended the Cirque? Of care. I would say that, that would be the, the thing he did he extended the circle of care, and he believed we're all God's children, and he had a radical hopefulness I, there was a Franken the religious foundation at the same time he had a deep awareness of sin. There's a good book called a stone of hope which compares the, the northern white civil rights woman to the southern black prophetic tradition. And the northern white was like, oh, we just educate people. They'll see the segregation was wrong. And the southern prophetic tradition was like sin Israel in the world. And we really have to force them to confront their own sinfulness. We really have to take the battle right to them. So it was aggressive as completely aggressive, but it was aggressive in a loving manner in a way that you don't corrupt yourself and turn yourself into the mirror image of hate and prejudice. The sin wasn't perceived to be only in the enemy, as well. You know, outside is it was also believed to be within right? And if you take seriously. You see it as a common thing that radiates will go back to an idea. We earlier discussed the neighborhood is a unit of change. So the sin of slavery, the sin of discrimination is not just an individual in. It's a national sin is a sin that radiates outwards and affects all sorts of things across our society and tough measures to be taken against that I've recently been convinced that reparations is the right policy as a way to really dive into an acknowledged that sinfulness really as a sign of respect to those who have suffered under that well coming from you, that will surprise some people, I know. Well, I believe me, I never thought I would get there. So this is really interesting to me tell me more about the leash of your thinking on this. Well, a few years ago, Tallahassee coats wrote a famous views for the land called the case for reparations. And I read it learning a lot about the red lining and some of the discriminatory housing policies. But ultimately saying that the idea of reparation seems completely unworkable like how do we find out who was in the Senate of an African slave who was not supposed to? Give money to Oprah Winfrey. And LeBron James is it a matter of writing checks? And so the whole thing seems wrong because so many Americans have no history in their family of perpetrating slavery. Maybe they're immigrants came, it seemed like completely impractical idea, but over time as I've seen the crisis grow, I've seen cited divide. I've seen our politics over line with our racial divisions, which seems to me poisonous dangerous. And we've seen the rise of white ethnic nationalism is sort of radicalized my view. And I don't think reparations should be guilt payment from white people to black people. I think it should be a sign of respect for all the pain and suffering that has been inflicted through discrimination through slavery, and it should be a process of coming together to figure this out, and as coach writes in that essay, the very process of having this conversation is a way to show their respects who knowledge wounds and a way to acknowledge that collectively, this has been great sin, and it's the great radiating. That is polluted a lot of our society. And it's the sort of gesture that could at least get us over to the other side, where we can have a different conversation been around the country, talking that weavers. I've seen a this is a maker break moment on race. A really could come to think that the election, Trump will the rest be there's just so much anger, so many conversations. I've had and of course, we're all aware of it intellectually, but when you spend your, your days, having dinner with folks in South Carolina, or wherever Chicago Norrland's, and you see the level of not just indignation. But pessimism, I was with a woman in South Carolina who said she's an older woman. She said, I grew up in nineteen Fifty-three. It's worse for young African American kids in my neighbor was when I grow up, and when you see that level of pessimism that level of disenchantment at the same time you have the Trump election, and you have really are political divides overlapping with our racial divides, you come to the conclusion, something unusual needs to be done and that. It was my conclusion. On the riot. They might also say, don't talk to me about this, this community being the solution. The Senate all hope point is about community. You know, we are a community that has not been listened to properly. We believe passionately, and you know, the American that we remember love and miss, and whatever, and it's and it's all about communities. So what are they missing? Yeah. Well, I would say the say evangelical Christians on the right they have community, but they also have a siege mentality a mentality that they're completely under assault, which I think, is exaggerated. And when once you have a siege mentality once it's us them once it's tribal, you're willing to tolerate a leader who violates all your principles, which is what they've done in signing up to Donald Trump. You also on the right had a unorthodoxy, which was economically free market, which actually undermined community and I was William Buckley's. He was my mentor. Or and Nash review in the days, we had a sort of a tension between the real Milton Friedman free market conservatives and the social conservatives. But by the time Reagan came along, and let alone, Paul Ryan, the individualists had one, and so it became all corporate free market, and the idea that there was any social cohesion that was being ripped apart, by the free market, that all was given lip service, but no real message and conservatism drifted off into this hyper individualism, which has left us in part where we were and free market economics doesn't give you away to moralize the market, where moral creatures. And if you put us in an amoral system, we will rebel, and that sort of what's happening now. And I think what young conservatives are doing is trying to find that thing that moral market, that sense that capitalism's great. But we've got to put it within social constraints. But when you think about community, is it? What would you say to someone who said, I believe, in community, but I also believe this that you see that community depends on to some. Intent on on deep roots of tradition. You cannot throw in bring in a very short period of time, huge numbers of outsiders with different cultural and other assumptions and jam them in the same space and expect things to go. Well, is that a reasonable point of view? No, you know, we're in lower Manhattan. If you walk. Half mile southeast where we're sitting you'll pass where my grandfather had a kosher. Butcher shop. You will pass where my grandfather had a law firm, you will pass where my mother and father, both grew up where I grew up. And right now where my son is in college. So that's five generations. And when you go back and look through this neighborhood in, when my grandfather wants, he wrote me, a map of the neighborhood lower Manhattan, and there were finished buildings that were German buildings. They were bohemian buildings there were Russian buildings. This all seems incredibly polyglot and multicultural of time, and it had tensions. I mean, if you walked by wrong building the wrong day, kids, with Roxette you, but we, it was a creative tension two million. It was something we could handle and the vision of America as universal nation was realized in some large measure, and I think that's still happening today. I was in Nebraska yesterday and had dinner with about fifteen folks in the bresca. There were all white, except one Latino woman who was a small business owner in their small town. And she said, I never had home, I had to leave home when I was fourteen but you people have given me a home and I love you for the way you made me feel. And in the last few years, I've just had to turn off Twitter because I don't want to see what you like on social media. She does not want to know their opinions on immigration policy. She just wants to know them as human beings and human beings. They get along when they start talking about Donald Trump, they get into trouble. And so they try not to talk about. But it still seems to me that there's an art to how communities can embrace, and bring in outsiders, and there's, there's a huge difference between that feeling of people coming in, you know, on, on our terms and answer. The welcome by says opposed to suddenly huge numbers of, of people who don't look like you and, and don't talk like you arrive. And, you know, create that sort of feeding banks. Isn't it possible that the global capitalists, you know, who just believe that opened up everything, make everything free, whatever they've been naive about humans ability to adapt to change that, that rapid in that dramatic? Well, there's clearly tensions, but, you know, every once in a while this is happening. I mean, probably six times last four or five years, I said to myself, you know, I'm going to write a column where I admit that immigration is really complex, and that it's economically very mixed bag and hurts people from low wage jobs, and then I look at the data and I just don't find it there. I, I find that immigration boost growth. It doesn't actually have much cut into the wages of low wage jobs, 'cause it pushes other people earlier inhabitants up the wage scale up the job scale. And so it I just don't find evidence to argue that it's a this thing that is really sucking down the lower middle-class, put these together a bit more because, I mean, this, this is quite wide feeling right now that, you know, politics is broken to some extent capitalism. Seems broken. It says that of, you know, lots of jobs, lost lots of inequality. There's there's just a lot of unease with the, the kind of comfortable sense of twenty thirty years ago of, oh, you know, end of history, you know, we figured out how to run societies how, like how much we need for like a radically different political story, perhaps one based around you'll put with community somehow at the center of it. Or is it best to think I mean, you're a conservative in general, you, you don't believe in is radical changes like Tinca gently? And Kathleen Ryan. Yes. Yes. So how so that you're sitting with what, what actually is in some ways quite a radical idea of this. This magnetic idea the sentence of how how should we think about politics right now? What even even something as basic as the left right spectrum seems to be shifting before our eyes. I thought I knew what that was. And I, I don't think I know what it is now so much. How how do you see things now? And where do you hope they go so somewhere in the book, I mentioned a series of change, which is ratchet hatchet pivot ratchet. So we face a common set of problems World War, Two the depression, whatever we create a culture to fix it. And we do that collectively, and we ratchet up where we move upward and that culture works for a while, and then it stops working, and then you have to hatch it up. You have to chop it up, and those are moments of paradigm shift when everything is in. Uproar and nine hundred sixty eight was such a moment. Eighteen forty eight was such a moment. Probably nineteen o five and now such a moment where chopping it all up. And in those moments when you're shopping up the old paradigm it can seem really messy, but I have faith in human ingenuity that will figure it out, and we'll pivot over and then we'll ratchet up again. So, and so I do think that our, our core problem right now is social isolation and social fragmentation loss of trust loss of social capital. And if we built a society based on our affections, and I always get in gooey, because it real that is the real stuff, one or affections that bind us, they're sort of four things. There's our kids, we rally around our kids. And so if we had a set of policies to help kids have early childhood education in their family partnerships and better schooling and better training. That's something we can all agree on second. We rally around our work our ability to give to each other through work. And if we had a set of policies that were about training about community colleges about way. Wage subsidies that would lend dignity to work. That's something else, we could rally around third, we rally around a story communities, a group of people share a single story. And we as Americans have lost our story we had a story, but it was sort of the white male story of American exceptionalism, we'd into new story that includes all the voices who are here. And so telling that common stories the third thing and then I, I think are just love for each other is the final just creating those neighborhood bonds that lead to national bonds. Have you seen any blade is adopting, some of this thinking like is this just going to be subjects that Collins fears to come out might the country and not just this country other countries and change in response, some of this thinking the rubber Putnam has a theory, which I agree with her. Unless I learned from him, which is, he looked at moments of social change big change, and so eight hundred nine hundred nineteen ten was such a moment, and it was a period, when we had big wave of. Ration- big economic transition. A lot of political corruption, and he said, how to change happens. He said, I had happened culturally, the social gospel movement replace social Darwinism. So very individualistic ethos was replaced by communitarian ethos second year to civic renaissance. You saw the creation of the boys and girls clubs wasn't girl scouts the temperance movement. The settlement house women and WC p unions germinal movement. And then later, you had the progressive movement, a political movement. So when cultural change, civic change political change, and to me, that's probably the right sequence. And we're, I think we're gonna cultural change moment, where certainly in a civic renaissance, so many people are starting new organizations to we've people together, the political chains, I live near Capitol Hill, and that I don't see it, but that'll come last after we fix the society and the ideas, give us some sense of what it feels like on the inside of being a Republican who is not in love with the president. It wasn't that bumpy. I really didn't. Lose a lot of my friends, I you know, if you look at my resume I worked at the Wall Street Journal editorial page, I worked in Nashville, I works for the weekly standard. I worked at the Washington Times, I've sort of done, the whole thing, the Hoover Institution Stanford, and, but I would say most of my friends are all never-trumpers, and I think we shared a certain ethos of what conservatives men, one of them, by the way, was that it politics is a limited activity that what really matters is his, his character relationships and things like that. And so it was beyond the pale for us to get involved with a guy like Trump, who was violates every moral norm. You can think of and second, frankly, and I'm not sure those unlawful on here this, but I spent a lot of time in conservative circles. I live in New York and DC. And so I spent a lot of time in liberal circles, I would say, I heard more condescending racial language in my progressive circles than my conservative circles. Like what people talk about white supremacists casualty without. No, not even that. But just sort of patronizing attitudes toward African rackets and other minorities. And. Sort of bigotry of low expectations as George W Bush, call it. And I think for a lot of us, at least on my kind of conservatism Trump's appeals to race were unsupportable. It was that was just no matter what else he said that was beyond the pale and could be someplace, we could never go. And so it's been awkward and for a lot of people whose policy ideas, find a natural home in the Republican party. It's not clear what's going to happen, because the Republican party, I don't think is not going back to it was, and it may be caught up in Trumpian ISM for a good while to come. An I'll just speak for myself, just feel homeless politically homeless. I'm I, I actually like Elizabeth Warren personally, but I'll never agree with her ideas. I could never support the current Republican party. So what do I do? I don't know. There's that Starbucks guy, but I'm not sure he has an idea either. But that, that must be profoundly depressing, though. Right. Like that. That doesn't sound like UC. A particular way forward for someone or, or less like a party, you can actually, execute and do something less. It's the centrist democrat than you'll feeling but because I'm conservative, I believe all the things you've been Hartson door fewer those that kings can cause incur-. So most of life is not political. Most of life is moral social relational. And so that's why I wrote a book on relationships because I think that's where the real action is. And that's how we can really make big improvements in our lives and the lives around us. Let's actually explode that for that because it's an easy thing to say and I actually happened to agree that so well at the pieces of attack onto that is that a lot of what shapes history is scientific and technological space is people who engage in the art of changing. What is possible? It's, it's, it's changing if you like the shape of the adjacent possible, but that is in flat contradiction to every media agenda. The entire front page of every newspaper in the first hour of every cable show is all in the politics of the moment. It's, it's incremental who, who did, what that was outrageous. This time, just how angry are they house countless? Is it those no expirations other stuff? So the implication of your view is that most of media is missing the most interesting conversation, south that for sure that's zillion times. True. I mean a guy say we're over politicized under moralizing under cultural is under technologies. You know I go to Ted periodically and you get to see Sergei Brin. You see people who literally will be known three hundred years when we look back on certain decades eighteen nineties eighteen eighties. How many decades do we think the political leaders were the most important thing in that decade, nineteen twenties? Now is the culture of the flappers in the, the nineteen thirties was depression, but it was also the rise of Hollywood in the nineteen fifties. It was like James Dean, the MVP. Beginning today in the nineteen nineties, clearly, it'll be Silicon Valley. Maybe even today if I often tell young people if I were starting my career I'd look into genetics. I looked at by tonight's that's clearly where the action is going to be. But we like to cover things that have press conferences. It's easier and then at the moment, we're all caught up in the national soap opera of Donald Trump's brain. And if you want to write a column that will get a lot of us, he write about how bad Donald Trump is, and readers and viewers seem to have a limitless appetite for that. But I do think it's just a gigantic distraction to what's actually shaping and what's actually happening in America. I mean, that's the riddle that plays out in quite a painful way across all social media online has there appears to be a frustration gap between humans natural tension magnets. And what might be healthy for the for the coach, we've discovered, what Rupert Murdoch because now for a long time, the, you know, the, the way to harvest, lots and lots of attention, lots of eyeballs. Is to, you know, showcase strong opinion. Anger outrage drama, reason, does not play is a winner, and I found I can't Twitter about sacrificial love doesn't get a of tweets. There's an accent, which people are embarrassed to have the conversation in, in public. I think it's in a sentence, multiple people will be there right now. You know, sort of finding that the tweet about how, you know, which part of this, they want to. They want to mock. It's, it's just the, the most of high-minded is the way. But, you know, the most sincere earnest any conversation games. The more people want to take the piss like, is there any scenario future, where it actually becomes cool to talk about uplifting material I think it is for ninety percent of the people, but there are ten percent of the markers out there. And I found that when my columns have generated the most vicious response, it's because I admitted some vulnerability something I did wrong. And there's something about Volmer ability that wants gets a lot of people to say, okay, you're really being you're not just some pundit blowhard. But there's another group that vulnerability enrages them and they see it as a chance to pounce. And so the courage to be vulnerable is one of the kief courage is of our time. I mentioned this group thread, there's woman who sits on the board and her dad beater when she was a kid and until she was in thread. She didn't tell that story anybody because it would be vulnerable in make people uncomfortable. But she got in this group that were, they have an ethos of, as they say, you will show all the way up. You will call thing thing you'll be brutally honest and vulnerable. And so she told the story to thread, and then she told her to family, and then she allowed me to put her writing in my book, and that's a act of great courage. And with that act of courage, you create combustion. You create emotional combustion, and that's how communities are formed. And so, I think most of us know that, but there's a group of people who are not weavers of society who are rippers of society. And when they see vulnerability they see a chance to pounce and destroy, and I don't know what they're acting out of. But it is a fact, but that doesn't mean you st- vulnerability should be stopped Rene Brown woman. I don't know. But admire she's written a lot about vulnerability. And I think she's correctly identified the key. Rate of our age. Yes, she had a memorable tedtalk has that she wanted the most beautiful of all time and the idea that she will resonate with people that, there are a lot of people, I think who holding tension and by being given permission to be fallen Rable, it actually is, is, is a big deal for them. And that is how relationship is built, it's one person vulnerable the other matches their, their ability and then offers. And then it's a series of gradual deepening. Entrusting gestures. I mean, the question for me is the in these stories are inspiring. How scalable is this is a world where enough people, you know, look around the life isn't very good. I could do something. Let's do this and actually moves the dollar in a way that, you know, for example, reverses, the current suicide rates and all the other miserable things that, that are happening. Do you think it's scalable? Yeah. So here's the theory of change for my project was skull weave the social fabric project. It is that relationships are the key to restoring society, but. Relationships don't scale 'cause they're built one on one and they take time. But norm scale if you can shift the norms of a culture how we should behave in the world, then you can really have a big change. And these weavers are a movement that doesn't know it's a movement. They're all out there. They don't know their common values. They don't know. They're all part of one big thing, and we just try to lift them up and say, you actually are one thing. And if we can unify and create some hubs then we can have a big effect. I mean, is there any political policy that could further empower and inspire more people to join that movement? You know, the politics I as I said comes last. I'm there are things I would do one thing I would do is I would I would take the charitable tax credit, and I would make it possible as a refundable credit for people were not making enough to really itemize deductions. It's really encouraged charitable giving up and down the income stream or at least rewarded the giving is already happening, as you know, poor people give a higher percentage of their income, and rich people, and I would just get you get. Deduction, even if you're not paying tax, get basically the type credit and he gets refund and so there are things I would do I do think it's also important to devolve power. I think devolving power out of Washington, and giving people actual local control is a way to really get them active in their community. I was in as I say Nebraska yesterday and Nebraska's weird because it's a state without too many people, but it's got ninety three counties and some of the county's only have seven or eight hundred people in them. But they've still got a school board. They still got a water council. So everybody basically has to get involved in government, because there are so many jobs in to get done. And I think it's very good for Nebraska, that people are really involved, but one of the things that I think every community in the world today, every physical real community anchored, in place is probably facing as these new massive competitive of people's attention and time, aka technology, and it's different different forms. I mean net flicks is kind of also the internet and. Title full of unbelievably powerful addictions, attractions and ways to spend time and including the offer apparently of community and, and so seventy people are actually shifting the sort of that potential to form communities to online efforts that Facebook, friends, etc, etc. Is that part of what's happened? I would when you talk about the desire to find a parent community emphasize the word apparent, you know, the the seventy percent rise in teenage suicide rate correlates pretty well with the rise of the smartphone. And so it's an apparent community, but it's also community that's can be comparative and doesn't really satisfy people. So this is something you appreciate probably more than any other even being on earth. We have now at least screens, and we can sit at home and watch YouTube. So what's taken off in the last ten years, the conference business, people want to be together. They wanna be in a room together and experience something face to face body to body. And emotion emotion a surprisingly under appreciated. Senses, our sense of smell when we're around each other, we're constantly taking each other's for moans and other things. We, we were there communicating in a way. We're not conscious of, and so I would say people, you know, in every neighbor, I go to brunches become the new church. And so people really need to be in direct contact with each other, and they need to have local contexts, and so the net flicks and all that stuff is great. But I don't think there's anybody who really thinks that of fulfilling life and spend watching game of thrones. The part of the problem is that people have to think at people's reflective minds can know that that's the best thing. But in the moment, the power of a lot of these magnets, is pretty intense. Is that people just people may not say this is what I wanted to do. But people addicted, whether it's technology, or to opioids or to whatever it is, these addictions have have a pretty toxic effect. Yeah, the ancient word is idolatry, so we idolize certain things that we think, will give us. Ultimate satisfaction. Sometimes it's alcohol, sometimes. It's opioids. Sometimes it's Twitter. And the thing about idolatry at the beginning. It feels great it, it asks for nothing and gives you everything the first drink of the martinis tastes, great at the end of dollar tree. It gives you nothing and ask for everything alcoholism, totally takes over your life, and I think that's true of the smartphone. And we're, we've got this new technology that at the beginning, we thought, oh, it's gonna make everything, great, we'll communicate. And they'll were a little be peaceful. Now we've realized that's the opposite of the truth because we had unrealistic view of human nature. And we've also learned that these are tools, and if you look for a tool like a bus to get you from one place to another. That's fine. If you look for to give yourself, meaning that's a mistake. And we've learned that our smartphones and the rest of the technology has to be controlled, and we've got a create rules around it. So now, what you're watching is all across America. Parents figuring out I've gotta limit screen time. I've got limit screen time, what rules do I place and we're figuring out how to use the technology I've basic faith. In a again are Billy to figure stuff out. We'll figure out how to use technology. So it doesn't destroy us support of the camera back and look how country in the world where where are you David on the pessimism optimism spectrum, and why the I'm a long-term optimism when I was in the nineteen ninety s I covered Europe and sort of that part of the world. And I covered a bunch of great events covered the profile Berlin Wall. German reunification the end of the Soviet Union Mandela coming out of prison in South Africa, the Oslo peace process in the Middle East, and it seemed like barriers coming down, and liberal democracy was going to triumph the past twenty five years have been seen the rise of ethnic nationalism. The rise of authoritarianism the rise of tribalism. And so that has been the great negative trend of last few decades. But as I say, I do think you and beings figure stuff out, and I do think culture's shift cultures collective response to the problems of the moment. And most of the people, I visit with on the left and right. Don't wanna live in an era. Era of tribal warfare. They just don't like it even Washington. That's true. And so, I have to feel that we have the ability to create an alternative future, not based on try but based on commitments to one another. I actually love that the Ford's people figure stuff out. But people say that is outside must of the discussion. I must've discussion we have is, is sort of Dorning, realization of how awful some new trend or whatever is, and it feels of well-meaning to most people and our normal response is just to either change the subject to carry it feel sick about it. And we actually get annoyed with people who say, you know, I think we might be able to solve that it's like don't be so silly. And yet, if there is to be any hope that that's kind of the only thing we can believe it won't it won't sort itself out. And so I kind of love that mindset of. Yeah. Live with the problem for a bit. And then just say, well, what, what would it look like if people were to figure it out does that have to be on a giant leap? Can it be done piecemeal, who the people who might do that? Maybe those people should be on the front page of the newspaper from time to time they often on a not just that they're ignored after. Right. And one of the good moments for me. Was I looked back through the social science and the big public intellectual literature of the past hundred years, and every decade people were to pessimistic? It was always the decline of this, and the decline of that, and the end of this, and the end of that, and you look back like they were complaining the nineteen fifties things were okay. And when you in retrospect, most of the, the cataclysms never come to pass, we in the public and actual business are cataclysmic because wins us attention. And because we genuinely want to draw attention to problems. But if you look at the balance of our history, it's the story of people suffering through things, and then figuring it out, and that was true of the civil war, which was more tumultuous period than our own. It was true of World War, Two, the great depression. These were all worst periods in our own. What decade exactly when people want to go back to I wouldn't want to go back to any of them. So, I think our problems are severe and global warming and things are really severe, but I'd rather have our problems than almost any other decades problems. One of the things, I think about a lot, and I haven't really taken the sought very far, is that I, we've spent a lotta time all of us in our business thinking about decision, making, and cognitive biases and your Ristic's and the work of Danny continent and over the last thirty years we've learned so much about that. And just how the how we do decisions are the next. Big frontier seems to me is desire, what our motivations where do our desires. Come from how come I can't force myself to love, clams, where where where does that desire come from? And so to me knowledge is now plentiful but motivation is scarce. And so figuring out what motivates people is really the next frontier of understanding ourselves what our desires, what will motivate people to make change. Is it the? The that the assumption of a lot of activists is that the, it's you have to really turn up the level of concern you have to scare the frog to leap out of the nearly boiling, pardon otherwise it will just fester there. But others believe it can't just be that, that you have to if if that's pushed too far. You have no reason to anything at some mixture of a belief that a solution can be found coupled with that. I has anyone research seems to be that such an important topic because, because I mean, the future of our species kind of hangs on us, collectively generating the conditions, what by enough people get off their asses and start to tinker around and fix things in the I'm not sure I've seen data on that I read philosophy about it. And so if I wanted to motivate people to do 'cause I would say, if you join this, you can get really close to people most of our thinking is not for truth. Finding most of our thinking for social bonding. We think the things will get us like. And so if I mean global warming, you know, one of the opportunities that when one of the burdens is it's, it's a collective from. We have to self together. And so to me, it is the, the, the specter in the hope that this is the problem around, which we can build a global community and go back to the bible. This is Rabbi Jonathan sacks point the book of exodus has hundreds and hundreds of verses on the building of the tabernacle. Why do they have hundreds of verses around this building this little structure? It's because a community is a group of people who build something together, Sex's book is called the home, we build together. So dealing with global warming is the Project UNIFY us, that seems to me the hope and that's really, what motivates people still want to be with each other on your end Jenny do feel your halfway up peel, a second team. Do you feel like you all finding meaning and, and has it brought you happiness? I feel I've been through the valley, and I at least know what to look for. I know what desires are the best desires. And I, I try to live. Even though I'm a newspaper columnist at the level of the heart and the soul. And I I've been taught a distinction between happiness and joy. And I shoot for joy and so happiness is when you win a victory, and it's about the expansion of self. You got a promotion, your team wins the Super Bowl. Joy is about the transcendence of self when you forget about yourself, and it's when you're dancing with others, and you lose yourself. It's a mother and daughter in communion with each other. It's when you're with your crowd, and you forget all about yourself. And to me the highest thing shoot foreign life is moral joy when you're serving a cause and you care about it so much. You're not thinking about yourself at all. And so leading the self slip away is what I'm shooting for in life, and I don't always get there. In fact, I never get through. I never spent a whole day, but it's when I'm shooting for, I mean, we're not my column comes out, I always check to see how to do it was it popular. It was not popular. That's something I should never do, but I'm stuck with myself, but the moments when you forget can forget yourself. And lose yourself in a cause those, the people I see who radiate moral. Joy, they're not at stake. They're not thinking about themselves. They're living a life at January's for others. A nice guy was Mossel, everybody's sort of selfish, which sort of true, but I've seen it so many times, these weavers they literally live for others, and they radiate joy. I mean, speaking of equips, it is weird that people who live for other seem to get joy from. It's not clear to me. Why edition with allow that? Yeah, I mean, the theory would be we didn't survive because we're really strong or fast, we survived, because we're really good cooperation. And the first time the Tigers came to get us they ate us. But the second time we figured out ways to fight them off. But if that was, so you would think that people would know that being generous would give them joy. I don't know that they think they don't even think about it, and it's not on the menu of possibility to to really focus a huge effort. Right. They will. I were supremely broken. But we're also splendidly into how we have both things, but I would say our culture has messed us up. You know the word altruism was only invented a few centuries ago. Once we invented the concept that you in beings are basically selfish than we had to invent a word for when they pave nicely. But before that being terrific wasn't odd. It was just what you did. It was part of your community, and we in America, are the most individualistic were often the extreme, and we have a social science model that says we're all basically self interested, which I think is partially or largely untrue. So I like to ask everyone who comes on this podcast, if they could implant when idea in everyone out there, what would that idea be what I notice in between I mountain people in second bound, people is those who have fallen into themselves that we will sort of grow life, leading the ego level. At what why and what the world thinks about me, I want people to like me. I want to be well thought of it wanted to be mired. I want to win victories. But at the. Crucial moment of life. You realize those are not the important things you fall into yourself and you really live at the level of your heart, which is yours for fusion with others in the level of your soul, which learns for fusion with some ultimate good and people who've taken the bigger journey of life have fallen into themselves, and they've discovered the substrate the lowest level of themselves where they find an illimitable ability to care. I've a friend who I quote in the book, she said, when my daughter was born I realized I loved her more than ever Lucien required. There's a level of love and care. That is just completely human in that level of love and care there. That's where our dignity is found this a beautiful line. Well, David Brooks has been amazing conversation. Charted individual dreams, and the face of the country, the planet, etc. I've loved every minute. Thank you. It's been a great honor. Thank you, Chris. David Brooks is a New York Times columnist and the author of full books, including the second mountain the quest for more life to listen to David's TED talks. Visit Ted dot com. This week's show was produced by Meghan tan production manager is Roxanne, high mix engineer David Heymann, the music is by Alison Leitch Brown special, thanks to my colleague, Michelle Quinton. If you like this show, please, share it with someone else was curious and consider rating and reviewing us on itunes or wherever you listen to podcasts. I'm Chris Anderson. Thanks so much for listening. On the next episode feeding AI research, a investor with a Kaifu Lee. We talk about some of the amazing developments happening in China and the possible implications for the future of work for all of us. I will be able to do most of the jobs of forty percent of the people, so I worry are we going to be able to shift fast enough and prepare for this future world in which the routine jobs, are this place.

