23 Burst results for "David Brooks"

The Trump 'clown-iverse' continues

Between The Lines

09:55 min | Last month

The Trump 'clown-iverse' continues

"Another crazy waken US politics. Remember this. Now back they sure you. In fact, let people know Senator I'm not going to answer the question. Because the question. Just as radical left would you out Mason who is on your list? Not. Surprisingly, the media responds to the debate especially Donald Trump's plan rudeness it was overwhelmingly hostile wasn't it? Couple of days later, trump was diagnosed with code. After mixed messages about health trump got in a car and run around waving to supporters. Then he was released from hospital he returned to the White House and he went on one of those twitter rants among other things. He told the American people not covid even though he's doctor has said, he may not entirely be out of the woods yet. So, what does all this main awake after the debate and only weeks before the US presidential election and what does it mean for America's image in the world? For answers. Let's turn to a leading. American Common Taito a conservative who says he's quite sick of living in what he calls Donald Trump's clown verse or drama drivers over believers or I can't believe these guys actually the president. Verse. Brad. Stevens is a columnist with the New York. Times, and formally with the Wall Street Journal, where he won a Pulitzer Prize for opinion writing I should just warn you all that he comes to us via a scratchy on in Manhattan. Bread. Welcome back to the Shire. Back Be Sydney. Well, the rate is of the New York Times I can't wait to see the end of trump you yourself are prominent never trump you your New York Times columnist this week you say you was trump will give us just a few reasons why I wish a speedy recovery. I think to wish ill. To reduced to his level on that, of course, it's been. Core of the trump EST project which has been to based political norms and diminish moral standards. So why would I wanNA join trump along along that road a bit for more narrowly political reasons. I. Wish it well, because God forbid he were to die before the election, he would go down so to speak a undefeated. And what I hope is that a resounding electoral defeat in November and I'm speaking of the conservative. will put an end not only to the trump presidency, but she trumpism as a an ideological force. In American politics. Now. You rauch trump. The man needs to leave and lose because it's the only way the trump cult might die it unsubscribe to the cult trump obviously. Is that why you among that never trump was. Are exerting very little influence on the political right in America these days. You know I I hear that and. I was struck by the disconnect between my supposed- irrelevance and irrelevance might never trump fellow travelers. And the fact that the president. Describing us as human scum the conservative press keeps denouncing us if we're really quite so irrelevant, you think they want to go so much energy. Truth. Election that is probably going to turn on a small number of a relatively small number of voters in swing states, and so I think we're not quite so relevant have some people allege and stressed that never trump is include many prominent conservatives lock yourself William Kristol George Will Max Booed David. Brooks. David. From and Applebaum. Jennifer from there among others. But you see your critics would respond inside the Elat media consensus with there on the left or the never trump conservatives they've been consistently against trump wrought from that said. And Nights. I haven't you guys foul to understand what got America trump and indeed Britain brexit in the first place. You know. I'm not quite sure I agree with the analysis. Is and came about in part because there was unquestionably failure of the mainstream conservative establishment, which I guess I was park in recognizing some of the populous tides in American politics. I think it candidate for a much more specifically than which was a luxury crisis. In Europe, but went unchecked help create brexit brexit had knock on effects in the United States. As well, and and I would add a larger point com, which did you those who are listening here are left in any healthy democracy need a mortally healthy a conservative movement. There's no democracy that doesn't have a conservative side of politics. and. So even our adversaries are opponents politically should want us to succeed want a conservative movement that is optimistic that is inclusive that is in favor of growth, and that favors the open society and the free world. That's the way I can feel, okay my politics, they remained unchanged from the days before trump and hopefully will remain unchanged. Have said analysis requires us to listen attentively to individual voters tell us about your subject to Chris you right about her and you'll recent York Times call him. She's a registered Democrat and a trump voting lesbian store manager from Manhattan, and she fits none of the cultural demographic stereotypes of the trump by Brett tell us about Chris. Chris is a woman who is well educated. Well traveled and as you mention, she is She's gay and she the trump supporter and I one of the things that I I occasionally will be with my column in The New York Times. Is. Essentially. handed over not not fully. But at least partially handed over to Voice of that I think the predominantly liberal leadership of the Times. Need to could here because What she observed is that at least until the pandemic, her savings accounts or pension or private pension account for the United States a call four one ks. Arising smart. The economy was doing better in her view than it had been under Obama and that that's the counted for voters like her as opposed to you know questions about the president's mannerisms or read myths or his coarseness on the world stage and I wrote it Tom for the simple reason that Hillary Clinton would it become president? Her supporters hadn't been so convinced. That it was only a bunch of rednecks Yak. In the middle of the country, we're going to the trump. He is indeed and make the point. She's not an outlaw. She's a red voter in a blue state. My guest is Brit Stevens he's an award winning columnist with the New York Times. And we're talking about. Well, let's be frank. The crazy times in American politics. Let's turn to the debate bridge sixty years ago October nineteen sixty. The World Watch the Kenji Nixon debates we were too young. We went even. We weren't even born. To civilized will informed holly. Intelligent. Courteous Navy combat veterans are both in their forties. And yet six decades later. The world's being shocked and horrified. By the time of the first presidential debate these to all men engaging in A. An angry angry exchange is the best the both major parties can offer the American people sixty how's it come to these? You know when I was when my wife I ever watched, my wife has his permanent immigrants United States actually came a citizen. BECCA very. And I have to turn to her engine apologize for bringing her country because it was mortifying fortunately, the United States is a lot more than its leader. But debasement of politics has been long the making and it's one of many reasons why I just can't accept trump as president even though can time-to-time agreeing with his policies because he is he has brought the state about politics shoot a level that. Be chargeable to describe it as over Banana Republic and and you know onto. The Kennedy Nixon debates that I am are well enough to follow up one of the great issues that debate. The status of key Moi in Matsue, he's a little time with his island off the coast of mainland. Just unimaginable that piece to standard standard-bearers would have that kind of exchange although I. Walked by what Action Nowhere Chemo in that. So actually are. Yes you said that Donald Trump in that debate was channeling Alec Baldwin Channeling Donald Trump and yet he was holy himself. I get all that but is a more wrong with America than Donald, trump, Brad Stevens yet they're into lot more. You know I think Adam Smith Donald trump is a symptom of of some of that ruined but in seeking to an Australian audience I think it's worth remembering and reminding this audience that there could. Be Fixed his right in America