Donald Trump Chicago Abraham David Manhattan America New York Times David Brooks Senate Ted speaker Englewood Republican party partner Elizabeth Warren Sarah hamburger Paul Tillich Chris Anderson
Was the Nuclear Family a Mistake?

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Was the Nuclear Family a Mistake?

"There's nothing has been more devastating for culture than the breakdown of the family. But what do we mean by family for the Call Center John Stonestreet? This is break point. New York Times columnist David Brooks made waves last week with an essay published in the Atlantic. Brooks's point is simple. What we call the nuclear family mother father and their two and a half children often in a suburban home with a single income is an invention of the twentieth century. It's not what the family look like for most of history instead writes brooks humans have typically existed in multi generational networks have grandparents aunts uncles cousins. Supporting one another. It's the extended family. He argues that is the natural family now. The key here is context. Brooks admits that the nuclear family has always existed but without an extended circle relatives. He thinks it's unstable and history seems to back him up the nineteen fifties he writes where the high watermark of the nuclear family but as the fifties economy and mass unionization became things of the past nuclear families fragmented into ever smaller forms with single parent homes. Now being the most common among the important points made by Brooks is that certainly by the time. American culture had absorbed the full impact of the sexual revolution the American family had already been substantially transformed by industrialization and other forces of modernity not least of which the widespread separation of work from home. Unfortunately the title of Brooks's essay in the Atlantic is well terrible to lead with the nuclear family was a mistake muddies. The waters even Muddier as brooks suggestion that alternative forms of Kenya which he calls chosen families can be legitimate replacements for the nuclear family with the only criteria for their success being that their chosen and so he praises networks of shared parenting in such places like African American neighborhoods with low rates of fatherhood also same sex and poly-amorous arrangements and LGBTQ communities even groups of friends living together to support one. And what Brooks Mrs? Is that all of these? Things are attempts to mitigate situations caused when families break but they're not replacements as noble as some of these attempts are the outcomes for those involved in chosen families especially outcomes related to the long term health and wellbeing of children are consistently worse than they are for those nuclear families critiquing. Brooks Essay at the Bulwark. Mona Charen reminds us. That family including external families are still built on marriages. A family is more than a mere social construct. It cannot be whatever we make it or want it to be. It's founded. She writes on human nature and biology including the unique bond that ties parents and children. And a symposium at the Institute for Family Studies others point out that chose and families that brooks praises are often far less stable than even the isolated nuclear family that he's critiquing in the essay in particular the statistics on abuse and neglect. And those contacts are alarming. Where Brooks's right is that a mom and a dad and a couple of kids are not the family. Most people throughout history have known and that forces them modernity have isolated the nuclear family arrangement away from extended families and other social networks. That were once normal and that can support them. Another way to say this is marriage is hard and parenting is hard and grandparents aunts and uncles cousins and other extended family members are really helpful. Their presence used to be far more common in the past than it is now. Andrew Walker's response to Brooks Essay. Makes the very important point that what Brooks is looking for an so-called and families already exist and another institution one? That's been around for a couple thousand years. The church Jesus didn't start the church to replace biological families and what other social institution can offer the love supporting community that can help hold a household together so the reality to which Brooks points is a marvelous opportunity for the church to be the agent of restoration. That Christ has saved it to be still brooks's wrong to suggest that love can dispense with biology. The natural family is built around biological realities like male and female and procreation and it's therefore as irreputable as gravity as books like Mary abor stats recent primal scream clearly document. The last several decades of ignoring this design has brought devastating consequences for breakpoint. I'm John Stonestreet.

David Brooks Brooks Essay Brooks Mrs Institute for Family Studies John Stonestreet Mona Charen Atlantic New York Times Kenya Andrew Walker Muddier thousand years
The Isolation of the Elderly

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:39 min | 11 months ago

The Isolation of the Elderly

"We already know social isolation the nuclear family. But we're painfully learning the elderly. Have even more to lose the Colson Center. I'm John Stonestreet. This is break point. Couple years ago I came across a strange story out of Japan and Bloomberg BusinessWeek Dozens of elderly women at turned out admitted to crimes of petty theft. In the hopes of going to prison. There are always people around. One of the inmates told a reporter. I don't feel lonely here. I remember this heartbreaking story a few weeks ago when the Atlantic Publish David Brooks latest piece about their nuclear family. Brooks argued that the nuclear family as we define it now with mom dad and kids often isolated from extended. Family was not the norm for most of human history are fragmenting into smaller and smaller. Even isolated family unit has heard us. He said much brooks piece as well as the significant volume of responses that it triggered focused on the challenges of raising children without extended families unmentioned but just as much at stake is what the elderly population has to lose in these new modern arrangements. After all it is one of the largest generations in modern American history. The baby boomer's that make up today's elderly. With far more boomers there are genetic. The math just isn't working out. Who's going to care for them? The lack of a clear answer to that question explains a whole range of strain heartbreaking stories like the fever grandma's in Japan or the increasing number of elderly people who die alone at home and aren't discovered for days or even weeks or tech companies betting on a profitable opportunity in artificial intelligence that can keep the elderly company according to the last census. Nearly eleven million Americans over sixty-five live alone. Another California study found that forty three percent of all senior surveyed suffered from loneliness whether or not they lived alone. Loneliness is especially hard on seniors a seven-year UK study found that. The lack of social contact leads to an early death regardless of participants underlying health issues because loneliness is linked to such things as high blood pressure. Obesity heart disease weakened immune system depression anxiety. Cognitive decline in Alzheimer's still are loneliness. Epidemic is even more a cultural problem than a math problem after all the generation whose parents are now aging came of age themselves. The Roe v Wade era will have to come to terms with what legally treating inconvenient lives as disposable will do to our cultural consciousness beyond the taking of innocent life. Legalized monetize and popularized abortion. Kills a culture sense of what life is even four? Inevitably life post row is too often evaluated not in terms of its own dignity but in terms of some sort of self satisfaction bottom line. It's not hard to see where this slippery slope leads. Suddenly were toying with genocide against babies with down syndrome. Suddenly were exploring assisted suicide and euthanasia. Not only for the sick but also the uncomfortable and the depressed the criteria for so called acceptable and even desirable death gross thin. It's that world that culture that group of people that's forced to deal with the growing number of isolated elderly. All of us grow less autonomous and more needy with age words like inconvenient and burden were used for decades to justify legalized abortion are now being used for others as Chuck. Colson warned a world view. That says we weren't made on purpose but happened by accident ends with the conclusion that life is beautiful anymore. Rather it's a numbers game that favors the strongest and the wealthiest now. The good news is the body of Christ has with the larger world needs if it is to find a way to care for its aging population the knowledge that all life is beautiful and valuable. Even if it's vulnerable we'll have to say that over and over and over and we'll have to live it out too. There shouldn't be a nursing home in the country not flooded with Christian neighbors during visiting hours on that foundation we can develop plans for our aging parents that holds them as integral members of our families not distant obligations. We must innovate ever better. Palliative care and the church must become the leading place in the world where multi relationships are both fostered and celebrated our kids after all are watching and one day. They'll have to decide how much of a burden we are to them for breakpoint. I'm John Stonestreet.

Alzheimer John Stonestreet Family Colson Center Japan David Brooks social isolation Colson Bloomberg reporter Atlantic heart disease theft Epidemic California fever down syndrome Chuck
1531: Yes Is the New No by Ira Israel on How to Slow Down Life & Create More Meaningful Connections

Optimal Living Daily

07:58 min | 1 year ago

1531: Yes Is the New No by Ira Israel on How to Slow Down Life & Create More Meaningful Connections

"Real quick I recommend listening to this show on spotify. Regan listen to all of your favorite artists and podcast in one place for free without prima count. Spotify has a huge catalog of podcasts. On every imaginable topic posy can follow your favorite podcast so you never miss an episode. Premium users can download episodes to listen to offline wherever and whenever and easily share what. You're listening to with your friends on instagram. So if you haven't done so already be sure to download the spotify APP search for optimal living daily on spotify or browse podcasts. In the Your Library Tab also make sure to follow me so you never miss an episode of optimal living daily. This is optimal living daily episode. Fifteen thirty one. Yes is the new no by IRA ISRAEL OF IRA ISRAEL DOT COM and. I'm just a mall like the guy that reads you. Articles or book excerpts every single day including holidays for over four years covering personal development or self-help how to live a better life and a Lamar always with permission from the authors or websites. Just at these subscribe or follow button in your podcast APP to get new episodes for free taste post being from Ira Israel slows. Get right to it and start optimizing your life sir. Yes is the new no by IRA? Israel of IRA ISRAEL DOT COM. There's a wonderful sketch in Monty. Python live at the Hollywood bowl where four Yorkshiremen are trying to best each other regarding who survived the most indigent and treacherous childhood. Douglas copland referred to a similar phenomenon that occurs at a meeting as one downs manship. There's a new game in town in relation to business if you observe conversations closely does it seem as if there is some sort of tacit contests regarding. Who is busier for instance? You tell a friend that your day was jam packed with back to back meetings. And she tells you that she had a fly the organ donor helicopter to Santa Inez and back twice to save two Nobel Prize winning rocket scientists twin sisters who both needed kidney transplants. He think you had a busy day. I've noticed a large percentage of blade email responses I receive include the words crazy busy or some derivative thereof and the first two lines. If our writing in German crazy busy would already be one word of late. Have been on the receiving end of that phrase so many times that I'm certain it'll be included as a single word on the next edition of the Od of course the ultimate manifestation of crazy busy the emperor's new clothes is to not receive any response out all those non responses from people who are so many clicks beyond crazy busy that they're overwhelmed totally swamped crushed. Inundated am when your paths casually cross a yoga or whole foods or starbucks. Their faces light up as they rush past exclaiming I know I oh you call have been crazy busy. Let's get together next week. Granted through many years of studying and traveling of met some pretty high powered human beings yet. Dear few people floating around my orbit have full-time sixty hours per week desk jobs. Most of them are self employed freelancers. Yoga teachers artists writers filmmakers musicians therapists and other types of rampant do-gooders. If I met someone who worked seventeen hours per day seven days per week in the Foxconn factory and he said crazy busy out understand if I met someone who was weeks away from finding the cure for leukemia after twenty years on a laboratory and she said crazy busy. I would concur. But if you're self employed I think the term crazy busy is relative. The problem is that business has become part of personal identity. How we get our sense of self eleven years ago. David Brooks wrote of the new Bohemian Bourgeoisie class nonchalantly trying to gain social status by besting each other with exotic vacation destinations. Oh urine seem bars for Christmas. Antigua's so much less seaney I think that business is a new status symbol that people use to measure themselves against other people. When was the last time you heard someone say? I sat in bed for the last week. Eating Licorice and watching. Tv and didn't think he or she must be unwell. Ever hear the phrase. I WANNA be a human being not a human doing and this is how yes has become the new no because many of us have become human doings since the invention of multitasking cargo air. Go some could now be translated as I'm crazy busy therefore I am. We're all so crazy busy that we double book flake on meetings canceled. The last minute via email text important messages. That shouldn't be texted pregnant driving on freeway. Now gotTa Stop Smoking Sucks. We'll call later. And wheeled caller. Id like Luke skywalker wielding a lightsaber. Swoosh swoosh Oh Jones calling probably just a winge about her cats hairball making wait. I'll call her back later right now. I'm crazy busy. But when crazy busy becomes your way of being in the world later too often becomes never so yes is the no because people say yes. Let's get together next week. Tear face but after Sandra emails and tax trying to schedule a place and time to actually meet they give up. An actual human connection flew away into the ether. Showman personal integrity. Should I mention creating a reality by being your word and showing up when you say you will? I dare not I dare not. I recall hearing the phrase many years ago on your death bed. Your inbox will be full. Meaning that there are perpetually things to do things we think need to get checked off our ever-growing checklists we delude ourselves into believing that texting and emailing allow us more time get things done and we delude ourselves into believing that were really connecting with people through these new media signs facial expressions and smells sands body language. Sands Touch Sansei contact. Our people living happier more fulfilling lives since technology than able to us to do more or more precisely to do more things at the same time and be crazy busy or people increasingly stressed out due to over-stimulation due to being over connected. Let's not allow yes to be the new. No let's make an effort to engage in authentic and compassionate. Communications was not fool ourselves into thinking that interacting on facebook or twitter will help us get our emotional needs met. Let's take out our ear. Buds more in a restaurant or cafe less show for the human beings in our lives with face to face interactions. Let us stop hiding behind our thumbs and fingers the eyes of the windows to the soul not the thumbs so put down your iphone. Put on your blackberry. Get up from your computer and make a real connection with fellow human being today. Because you don't want your tombstone to read was crazy busy. He wanted to read beloved. You just listen to the Post titled. Yes is the new no by IRA ISRAEL OF IRA. Israel DOT COM. A real quick thanks to anchor for hosting this podcast. Anger is the easiest. Way To make a podcast. They'll distribute your podcast for you so can be heard everywhere spotify apple podcast Google podcast. And many more you can easily make money from your podcast to with no minimum listenership anchor gives you everything you need in one place for free which you can use right from your phone or computer creation tools. Allow you to record in Eddie your podcast. So it sounds great. Download the anchor APP or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started. They get IRA. This title reminded me of Derrick favors post from very very long time ago that I narrated way back in episode forty four. I believe now that this is going to be like the opposite view of that article which was basically saying that we should say no to more things to make room in our lives where things that actually matter but I was wrong. Ira is saying don't allow yes to be the new no don't say yes and then not follow through or take on too many things causing yourself to get overwhelmed and also get stands on technology in general in this article. Make sure we always keep that in check anyway. I don't want to summarize the article if you want to hear that good one from Derek. That's way back in episode forty four. But they'll do it for now. Thank you for listening being here for subscribing to the show. Have a great rest of your day and we'll be back tomorrow as usual where OPTIMA life awaits.

IRA spotify Israel ISRAEL Ira self employed Regan Douglas copland starbucks Foxconn dot Lamar Santa Inez Nobel Prize Oh Jones Hollywood Derrick David Brooks
Episode 30: David Brooks

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

06:32 min | 1 year ago

Episode 30: David Brooks

"Looking to reach your full potential, and she excess business life only tried and tested guidance from people who have truly made an impact you have come to the right place. Welcome to five questions with Dan Shah, bell, New York Times bestselling author Dan shop bell distills. The most actionable and tangible advice from overriding of world-class humans, including entrepreneurs authors. Olympia, NHS politicians billionaires noble prize winners. Ed, speakers celebrities, astronauts, and more inspirational guidance, practical advice and concrete solutions. Our power chat starts out. Welcome to the thirtieth episode of five questions with the end Shaw bell as your host my goal secured. The best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by ask them just five questions. My guest today is. New York Times off calmness bestselling author David Brooks or an Toronto Ontario. He spent his childhood in New York City and then Philadelphia in one thousand nine hundred eighty three he graduated from the university of Chicago with a degree in history during school he wrote reviews and satirical articles to campus publications upon graduation. He was the police reporter for the city news bureau of Chicago, which influenced his conservative political views, then he was an intern at the national review when that ended he spent time at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and wrote movie reviews for the Washington Times two years later, the Wall Street Journal hired him to edit the book review section in two thousand books penned his first book called Bobo sin paradise that new upper class in how they got there in two thousand three he became an op-ed columnist for the New York Times since then he's written several other books, including his latest the second mountain the quest for moral life, which will be discussing this episode. Do we have to achieve personal goals before serving others? No, I. People some people do their second. And I what I do think you have to do is you can't live in the go. And so like a lot of people I sort of grew up wanting start my career wanting to make a Mark on the well known and those were ego driven goals, and if you're driven by the goals of the go, you're on the move, you're working. You're not really committing yourself to other people into relationships. So I do think something has to shock you out of the go and get to down living within your, heart and soul. You're longing. For others. You're longing to do something. Good. And for me. It was a valley. I think some people get blasted out of their ego by some great love, call them with something a cause or a person, but something has to happen for you to just live at the center of yourself and not at the surface of yourself. Why is commitment the key to creating a meaningful life? So I tasted freedom at one point. I was at remarriage, and I was living alone. And one thing I learned so I had a life of total freedom. I could do what I want. I could move where I wanted. I befriend who I wanted. And I learned that freedom sucks. Like political freedoms great economic freedoms pretty good, but social freedom sucks 'cause you're attached. You're remembered, and you're isolated you have no real commitments. And the people who remembered have given themselves away usually to family or to vacation or a community or two loss of your face. And those people are planted to down and those people have really tight relationships and the 'cause they serve is not just themselves. That's the thing. They are in love with what's the best way to overcome loneliness. Make friends, you know, pay attention other people and one thing I learned when I was in the value can't pull yourself out on your own. You have somebody to reach down and pull your pull you out and show you a better way of living. And I just got lucky I got involved in really a second family community of people, but forty DC kids age seven seventeen to twenty two and then maybe ten adults more my age, and we would just meet every month and just throw our crap on the table in total owner ability, and those kids really showed me how to do relationship and how to live a much more. Open what they have is motion transparency. You know, what they're feeling all the time. And they gave that gift to me a little and so I I was listed out by the generosity of others. And why should we choose attachment over personal freedom because if you s people on their deathbed, what is their life was the most important thing in their life. Ninety nine percent of them will say my family, my friends, they always talk about relationship. And if there's one thing we know about joy, it's what emerges out of relationship. I make this distinction in the book between happiness and joy happiness is when you when victory and get promoted your team wins. The SuperBowl yourself expands, and that's good happiness is good. But joy happens when the self transcend self you forget the self you're out of nature, and you sort of feel merge with you've nature or you're in love with somebody and you feel merge with them or you're serving a civil rights 'cause and you feel merged with your fellow protesters in in pursuit of something. Just and those happiness is good. But joy is better. And if we ain't or joy our life will go well. What's your best piece of career advice? I was given a good piece of advice early on when you get out of college say everything you never really know what you like. And you have to try things on the second piece of career advice is early in your career. Do something completely crazy because your horizon risk will be a lot wider than it would be. If you do something conventional your horizon Riskoul stay small third bit advices pay attention to density capital that say if you can do something interesting than forever after an every job interview in every dinner conversation. People will ask you what was it like to be a yet, Kurt or in Mongolia, and you'll have peace of identity capital? And then the final thing I'd say is get to yourself quickly. A lot of people they have some far goal, but they should get a graduate degree before. I do that job or I should prepare this way before it you that. But it's usually best if you know sort of what you wanna do just start doing it and the practice of it is more valuable than anything else. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom. David to follow his journey. You can read his books and finding on Facebook and Twitter where. He shares his articles political views travels and speeches. Hope you enjoy today's show and the amazing advice our guest provided. Remember that you can only benefit from advice if you packed on it before you do we would appreciate your feedback in the form of review, you can leave a review on I tunes, Stitcher or of pot catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan Shaw. Bell dot com slash review. Now.

New York Times David Brooks NHS Dan Shah Ed New York City Olympia Dan shop Dan Shaw bell university of Chicago Facebook Wall Street Journal Chicago Toronto Hoover Institution Mongolia Kurt
Character, Soul & the University: David Brooks

How Do We Fix It?

28:55 min | 1 year ago

Character, Soul & the University: David Brooks

"So we're at a big hotel here in new york with members of heterodox academy they include college faculty and staff a lively crowd is here in this episode we're gonna hear from new york times columnist and author david david brooks who speaks about how his professors shape the way he sees the world when he was a student and also today and the potential for colleges now to improve are mental and spiritual health some serious stuff yet also there are moments of humor david brooks it's easier to demonize the opening and a lot of people do but you know i i did this piece maybe fifteen twenty years ago called the organization kid about princeton and it was about how students never challenge their professors were over that and i think that's on balance a good thing i think it's you know david foster wallace and the famous kenyan address said there's no atheist and life we all worship something and some of the spiracy earnings come out as a political radicalism neck and take a fanatical form but it does grow out of a spiritual journey are show is about sixes yeah how to make the world a better place how do we fix that richer with this episode we have a different kind of show we're not doing are usual interview were actually gonna be discussing a speech were at their annual conference of the heterodox academy and they've partnered with is on a number of podcasts at this event jim you were saying i think there there were seven people yeah guests on how do we fix meghan mcardle alice drager mash heterodox academy with their jonathan height who started heterodox academy was one of are get so we we kind of felt like were added community of people who are concerned about the same issues we do so what kind of issues are we talking about just a reminder that heterodox academy is a group of people dedicated to die versity viewpoint diverse city at colleges colleges universities in society at large yeah in this one we've talked about a lot and now it's interesting to see a whole host of organizations that are dedicated this so we're here at this event you may hear some rattling stop moving around in the background will reuven ores a i and before we hear from david brooks social psychologist jonathan height author of the bestselling book the coddling of the american mind and another guest on how do we fix it spoke about the work of this group it means a way of moving through a volatile world with habits of heart and mind that enable constructive engagement across lines of difference it means being curious and intellectually humble being constructive destructive not sarcastic it means welcoming and embracing critics because they make you smarter so that's what we're all about that's what we think academy should be about is about as fest there were also awards presented by death match schick who heads up heterodox academy academy they gave awards to a number of thinkers including the young writer named common jews who i've been following for a long time who's i think real rising star but all they words had this theme of how do we were bored people who stand up open communication free thought freeing wary and the importance of real honest debate so you and i jim will be back later in this podcast for are response to to what david brooks sad and i'm not sure how much we could add but he started off off his speech by talking about his student days at the university of chicago and then when i was eighteen admissions officers at columbia was leaning brown decided that she got the university of chicago a so and my favorite thing about chicago the one everyone knows which is not true which is were fun goes to die but the one i love is it's a baptist school raciest professors teach jewish students saint thomas aquinas and so that's that was put into and i fell into the atmosphere i had a double major there in history of celibacy while i was there and this about his weekly appearance on pbs news hour i do a segment called shields and brooks whimsical brookefield so doing better and we appeal to a certain upper middle rao somewhat elderly audience so if a ninety three year old lady comes up to me airport i know what you're gonna say i don't watch the show but my mother loved it so that were very big in the hospice community and then the serious bit of david brooks his speech began with concerns about liberal education we edited parts of what he said beginning with a student life at the university of chicago but as i get older the thing i appreciate more is the sees the were planted did by my university and the seats that can be planted by people at university to change a life forever and so i went to chicago back at a time when my colleague anthony chronicles the humanistic ideal what's shaping higher at and humanistic ideal is that a university is mission is to be a logical it's shaped the character in the souls of the people who go through that there's a guy in the nineteen twenties names j f roxburgh who worked at the so schoolers headmaster any said his job at so what's the turnout young men who were acceptable at a dance invaluable at a shipwreck and i've always admired that as a way of thinking about changing character or it's an old spartans said i make honorable things pleasant the children and a lot of what teachers do is they take something excellent and they make it pleasurable too young person now they humanistic ideal is no longer prevalent in a lot of universities it isn't some but not in many and then there's been a place crime and says by the research ideal and the research ideal has done a lot for us it's based on the idea of specialized knowledge these specialized field stands the small bits and you could next band truth through that and we've had many great breakthroughs there is because we have specialized but according to crime in this emphasis on specialization draws attention away from the whole lavar live and requires that we focus on small aspect of them at selves big questions questions like what makes life worth living began to see not only unrealistic but irresponsible and pernicious almost unprofessional asked my friend and colleague and actually third cousin steven pinker of harvard a road i have no idea how to get my students to build a self or become a soul it isn't taught in graduate school and in hundreds of faculty appointments and promotions i've participated in we've never evaluated a candidate on how well he or she could do it and that's a recently cogent argument but my view is if you leave students on their own to do that with no guidance on the hardest question of life you're asking for trouble and schools have no choice but to get in this business and my professors at chicago took advantage of this when i was there there were still some refugees from world war two who escaped nazi terminally and taught content hobbs into cities as if the sacred crowns of humanity or contained in these pages and if you read them well you would know how to lift and there's a saying if you catch fire with enthusiasm people will come from miles to watch you burn and my professors had that enthusiasm and those of us who are prepared passionate schnitt lectures or conversations seminars the students realizes sometimes you pour into the class more then the student is ready to receive 'cause they're just too young but i do think you are planting seeds and i think i'm walking testimony of that of the seats that were planted when i think of what my professors did it chicago i think they did six things first they took a sudden they welcomed us into a tradition of scholars a long line of men and women who were in this conversation conversation michael shot said is an endless unrehearsed intellectual adventure in which imagination we enter a variety of modes of understanding of the world and are cells are not disconcerted at all by the differences or dismayed by inconclusive miss up but all and we're just a little peons in this conversation but we're entered into it the second thing they do is they introduced us to the history of the world moral ecology is we often tell students thinking yourself come up with their own worldview and if you're name's nature aristotle maybe you could do that the rest of us need help and so what were the lucky inheritance of all these moral ecology is the classical moral ecology that emphasizes glory and honor the he break one emphasizing medium slow instruments of conscious the christian one emphasizing humility surrendering gracie lightman conscious project based on reason narcissism buddhism confucian ism african animism marxism they're all these inheritances and they didn't tell you which one the pick but they said here they are see what fits and that proved to be tremendously valuable the third thing they did was they taught us how to see now seeing reality seems like obviously you open your eyes you look at the world but i look at politics i work in politics six and nobody sees reality clearly they see the reality they wanna see based on their prejudices and their self interests seeing well is not natural it's an act of humility and it is taught is taught by copping people who know how to see well the vinci george eliot george orwell jane jacobs james baldwin leo tolstoy you see how they saw john raskin once wrote the greatest thing in human soul ever does in this world is to see something and tell what it saw in a plane way hundreds of people can talk for one who could think but thousands can think for one who could see or will do is just a great senior tolstoy was a great syria's that's got a cnn if you're running a where there's a girl kitty is going after a ball he describes what it felt like when she put on her velvet choker would have felt like when they're harris 'perfect dressers 'perfect what it feels like to be an eighteen year old girl at the top of her game what it feels like to see the man she thinks she's gonna marry bransky looking at at at the ball in rapturous love and then what it feels like when gronkowski is not looking at hurries looking in renton and when it feels like the whole insides sucked out and tolstoy just concede that reality with such clarity and communicated that such a skill fourth are professors taught us intellectual courage there's no such thing as thinking for yourselves even the words we think with their collective things and most of us don't think for truth we think for bonding we wanna believe the things that'll make us admitted into the right social circles and so you have to be taught to go against that and think for truth some of the time and professors by encouraging urging us to scream at each other in a civil way encouraged us to seek truth fifth they gave us emotional knowledge serene whitman izzy exults and joy to followed gal ails he follows his discoveries wherever they might leave them to be with scholars encounters gunpowder sylvia plath as she encounters the deaths of madness is not have new fact but there's still had a new experience and is to have had the repertoire emotions widened the little i once thought taylor swift interviewed on sixty minutes and somebody cetera you're songs are sad and taylor swift said well they're really twenty two different kinds of sadness is your boyfriend dumps you sadness and she plays the song there's you dog sadness a different song you're mama's matter you said and it's a different song taylor swift as an expert at sadness who would wanna go through life with one kind of sadness or one kind of happiness when you've got twenty two and you could only do that by having these experiences that are and and emotional wisdom pass along to you six chicago gave us new things to love and i think this is most universities do they put love in front of students things the students students find beautiful and they wanna follow along some of you probably know plato's ladder loves where plato advises when you're teaching young put a beautiful face in front of them and they'll be attracted to a beautiful face but they'll realize there's even higher beauty which is a beautiful personality city and then if you show them a beautiful personality the realizes even higher beauty which is a beautiful society which is justice and if they see that beauty they'll realize there's even hire a beauty which is truth and the search for truth and then they'll realizes his higher beauty still which is the transcendent beauty of the universe to which nothing could be added and nothing could be taken away until you walk students up the ladder up loves and you give them newfield still love new people to love anywhere rao's in some sort of erotic atmosphere around ideas i went through sitting in the regular stein which is the library at chicago profitably ugliest building on the face severe and i was reading nature and i started at seven and i woke up i was reading but suddenly it was eleven i was not at myself at that moment i was in the book and they erotic atmosphere somehow sucked me in and when you have that kind of experience it's harder to be shallow in later in life because you've tasted the fine wine and the kool aid just won't do real said in the midst of his education i'm learning just see i don't know why it is but everything penetrates more deeply into me and does not stop at the place where until until now it used to finish ivan inner self of which i was ignorant any education i think i got introduced us so that inner self it somehow very impressive and then the professors around us did something that encouraged us to work harder one of my heroes is a scientist deal wilson and wilson was at harvard he had a professor at a mentor name philip darlington and they were both bugs scientists they're collecting samples and darlington said don't collect samples on the pass cut through the jungle do it the hard way but the right way and one day darlington the legend of darlington is it he wasn't amazon upon floating on a log collecting samples and crocodile got up and grabbed him and pulled down an he escaped the crocodile grabbed him again pulled him down he escaped the third time through the right side of his body was shredded he made made it back to campus back to safety but his wilson says a road that's not what impressed him about darlington anybody could get out of a crocodile when pressed him sit in a body cast with his right arm immobilized he taught himself self to go back into the jungle and collect samples lefthanded with one hand and he did that for months and that's what people want from their professors they wanna be taught that something is hard and it is worthy of hardness students don't want happiness they want intensity and so that's what you get into university just and expansion now do we give that all the time i think a lot of the times we don't we don't help the students in years after college students are so spiritually hungry my students the students at every college i go and they want to know what is the highest and best life and we handle a bunch of great empty box is a lot of the time the first empty box we have them is freedom we told should be free freedom least happiness we give you you're liberate itself freedom doesn't help him defined what the best life is they got plenty of freedom so then we have another big box of nothing possibility you're futures limitless you could do anything you want your day's just take risk don't be afraid to fail has it helped him the it's a thousand things limitless how does that help them defined what their best life is so we give them another empty box the box of authenticity look inside yourself and you're true in her passion you're amazing awaken the giant within you do that doesn't help the meta you is the thing that has informed yet so we give them the biggest an empty box of all the box of autonomy you're on your own it's up to you to find their own values no one else could tell you what's right or wrong for you do what you love and they're cast out on the road without any guidance and a lot of my students are great students they got into yale but they wander and some of them wander into what do you have to guard called anesthetic life they wouldn't have life is a series of adventures which is where each adventurous funding and they measure their by a set of criteria is it interesting as a boring and that's great for them for a little while a but eventually they get bored of it because it's not accumulating into anything others leader life of what the guy a writer named mattel you style guard called and insecure over achiever they wanna solve the problem of insecurity and goldman or mackenzie tell some junior year we know what you're gonna do next three years so their heart may not be in it but they go into goldman because they're good getting into things so they treat life as an extension of school they just get into procedures france and then they follow that life and pretty soon the deepest questions of life which is the enemy college give replaced by the shallower questions of how do i succeed speed and yet you could let drop those spiritual questions that used to obsess you and you become a little more of a shrewd animal as all guard says you have a problem in the foundation of your life and you could solve it by building a shiny new story up on top and eventually though there's static life or whether it's insecure over achiever life they hit a sort of valley a psychological valley nisha said he why do for fun indoor anyhow he was widely for the door anyhow if you don't know you're why wouldn't have setbacks coming you begin to crumble and i get them and maybe you do to from the students a few years later and their tone of voice is so different they've been hit by these mental health problem and their confidence is shot i had a friend named casey gerald who's getting interviewed for a job and instead of just answering questions you ask interviewer question and it was a very good question what would you do if you weren't afraid and she started crying the she wouldn't be doing hr that company if she wasn't afraid my old professor alan bloom said everything is is relative on campus and it creates men without chests it creates a sort of bourgeois blandness i think that turns out to have been wrong and hannah rent what's more right when she said that all forms of fanaticism come from existential anxiety if you're essentially anxious you don't in turn into a boring now last man you turned into a fanatic and not and that's because you're trying to find some way to belong there psychologists have a phrase the hardest thing detours the patients attempt to self cure and they attempted self cure of loneliness is tribalism tribalism seems like community but in fact it's the opposite of community community is based on a mutual love for something you're town you're school tribalism is based on a mutual hatred of something some other and you get the tribalism that flows out of a spiritual boyd and we see vada and politics and a lot of that on campus and so that's the problem put before us be solutions will come from people like in this room who are willing to engage the deepest issues and the deepest ways the solutions will come from the spiritual hunger which never goes away one of my students who unfortunately died tragically young age i remember we had coffee wants his name is john harris tuning in and he leaned over to me and said were so hungry the spiritual hunger so palpable and then the final reason the students will come with a kind of heterodox see i see in students rather visit all around the country and it's in their backgrounds and you probably have these students they've got all these weird backgrounds like part french there park costa rican they've just come from all these diversity places and they don't normally admire pluralism they embody pluralism the realism they have all these completely different backgrounds they were the syrian a who wound up in the community college in ohio a woman who grow up in a pap just home in alabama in our first generation college student in an ivy league school so they transcend worlds and they donnelly admire heterodox he they are headed rocks i could come to think of them as amphibians and we talked about the fragility of young and that's true but a lot of the students we all have have made any purpose unum their life mission because they've taken so many opposites in their background and they've created something special in themselves and their heterodox see their respect for bridge and capital there of respect for finding narratives of giving integrity to a diversity life are some of the things that are gonna leave this out of the craziness of the john describe thank you so that was david brooks at his speech to the heterodox academy jimmy you and i will be back in just a moment to talk about some of the things he said after his speech an overreaction to them it's how do we fix it i'm richard is and i'm jim eggs now back to the dessert course after the speech he took questions and he praised student protests is a kind of moral awakening which might have surprised you i thought it was a really smart take actually it's easy to demonize the walking in a lot of people do but you know i i did this piece maybe fifteen twenty years ago called the organization kid about princeton and it was about how students never challenge their professors investors were over that and i think that's on balance a good thing i think it's you know david foster wallace and the famous kenyan address said there's no atheist and life we all worship something and some of the spiracy so you earnings come out as a political radicalism neck and take a fanatical form but it does crowd of a spiritual journey and you're going to do good and so that to me is actually a good sign and sort of it the were students be just the materialistic unhurt one and not the one who screaming you there at least alive but now the moral ends this is fully alive on campus and i think on balance we should be deeply appreciative of that and that the students are finally feeling free to do that all my life at one of the kids come up to me and say you know i really want it to matron accounting but my parents were forcing me the major in art history and that'll never happen because it's always the kids two of the spiritual you earnings and the parents want event at them there's been so much talk about you know speakers bean deep platform driven off of colleges because of their ideas but brooks talked about something i thought was really important which was the greater cost of idiological conformity on campuses is it cuts that some right wing guy doesn't get to give a speech it's with the students and then another highlight for me jim was when he talked about the power of persuasion suasion people always say we need a hit him hard or like when have you ever been persuaded by being hit harder i get persuaded run meet somebody i think is really admirable i get persuaded by somebody who seems to be reasonable and seemed like an honorable person thinks that and i get persuaded by pleasure the best way to be a good conservatives to be enjoyable person and it gives credibility because i just i've never been persuaded by incivility i actually at a friend over my house and we were talking about reparations on pro reparations and so she said to me she so and abraham lincoln book on my bookshelf and we were agree on everything and then she said to me you know i think abraham lincoln was guilty of worst genocide in adolf hitler and she was talking about the lincoln treatment of a native american an agent in our history like native american policy was terrible but it's terrible before lincoln trouble after like and he was busy with a civil war but i felt this white hot heat and i would have disagreed with her about everything at that moment and so just as a matter of persuasion i just you know we talk about like going into war it's good they martyr the only of the conversation is a really good at a martyr and i don't think i've ever been persuaded by getting hit in the face another thing with david brooks answering the question i've asked myself for years which is why is it the politicians rarely if ever admit that they're wrong i mean isn't it attractive to admit that they were learn so i think from experience i thought his comments on this were so brain and something he is surely learn from experience with the support of the iraq war and then round about two thousand seven i like realized that wasn't really good a and so i had sleepless nights real torture and i finally wrote a column of really confessional column what i got wrong and what i learned at that moment was that when you converted that way you're fans feel betrayed and you're enemies field emboldened and they seize upon your vulnerability and they attacked you for it and so there's a reason why politicians never admit there it's not because they don't know they haven't committed airs but it's the total killer from both sides i just love what what david brooks says about walking students up the ladder of love well he's quoting played out there about how you introduce people to higher and higher ideas and you start with the beauty and you work your way up the ladder the truth any call it this almost erotic atmosphere yeah it is so he gets that from allen bloom who was the guy who wrote the closing of the american mind i didn't know the bloom had been one of his professor at the university of chicago go but this notion that the deep engagements ideas is a kind of transcended and and and also erotic experience i just very moving he spoke about that in a very moving way and it kind of made me wanna go back to college college and then when he he really had me when he started talking about rudy niche and losing himself in nature i ask you wrote my senior thesis in college on nature you know a very difficult thinker who said a lot of horrible horrible things and yet and engage person should be able to eat a sinker who's wrong about a lot right about other things and learn to make those distinctions if we start tried to say this whole group of thinkers is on the bad list 'em drive off that's the way were going to often were never gonna learn anything from hopefully brooks that's an example for real kind of open minded inventory discussion in gauging even he says he's almost he likes it when students yell at him it's better the students were aboard