Donald Trump United States President Trump America The New York Times Manhattan Brad Stevens Brit Stevens Chris Senator Mason Pulitzer Prize Matsue Banana Republic Wall Street Journal William Kristol Twitter Shire
9/11 Trial Faces Another Delay: New Guantánamo Lawyer Wants 30 Months to Prepare

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

9/11 Trial Faces Another Delay: New Guantánamo Lawyer Wants 30 Months to Prepare

"The 9 11 trial was scheduled to begin in January in Guantanamo Bay. But NPR's Sasha Pfeiffer reports looks increasingly unlikely now that a new defense lawyer in the case says he needs 2.5 years to prepare. David Brooks. Past clients include Charleston, South Carolina, Church shooter Dylann Roof and one of the Boston Marathon Bombers. He's now the new lead attorney for Ramzi Bin Al Shibh, one of the five men charged in the September 11th 2001 terror attacks. He was appointed because his predecessor left the case. Brooke says an illegal filing He hasn't even met al sheep yet and faces hundreds of hours of work just reading more than 33,000 pages of hearing transcripts. He estimates it will take him at least 30 months to prepare for trial. That would be well after next year's 20th anniversary of 9 11 and the price tag of Guantanamo already more than $6 billion would continue to

Ramzi Bin Al Shibh Attorney Guantanamo Bay Sasha Pfeiffer Boston Marathon Bombers David Brooks NPR Brooke Dylann Roof South Carolina Charleston
"david brooks" Discussed on The Munk Debates

The Munk Debates

05:57 min | 6 months ago

"david brooks" Discussed on The Munk Debates

"I would say I saw a poll in the UK about a week or two ago and support for you be I was off the charts. He was like in the seventy percent tile I. Think a lot of people take day. A could use the floor. I can't speak to count on this, but I can speak to the US. And speaking to a lot of democratic politicians, their view is a core value and I think this is true candidate core values work. That you work for money. You work to provide your place in society, and then if you're going to time, wage benefits and wage subsidies, you tie it to work. And that if you don't tie it to work than people begin to pull out of people say that's not for me. And so I do worry that you be. I would drain the work ethic. At the time of crisis, it's different. There's no work and so giving people money nothing is is the right thing to do, but over long term I would worry about the cultural effect of basically giving people an option to not work or or to try to work on the black market, and then get you bi, but I would support. Subsidies so people were working forty hours. A week can live at a decent level, but I I think it's at values work. That is really the big divider there yeah the dignity of work and the effects on communities and individuals who are denied the dignity of a job, and as you say more than just the material benefit, but the central social standing that comes with employment is absolutely critical. Let's take a final question will squeeze this in a under our one hour with David Brooks Let's see who our final question is. Cynthia from Salisbury she's asking everyone thinks covid will finally wake people up to the gross inequalities capitalism. How can we make the needs of our most vulnerable of real prior wordy in our politics and culture, so I mean David? Maybe that's just an opportunity for you to. It's a nice. Nice broad question. It summarizes a lot of the themes that we've discussed with you over the last hour. Maybe that gives you an opportunity to leave us with some of what you think are the key points to reflect on as we try to think through. How will this pandemic change? Our politics change our culture change our society not next week, not next month, but as we discussed the years and maybe the decade to come..

David Brooks Cynthia US UK Salisbury
"david brooks" Discussed on The Munk Debates