new york princeton david foster wallace new york times david david brooks fifteen twenty years ninety three year eighteen year sixty minutes three years one hand one day
'The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake': My response to an article of seismic significance

The Daily Article

10:14 min | 1 year ago

'The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake': My response to an article of seismic significance

"This is the daily. Article podcast published by the Denison Forum or culture changing Christians to receive the daily article directly to your email inbox. Week Day morning. Visit the daily Article Dot Com. Now here's Today's news discerned differently. David Brooks is one of the best known public intellectuals in America a longtime columnist for the New York Times and a contributing writer at the Atlantic. He's also the author of several bestselling books. I have found him gracious and humble in person and have followed his writing with appreciation over the years however I was more than surprised by the headline of his latest Atlantic Essay. The nuclear family was a mistake. His article is receiving so much attention this week that I've chosen to summarize it and then respond to it biblically given the significance of this issue. Today's daily article is a little longer than usual brooks describes what he calls the story of the family once dense cluster of many siblings and extended kin fragmenting into even smaller and more fragile forms. The initial result of that fragmentation. The nuclear family didn't seem so bad but then because the nuclear family is so brittle the fragmentation continued in many sectors of society nuclear families fragmented into Single Parent Families Single Parent families into chaotic families or no families. He notes that in the year. Eighteen hundred. Three quarters of American workers were farmers with large families living together until eighteen fifty. Roughly three quarters of Americans older than sixty five lived with their kids and grandkids nuclear families. A husband and wife living with their children were surrounded by extended or corporate families extended families as Brooks notes provide resilience when facing hardship and help raise children together but when factories opened in big. Us cities in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries young men and women left their extended families to chase the American dream. The families they started were nuclear by nineteen sixty seventy seven point. Five percent of all children were living with their to married parents and apart from their extended family from nineteen fifty to nineteen sixty five. Divorce rates dropped for Tilleke rates rose and the nuclear families seem to thrive according to Brooks when you think of the American family many of us still revert to this ideal. However only one third of American individuals live in this kind of family today. Brooks claims that the nineteen fifty to sixty five window was not normal. It was a freakish historical moment. When all of society conspired wittingly or not to obscure the essential fragility of the Nuclear Family Brooke Sites these statistics from Nineteen. Seventy two two thousand twelve. The share of households consisting of married couples with kids had fallen by half thirteen percent of households were single person families in nineteen sixty in twenty eighteen. That figure was twenty. Eight percent in nineteen sixty seventy. Two percent of American adults were married in two thousand seventeen. Nearly half were single more than four fifths of American adults. Twenty Nineteen Survey said. That getting married was not essential to living a fulfilling life in two thousand four thirty three percent of Americans ages eighteen to thirty four. Were living without a romantic partner by two thousand eighteen. That number was up to fifty. One percent families have gotten smaller as well. The general American birth rate is half of what it was in nineteen sixty. Today there are more American homes with pets than with Kids Brooks also notes that African Americans have suffered disproportionately in the era of the detached nuclear family. Nearly half of black families are led by an unmarried single woman compared with less than one sixth of white families two thirds of African American children lived in a single parent family in two thousand eighteen. Compared with a quarter of white children. Children are especially affected by the breakdown of the nuclear family in nineteen sixty. Roughly five percent of children were born to unmarried women. Now about forty percent are in nineteen sixty. Eleven percent of children lived apart from their father in twenty ten twenty seven percent did only about half of American children will spend their childhood with both biological parents. Here's the foundational part of the essay when hyper individualism. Kicked into gear in the nineteen sixties. People experimented with new ways of living. That embraced individualistic values. Today we are crawling out from the wreckage of that hyper individualism which left many families. Detached and unsupported and people are experimenting with more connected ways of living with new shapes and varieties of extended families. Brookes asserts the blunt fact is that nuclear family has been crumbling in slow motion for decades and many of our other problems with Education Mental Health Addiction. The quality of the labor force stem from that crumbling. He believes that Americans are hungering to live and extended in forged families in ways that are new and ancient at the same time. Brooks's right to focus on the nineteen sixties as decade when the fragmentation of nuclear families began. But he does not explain. Why such hyper individualism began. Then the answer is a cultural movement called postmodernism. This worldview claims that our minds subjectively interpret our subjective experiences resulting in subjective truth you have no right to force your beliefs on me. Is the mantra of our day. This movement began in the nineteen sixties for reasons. Too complicated to explain here for much more. See my website article shaking the foundations the shift spiritual authority in the postmodern world. It made the Bible a diary of religious opinion and Biblical morality. Your truth of course declaim that there is no such thing. As absolute truth is to make an absolute truth claim and to reject Biblical morality regarding sex to be experienced only within marriage and marriage a lifelong covenant between a man and a woman is to suffer the consequences when we drive our car off the road into the ditch ignoring the signs along the way the damage. That results is not the fault of the carmaker but the driver. Let's close with some good news. Brooks reports that family trends may be changing economic pressures following the two thousand eight recession have pushed Americans toward greater reliance on family today. Twenty percent of Americans live in multi generational homes up from twelve percent in nineteen eighty. More young adults are moving back home as our seniors communal living where people share a kitchen and help with parenting is also growing in popularity. Brooks points to another endeavour. He started two years ago called weave the social fabric project. We've exists to support and draw attention to people and organizations around the country who are building community. He cites organizations that bring traumatized veterans into extended family settings and nursing homes. That house preschoolers so seniors in young children can go through life together. Brooks became part of one such forged family in which twenty five children gathered with several adults for dinner every Thursday night. Our Cultures Hunger for authentic family is an invitation to the family of God. Your Church and mine should be a loving community into which anyone is welcome and which offers the resilience and shared values extended families once provided David Brooks article reveals the problem. Now it's our turn to offer the solution. The more our culture runs from God. The more we run into him the darker the room the more powerful the light who will see the light of God's love in your heart and home today are you experiencing all of God. There is when I wrote empowered a guide to experiencing the power of the Holy Spirit. A central question drove my writing. Am I experiencing all of God? There is I grew up in a church where we didn't talk much about the spirit's power and work in our lives yet. I knew other churches where it seemed. As if the work of the spirit was overemphasized neither approach is biblical so I saw how to rightly live in through the power of the Holy Spirit and I realized just how incredible it is that the spirit of him who raised Jesus from the dead dwells in us as Christians when we miss out on experiencing the power of the Holy Spirit. We failed to experience. All of God. There is while empowered can be read any time of the year. I wrote it as a forty seven day. Devotional intended to be read every day from Ash Wednesday February twenty seventh through Easter Sunday. April twelve empowered also contains spiritual gifts assessment. I know many people have benefited from and I pray it helps you discover yours spiritual gifts as well. Please request your copy of empowered today. Daily Article Dot Org. That's daily Article Dot Org. Would you consider sharing this podcast with a friend family member or CO worker in order to help build a community of culture changing Christians? Thank you for listening to the daily Article podcast today.

David Brooks Kids Brooks New York Times Denison Forum Holy Spirit Us Atlantic America writer partner Brookes two thousand four thirty three twenty ten twenty seven percen thirteen percent forty seven day Eleven percent Three quarters Twenty percent
The Rush Limbaugh Show Podcast - Dec 11 2020

The Rush Limbaugh Show

1:51:16 hr | Last month

The Rush Limbaugh Show Podcast - Dec 11 2020

"You're gonna come into a new season of joy and fulfillment like you've never seen hi. I'm joe los team. I have a daily podcast rat. Talk about poker coming obstacles accomplishing dreams and becoming. All you were created to be. You may have had some disappointments in the past but this is a new day. Keep feeding your home's feeding your dreams use your energy to feed your destiny. Listen to the joel osteen. Daily podcast on the iheartradio app. Or wherever you get your podcast him to today's edition of the rush limbaugh show podcast. It is always always incredible honor to fill in for rush limbaugh on today the day the lord has made and on open line friday eight hundred two eight two two eight eight two with love to have you on the program. There is a spirit of tyranny. And it it just. It's stocks the globe and it exists today within the left and it is frightening the way it is mimicking. A country held under complete tyranny. And that is the country of china. And there's a lot of talk this week past few days because the media the mockingbird media and i'm disappointed to say geraldo rivera joined the anonymous completely mischaracterizing. What rush limbaugh has said about the possibility of this nation becoming united again russia's some almost four hours of commentary around this topic in discussions with callers. It's difficult understand how anyone cammisa understand. What ross said unless the goal is to do that and i think obviously with some you hacks like the basement dwellers at media matters. That's that's not just the goal. That's the tactic that that's what they're paid up to. I understand a seven cents per hour to do so a lot of money that they do the basement dwelling the left does not have any spirit of uniting. They live under a spirit of tyranny. You cannot you. Rational politics can be debated. We can debate tax rates. We can we can do that. We can debate allies. To what degree should we support allies. If at all these these things can be debated but if you look at even the policies of the left medicaid for all it's all inclusive they have decided you will have the government force you to use government healthcare. That's what they decided to debate on that. You cannot debate the life or death of a baby. That's that's there's a one or zero. The baby lives or dies. And and in the case of abortion. There weren't even happy getting the one buck per month or whatever it was with obamacare where you had to where they took your money and said no no. You're you're going to support this with your money. They had expanded into wealth. The baby's born but still has a to- inside the mother. Well then then we can kill the baby to you. There's no there's there's no spectrum there. And i think this is by design. There will be speech codes for all. You will pretend a man is a woman. You will pretend all white people are racist or you'll be cancelled. There's a thing in politics called wedge issues in the mid to divide a political base from either a party or from a candidate. The left is attempting to divide us from our children. They're attempting to divide is from our bodily autonomy. It's it's not enough that anybody who wants one can choose to take a vaccine. The left says has to be compulsory. Everybody has to do it. Everybody for a flu with a ninety nine point. Eight seven percent survival rate my faith. I'm a christian. Faith sometimes collide just my politics. I would like to unite. How where is the point where we can unite when everything. The left marches out is designed to crush this. There's not designed for rational discussion rush. Limbaugh speaks for rush limbaugh period. That's it and the media mischaracterizing. We said including her author. Vera is it has to be purposeful so look it's brother odd. Given the fact that rush speaks to an audience of eighty million people but rush actually said was heard by us. And here's more from rush. Limbaugh himself now. I didn't advocate for it. I never would advocate for secession. I'm simply repeating what i have. Well now that has gone viral. Apparently it has gone viral. That i m advocating for secession. And i wanna read something to you hear from freda powers. She's writing at At biz pack review is just a little pair of. It's all on this. That i just shared with you see says the limbaugh clearly stated he thinks. The nation's trending towards the session was not advocating for it but the left anyway jumped on his remarks to bash him from everything from sedition treason. Talk of civil war found. Its way onto twitter where the phrase was trending mainly triggered by the ongoing election battle but also many of the social media platforms accused. Limbaugh of saying something he didn't that is the key i have been accused and this is nothing new either. I've been accused of saying something. I didn't say in this case i have not did. Not and would not advocate for secession. You people know what i'm about. How many times have i said it. The objective here is a gigantic army of voters who win elections that we have to have political victory that we have to beat them back politically at the ballot box. That's been my entire Reason for being here and and in the process informing and educating people about what liberalism is and what. Communism is what socialism. They'll be properly informed able to reject it which is crucially important right now because more and more people are signing onto it more and more people think. Socialism is great. We just haven't tried it right. On the right people had enough money behind it and And all of that. So if any of you have been caught up in all this if you get in a twitter war and this and that and the other thing i simply referenced what i have seen other people say about how we are incompatible as currently divided and that secession is something that people are speculating about i m not advocating it have not advocated. Never have advocated and probably wouldn't. That's not something thirty two years. That's not the way i've decided to go about handling disagreements with people on the left. I just think they need to be beaten. They need to be defeated. How many times over and they need to be defeated and in more than one election so anyway. That's that i wanted to get that out of the way and clear up for anybody who is under any kind of a misunderstanding. The misunderstanding as rush. Is you kindly stating it. It's a purpose of misunderstanding. I i wanna just propose. A comparison that trended on twitter. The word limbaugh of the second. I saw it. I said okay. What is this. what is the attack. I collect. i saw that it was alive. I listened to the entire broadcast that they like you. I want to propose a comparison. There are two politically oriented murderers in our country this year. One of them happened on the streets of portland. One of them happened in denver. The same media. Who wants to pretend rush. Limbaugh is advocating secession. Has done nothing to look into those murders on video in broad daylight. Well actually the portland was at night. Nothing no interest. There are two domestic terror groups one of them with the name designed to divide black lives matter. Inc is a morally objective fact that the lives of black human beings matter like the lives of all human beings matter. It's morally objective fact. They antifa our to domestic terror groups. And there's been no interest in the fact that they are violently pushing for civil war. They have burned american cities. They have asked for and gotten police. Officers killed and teeth. Members have directly attempted to assassinate cops. There's a paper from a rutgers. University project called network enabled anarchy that studies. The recruiting methods of antifa. This idea as joe biden's dementia said that they're recruiting mimics hamas and isis their tactics and the people they choose to con- into joining anti if it's not a mistake that a lot of the people in antifa are mentally ill or are are longtime repeat felons. There's no interest in that there's no interest in the democrats election integrity project which included the option of succession if they didn't like the outcome. Where four states secede from the constitution. The constitution says the state legislators the body of legislators legislators will create the rules run elections. That's a specific body. The founders could have said or a dude. They didn't say or a dude. They were specific the legislative body. That much that closest to the people will determine election rules not county. Commission's not the stroke of a pen of an apparently compromised secretary of state in the state of georgia doing a side deal with the democrat national committee. As i understand it no they said the legislature. Why because they wanted you to make the rules about elections. Otherwise power seekers will build themselves elections. They never lose. Not everyone got this wrong about rush. We're going to be joined. We come back by free to powers biz. pack reviews. Somehow she got it right. Maybe she'll share this magic formula for journalism done accurately taught herman in for rush. Limbaugh the eob. That's todd herman. In for rush limbaugh the eob network eight hundred two eight two two eight eight two yesterday. And the day before the media went nuts completely mischaracterizing. What rushes said about the mood of the country. What other people see as a path to succession. And it's it's a purposeful thing. They know the power of ibi eighty million people so in my judgment. It's a purposeful thing. But was my kerala rivera jumps in on this and maybe he's ill prepared. I think we set up. I don't know for sure. But i think we set aside full number for geraldo to call. And just leave a voicemail apology so he doesn't have to slowly himself talking to fill in host you. You would want to do that. I mean that way. We can play that on the air. Geraldo those apology letter. Them got it wrong. And there are still people who practiced journalism a free to powers with his pack review. Joins us on the rush. Limbaugh program Freighter up welcome the rush show at szott. Herman filling in high todd. Thank you for having me. It's it's a pleasure to have you. You've got the story about what rush disgusts because it was a nuanced discussion. It was a lengthy discussion. And i heard in russia's voice a lot of concern and and in guided inexperienced guided by wisdom being very very careful about how we discussed us The the rest of the meeting got this wrong pretty. What's the secret that you have the secret method. You have for not getting things wrong. Can you teach the mockingbird media. Had to do this the secret. I think the secret is eyes and ears is. It's probably just listening and not jumping on the first bus that pulls into the depot Because that's what it sort of felt like it After a while yesterday. When i thought everyone got on the bus and left and i may have been at the wrong bus stop. You know. I seem to have missed what everyone else was saying. And you know it kind of makes you think that you're on the wrong track but it's not if you're actually listening to what rush said in originally and you have the patience to listen to it from beginning to end. You know the truth is there. There are people who will say. Oh we'll rush limbaugh says this or that and look i've i've much smaller version of that morning show it. Kt t h in seattle and. There are people who've never heard a thing. I've said and they will immediately attached to me beliefs that i i don't hold but in the case of rush being the most recognized name and broadcasting and this is important to the discussion everybody to understand. It's not just a kissing up to espn's arash it's a fact that rush holds an audience twelve to sixteen times greater than any of the television shows that are heating him. So let's just let's break this down with With you about what rush actually said did he advocate secession. No not at all and if you were bothering to listen to the conversation you know from the caller who called in and asked about the division in the country and how to kind of reconcile the country and what steps could be taken and and you know whether whether it was even possible that's where the discussion came from from. What i you know what i looked at. You know writing at at this review for a few years you know. That's the normal process anyway. This story is not always. just this. Is what rush said. And then there's a headline it's kind of like you want to know what was behind it and that to me is what was behind it and i realized when all of twitter was having a meltdown over his a civil war that he was advocating. That there must have been something more to it. But really the more you you go back and you look you realize that. That's that's what he said you know. He never advocated and he specifically said that he thought that the country was trending towards secession based on things that he had read and what he had heard others things so. I don't know how you can mess that up. Free to power with his pack review. So let me let me point out some comparisons here. I my radio show emanates from seattle. Which is as i've called it. The new confederacy explain. They refuse to enforce federal immigration law. They refuse to enforce federal drug laws. They refuse to enforce law at all. They're literally decriminalizing crime literally. I'm not. I'm not making that up. And you have portland taken over by another autonomous zone. You have the releases of felons with the excuse of the flu. You have the election integrity project from the democrats where they actually wargame. Maybe we should just have the the western states sort of sort of secede. You know journalism far better than i have. You seen those aspects of society covered from a perspective of people actually taking steps that from a legal basis is sort of a precursor to secession. I haven't You know. I'm i'm sure there are Stories that are out there. You know just you know for some groups who are doing that and Some who are advocating that. I mean i wasn't hearing that. I think that's probably what happened with the russia's original comments to that it didn't catch me off guard because i wasn't looking for a screaming headline about that i haven't seen that If that's what. If that's what you're asking i just i look at proportionality. You know i look a domestic terror group seizing parts of a city in seattle in new york and in portland now again and they're saying we are succeeding and we have guns and we're going to shoot out and try to kill cops but but but russia's something and we landed we've got about a minute left free to powers pack review. What do you think. Just if you were to cap off this year in media what do you think is the biggest selective bit of coverage that you've seen from the mockingbird media and i refer to them as a liberal media we've got about forty five seconds left just. What do you mean the selective what they're focused on. I don't focus on what they didn't. Well what they don't focus on is really just basically truth and you know just integrity in journalism. It's just actually destroyed Everything that we've been working to do. I think like the the masks off There isn't a some kind of unbiased anything. it's just. Everybody is is advocating for something and everyone's been pushing for their own agenda. So i that that's that in a nutshell is what we've seen. You know this this year just agree. I i'm a proponent of thing called the propaganda of silence where i think that the biggest tool that at that people who are posing as journalists barashi advocates in agitators uses is silence. It's been great to have you. Free to powers biz. Pack review this pack review dot com. Thank you for being journalist. Frito appreciate you coming on. She's show it's taught herman in rush limbaugh on the one and only eib network fixture of me on the network for the years of support if you wanna leave of rush if you want to leave a note for rush to to rush. Limbaugh dot com notice supporters. Rush takes day to rest. We expect him back on monday to be here once again. By the golden eib microphone My faith sometimes collides with my politics. I want to bring people together but the very notion of that is made impossible by left who constructs every paradigms as one. That debate is in fact warfare. For instance noticed this they have taken what is a process. Science is a process. You create a thesis and then you attempt to disprove the thesis you want something. That's observable testable falsifiable. If you falsify it your your your your thesis is gone. They've erased all of that and simply made science a conclusion and a conclusion that is demonstrably. Wrong like tony. Falcon the the guardian of the year. Thank you for making me. The guardian of the year of done a good job of guarding washington. Dc and really. I understand that my job was to wait until maybe we could get joe biden back and then we can start to have some sweet sweet cash flow with china fund. That will hand lab again. He's been wrong on everything he knows. He's wrong but they will say twenty is a man who says masks work and they don't work she's never said they work. He said that the right thing he knows they don't work for for blocking upper respiratory viruses like influence his own. Cdc does that but they will take tony factory and they'll make him science. They'll take bill nye the mechanical engineering guy. And they'll say that that science so bill nye plays with things and on on a video and says hey. This proves masks work except it doesn't because viruses are are sub microscopic one tenth of one micron opening in an n ninety five masks. Three tenths of a micron. Three sensible my grand so even with science the amalgamated into this thing. Here's the conclusion if you disagreed that a piece of cloth stops you. Are you being told us. The world's most deadly virus in history. Well then you're not just against this report you are against science self and they do this with issues of what they determined to be justice. Right the reason. I created the construct of of course. Black lives matter. That's why i will not back. The violent marxist led domestic terror. Group called black lives matter incorporated. That is getting black people killed. Because the design of that name was about dividing you about shoving you the second you see it's about shoving you the policies all inclusive. Everybody's in we've decided for you. The corentin measures first time in history. Quarantine to help them. That's not true because we did that during the spanish flu hundred years ago and by the way it failed sixty million people died. Progressivism as it's called is a board mentality. Resistance is futile. Oh your home schooling your kids so we'll pass laws to make that possible. You can't do that you don't get to do that. We don't like guns. You can't have any. We don't like meat. You will stop eating it. How can uniting. Who's pushing for the divorce. It's not republicans who are beating lady liberty abusive spouse. This is not us. We are not burning cities down. We are not attempting to murder cops and organized fashion or at all. It's not us. There's plenty of things for us to be angry about. Plenty like unconstitutional. Volts counseling out constitutional votes. We'll talk about that later. In the show in some detail the texas suit and the response to it bernie in anchorage alaska home to part my mom's family alaska we are alaska. Bread great deputies. Show burn the russian show as taught him and filling in pat. Thanks for taking my call. I'm calling because before lunch. Rush blindly leads us down the path of succession section I would suggest that we adhere to a philosophy articulated by rush. I don't know maybe twenty years ago and that was a philosophy of incremental ism. It's a philosophy successfully practice by the progressive. And now we know the chinese government also but we take small steps. Whether it's protecting the family or health insurance or saving babies take small steps. Maybe fifty or sixty years. We'll be we will called wished what the progressives have accomplished in this country russia's recently. He's still on his hands in the air. I think you can't understand why we tolerate riots and destruction of property and harm people. Well it's because of this incremental ism that the progressives have succeeded with. What are your thoughts time. Well i would disagree that russia's leading anybody down a path to secession. I don't think that's what you meant to say the but you're right about incremental ism and here's the way the incremental listen works like. Oh we want a public option. Will you have one. There's medicare and medicaid. There are public options. What we want more but will you. Do you have welfare. That's also an option. Yeah but we want a bigger public option and then it's a well. We want the private sector to go away. The incremental ism is language like Does look look. I talk a lot about this because i feel it's so unbelievably destructive to society. And because i know that turn commercialism is pushing this years ago it was. Hey some people don't have identified a man or woman okay. So adults make that decision. I don't think any of us care now. It's thirteen year old kids. can we'll get cross sex hormones without parental permission. And if you don't like that oh by the way we're gonna put those clinics in the school charge your insurance company and then not tell you that your kids on this or on a very serious antidepressants. Because we the expert class as david brooks has called himself. He says he's the expert class. He's a fake conservative dinner times. We'll talk about that too. They've they've they go from just the seed of an idea that's always told us is for the children or it's for the poor and then they push it and the the the violence you talk about in the streets. I think that rush is you know from what i've heard and i don't wanna speak for rush because he does that. Here's what i've heard. It is an astonishing thing to watch mayors and city councils and governors like kate brown and oregon gavin newsom in california. Like andy cuomo in new york like jay z in washington state. Literally allow these things to happen. And i think that sometimes stand with. Aw i do. I stand with our. Have you ever seen these these white little see. I gotta be careful with my language. Let's say this way knuckle. Dagger basement dwelling thumb sucking people made sad by bitterness and jealousy living in basements and begging mom and dad four Four sugar breakfast at the age of thirty to those people white kids in adult bodies. Going to black cops folks. Have you seen this. These antifa types going to black cops and saying things like you've got the biggest knows i've ever seen lips fit through the door with you. The most vile disgusting racism. You'll ever hear and these police officers stand with pride in patients and they stand with their brothers and sisters who are black cops white cops in asia cops in hispanic cops and people who'd rather not talk about the race cops and they don't crack skulls. They don't draw night. Stick where i come from. I'm i'm i'm one third to two. Maybe more redneck. Where i come from. That's a sign. You say that to somebody that's sign. You put a sign in your face that says smack me here about sixteen times and i'm one part christian. Turn the other cheek. But they're pushing it to such a degree that they want that cop to overreact. The left wants that moment where they will cause the violence and then step back and say they started it in the media. This week is trying to pretend that a man who has his three hours of every day of his life five days a week recorded is the one leading this. The secession couldn't be further from the truth. It's always been about ideas. It's always been about ideas with this. Come back on. The russian program taught him and filling in the abbey. Hi i'm todd last name. Herman get to fill in for rush limbaugh today. I want to thank of proud. Rush affiliates newsradio five ninety k. Kyun t in spokane for me is for students today. There is on youtube. If you don't know the history of youtube. I think it's important to understand it That it was founded by. Guy named chad hurley. Great timing perfect timing there and it. just right I think the lead investor backing today got him roelof botha one of the big silicon valley venture capital firms. They kept very little money in the bank so that they were not a target for suits because they knew they were gonna. Have you know people putting up videos. They didn't own music videos and film videos. It was built to be sued was built to be huge. They have no money. No target for a lawsuit. Google acquires it for five or six billion dollars and it was the notion of. Oh you're the media. Now that site purchased by google has announced they will now delete history. They will debate. They will delete debates about election. Twenty twenty they will debate anyone questioning the one in four or quadrille and chance that joe biden caught up in four states in a matter of four hours with vote counts coming in ninety four percent. His way in powered by unconstitutionally provisioned diktats in states. That were the signatures of one person or of county election boards of governors not as the constitution proscribes frankly and plainly. The legislatures of those states youtube owned by google will erase and delete questions about the historical transfer of power. The same youtube. There's announce they have given the world health organization ownership over their healthcare videos an organization funded by an activist. Bill gates connected to the un with an anti western point of view. That's a good thing that this doesn't look anything like china at all right. That's that's that's really comforting isn't it. They'll keep the russia hoax videos up because that's the official state position so once again with the left. It's not just the debate these things. We will disappear debate. We will disappear the controversy. You can't think that listen. If future generations can't watch the history. They can't think thoughts. George orwell wrote about the control of language. You can remove the very ideas we hold dear. You can remove the idea of love if you remove the word. Accept the feeling. But you can't articulate it dumbs down to caveman states of ideas. Good bad sites not science. That's where the left wants people. They don't want gradation. They want degradation of ideas. They want dumbing down of the american populace. They want the disappearing of bad. Think they see it. Let's talk to laurie in mouse. Sten wisconsin. laura. You're on the rush. Limbaugh program thought herman filling in high lori. Hi i'm rush. In president trump have given us our voices. pack a freedom freedom of speech and to your point political correctness. This this was so sad because that was the start of. It are the teachers in the school. Indoctrinating our children and we to me Have seen socialism during obama's years when You can have your healthcare. We got lied about that shovel ready jobs. Oh i'm sorry. They're not so shovel ready. After all i mean the lies the bushes the nine eleven And always thinking that the two parties working against the other one in back there in bed with each other. It's really sad Describe a return of our voice. Laurie you describe this. And i want to return thought to you. You speak of political correctness. Laurie have you ever heard the phrase selectric. Tolerance notice selective tolerance. I want to tell you this. Because i agree with you. That russia has given us. our voice. Amplified our voice for thirty two years and president trump has returned the voice of people who have not been forgotten. They're being raised. By the david brooks is of the world fake conserved in your tux. There was a leftist name. Herbert makusa he. A system called selective tolerance in. He taught it to a generation of professors who are now. Running colleges and running. Teaching schools selective tolerance. Is this lori. We will be tolerant of only those things that tear the united states apart. We will be selectively intolerant sa- political correctness is one phrase for a recipe created by guy. Long ago hebert makusa fu said pretend to be tolerant and yet this program any liberal cken call. I've never seen. Donald trump wants to ban an idea ever or to ban speech. So appreciate you say that lori appreciate you talking about the return of your voice and thank you for calling. Russia shows todd in for rush limbaugh. It's taught herman in for rush limbaugh and next hour you got to hear what fake conservative david brooks said. He has invented a class of his own. And he wants you to know that his class of people is going to be reaching out to us to to sue us into paddison. The heddon let us know that his class. They're going to pay more attention to us. Because we've been hurting for attention part of his class. I'll tell you what he says next hour. What he's named his class part of his class runs seattle from which my radio show emanates selective tolerance hybrid makusa. Left us organizers taught that taught people to be tolerant of only the things that tear down the united states of america like the like the family right the same seattle public health so-called that told people don't shoot data hug your grandma even if she's a sixty five year old cross stitch champion. Not co morbid factor. Incite you'll killer that you dare get together and eat thanksgiving dinner with more than five and a half people now. They've said hey if you're dating swiping left swiping right. adamson sex. Cut a hole in the