The Munk Debates

03:12 min | 6 months ago

"david brooks" Discussed on The Munk Debates

"To the monk dialogues special edition of the Munk. Debates podcast where we invite big thinkers to reflect on what our world will look like after Cova nineteen. This Week New York Times columnist David Brooks. Now on how the pandemic will change politics and society. David lead side Gut to some more questions here. There were a lot for you, so we'll answer those that we can. The next one up is from. Visual. He's asking Joe Clark the former Prime Minister of Canada. As talked about the competitive bandage that we have in Canada given our internal unity relative to the United States what are your thoughts about Canada and its leverage on the global stage in this new World David you did have a long career as a foreign correspondent, you spend a lot of time in the world's capitals and points in between you know candidate right now. Now is feeling pretty uncomfortable. Squeezed between China and the United States and the growing great-power rivalry between your country and Beijing, what do you see potentially as a path for Canada in this world that the pandemic in some ways as you said has been an acceleration of these tensions and trajectories that were kind of already set on course prior to the viruses up break. I now toggle back and forth thousand Canadian conversations, American conversations and I always think Americans are so beleaguered the division. The culture war is just so much more acute. And will we have in this country? We don't disagree more than we used to. Intellectually we just hate each other more over those disagreements with the political scientists call effective polarization, emotional position hatred is much higher and I. Don't detect that when I crossed into Canada, quite as much though you have a fair share. What I would say is that I mentioned knife, globalization and that we. Either it was betrayed by bad people or we were naive about it. But among the countries that has benefited the most from globalization that has succeeded. The most from globalization done the best, I would say his Canada. Both immigration policies in trade policies. Even guys managed to mostly avoid the financial crisis. In, so I would take Canada as much as any other country. Has hasn't instead in figuring out a solution to globalization that has not victor on, and that is not Bernie Sanders, and I would say that's been the case with Canada. I practiced in a different way with the Scandinavian countries one of things. That's really hit home for me recently as we had this debate. Often around the world. Margaret Thatcher! In your countries well where you either for the market or for the state, and the market was the right state was the left, but if you look at some of the countries with the most successful societies and I would include Scandinavian Canada in that. They have pretty strong markets. An pretty strong states. It's.

Canada David Brooks Scandinavian Canada New York Times Cova Margaret Thatcher Bernie Sanders United States Prime Minister Beijing Joe Clark China
"david brooks" Discussed on The Munk Debates

The Munk Debates

03:46 min | 6 months ago

"david brooks" Discussed on The Munk Debates

"Give them Sunday. And I wrote a conscious a few weeks ago, and since then in the US Senate not because of my own, the cases so obvious. There's been real movement. There's been a whole raft of Democrats. Even some Republicans are beginning to sign on a lot of Republicans privately upset. If you can get it going out, be there for you. And so a real unblocking, so that would be the one obvious policy. I think just to get I. Don't know what service they do just to get kids from Berkeley in the same team with kids from mobile. Alabama would do a lot in this is true in Canada to imagine getting kids from East and West, just having that life experience together. That would go a long way I should say. We're speaking on a day when we've had riots in Minnesota. With two cases of of real racial prejudice, killing of a young man in Minnesota. Thing in central park, but in the US, the legacy of slavery is just an ever-present legacy. And it's hard to really talk about unity without addressing that subject, and that requires national leadership. And there are a lot of different ways you could do it i. have been converted lately to the idea. Reparations I now support them. Just as a show of dignity to what African Americans have suffered in this country. It's hard for me to see really unity as a country. Until we make some CIGNA progress that and that takes some sort of traumatic step and to me. That's a national step. Create words okay. Let's go to our next question. Here will put that up on the screen from James Jones, he says what vital issue do you think will be forgotten in the upcoming issue, due to the massive amount of attention, being paid to the pandemic, so what could slip through the cracks here David that you think warrants real attention, yeah, the one that leaves immediately to mind is education. Do think online learning is not working. It works for like the tiny sliver Piper motivated students, but for most it doesn't. And I know you know. We were all calling people around checking on a friends and my friends. Their emotional health is entirely dependent on what age children are. And, so those who children are grown. They're doing pretty well. Those children are young. They're fine. They were going to be quarantined anyway. those children who are ten eleven school. There's a lot of stress there and what I worry about is those children who were already disadvantaged, educationally falling further behind losing basically the last half of their school year, losing summer and sort of just falling further behind, and we haven't quite solve the problem of online education, and so I worry about that being lost I do think there's a movement afoot that I've come to be intrigued by which just educational pluralism. At least in the US, we took this industrial model. Say High School, or elementary school and plop them down all over the place in schools pretty much look alike, but the creativity that I've seen in the educational landscape has been from small schools, really idiosyncratic schools schools with a distinct culture, and when I ever I go to a school where I think of that's really leaving a mark, student. The school is not afraid to be itself. And I'd love to get to a world where the schools were probably a little smaller, but they're allowed to be more distinct, and they're allowed to really reflect the community and be rooted in the community, rather than being these islands pop down in the community where the teachers and the parents don't have that much in common where the principles are not community leaders. And so I'd love to see a little more that I. do worry that that's the issue. That's GonNa get overlooked and.

High School US US Senate Minnesota Alabama Berkeley Canada James Jones David
"david brooks" Discussed on The Munk Debates