shower curtain in have what's called a in god. Forgive me a glory hole. That's that's the recommendation special people's taught him in for rush. Limbaugh the qualcomm we believe in staying connected and you can see us wherever five g is helping transform telemedicine supporting remote education empowering mobile p. c.'s the invention ages here learn more at qualcomm dot com slash invention age. You're gonna come into a new season of joy and fulfillment like you've never seen. Hi i'm joel steam. I have a daily podcast brat. Talk about overcoming accomplish dreams and becoming all you were created to be. You were made for more. You have new levels in you. There are seeds of greatness waiting to spring for you can't think negative thoughts and live a positive line and on my daily podcast. I'll help you get your mind going in the right direction. You may have had some disappointments in the past but this is a new day chains that have held you back or being broken doors are going to open the to never dreamed would open. Now do your part. Keep feeding your home feeding your dreams. Don't use your energy to feed your history use your energy to your destiny. It's inspiring uplifting and encouraging. I think you're listening to the jewel steam podcast on the iheartradio app on apple. Podcasts get your podcasts. It is just an absolute pleasure and an honor to sit in for rush. Every time i've gotten to do it. I still just can't believe it. It is still just a thing of marvel to me. I'll leave this building today. Normally do my show at a seattle at k. T h today. I'm in In spokane newsradio five hundred k. q. And teased lead muser studios. I will leave this building and it will still be a dream that just happened. And it's it's as all these are that the lord is made and i've been i've been praying. I've been praying that that a spirit of truth would fall upon this country. The spirit of truth in fact because we're living through an era of just great disinformation and great attempts to break us break the country but to break us to break our will to break our belief in ourselves and our capabilities and our intelligence and our specialists to god or irreplaceability is. You're not replaceable. You're not none of you are and your loved. You are and your tasks important they are. You may be depending on where you're at in the country right now making breakfast for loved one. Who's ill that's important. You might be in a car working hearing this. You might be listening later on podcast after a hard day looking for work you matter your tasks matter your contribution to our great society matters and your intelligence matters in your discernment matters and our group discernment matters. There is a dynamic in the left is attempting bit vitus that is explained in a book that used to be a big deal in technology circles. The kid fedral versus the bizarre. I'm paraphrasing that. The bizarre is everybody goes in and buys and trades and shops in. it's an open market and that's where you get. Great inventions in the cathedral is a few small. Blessed people. decide everything for everybody. That's one way to express it now. The way is where russia's expressed it all. These years is that the left does not seek discussion or agreement. Seek control over us completely. They must be defeated. We could talk about it this way. We can talk about walter williams. God rest som who had said that freedom is not the natural state of things that that there is a an attempt to put people back under their control. The cathedral david brooks is fake conservative at the new york. Times fake conservative. David brooks wants austin. No it's not our fault that were stupid rubes and he wants us to rest assured that he and his fellow greats in what he calls the expert class. We'll be reaching out to us more often. The core problem is not the internet a lot of people that go to the internet as the internet. But look at how much more. Republicans are affected by conspiracy theories than democrats so it can't just the internet. There must be some demand. I think there are two core problems here. One is a lot of people in the expert. Class live in blue cities who are thriving and a lot of people left behind in the world parts of america they feel threatened economically culturally socially and they have no contact with the expert class. So the thing to do one we those of us in the expert esser journalism and academia have to do a better job of reaching out and post trump establishing relationships showing some respect. All i'm relieved. Hey dave come out to house ride with me. i'll take you. Well know you can buy since you're the expert you can buy us lunch and i'll introduce you to some of these groups that are not experts and they can ask you some questions. Dave like i heard the other night during lunch are per dinner with people not in the expert class there who said things like why do what is the. Cdc continued to use a forty cycle pcr tests when she himself has admitted that you cannot even culture a virus from forty cycle pcr tests. That is returning ninety to one hundred percent false positives one of my dinner said hey i heard about that. I also heard that they tested water with the pcr tests for the cove and it came back. That water had the cove it and they said things like. Yeah and i just. I'm asking this like with a ninety nine point. Eight seven percent survival rate. Why doesn't fao come out and say hey you don't have to rush out to get the vaccine if you're not in a vulnerable class you're ninety nine point eight seven percent likely to recover from this ninety five to ninety eight percent likely to never know you had the covert flu. Why does this and this was a conversation. Us just us rubes just kicking around some ideas. Just this rubes. We were also saying things like this. David brooks expert class person. Maybe maybe you didn't hear this. But there were those those saying y is why are these four states five states inventing new rules for elections saying that the covert flu is so dangerous. People can't vote in person. We need to mail everybody in the world the ballots even people have been dead for seventeen years. Because it's so dangerous to vote in person and you know. Look i mean. It's not like the writing. I mean if you're going to write and burn things down then that's perfectly safe. David that might be why people are not developing conspiracy theories but they're developing truth theories dave talk with you any day. I know more about sars. Cov two than you'll ever learned. Dave doesn't make me an expert. It means i observed the patterns of pre covid science lockdowns. Don't work masks. Ineffective do not quarantine the sick. Cdc and who papers on this. Don't use a test returns. False positives use the setting the pcr tests that allows you to identify only live virus as determined by nobel prize nominee in italy an actual scientists. Maybe don't push vaccine at this point. Maybe hold one back that michael jordan the former. Vp of research for pfizer. Says can sterilize women. Because it goes after the spike proteins. David brooks and my my my expert enough for you this rube. That's the most revealing comment yet. The expert class or journalism or journalism academia academia. Like the one that is telling us that. This country was founded in sixteen. Nineteen is a racist colony that that was the founding of america like that academia the academia's academia and academics who told us that the preeminent example of what they call fake news was that trump was elected not selected. By vlad. putin. Is that the sort of expert class. For seeking dave jake tapper clearly. A member of the expert class clearly. Well david brooks said expert class or journalists or academia. He's called the texas case asking the supreme court to decide. Are we still following the constitution. He's stunned he calls it garbage insane and seditious okay. I'll play listen. I know. I'm not an expert class. Member like like jake tapper fake conservative. Dave brooks. pardon me. David you have to have the. How did the the fancy people call it. They call those silence silence. No no no. I got it syllables. So so laval's david brooks not dave. That's what rubes are called. Rob not robert jake. Do you want to get pulled over by cop in have the officer see to you. I am seizing your car. And you jake. Tapper member of the expert class would say. Hey hey you're not a member of the expert class in be and what grounds and a cop says you're disenfranchising other drivers and he takes your car because the constitution says it doesn't ask. It doesn't recommend it doesn't suggest it says state legislative bodies make the voting rules for federal office. The governor of georgia is not the legislature. he's one man. No albeit an expert class. But wait what. The founders expert. Oh sorry we. Some of them are farmers i apologize. Anyone can spit in the ground than girl wheatfield. Mike bloomberg said so the constitution says the people as represented by the legislature will make the voting rules. Why because better the people do it then. One person because that one person expert class will make themselves president for life or governor for life with brand new voting rules. But that's what the expert class want. Remember among the things recommended by the expert class was experts vetting presidential candidates before you hit the vote for them the expert class is recommending reeducation camps for you. Because you had the wrong thing to say. I prefer a non-politician as president of the united states and the expert class is telling you the constitution and the elections be constitutional. Is insane us. So david brooks barbie. David come out to hauser idaho. You and i will go have dinner with a bunch of us rubes in you. Can you can lecture us. We'll even pay per diem. Dave oh that's a fancy word you can look taught him in for rush limbaugh. Gabby no-one todd her. In for rush limbaugh on the eib network and you can leave russian notes at rush. Limbaugh dot com. You can also subscribe to the limbaugh letter and rush twenty four seven. I gotta renew. I keep forgetting to go. Renew my subscription. Hasn't it hasn't been out yet. But i need to give it to myself on christmas. It is always always have rush with you always. We're talking about the expert class just quickly. Some things that the expert classes expertly succeeded in expertly causing during their expertise with a flu. That that and we'll talk about this later. The journalist of the year have predicted that the coronavirus return out to be basically normal flu. We'll talk about later in the year which the journalists of the do that when we talk about time. Magazines guardian of the adoptive Suicides up twenty. Five percent expertise. Don't you know overdoses or up. Fifty to one hundred percent because of the expert class violent crime depends on where you live in seattle What was it the current numbers up three percent homicides at record levels. I know that very similar in In cities like minneapolis heart attacks cardiomyopathy up three hundred percent miss cancer. Screenings at fifty percent missed chemo treatment. Up fifty percent. There's about one hundred and twenty thousand destined unexplained except it can be explained. They're locked down this my friend just in heart at rational ground is data expert and tracks this stuff rational ground. You can go there and be rational. But david brooks will let you know. Look those are expert that drive that made imagine if the word experts involved how bad things would be without their expertise. It's chilling to think without their expertise. We might have just said if you're sick. Stay home if you're old and ill be careful if young go back to work wash your hands such and use the the the the inner elbow of your arm. What is at the the bend of your arm to cover your sneezes. Not your hands. Would it with your hands in your face and the snot such. Don't do that but we have. The experts locking down economies generational theft. But it's an expert theft so at least we know that we could be padded upon the head by the david brooks is in jake tapper of the world the expert class folks guys tapper brooks log. Your eye specs ours on to say one of the expert classes of course politicians like cynthia johnson. Jody from homered. George who would like to address some things. Cynthia johnson said jody. Welcome to the russian is taught him and filling in. Hi how are you doing dude. Great cynthia okay I am calling in reference to simply johnson in michigan regarding her domestic terroristic threats towards trump supporters She needs to be held accountable. And in my opinion be arrested. There needs to be an outcry. The american people that That we're not gonna do this kind of rhetoric to continue from our elected officials because it doesn't just resonate in their state it resonates all over the united states of america and i have already called. conan's office take cruises office the fbi And i just wanted to contact Rush limbaugh shown so that the audience can be aware of what she has said and that they can have their voices her to by contacting their elected officials and did even the fbi because either domestic terroristic threats toward trump supporters. She said that we are to walk lightly into watch our back and she was calling on the military and she also called for her black brown brothers and sister. She said you know what i mean she. She was calling on then to To take down The white rent. This kind of rhetoric is dangerous and it needs to be stopped. Would you maybe consider this. Cessessionist rhetoric. i i believe it's terroristic right. I agree with you on that. I'm wondering since the media. This week was pretending that rush will his was was was sponsoring succession of states. Which was not most pointedly was not. We went through that last hour. Do you think this sort of talk is dismissed No i don't think this is just. This is just typical of of the left They They thought their authority and fear. And i think it's time that we said we've had enough that. We're not going to tolerate this kind of rhetoric. That dangerous and we see what's been happening with the black lives matter and teeth of movement because said that their rhetoric. They held accountable. They accuse us of being terrorists. They are the true terrorist. We're not the ones going around threatening people's lives. She's threatening the lives of trump supporters. That right there in itself. She should arrested. If you've seen from office if you've not seen the video if you've not seen the video to which jody's referring we'll try to get this audio for you. Cynthia johnson films herself up close and you know she serious because she takes off her woke mask around her neck and she's in a gray suit and and she's looking really deadly serious into the camera and she does say things like you need to walk carefully need to walk. He needs to be careful. And it's very i take it to be very menacing. And then she says in those of you who are soldiers. If you know what to do. I think she says do it right. Do it right. This comes on the heels of it being done right. Well i mean if your goal is violence there have been two citizens of our country murdered and political murders in one in denver one in portland because of their political position in the judgment of just about everybody who watched these definitely important definitely in portland and teeth up in portland and yet i see no calls to jody to your point. I see no calls for her to resign. We have a congressman. Maybe he won't confirm it but importantly he will not deny it. Maybe sleeping with the chinese spy for the chinese communist party who incidentally bundled cash for his campaign and incidentally apparently helped seed people into congressional offices and now oh is he going to get off the intelligence committee will maybe so. Maybe maybe not. Maybe not in congress anymore. It's the the selective outrage. It's almost a cliche to say. But i'll see if we can get this audio for you. Maybe were missing something. Maybe there's some nuance that we've missed. And cynthia johnson statement is taught. Herman in for rush limbaugh. The abbey no rush about dot com. You can leave a special note of support for rush. I've heard him talk about how meaningful are notes to him so hope you get an opportunity that okay. I want to get to the just the astonishing degree of stamina that are has displayed as he has been and i wanna make sure racist the right way as you have been never treated more disloyally by so called important members of the gop. In i'm going to talk about. Ag bar in a second here. And i have been a pretty big defender of edgy. Par and his knowledge of a certain investigation into a laptop of a certain person who said to have a certain math problem for that. Want to hear. Talk to laurie in georgia. I want you to hear what cynthia who des socratic state rep said in this video. Filmed right up. Close to her face and i think she looks individual. She's like maybe trying to trying to scare people a little. But that's just me. I don't know her. But here's what she said. So this is just a warning to trumpers. Be careful walk lightly. We ain't playing with you enough of the shenanigans. Enough is enough and for those of you. Who are soldiers. You know how to do it do it. Right in order to make them pay. I love ya. Maybe she meant it in a nice way. Maybe she meant that in a nice way there. There are in american cities on multiple nights. There are members well. Members there are adherents to clamp onto people who adore follow embrace deify. The black lives matter. Inc domestic terror group and their partners in who go through to this day. I i know. There's a rumor that they had disappeared. Post-election and to most in most ways blacklivesmatter inc has well with their one point. Three billion dollars that they have spent me do. the math. math leverage is harlem. Care the one zero on helping black people zero. They've absconded with those dollars to this day in american neighborhoods they go through neighborhoods and they chant. Fire fire gentrify. Fire fire fire. Get the fire. These are the same people who attempted to burn cops alive in a trailer in seattle after they tried to lock them in with quick drying cement. Oh you didn't hear about that. So when cynthia johnson says things like that and she is a quote lawmaker. I don't maybe. I missed the part. Where david brooks kicks her out of the expert class. Maybe i missed the part. Where jake tapper says. That's seditious which he's called a court case a court case a request that the supreme court say to wisconsin and michigan and georgia and pennsylvania. Y'all have to follow the constitution. Or i guess. You could effectively secede by announcing yourselves as non adherence to the constitution of the united states of america where we don't adhere it'd be one step past sanctuary states saying you actually. We refuse to cooperate with with federal immigration authorities and then going to the next level. Oh we actually won't let you come in our courtrooms and then going to the next level we won't we won't let you come in our jails then go into the next level like this guy the the so called kind prosecutor and king county which is the county in which seattle sits a guy who is known universally as as heroin. Dan sarrebourg says. I will not prosecute illegal immigrants with with wise. Because it's unfair or you could go further with states who've said yeah. That person did commit a murder but they snuck into the country therefore they're especial special class of people. You can do that. I wait to see cynthia. Johnson kicked out of the expert costs. I wait to see jeb. Bush who who's thanked. John cornyn john cornyn has come out and said how dare the state of texas say. Wait a minute. Unconstitutional votes in wisconsin michigan georgia and pennsylvania unconstitutional votes dilute the value of constitutional votes in texas. How dare they challenge other states abilities to secede from aspects of the constitution. john cornyn. oh he hates the lawsuit. he's from texas. Don't you know jeb. Bush is from texas or thank. You john cornyn. Cue thank you for standing up. It's a court case filed every day. It's a question for the supreme court and to me. The questions pretty simple do we do. The states have to adhere to the constitution order. They get to succeed but just to. What is it articles. Two and three just just to. Those is bigger to succeed seat from that. Next day can secede from the first amendment and the second amendment fourth and the fifth and the tenth etc ad nauseam. I states can't secede from the tenth that you understand my meaning. Secession by progressivism. Secession by incremental. Ism states. now we're not following that part of the constitution and the disloyalty is to us william bar. Bill barr knew he knew about the hunter biden. Investigation for months. Now i want to extend some grace to bill barr to say. Perhaps this is principles. Look i don't want to politicize this bill. It was already in the public sphere bill. The democrats politicized a lie that the president was owned by russia. Politicized it for four years. They politicized the lie that the president's voters were rushing tools unable to know the truth. Bill de knowledge about the hunter biden. Investigation was lied about by jack. Dorsey the so-called while he is the ceo of twitter. Jack dorsey nope it's disinformation. We will not avail. People of at facebook decreased reaches about the stories. They call it protection protecting the two thousand twenty election bay protecting the results bill. It was already politicized bill. The second oldest newspaper in the country was blocked from distributing at do these publishers and they're not platforms in. You knew when there is an attempt to meddle in this election by jack dorsey by mark zuckerberg by the mockingbird media by cnn meddling pretending. I don't even know if joe biden has a kid named hunter wait. I thought his name was was hank biden. And you don't come forward with the truth. Bill is your principal not to inform the american people that the guy who the media pretended fifteen seconds after they got resulted to like pretend that he was president might be compromised by our actual number one geopolitical flow the chinese communist party. Maybe we should know that. Bill barr but now he's telling us thanks. Bill get to more of your phone calls. It is open line friday. Let's start firing through your kohl's to russian bus shows taught him an infrared on the eib network taught herman in for rush limbaugh on the eib network. I don't know that we have gotten the voice voicemail yet from her all the rivera for his apology. For buying into the disinformation about rush. We'll check on that. Also no word yet on if the leader of the expert class david brooks will be coming to idaho to To anoint us. We're not anoint tests but to rub us on are cute fuzzy little heads and let us know that the expert class they're paying attention reaching out let's talk to luiz. Cumming georgia lewis. You're on the russian program has taught him and filling in welcome. Louis how you doing so great born and raised in new york. Been down here in georgia now. Fifteen years and i'm puerto rican and first and foremost i'm gonna american i but you get sick and tired of these political activists and leaders that want us us brown people for the political ploys and my kids are half white and i'm expected to send them to reeducation camps. Well i guess just getting sick and tired of it man. It's just ridiculous already you know. It's it's just unnecessary. And and you know. I've been a republican now for quite some time but it's a lot more people like myself have been opening their eyes up to the left and we all know what's really going on and it's it's it's It's clear that the results of the election were in our favor. And we're taking away from us because there's no way where we're going to be gaining seats and lose a presidential election. The masks doesn't work at all. Want to ask you just a series of questions. Because i'm filled with questions number one. Honestly how do you feel about the phrase black and brown people like it. I don't like it because we're off from somewhere. I mean you're either italian irish german. I mean until week because it's an awful lot. We all come from somewhere. We're just not white. Like brown. And and i agree i find it. I find it to be the least common or the the lowest common denominator. It's you know it is a a hugh right huge. I'm much more interested in who you are than hugh you are and let me ask you this coming from new york. Where there's a pretty robust puerto rican community to georgia honestly. Have you experienced racism in georgia as someone that the left would call a brown man not racism but prejudiced when i came down here and that was basically because of the sound of my voice when i first came down here i have a job calling people in north georgia counties. And he'll haunt me in their house to do service. Because i had a yankee accent that offer me at all. Because i had to understand why they felt that way and i learned and after you know talking with these folks and you know next thing you know. There's giving me the keys to their houses and telling me to make refrigerator. Goodness that's i mean. That's not a slow clap. That's that's that's an american clap. I'd love what you just said. Man i love that so your kids. You know their youth. I'm trying lewis. Not to use the nomenclature of the left and in black and brown people. And i don't know maybe that makes your kids tan. I don't know it's it's silly Do they ask you or do they ever say dad Should we have like color based alliance us kids. How did they feel about statements. Like black lives matter or black and brown people must think this way. Honestly how do they feel. Okay well my daughter. Six years old. So i have not introduced her to that. Every one is a child World children of of the lord. Jesus christ and the understands now. My two boys are a little older eighteen and fifteen nineteen year old sees through the crack. That's being within wants to leave new york. My fifteen year olds is kind of still like the high. So he doesn't understand the differences What's going on versus what you know what to being told on the tv versus what really going on. But he was one of those kids despite that that did not leave the classroom. when everyone was protesting. The guns are a year or so back they both. My sons were in School they sat in they go out of protest and they were making fun of them when the kids and the and the teachers got back. You louis what your kids did by not joining the group is so vitally important. I've been really scared by how many people have given into masks my view. You wanna wear them. that's fine. please understand that they clinically. Don't work like an i. I'm obsessed with with covert in the details about that. I've been terrified about that. I've also been terrified by how many people simply have now decided that well we have no choice but to remain locked down in your kids to have that courage at that age when peer pressure and peer adoration. This everything for those kids man. I'm proud of them. At least this is a great phone. Call and i wanna thank you for the honesty about your experience in georgia in the way the story ends. And it's just really great to have in the audience. You louise for call. No show one last thing before you. He's my daughter now whenever she cries i tell a dump. Don't be crying like a democrat. That's in my in my brief radio career. You have made me clap for. Maybe the fourth time ever just broken out in spontaneous applause s really cool louis. Gay god's grace piece of the lord passes understanding be amongst junior family. Thank you for calling russia. Show lewis just an absolute pleasure taught herman in for rush limbaugh on the one and only get too many more of your calls as we roll through open line. Friday on the rush limbaugh program is taught him and do my best job. I can fill in for rush such an amazing on her. We just talked to louise in georgia and lewis a puerto rican moved from the to georgia in was explaining. He does not like being called a black and brown person. He does not like being told by. Joe biden others it. You ain't puerto rican if you don't vote for me etc and raising kids to understand that they don't own anybody their allegiance because they happen to be from puerto rico right the country. The united states. Obviously the allegiance. Baroness allegiance whose faith. I interviewed a woman from issaquah washington whose husband is a police officer and she was surprised because her husband has been very active at their school. They've young kids very accurate at their school taking his time to visit with the kids etc and her kids came home to emails from their school district in washington saying that cops murder black and brown people because they like to and her kids happen to be part black part white and they're looking at their father who is a black cop and they marine and they worry about him when he leaves the house in the seattle area and she was saying to the school district really the same man. You know you now calling a murderer and the white supremacist. A black man. That's the sickness of the left dividing this nation on purpose taught. Herman infrared such an honor to fill in for rush. Every time i've been allowed to do it's an invited to do it. They want wanna think alley. And mike and greg james and craig and rush himself and you for letting me do this on a russia's program today is i'm fond of saying is the day the lord is made and i believe that our founding documents in the united states were i contend they were divinely inspired and we can talk through that you've heard rush of course every year favor us with the true story of thanksgiving and the true story of of this country and you can also read for yourself the recognition that became the american experiment. The american exceptionalism american is not america's not exceptional because of the size of the continent or our placement in terms of the hemispheric placements. The american exceptionalism is that men women but who had an opportunity to create their kingdom. Didn't they didn't. They took great care to recognize something that had never been recognized in the history of countries that there their rights that human beings have because we were created by god the creator we have these rights by virtue of the fact that god cared enough for us to make us not automatons. We're not robots like god who in my judgment and i contend is pro freedom and consequently then pro responsibility. Sure you can make those decisions and you will pay the price. Likewise in a constitution and bill of rights the pursuit of life liberty novenas their wordsmiths. They were careful with words. They understood the power of words. They signed their own death. Warrants but the declaration of independence. They understood that by signing that document. They were saying to the king. We have conveniently provided you are on death warrants. They prescribed systems that made it hard for people to become monarchs or kings. They described systems checks and balances. They're call to make it difficult for people to game the system in their favor. They were very prescriptive in that regard. They wanted to make sure that our conscience that which is in our mind that consider our conscience to be a bridge between our soul in our beings our conscience our most valuable possession is our conscience. I don't think we possess our souls. I don't think it's ours. I think our conscience is the first amendment the second amendment our ability to guard the defensive our conscience with firearms the same ones that the government had at the time in voting. Do you think that people who signed their own death warrant. When they signed the declaration of independence do think that they understood the importance of not allowing a monarchy to rise again of not giving a powerful person the ability to create rules under which that person would always be reelected. Do you think that men who studied the world's geopolitical systems all of them didn't in fact think through the steps someone would take to advantage themselves in elections to such a degree that they could never again lose office when they designed the constitution and designed for federal offices. These people who had great regard for the power of the people hence the tenth amendment those powers not given directly to the federal government resides with the people or the state they chose some powers for the federal government a few of them but they chose them amongst those were the ability to decree design and prescribe the process for having election rules in various states for federal offices. Those men who loved words who studied them understood their power who were afraid of having a monarchy rise again who'd never wanted power concentrated designed rules and they said in the states the body of the state legislators they will make the rules for elections they will the largest body that proportionally represents the most people explain that a governor of a state represents all the people so in a state of seven million people. It is one to seven million in a legislative body can be one two thousand. You're much more likely to meet your state rap in a grocery store than ever meeting your governor just just statistically speaking the founders said the state houses the legislatures shell determine the election rules. This isn't complicated. In the states of texas's case against wisconsin michigan pennsylvania and georgia. You can make complicated if that makes you happy or if that serves your purposes. Is the governor of georgia is he the state legislature. That's actually a yes or no question. He's not is he. One man yes. If he's allowed to make election rules with the stroke of a pen can he make himself governor forever. Yes likewise is the secretary of state of georgia is he the state legislature. He's not could. He create methods if he consigned side agreements with the democrat national committee in what's called a consent decree and that may be a and settle thing. That's a neat little technique power seekers us. Hey you and then you'll say hey. I can't defend this in court so let's reach a side. Agreement is the democrat national committee. Are they the legislature of georgia. Now they're not north the secretary of state if they made a side agreement that change. The rules of elections are county boards of elections in philadelphia. Are they the state legislature. No is the governor philadelphia. No is the supreme court no and sustain pennsylvania. They violated their own state. Constitution violated the federal constitution's parameters on how elections are created or how they are administered so jeb bush is still rage tweeting today to the degree that jeb bush can range tweet which is sort of like a block. A- velveeta cheese being really passionate about something. You've seen that when a block of velveeta cheese just shakes with indignation so jabbed velveeta cheese of politics has him or his staff rage. Tweeting about texas lawsuit. It's ridiculous they couldn't even get the solicitor general to represent it. They're gonna turn to ted cruz. Yes there are people who have been in in. They have been installed into the republican party or ground down or deluded down or they're so very very very very very happy to be invited to the jeb bush christmas party. Pardon me jab. I didn't mean to offend you holiday party but they will say look. We can't shallan jr the election results. This is crazy. It's exactly what the left will count on. We can't challenge our system. We're not texas is saying. Do we have a system. Do we actually have laws. Because if county election boards and states secretaries of state and governors can change election laws of county clerk. Why not an assistant county clerk. Who works weekends. Sundays noon through four. Why not attempt employees brought in. I don't know from some temp firm. Who brings people in from china that well. I have an idea to get into the building. I can change the election rules. Why not twenty. Four states oppose the texas lawsuit. Seventeen states approve it last. Count all of one hundred. Six republicans can see clear to going to the supreme court to say. Do we still follow the constitutional rules. They're not guidelines this the legislatures shell not might can think about. Maybe one day would consider so when people are telling you like the velveeta cheese of the role of politics. Jeb bush and by the way people like velveeta cheese i get it because with chile and hot sauce Heart attack in a bowl. It's delicious if you microwave to people who want to tell you this is frivolous was it frivolous. When the people who signed the declaration of independence understood they were signing their death. Mort is that an active frivolity. You brave members of the expert class. We'll come back on the rush limbaugh program with your phone calls and open line. Friday eight hundred two eight two two eighty to talk in in for rush limbaugh. The taught her in for rush. Limbaugh this right now. This moment is it's time day that most home burglaries take place. And it's not late at night like you'd see in the movies or tv shows in the middle of the day when the bad guys think that you've left your home unprotected and it's fair game rush would tell you that's where simply safe comes through for you. There's every reason to secure your home and make your family that much safer. You can do it now. You can actually have a home security system where it used to not be affordable. This is simply safe home security. There's always going to be a time when your extra concerned that your home is properly secured whether it's when you leave for work in the morning or leave your place vacant for the days that you're away vacationing or what have you simply safe's system gives you that peace of mind. There's an effective deterrent standing in the way of every burglar once you install this system it's really cool because it doesn't use wires that takes so much complexity out of it takes the expense out of it. The system installs quickly less than an hour. It operates efficiently uses wifi for all of the various sensors to communicate with the base station. Not wires you can expand it as you wish. You can add sensors wherever you want without running a single wire. All you have to do is put the sensor where you want it. You go online to simplysafeusa.com you choose the components that you want they pre-test and configure them. They send them to you. You put more. You want them in the house do it. In less than an hour you were up and running. Twenty four seven monitoring meaning. There's a break in cops got called fourteen ninety nine a month not fifty and there's no long term contract design see it again at simplisafe usa dot com. You get free. Hd camera with your purchase. It's a big deal. Simplisafe usa dot com. Thank you rush. And of course thank you for supporting this sponsors. The rush limbaugh program. All these years talk to john in topic arizona. You're on the rush limbaugh program. John thanks for waiting. Appreciate it welcomed the russian show. It's todd herman filling. Yes topa care. Zona talk to make a point. No problem i wonder if the point that the gop is not been paying attention to what's been going on here in arizona last few years after mccain died. We ended up with mick. Sally runny cinema. She lost so we got cinnamon. There's democrat and then kyle or Flake steps down. They stick kiling there. Then kyle decides he doesn't wanna hang out so then they we end up with mc sally against kelly and then kellyanne of in there as a democrat. We lost two seats in this state in the last three years or so to democrats and we wouldn't even be talking about georgia. Gop just paid attention to what the heck was going on here. In arizona and down in america county was all the shenanigans. and then you know turning around and certifying. The election without hearing with giuliani. Had to say yeah. I saw that do see. If i'm not mistaken is gonna be the head of the Pseudo republican governors association. Now let me ask you this. What is going on there. I think there's a lot of shenanigans. It's been going on in maricopa county for a while. You know they really targeted maricopa during the obama administration. When you had pile down there you know keeping all the illegals out in such and When jan brewer end up stepping out it just seemed like the party started to kind of go ryan on everybody. And you know i. It just seems like there's been a lot of shenanigans. Going down down the tucson america their county area fraud Yeah i mean Giuliani could sit. Saying there's almost three hundred thousand. You know questionable votes in the state and yet they certified the election with know less than ten thousand votes and didn't bother to even listen to what he had to say. Meanwhile the got to democrats as senators from this thing. I can't even. I just can't believe it. Buying there is a thing that the democrats started years ago. John called they did. It was called the colorado experiment and it was about turning red states blue and they spent somewhere around thirteen million bucks for something and it was very sophisticated. What they did is they looked at they. They look at these things as as almost maoist insurrections and are not trying to be hyperbolic they do. They look at. They look at college campuses as as maoist villages and we own those. So how can we then take those in owned the city councils and how can we then take those city councils and radicalized them to such a degree that they could become pressure groups for people who are even moderate in thought in crate. That pressure that momentum that sense that the owner left owns us in his winning this and then they in a very militaristic way. I'm not saying violently. But in a way they expand from those so i say this for other red states. I say this for for idaho. In regard to boise and montana. In regard to into regard. I think boseman and maybe i'm wrong on bozeman. But this contain them do this. Don't give them things they like. Don't give them high speed rail scams. Don't give them light rail scams on your college. Campuses demand demand that you have ideological equality on college campuses. Make an argument about equality. Make it costly for them. If they can't demonstrate that they have conservative professors on campus. Fifty fifty they'll see to chill on economic freedom. You'll say no it's a return to economic freedom. do not give them the slightest foot in the door on saying. Hey we're going to welcome people who take drugs to our community. That's what these cities do. They create these. Oh it we're going to stop. We're going to stop criminalizing drug use. We're going to stop doing that because it's a humane thing to do. We're going to get into restoration programs with people commit crimes and understand. I need redemption every day. If sometime someone's a first offender good gracious. Yes yes try to keep them out of the system. But that's not what it's about. It's about creating an environment that imports people who want to vote for leftist policies. Defend your states demand. The gop makeup battleground out of these college cities. Because that's what the left is doing in pay attention to this stuff. Don't see your cities to give in like the gop in washington state. Did the gop in portland did well. It's just portland. Give them the city. They can't get the rest of the state they can. If they own your major city they can get the rest of the state. They control the spending the population centers. You must gop. i'm looking at you. Doug ducey as i understand. I think i got it. Right is now the head of the titular. Republicans pseudo republican governors association. I'm looking at you. I'm looking at the gop and there was a great election. It was a red wave and it was trump's period. It was the trump wave now to your point about vote fraud. Anomalies within anomalies within anomalies the president one more votes income and still lose in that way. We can go down the list. All his losses came in these key states. All of whom changed the rules. All of whom broke with the constitution and and they happened in a four hour period in the middle of the night after the counting had stopped. That's an anomaly. Within an anomaly within an anomaly. That's the one in four trillion. Chance taught herman in for rush limbaugh on the eib. Thank you for having me. Those curious that do a morning show that emanates from seattle at com. There's a podcast available there. What's a radio show. But that's that's the website on twitter a complaint about the music here off topic mannheim steamroller. Christmas music isn't being played missing russia's christmas music We'll just make this very clear that starts next week. that's when then. When russia's christmas music will start next week and we're anticipating russia's return to the golden eib the actual and only golden eib. Microphone on monday. I gotta get to the guardian of the year from time magazine. They've invented some new classes for the expert class to to honor. And i'll tell you who the guardian of the year is in just a second. Talk to sean in. Cumming georgia sean. You're on the rush. Limbaugh program taught her filling in glad. You called sean. Thanks for waiting. Hey thanks. I've been watching the hearings in georgia and michigan other states for way too long this last week and there are so many instinct. There are so many significant anomalies. And maybe they've been there to a lesser extent prior well elections. But this time it seems just way way more prevalent. Can i give a couple of quick examples. The harry's zoo okay. Susie voyles pull manager and fulton county with over twenty years of experience testify that she was working on the audit process at table. One thirty six and she saw hundreds of mail in ballots. That were perfect. Mail in ballots. Perfect no fold would have been folded if they were mailed out and a batch of over one hundred of them that had the exact same image for the biden votes. You notice a little tail. Unlike the side of the oval that your circle in and it was ballot after ballot after ballot that had it it was copied over and over on pristine paper and won't even showed signs of like the copy machine top was raised during the copy. She said she told the manager. They didn't seem to care. She informed the of secretary of state has not heard anything back. And then there's a gentleman named david cross. He testified that he noticed there. Were these large ballot transport bags with thousands of ballots that were mandated to be secured but were missing the locks. Many were missing the chain of custody records. He told the higher ups at the counting centre and was immediately kicked out and labeled a troublemaker. And the media to take some pictures and they showed him during the hearing that the pictures are there. These are tainted tainted votes. This is the this is what people must understand. Because you'll have people from the left or people who are following the jeb bush school of. Don't you dare question the system. That's that's just not fair. That's not done it's done is when the georgia says we've counted the votes again. We did three counts. Here's a funny thing if if someone if if you if you recount the same tainted votes what's what difference you're gonna get exac exactly. We don't need widespread fraud targeted fraud. Just a few counties could swing the election right. There's an analysis that i'm just wild about because it matches up with what i've seen. I i come from a background of working with engineers and data and at one point started in in seoul. The big data company. And i've got friends. Who are big time. I mean serious for real data analysts and i've watched i've watched patrick burned the founder and ceo of overstock dot com interviews in the media and his video. He did about observing algorithm fraud. I've watched. I've read this piece from woody jenkins at central city news in woody in your state takes defeat of votes in analyzes said. Hey how is it that in a raw data feed. There's blocks of twelve hundred votes for biden. So you have know it's out to me. That's an algorithm. Raw data doesn't present itself that way. That's not what happens. And in in pennsylvania it was block of two thousand votes for biden inserted from time to time that would match directly up with what you're saying about piles of ballots it appear to be xerox copies so for the secretary of state of georgia. Understand this we watched. You are absolutely doing everything you would do. If you didn't want us to see we watched you don't want to see so there's also there is motive opportunity. Then there's attempts to hide so i agree with you. I am very very concerned about that. Sean that's a great call. Thanks for calling rushing. Show very much Time magazine is speaking of the expert class. David brooks the fake conservative. The new york times has appointed has created a new class of people called the expert class. So he's created the class therefore he runs it and he's suggested that it's him and journalists are academics or people who are doing well in blue cities and they want you to know. David brooks wants you to know that that they're going to reach out more to you because you are being taken in by conspiracy theories time magazine has taken dr tony out. She made him the guardian of the year conspiracy. Theories let me let me present some to you. Tony falcon said this. You know in the middle of the pandemic wearing masks does not provide the sort of protection people think it does it in fact it may. It may lead. It may lead to some harm weeks later. Tony i wear a mask because it's it's the right thing to do. it shows. It shows people that this is the right thing to do tony. Foul at a ballgame with the mask off tony fouled. She knows it has said. And i've played the audio on my own program about the pcr tests that contend to show that you have the covert they don't. They are ninety percent false positives because they're running too many cycles. I can geek on this day. Let me make it super super clear. They're taking images of viral aren a and blowing it up by one trillion times. This is very much like if you are a festivities cleaner of your house you clean it every day. If i came in and took a microscope under your fridge i could say year filthy booked. You look at you more completely. They're finding leftover remnants of some viral code. That may have come from. A fluid may have come from the flu from the flu or cold. It may not be the covid ninety percent of the time. It's not tony thao. She said you know with pcr cycles threshold of above thirty five. You know you can't culture a virus from that so it's not i mean you can't even culture keep determine whether people have a live virus. He knows he knows to members of his team. Wrote a very widely received widely acclaimed paper saying in the midst of a upper repertory respiratory virus like the covert. Flu don't lockdown. He knows that he knows. The survivability rate is is is ninety nine point eight seven percent anytime he wanted to. He could come out and say this painting that people need to understand most of the people who are dying from this from from from covert one died this year anyway. Most of the people were that sick to. Let's let's let's have some reasonableness and how we deal with this. he won't. He's not a guardian of anything but him well and the expert class time magazine hates us. Tony guardian david brooks is the head of the expert class. A sucked in hell michigan on the rush. Limbaugh program has taught him and filling in high cece c. Heus we. We've talked before. Good that you back. Thank you yes. It was many months ago. That i call just at the beginning of my journey here and since then we have taken our obama pictures off the wall. I don't know if i told you. I had already gone to the rally up in freeling michigan. And there's so so many lies. I went to a great women for trump bonfire and i spoke and they put me up on facebook talking about everything. Hashtag walkaway all that so. What i wanted to talk about today was the hypocrisy of the mass. And you. you're already telling this. i already know that. The tests are a bunch of baloney. And they're using it for something else. I'm not exactly sure. But i know a friend of mine in california. I think that you be gathering dna. I've also seen that. There's kovin on the test. Swab and i've also seen recently that. There's a little microchip on the swab into your nasal cavity. And i wanna know why. Our kids are being abused. I see little kids in the store on their mother's hip like with math on these people think they're doing something to protect their kids and at school we can't go because we have a pre existing conditions which we can't wear a mask we were just thrown out of a store the other day because I guess wearing Not wearing a mask and wearing our trump year people cry earlier. My daughter has a hat that says he's a fifth grader. It says trump twenty twenty make liberals cry again. And i don't know somebody ran away and i saw this The local news. There's glue ultra violet robot. Now that goes into the line dugout and cleans it out from all the viruses kills all. Why can't we do that for our school. Let let me why. Because they want the schools close. I don't i've not. I don't believe that there's microchips in the on. This on the tip of the eighteen foot q tip they shove up your beak right next to your brain. I will tell you this. I stay grounded in facts in this stuff but you said something vital. Why the masks. I want to address that. When i come back. Let's remember it was. Cc from hell. Michigan and cc is now with us. I do remember the phone call. Cc weren't quite there yet. you're here now. God bless you want them. Were so proud to have you on the team. Cc so proud to have you as part of our family fully and completely so basically what you said about why the mask. I want to address that when we come back inspired by the newest member of our team. Cc from hell michigan. God bless you taught him an infrared shibam the abbey. It's taught her in for rush limbaugh on the eib network. I wanted to address. What's who's a new member of the conservative family Hell michigan brought up. Which is why masks. And i wanted something that pointed to because a lot of people concerned about this that that okay with these long cue tips. This show up your beak to tests for covid Is there microchip. Cove sipa of that. I operate in the realm of facts. So i don't. I don't think that's the case and i would say this to people the folks who say people think that. Wait a minute. There's one hundred years of history about masks face coverings and illnesses like this. We'll give you quote using a mask to filter out a virus like using chicken wire to filter out dust where that come from came from pbs. A special they ran about the spanish flu in nineteen eighteen. Where face coverings were compulsory. Where you could be shot dead by sheriff for breaking quarantine sixty million people died from that it killed young people not old people but collective but it also could co doesn't do that when people can access information like that and say wait a minute. Why are they making. People wear masks. When a danish masks study is done diligently to the scientific method a group of people wore masks group of people did not. It was six thousand or so in total. It's a waited for six months. No academic journal would publish it. Because they said oh. We don't like the results not that we don't like the methodology. We don't like the results. There's show masks made no difference. There's another study. Academic peer reviewed two groups of marines until about four thousand people. One group of marines was was made to lock down to have their meals plated to go through fanatical cleansing of their surroundings. The other group didn't have to do any of those things. They were monitored by their commanding officers. You will do this. They voluntarily signed up but the participated the group that did not lockdown. The group did not wear masks. Got less covert then. The group that did people have access to this information and so they will begin to say. Wait a minute if you're lying to us about masks and you're forgetting to tell us when you say people died from covert you mean with covid when you forgetting to tell us that you count cova deaths far differently than you ever counted flu deaths. You change the rules if you count coca desk like you count flu deaths. You're talking about sixty. seven thousand. Total people have died from or with covid. According to the rules of the flu people will say what else are you lying about. You're not acting in a trustworthy way at all. Why masks well. Because they're embarrassed and they liked the result people are ignoring their own common sense and putting something on their face. That doesn't work that they're doing what they're expert class tells them get to a marshall in tallahassee florida. Marcia you're on. The russian by program is taught herman filling in welcome to the show marshall. Hey non mask wearing dez prayers to rush jeb bush and all the establishment republicans who seem to be peeling off and not backing us up during this election fight. marshall organized ground volunteers for jabs brother in two thousand in tallahassee florida when their lawyers were hauled twenty four hours from the airport on shifts. That was us when we when four. Am one any people who stand in line for t to keep place the for attorneys courthouse. That was us. it was the establishment. I was libertarian nationalist. Populist we all came together for the party and we stuck together and we fought like hell for his brother and for him now to abandon ship and stab us in the back. It doesn't feel very good and we will remember up. You heard that jeb bush. That was marshall in tallahassee florida straight to jeb bush taught her in for rush. Limbaugh gabby no. It's been just an utter pleasure and honor to fill in for rush limbaugh today. Todd herman. K t h in seattle and just makes the whole team. May i be. I mean not speak with you. In fact i hope i don't on show a prior to christmas because we won't rush back where rush belongs. Just say this about The christmas miracle. I see what a strange way for god to create. Faith himself that you you became a baby of a teenage mother. Not yet married in a town. Decried is nothing good comes from there. You made yourself week. You trusted us some of strategy. Well some of us did not but she did this for us. Truly interesting time to see the christmas star again. We haven't seen forever. God is in charge and he put us here for a reason at this time. Thank you for having his taught. Herman for rush. Limbaugh gonna come into a new season of joy and fulfillment. Like you've never seen hi. I'm joan los team. I have a daily podcast. Rock talk about overcoming obstacles accomplishing dreams and becoming. All you were created to be. You may have had some disappointments in the past but this is a new day. Keep feeding your home's feeding your dreams. Use your energy to feed your destiny listened to the joel osteen. Daily podcast on the iheartradio app. Or wherever you get your podcast.