The Munk Debates

02:56 min | 6 months ago

"david brooks" Discussed on The Munk Debates

"And welcome to the monk dialogues project of the Peter Melanie Munk Foundation presenting sponsors, Gluskin Sheff and the onyx corporation. My Name Rudyard Griffiths and I've had the pleasure over these last number of weeks of spending an hour with you every evening to talk about the effects of covid nineteen on the broader issues and trends that are shaping our society and tonight. We're have a real treat for you. He's a writer and author. A bestseller books from around the World David Brooks I've read them regularly as you do in the New York Times. On the PBS Newshour where he comments on, American politics with great sagacity, teaching, Yale and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences also doing some really interesting work with the Aspen Institute around his Weavers Project that we will get into this evening so. We. saw each other December here in Toronto and the monk debate stage for your buck debate on capitalism. It's great to be speaking with you virtually this evening. It's it'd be back with the monk community so pleased while great. David as I said, the purpose of these dialogues is to kind of stretch our minds into the future and try to think about how this pandemic is affecting US individually, but your expertise also is partly thinking about things in the context of community, and how we act, or don't act as a community in the twenty first century confronted by technology confronted by our economy. Confronted by our politics and the divisions within them. So what do you see? David is lasting implications lasting impacts of this pandemic on our politics. Maybe specifically our attitudes towards government I'd love to hear your views on that. Yeah I take a maximalist view on how much this is going to affect us, you know sometimes a big event happens, and it doesn't only a temporary effect in the US. Nine eleven had an effect on people, and they went more religious attendance. They more volunteering gave more blood, but that only lasted nine months and after. After that everything was back to normal on the other hand world, war to the people who grew up in world, war two, era had a very good sense that we work together, and that was true in Canada in the US. We work together. We can trust each other. Social Trust was very high in both countries, and now added sixty years that whole mentality, and so the reason I think this is a big event and we'll have a pivotal effect is not only a tragedy disaster. That's hitting us, but is hitting us in the. The middle of a social crisis we already had a social crisis. divisions, a rich and poor divisions, white and black, all sorts of social divisions polarization, and so we had this earthquake, and the earthquake happened, and then the pandemic hits us like a hurricane, and so it's a hurricane in the middle of an earthquake, and the hurricane is coursing water down through the ravines that were already split open, and so to me..

US David Brooks Rudyard Griffiths Peter Melanie Munk Foundation Gluskin Sheff Social Trust American Academy of Arts and S onyx corporation Toronto Aspen Institute New York Times Weavers Project PBS Yale Canada
Creating a Culture of Contribution with Tom Rath

The EntreLeadership Podcast

08:49 min | 9 months ago

Creating a Culture of Contribution with Tom Rath

"There's this crazy thing going on right now. The United States is filled with people that deeply want to care about the work that they do every single day and at the same time the United States is simultaneously filled with business owners. Who are desperately looking for people that care about the work that they do every single day. So why exactly? Can't we figure this out? Why can't we bridge this gap from the Ramsey network? This is the entree leadership podcasts. Where we help business leaders grow themselves their teams in their profits. I'm your host Alex Judd. And today we're talking to world renowned researcher and the best selling author of the new book. Life's great question. Tom Rath and in the mountains of data that he has collected on high-performing leaders teams in the workplace. He's found one very specific pattern a pattern. That could help bridge the gap between leaders and their teams. That pattern is an increased focus on contribution. Yeah you know one of the things that I realized pretty quickly as I started to look at the broad challenges that we face out there. Today in terms of the fundamental relationships people have with their work which on average across organizations are nowhere near as good as they could be one of the challenges. Is that There's just a huge misalignment between all of the individual talent. That's out there in the marketplace today. And what the world needs and so you know we've been pretty good over the last hundred. Two Hundred Years. It aligning products and services with what customers need. But we haven't made anywhere. As near as biggest strides in terms of matching individuals are with the demands that are out there in the workforce today. And what I realized as I dug deeper into this as we've done a pretty good job of helping people to understand their own talents there on passions and their own interests. But we really haven't done much with trying to determine what are all unique ways in which we can contribute to others lives in a real meaningful and productive way and you know I was deeply inspired by one of my favorite quotes from Dr Martin Luther King Junior and I something I asked myself. Every single day which was his famous quote about life's most persistent and urging question is. What are you doing for others boy? I think that's just a great way to Orient. Your Day orients your day around contribution and adding to things that will continue to grow in your absence. So that's what helped to focus a lot of this work powerful as you were saying that I was thinking about that John F. Kennedy. Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country. And it's amazing how The Martin Luther King Quote John F. Kennedy quote. There's something that when we hear that we kinda say that's right. That's what I need to be spending my time on and it's related to that topic of contribution so I'd like to know. How do you define that word contribution? Yeah you know it's interesting. I worked through a lot and was the first thing about. How do you help people to connect with a purpose or meaningful work which you hear a lot about it when I really got into the practical application of how do you get? People focused outward instead of inward every day and focused on how they're adding another person's contribution is really about the small bricks that you're adding to a wall over time essentially and it's more of the things that you're doing in the next hour today that might had to someone else's well being might inspire someone a day from now that in my case with my kids might contribute to their development and growth even five ten years down the road on days. When I'm not there helping so I think contribution I would define it as anything you do. That has a positive influence on another human being the continues to grow in your absence and those things usually start small and grow over time continues to grow in your absence. Why that Fraser? Why is that important as part of this definition? Well you know that's important to me from some of my own personal learnings. I talk in the opening of this book about how when I was sixteen years old. I was diagnosed with a real rare condition. I went blind in one eye. Because of it and doctors told me that I would be likely to have cancer. In my kidneys and pancreas and spine over whatever course of a life. I might live and I've battled cancer and all those areas and I bring that up because what it did was even from that young age over the last twenty five years. It got me very focused on. What are all the that I can work on this afternoon? Then we'll continue to grow tomorrow week from now year from now and eventually when I'm gone and what I've learned that experience there is you know it may sound kind of morbid from the outset but when you start to think like that it really does get you focused on more productive efforts during the day and things that you can feel good about tomorrow and many years from now and he gets you focused on what I would call or what I think I David Brooks talked about this about a year ago New York Times Column More Eulogy Values instead of things that go on a resume that are more sterile and tactical so it almost sounds like you're talking about like a mindset or an attitude for leaders but also just for individual team members is this mindset developed like do you have to go through a life altering transformative experience like you did to change your mindset or is it learned or how can we build up this kind of way of looking at the world that contribution is the first thing that we're thinking about. Yeah you know. I think it's like a lot of habits is a great question because it's in my experience in working with people working layers. It's bill with repetitions and it's built one day at a time and if you can step back and say in the next three hours what could you do? Even for fifteen or twenty minutes that would make a meaningful contribution to the growth and development of one other human being whether that's someone who looks to you for leadership whether that's a customer whether that's a family member just taking that daily focus is what helps you to build cumulative days that are better and better as time goes on and you know the other thing. I've learned that's been. I'm through this project in the last year with the book and the website around contribution is the more time you can allocate. That's directed outward toward contribution to others in meaningful efforts during the day. It actually minimizes a lot of the normal stressors that we have with all the things flying at us and all the pressures and demands of the day. And the more time you spend looking inward it actually leads to more insecurities more stress in the like where when you can anchor. Even a few of your efforts outward it takes a lot of that pressure off in the process. That's pretty remarkable. And I love that you talk about it as a habit because that sounds like something I can take action on. That sounds like something I can control. That sounds like something. Every leader can invest their time into. So what is the practical action? People can take daily or maybe even hourly to just start moving their mind towards an attitude and a posture of contribution. Yeah I think that's where it starts. It starts with bringing the humanity back into the work that we do on a daily basis and having conversations about it with our team members because one of the things that I realized when I got into. This is every time we sit down as a team to start a new effort instead of looking at other members of the team joining the group and saying what's there background. What is their resume. Look like what's their bio. What's their job description? We need to sit down and have a more personal conversation about who we are and why we do what we do each day. So that's why as part of this book. I put together a resource for people where they can go through and say. What are the big roles you play in life so for me? That's being a dad and a husband and a researcher and sometimes a writer and what have been the most influential life experiences that have shaped by what I do and so if you sit around and talk about that as a team had helped to bid and then maybe most importantly anytime you bring a group of people together or the whether that's two or three or five or fifteen people if each person can go around and say how do I think I can make a unique contribution of this team because so often we all get excited about something and we're just off and running without even having a discussion to make sure that each of us feels like we can make a meaningful contribution and we're doing that in complementary ways instead of ways that essentially overlap and it takes six months to realize. Oh we were all doing the same thing

John F. Kennedy United States Researcher Cancer Alex Judd Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Tom Rath Orient David Brooks Fraser New York Times Column Writer
"david brooks" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:01 min | 9 months ago

"david brooks" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And isolation And it's been especially bad for our kids we're talking about Family with David Brooks Whose article is called. The nuclear family was a mistake You know one difference between a nuclear family. Let's say and and a large number of people who come together to to live together for with a variety of connections is that they're they're at at the heart of the nuclear family was was a marriage and in fact when I was a kid they. They hadn't yet liberalized divorce laws so Divorce meant a trip to Nevada And it was really a privilege. The the poor just desertion instead of that A business now. People who come together in a variety of of of new forged ways haven't haven't stood before before their community and pledged themselves to one another what holds them together to people drift in and out Is it a different degree of association? There is a different degree of association. It's much easier to drift in and out in and they are definitely more fragile than marriages which are a little fragile. Any pretty proud and so I don't WanNa But I think people are looking but on the other hand I think the forged families are not just roommates and if you go on Pinterest or something and right in chosen families you see all these placards and other things for people who are in chosen families who say. The family isn't just blood. It's people who will be there for you unconditionally. And I do think a lot of these people who are in forged families chosen families. It's not quite as tight at tires. They'll blood tie but it can be a pretty tight tie And it's a sense of you know and if you go back and I mentioned this in the article if you go back through human history if you looked at the extended clans that humans lived in for most of our history. There were a Lotta `non-kinh there. They did kinship by being by eating together. And that gave them sense of kinship. They created kinship migrating somewhere together. They created kinship by being through an ordeal together and so our modern idea of kinship is not the historical norm for centuries and centuries and thousands of years. I'm just worried about the minute. We have left him. I'm I'm curious when you think ahead and another fifty years do you imagine a great for the formation of these of forced families re Recreated extended families And and a real diminution further diminution of the nuclear family Or do you suspect that it's you know. We're in kind of stasis right now. It's what's your view of wood. Will these situations like the one you're in be like you know the communes of the nineteen sixties or the salons of Paris at a different time or the or the main secular hippies and sixties but I would say one of the things when I spoke to so many families scholars for this piece family structures always changing. And there's no simple line you can draw through. It's always evolving and I would just say if you look at the history of family in over the last two hundred thousand years we're at the very extreme of smallness and so we eat at small tables and historically people have eaten at bigger tables with more people and I do think the trend right now and I think. The culture has shifted away from a culture of hyper individualism to a culture where people are really looking for connection and and I think they wanna find ways he heat at bigger tables. What what a Wonderful Image David David Brooks? Thanks for talking with us today. It's been a great pleasure to pleasure to be with you again room. Yes good to talk to you. A David Brooks his latest piece for the Atlantic is called the nuclear family Was a mistake. You can continue the conversation and get the point. Podcast at our website on point radio DOT ORG and you can follow us on twitter in find us on facebook at on point radio We're taking voicemails also for our Friday news roundtable and we want to hear from you. Do you have a question about? President trump issuing around of pardons or former DOJ prosecutors.