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The Candy Man  Part Two

Monster Presents: Insomniac

29:08 min | 1 year ago

The Candy Man Part Two

"And we're back at the ron burgundy podcasts season two baby pressure team what we'd do. I brush my teeth. Whenever what else does on holidays and sometimes i forget. I'm not perfect smile of your breath bother you being the smell of rare steak aged whiskey. Excuse no carolina that doesn't bother me. Listen to the ron burgundy podcast on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever after you find your podcasts the views and opinions expressed in this podcast or solely those of the authors and participants in do not necessarily represent those of iheartmedia stuff media or its employees listener discretion is advised from my heart radio and tender foot t._v. monster presents insomniac. I'm scott benjamin and everything. I think i'm about to tell you is real. This is insomniac a <music> beginning in nineteen seventy and all the way through august of nineteen eighteen seventy three there was a pattern forming in the community of houston heights in the north west central area of houston texas young boys his lots of them were disappearing more than forty in all before it finally ended parents parents were frantic reporting missing children's the houston police but the police were quick to dismiss the cases all of them as runaways and it was a decision that they would later regret as community backlash was intense when the real nature of the disappearances was soon uncovered <music> occasionally the parents would receive a note from their missing sons written in their own handwriting stating that they had moved away to find work mark or they were going to stay with a friend for a while. Some even received telephone calls their missing sons stating the same. When of course none of that was true. The boys were forced to write those notes or make those calls to their parents. We're now that the circle of trust included elmer wayne henley dean choral raise the stakes in his deadly game he offered both of his young companions brooks and henley two hundred dollars for each boy. They could lure into his house victim. Henley later claimed that he ignored corals offer until early nineteen seventy two when his family was in need of the money the truth earth is we'll never really know the first time henley claimed his two hundred dollars bounty for the life of a friend we do know that it became a regular occurrence silence. Here's the way it worked. Henley in coral came up with a plan that coincidentally was almost identical all to what john wayne casey was doing in chicago at the very same time the thought of a way to get a teen to willingly where a pair of handcuffs and it was almost like a game to them emily would i wear the cuffs himself behind his back and he would somehow escape making it look easy <music>. The secret was he had a key hidden in his back pocket. When the teenage victim would attempt the same when the custody and release lease dean would pounce on the victim quickly binding and gagging them so that no one could hear them scream henley claimed that's when he would leave the victim alone with coral believing that he was to be delivered to the dallas based sex slavery ring again there was never any evidence is leading choral belonging to such a group. Maybe the most chilling part of all of us at least so far is that the teens and younger kids in the neighborhood that brooks and henley were delivering dean choral for just two hundred dollars each were their neighbors and childhood friends this the same kids they grew up with and the same kids they went to school with you. The date was august seventh nineteen seventy-three and henley now age seventeen had invited a friend timothy curley age nineteen to a party at dean's house when henley and curly made it to dean's dean's house that evening they drank alcohol sniff paint fumes before leaving around midnight to buy some sandwiches. David brooks was not a dean's house that evening along the way the two teens stopped near henley's house and henley walked to the home of rhonda williams age fifteen. She was a friend of henley's. Enter drunk father had beaten her early in the evening. She said she wanted to get it out of the house until he was silver. Henley invited her to join them at dean quarrels home that evening and the three teens drove to dean's house in pasadena sedona. It was about three a._m. On august eighth nineteen seventy-three when the three arrived at dean's house dean was extremely angry with henley for inviting girl to his house telling him that he had ruined everything henley explained the situation to coral and he seemed to calm down the offered the three of them more alcohol and marijuana as they continue to sniff paint fumes dean <music> sat back and watched after two hours all of the teens and passed out when henley finally awoke he was lying on his stomach and dean quarrel was placing handcuffs on his wrists. He already had his mouth taped shut and his ankles were bound on together. Both timothy curley and rhonda williams were lying beside henley on the floor similar to his situation listen. They were both gagged with tape and bound with nylon rope. Timothy curley was already completely naked. Well rhonda. Williams still had her clothes on. When d- noticed henley was awake he removes his gag just long enough to tell him that he he had made a fatal mistake and bringing girl to the house he was going to kill all three of them. After he tortured curly dean then shoved a twenty two caliber pistol and henley stomach and threatened to shoot him henley was able to calm coral by telling telling him that he would assist him in the torture and murder of the other two teens but he would have to release him from his restraints. Surprisingly dean agreed to this man untied henley and then tied curly and williams two opposite sides of his torture board deans plan was for henley to rape ape kill williams while he raped and killed curly by now the other two teams at awakened and the reality of the situation was sinking in both were terrified and williams whose gag was now also removed asked henley is this for real hanley told her it was and then as dean if he could take williams into the other room coral was busy violating violating curly and ignored henley's requests. It was at this point that henley made a grab for dean's pistol and began shouting the dean that he had gone far enough. He couldn't go on any longer. He couldn't have dean killing all of his friends. Dean shouted back defiantly and taunted henley by yelling. Kill me wayne and then he move closer to henley. He yelled you won't do it. That's when hanley fired the first shot hitting dean coral in the forehead mm-hmm but the bullet didn't go through his skull as dean moved even closer henley fired another two rounds into quarrels left shoulder. This stopped him and dean staggered out of the room is hanley fired three more rounds into his lower back and shoulder dean was dead henley had killed dean coral and saved the lives of two of his friends as well as his own curly and williams were released from the torture board hanley and the three of them dressed and talked about what they should do next. Henley just wanted to leave but curly said no they should call the police they all agreed and henley made the call and at wor back at at the ron burgundy podcast season two baby carolina here is a pathological liar okay. So what does her brain like. I normally normally we disagree with this but i made a pact with run earlier so yeah. Let's go with it. Wendy's brush your teeth. Whenever what else does on holidays and sometimes sometimes i forget. I'm not perfect smell of your breath. Bother you the smell of rare steak and aged whiskey no carolina that doesn't bother me <music>. You're bleeding a little bit the back of your shirt that means it was a good waxing. They got the entire hair follicle. He say i know so ron is it. Has it been bleeding. It's been bleeding all night long. Cheap access had to throw my sheets out. This is ron burgundy until next time. Don't he used public restrooms. Listen to the ron burgundy podcast on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts aside from the corvette that dean quarrel had purchased for david when brookes which dean still had limited access to he owned another flashy car a plymouth gitex it it wasn't a coincidence that he drove a car like this it was fast and loud and it seemed to attract the attention of all the teenage boys in the neighborhood exactly exactly what dean wanted coral along with brooks and henley would cruise the neighborhood looking for potential victims an lured the boys either into the car or corals home with the promise of candy or alcohol or even a party mm-hmm but the g._t._s. wasn't dean's only car he owned another vehicle served a more useful purpose afford econoline van mm-hmm. This is the universal sketchy van that your parents warned you stay away from prior to his killing years. Coral quarrel would occasionally invite the neighborhood kids that live near the candy store to picnic with him at the beach using the van transportation of course <music> according to those that had accepted a ride years earlier. It was much nicer at the time carpeted and clean ooh however by the time the authorities seized the van immediately after dean's death it was just as creepy mm-hmm an awful inside as you might guess by then it was in regular use to haul dead bodies from dean's house to one of several several burial places it was even rumored that he used this as a mobile torture van similar to the torture room he had set up in the bedroom of his house complete with peg board like walls featuring drilled holes that serve the same purpose as torture board didn't his home the vans were windows were completely lately covered by thick blue curtains impossible to see in an impossible to see out the cargo area. The van was no longer neatly carpeted wanted but instead hold a worn out section of a beige rug was covered in stains cleese also found that length of rope and a hand built wooden crate with air holes drilled in the sides around the same time police found a similar wooden crate and dean corals backyard <music> but inside that one they also found strands of human hair leaving little doubt the dean used these crates to secure and transport sports some of his victims. The sad truth is when all of the young boys were seeing getting into the van or car along with dean and his two accomplices between the years of nineteen seventy and nineteen seventy-three wall. They never came back. <music> initially henley was treated as a hero saving the lives of two of his friends maria life monster monster but henley soon began to tell the authorities a lot more than ever bargained for when he told them how he and david brooks were in charge of finding teenage boys for dean quarrels rape torture and murder fancies he also told them he himself had assisted in several abductions and murders and helped torture and mutilate six or eight victims before there were killed. He told them about the southwest houston boat storage shed the dean coral had rented where most close to the victims had been buried while others were buried at high island beach and lake sam rayburn. Police did wanna believe stories stories. Initially that is until he mentioned a few specific names of the boys he had helped to abduct for dean all of the names he provided they were listed as missing children later that very same day august eighth nineteen seventy-three henley agreed to go to the southwest houston both storage shed with the authorities. He claimed he could lead them to the bodies of the missing children. When they opened the door to the enclosed boat shed there was some assorted junk to be moved a half stripped stolen car the kid's bicycle two sacks of lime and boxes full of teenage boys clothing. When it came time i'm to dig the work was done by prison trustees and the softer inside the boat shed was relatively easy to move almost right away then covered the body of a young teenage boy wrapped in clear plastic and buried beneath a layer of lime as they continued to dig they found several more sets of human remains each in different stages of decomposition. Most of the bodies were wrapped in the same thick clear plastic sheeting some had been strangled and the roads were still wrapped wrapped around their neck while others had been shot digging up to kane bodies in enclosed metal shed is hard enough to imagine but when you also consider this with texas in august the heat and the smell must have been unbearable on that first day the bodies of eight young boys were pulled from the ground in the boat shed all of them had been sodomized and all of them showed evidence of sexual torture including chew genitals objects inserted into their rectums mackerras plucked out and one other particularly sadistic treatment authorities learned through examining the bodies the dean quarrel had inserted glass rods into the boys penises and then he would snap them off and shatter them while they were inside the pain is inflicted would make a person begged to be put out of their misery. The coral would keep the teens alive for several days of this type of abuse abuse in the montgomery county maryland courthouse. There are thousands of pages of documents detailing the horrific murders of three innocent people to things from the early days of the investigation are clear no one knew for sure who committed the murders but some had a theory about who engineered engineered them soon as i heard the details. I knew my dad was involved right away. We know lawrence horn. I mean i knew wellesz. Instantly assumes lawrence everybody. Everybody knew that lawrence horn was responsible. Nobody even better than i but at the time of the murders lawrence horn was clear across the country watching tv his los angeles home and he could prove it beyond a reasonable doubt. I'm jasmine morris from iheartradio and hit home media. This is hitman then listen and subscribe at apple podcasts on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts while conducting my research for the dean coral story i kept returning turning to the one fact i simply couldn't wrap my mind around for the longest time and be honest with you. I still can't completely understand it. My question was this. Why weren't the houston police more concerned about the pattern of missing teens over relatively the short span of time around two and a half years there were approximately forty teens missing from the same neighborhood to families had lost not just one son but two kids each team brothers all taken at separate times what had to happen for the authorities to finally take action. What was the hesitation well. I think i found the answer or or at least the best explanation i've heard so far it comes from a book written in nineteen seventy four by a man named jack olsen titled the man with the candy story of the houston mass murderers in it olsen states that it was not just one factor the rather author combination of factors that led to the oversight i the houston police department simply lacked the resources to search for missing children request to do so often declined. It's also true that teams occasionally choose to leave home in pursuit you too something new different and exciting perceive new life just somewhere else. It was was easy for the police to tell the parents that they're missing. Teen was merely a runaway easy because that's what they truly believed it happened. It's also important to remember that the term serial killer wasn't even coined until nineteen seventy four before that it was almost unimaginable original but a killer of this sort was living in the same neighborhood along with the families the kids he was killing unimaginable that is until henley shot and killed dean coral in the early morning hours of august eighth nineteen seventy-three and the truth was the known in any way you look at it. This was an especially dark time for the community of houston heights. The senseless destruction action of dozens of young men all with the rest of their lives ahead of them is they were taken far too young in corals oldest victim. It was twenty years old. His youngest was only nine. David brooks turned himself in at the houston police station. He was accompanied by his father as he denied being involved in the murders but stated that he did know the coral had raped and killed two boys in nineteen seventy. The next day august ninth nineteen seventy-three henley accompanied the authorities to lake sam rayburn were two additional bodies were found in shallow lime covered graves at the same time police continue to search the boat shed they discovered an additional nine bodies on their second day of digging henley insisted there were still two more bodies inside but but they were never located later that evening david brooks finally gave a full confession admitting to being present while some of the killings killings occurred and helping bury some of the bodies the next day august tenth henley accompanied the authorities lake sam rayburn where they were able to find two more bodies that same afternoon both henley and brooks when with the authorities to high island highland beach and led the police to more shallow graves days later on august thirteenth henley and brooks returned to highland beach each with the police were they located four more bodies again henley insisted that there were still two additional bodies to be found on the beach but they were never located in total they had uncovered twenty seven known victims with the possibility of at least four more according according to henley at the time it was the worst killing spree in american history a grisly record it would only stand in for five more years until john wayne gays he was captured in nineteen seventy eight after killing thirty three young men and boys and burying them his crawlspace so in the end dean coral was the only one who escaped without suffering the consequences. Maybe he paid the ultimate price losing his life but it was as young accomplices that eventually had to answer for all of his wrongdoings along with her own of course and they're still paying for it today. In nineteen seventy-five david brooks was found guilty of deduction and murder and received a life sentence. He's been up for parole several times but has been denied every time his most recent chance for freedom came in two thousand fifteen. He still locked away elmer. Wayne henley is currently serving six consecutive terms of ninety nine years for a grand total of five hundred ninety four years in prison for his role in the houston mass murders with no chance of pearl. He'll die in prison. There's no question my entire view of the world around me is changed. When i started this journey. I wanted to know why serial killers did what they did. What motivated them. What made him tick and will i did find some answers to those questions asked found darkness a lot of darkness. Mr go along with it. I know they're good people around us but we should also never forget. They're bad people around us to very bad people who are capable of doing things you and i could never magin everything i've gone through my personal life in addition to delve into the lives of these serial killers. The sadness and death read about every single day is led me to the biggest question of all is healthy. We all consume soon violence in one way or another on a daily basis. It's on our televisions is on the radio and in our podcast is what drives storylines and plots. We returned through crime as a means of enjoyment. I'm guilty of this myself. What are the consequences the long lasting implications on all of us as individuals you as a society. I don't know if i'll ever be able to forget what i've seen in my thirty or so years true crime infatuation but i'm hoping some of those vivid david images will begin to fade into the distance rolled. I haven't been able to entirely stabilize separate my dreams from reality. I'm still working on it. Ah for now though i've reached the end of my fascination withdrew crime his time to take a break and hopefully with that break the nightmares that have kept up all night. We'll transition back into normal dreams once again. Today is one of those unusual days when i actually got some sleep last night about six hours asleep man. I feel pretty good. Almost like a like. A fog is lifted from my head like i can. I can think clearly i'm kind of ready for the day which is really pretty unusual title these past few years but <hes>. I don't know it feels good. Villa today might be a good day and i'm kind of looking forward over to it so not all doom and gloom all the time <hes> as far as sleep goes but most of the time it is but i thought you know him having a good day you i'll talk about that too. Insomniac is a production of iheartradio tender foot t._v. Written and hosted by scott benjamin and produced by miranda hopkins alex williams matt ah frederick and josh thane music composed by makeup in vanity said in covered by trevor eyler follow on twitter and facebook at insomniac pod on instagram at insomniac podcast and at our website insomniac podcast dot com for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio radio app apple podcasts wherever you listen to your favorite shows <hes> in the montgomery county maryland courthouse there are thousands of pages of documents detailing the horrific take murders of three innocent people soon as i heard the details. I knew my dad was involved right away. Instantly i said as lawrence but at the time of the murderer's lawrence horn was clear across the country. I'm jasmine morris from iheartradio and hit home media. This is hitman. Listen and subscribe subscribe at apple podcasts on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Wayne henley dean coral houston david brooks iheartradio ron burgundy murder lawrence horn Timothy curley carolina houston heights rhonda williams elmer wayne scott benjamin sam rayburn hanley iheartradio jasmine morris montgomery county maryland cou