David David Brooks David Brooks Nevada twitter facebook Pinterest DOJ President Paris Atlantic
"david brooks" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

13:22 min | 9 months ago

"david brooks" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I thought jeep as a child we I grew up with a bit of that and when I got married and had children and we found a way without even being intentional of having other people living with us it was so much healthier for the children as well as for me as a mother. It's a great story. We've been discussing the American family With David Brooks and also with Andrea hundred professor of Human Development and family studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Dr Hundred. Thank you very much for joining us in this case and we'll hear more from David. His latest piece in the Atlantic is called. The nuclear family was a mistake. I'm Robert Siegel and this is on point Are you sometimes confused by the economy befuddled by the financial system troubled by the trade war? We are here to help with the daily ten minute briefing on economic news of the day. Npr's the indicator from planet money. Listen now this is on point. I'm Robert Siegel and we'RE WITH NEW YORK. Times columnist David Brooks whose latest piece in the Atlantic is called. The nuclear family was a mistake Davidson comments we've heard from our website. Jabber machi rights winner. Take all killed the family. Men Change their minds. Why share anything when you can grab everybody's and start a new family or a fair at a whim and Emily Brown writes? This is interesting because my extended family is extremely close and extremely matriarchal. I actually think existence of such a allowed me to be far more successful than if I only had my nuclear family. I'd like to ask you what's the big difference. Do you think in kids who grow up in the extended family of of the kind of families we are described and kids grow up in a in an intact nuclear family. Do you think their their life skills. that One imports that. The other doesn't well You know I don't WanNa make a bifurcation or a generalization but I do think and I I would make maybe make the difference between kids who grew up in no family because I I think the problem with the nuclear family is not that if you can have a stable nuclear family doing great The problem is that's fragility and so it. Winds up with no family and kids who are latchkey kids who have one parent who have no contact with another parent and while we all know single moms and single DADS who are doing amazing jobs. Raising their kids on average of the kids who grow up in those homes They do less well in school. They have more emotional problems. They have lower life outcomes. Rush Chetty has a data that if you grew up in poverty with to married parents your chances of getting out of poverty eighty percent. If you don't your chances are much much lower in the odds are against you. And so I'd say those are the people we need to worry about. Most and I would say just in general across society. I think we've gotten less good at relational skills. I'm really puzzled. Over the the spike in suicide up thirty percent the spike especially in teen suicide up seventy percent or fifty percent or so The the spike in depression rates. Every college I go to the mental health facilities are swamped. I confess. I don't completely understand what's going on here but there's been something that has weakened our relationships and had the predictable effect on our emotional health and I think that somewhat related to what's become of a family forms you have been devoting a lot of energy in in recent years to Investigating issues of community of virtue of of kindness among Americans and And you've written also about very much the spiritual side of this for you and what's been going on in your life does the does the the forged family that you described earlier doesn't have a spiritual dimension For you is it. Is it a a something? You take part in And and do so with your your soul and mind Not just Your desire for conversation and company I mean I do. I mean I think when you get hopefully you stop being stuck in a stuck up middle aged white guy like I was and get a little more emotional and a little more spiritual and you discover the desires of your heart which is the desire to really connect deeply with others and desires of the soul. Which is to serve some good to feel in right relationship with the good and in my column everything. I was writing about came down to social isolation and fragmentation whether it was political polarization rising. Suicide Rising OPIOID. We're just in price of solidarity. And so I started something called weave the social fabric project. The Aspen in suit. You can go visit us. We Are Weavers Dot Org and basically we WANNA lift up people and learn from people who are just phenomenally good at building solidarity and they're not just building connection like warm relationships though. That's very important. They're building solidarity a sense of spiritual loyalty to other human beings and leading a life. That really is it's Corny to say but leading with love. They they the what the weavers do is. They treat neighbors as if they were kin. They treat non kin as if they were kin and though when I see all the fragmentation and hatred in our society I look at the weavers and they are the solution and I just tried to wish we change the culture so more of US embraced their values and embrace. Their lifestyle is just a better way to live. You find those invitations of of kinship like relationships are generally received or is it like the New York apartment to others you. You spoke of earlier. Who just as soon not be bothered. It's tough 'cause a lot of people they're trying to reach have been betrayed so much that they're instinct is. Oh if you show up in my life you're gonNA leave. You're going to betray me. And so they've been educated by very bad experiences and by betrayal. One of our weavers is a woman named Sarah Hanger who runs an organization called thread in Baltimore which really creates social networks around underperforming kids in the Baltimore schools and it takes a while before the kids will trust. And she says it's changing when somebody keeps showing up after they've rejected you at and it's but it's also a dentist. He changing to be the one rejected. And so what they do is that you create much deeper bonds relationship. You have to overcome a lot of fear and a lot of skepticism in order to get there. Because of what's already happened in our society you have wrote a written quite a bit about About your own life and I'm curious in in in. The one of us has been contacted by member of his community. Here I'm not sure who. It is but In the kinds of structures. That you're that you're now involved with do your now. I assume adult children are they attracted to this at all or or do they still feel. Hey you know we're part of what was a nuclear family. That broke up. Yeah I think we've when when they gave it the cover line. The nuclear family was mistake. I immediately texted all my kids. Hey not ours And so I think a they understood that and I would say that as they've gone through life and they're now in their twenties They've found their own versions at my daughter when she was five. She walked into a hockey rink and felt immediately at home. And she now works for the Anaheim ducks teaching hockey kids and I just visited her out there and I would say that team. And the team's she's part around those rinks They're really tight bonds of affection and they they T- speak and familial forms and so I I do think young people today including my own kids are finding that my oldest son served in the Israeli Defense Forces and certainly anybody who serves in any sort of military experience That's family and that's probably family. That's going to last you a lifetime and I do think there's a great hungering for really intimate bonds unconditional love and people are finding it in ways. Because that's how we're wired. Amy is on the line from Tampa Florida. Amy What's your reaction to all this a lot of resonance. I am an older mom of especially toddler and the nuclear families fragility is front and center. We recently experienced the flu. And as a family we were debating about whether to go to the ER. Because we didn't have any any help. And I believe we maybe relocating to DC metro where we lived before as a couple and also a single people we're going to be experiencing that region in a completely different way Housing astronomical since having This child I have experienced Typical you know New Motherhood plus medical issues and I've been driven to look into intentional communities and Co housing there are a couple in silver spring. And I'd like to hear your thoughts about how important that is in the face of an aging population and also in the face of Parents or parents of special needs children and children who will be ultimately needing as supportive living environment even after the parents passed. Thank you David. I read about Co housing communities in The peace and basically. They're they're usually a bunch of apartments together. When I write about this is in Oakland. Call to Michael Collins Which has twenty three people in ranging from age one to eighty three and they have a gigantic common kitchen. They eat together maybe twice a week together in the rest of the time they just eat within their own apartments. They have a Common Garden. Commonplace play area and in that particular cohorts in community. There's a a guy who's a nurse and one of the Moms told me you know I can knock on his apartment door one in the morning. put my have my kid held in his arms and say should we take him to the and the nurse is very happy to give that advice even in the middle of the night and so. That's the kind of support and the other thing that the some of the resins told me about that place. Was You have a lot of friendships across the age A woman I talked to Courtney. Martin has a little girl and her little three year. Old Daughter just has a wonderful relationship with one of the adult males in the. The guy loves the fact that a three year old daughter a three year old thinks he's fantastic and the girl loves the fact that She's got this funny guy who plays with their own time. And so this sort of multigenerational Connections that used to be part of life are are much more part of these co housing communities. Sally is on the line from haverhill Massachusetts. Sally Wicha High. I just want say I'm married into a a lovely large Italian family. We ended up moving away just because we none of our free time was never our own. It was always scheduled with family events. And they're wonderful people but it turned out. We just didn't have our own life. Yeah I mean David. There's that I Guess Sally is experiencing something a few decades. After a huge number of people have experienced that which was the notion is the big family the big multigenerational family. Can it be suffocating Do Children not get the kind of attention from their parents that they would in a nuclear family. And I'm wondering when you think of what What again what? The different experiences Do for kids. Who grew up in them? What what about that problem? Yeah I think they can be more suffocating for the adults. I think the kids are fine having squads of other kids to run around and play with but I think the adults can find it suffocating. You're basically forced to live with people who didn't choose Often their feuds and often like even we started with a stray of a guy who cut the didn't cut the Turkey at the right time That's a seemingly trivial thing can create years of feuds and so. I don't want to say that life in extended family is always neat and nice and a lot of the Weavers. We work with struggle with burnout. Because they're always giving giving giving and they don't have a sense of place to relax is t. a place to do self care and so. I don't want to totally romanticize these things and I'm a person I think our our values of change and I certainly live with modern values. Were I expect a certain level of privacy room in my own? A quiet place and those are often not around extended family so there are. There are pluses and minuses to both forms. I guess my argument would be. We've got a little too far over in the direction of privacy and separation and isolation And it's been especially bad for our kids we're talking about Family with David Brooks Whose article is called..

David Brooks Robert Siegel Atlantic Amy What Npr Sally Wicha High Dr Hundred NEW YORK Davidson Greensboro US University of North Carolina Weavers Dot Org professor of Human Development hockey Israeli Defense Forces Rush Chetty Emily Brown
"david brooks" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

13:12 min | 9 months ago

"david brooks" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Family? What works what doesn't work in your case. I'm Robert Siegel and this is on point. Astrology is as oldest civilization itself. And today it's easier to access than ever before thanks to the Internet and smartphones this week on through line how astrology almost one extinct and made a remarkable comeback through line from NPR. The podcast. Were we go back in time to understand the present this is on point. I'm Robert Siegel and we're discussing. The American family with New York Times columnist David Brooks his latest piece in the Atlantic is called. The nuclear family was a mistake and joining our conversation from Winston Salem. North Carolina is Dr Andrea Hunter. She's a professor of Human Development and family studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Andrea. Welcome to two point thank you. You've you've researched The phenomenon of the of the family and the extended family in African American society. Which is it's a different story. described the role of the extended family in for African Americans Certainly well first let me say that. I've studied African American family systems over the last two decades. Unc Greensboro and perhaps Even more important I was raised in one in an extended multi generation household embedded in a Broad extended family and. I just wanted to say I that David certain points to the demands and challenges that families are facing today and I certainly agree that this nineteen fifties invention of nuclear family. chase under those demands. But I do want to offer a different kinds of lands based on my work with African American families as well as my own experience in these families and that is that the lived. Experience of families is not one where the nuclear and extended family. Or by if you're catered or on different polls rather they're really dynamically connected. In complex ways. In these connections exist you know within households across them they straddle them and so in these connections can be very fluid or more bounded And certainly there informed by cultural culture and tradition and so when we begin to think about the African American families Certainly has been a centrally important ways in which families have been organize. There have been a source of resilience as David Notes a source of cultural continuation and survival. It certainly has helped African American families on dill with a difficult social economic dislocations and social and economic marginalization over time and in many ways African American families marriage engender has looked quite different And has not approximated that nineteen fifties social invention so in that way. I think that African Americans reflect The ways in which these kind of family type can be critically important at the same time We can think about the ways in which the extended family and nuclear families. Sorta multi mutually constituted And Think about the flow and ebb so less likely to sort of think about the kind of decline in the nuclear family of The disintegration of it and the ascendancy of the extended family system but rather to think about them and very mutual Mutual ways as a resource through which individual family members and also nuclear family. Units can draw on for to build their adaptive capacity. David Brooks Sound right to you Yeah it's a beautiful way to put it. I I I can just way express myself and maybe even the article that I wrote I. I try to imply that. They're two different things. An extended family is a nuclear family. With supports of the nuclear. Family is not going to go away. We're always going to have moms and kids and Dad's But I think the crucial question is what you support them with. And in the in the nineteen fifties and in many of our minds stay. The ideal is to you. Know Kids with parents in a house that sort of detached and sort of sufficient. But that's a that's never been the case with the African American community with family forms that were necessary under slavery was family forms that were necessary under Jim Crow. There was a struggle to find ways that were much more resilient much more supportive and I try to mention in the piece that they've always been grandparents involved. There's always been aunts and uncles. I spent a lot of this week in Watson Compton in south central La which are African. American and Latino communities and I guess I'd say you see two realities one you do meet young men who say you know. I Hate my dad. He's not around for me on the other hand. You see people of all forms of an all over chipping in creating relationship with young men and women raising children in ways that are adaptive flexible and successful. And so I I'd say those two realities the sort of disadvantages that a lot of young people grow up with a real. The family breakdown is real. But the family up is also very Let's hear from from some of our listeners. Cindy is on the line from Sterling Massachusetts You here Things that relate to what's happened in your family cindy definitely My husband and I just left our community in the north shore. A Boston to move out to central mass to buy a home with an in-law apartment so that we could live with my mother-in-law and There is you know. Despite the classic angst between Mother Laws and daughter-in-law's I was really the ones who spearheaded this. I'd recently taken some time off work to stay home with my kids and I just found the isolation and the burden of taking care of my kids by myself Especially as a woman with like the mental load and balance like everything I have to take care of The assigned to me essentially. Because I'm a mom and a wife I just found it really stressful and We decided to to make the move and my mother-in-law's recently widowed and She couldn't take care of herself and her house anymore. And I'm you know thrilled where my kids are going to be able to be with their grandchildren. And we're GONNA be able to help her and She's going to be able to help us for generations under the same roof. Yeah Yeah and I'm just you know I'm I'm so glad about it because it was just I as a stay at home. Mom temporarily hopefully There's just too much like the the loneliness isolation like in depression I experienced. And you know so. I'm hoping that that's GonNa it's GonNa be great for all of us. Thanks for talking with us about that David although Cindy described Redeveloping recreating an extended family to lessen stress. Do I have it right? There's a there's a point in your article that in Japan There's a study finding that women who were in multigenerational families were more stress stash than other women. Don't do I have that right. That is correct. And so in the old extended family of Avalon. Those families were possible because the women were stuck in the kitchen making meals for twenty five people. And we're not going to go back to those days. And frankly were much more individualistic culture. We're not going back to extended clans of of fifteen hundred years ago. So what we're trying to do is find a new balance and I think we've sort of overshot the mark on isolation and separation. And what things I liked about these new forged families into these new Extended families is. They're they're not as crushing Especially for women as the old ones support. They're not as isolating as the nuclear family. We wound up on. And the flexibility is part of that on the other hand and Perhaps Sandra hundred you encountered this as well One when you're a perhaps have a parent come in. Come and live with you Because the parent was old or widowed. Both of those things. But it wasn't it wasn't just about nursing it. It wasn't a it wasn't a matter of of caring for somebody who's ill and that seems to be increasingly what's happening here but it's not just that mother is old but Mother is frail needs constant attending to. I think what you see an African American families it's extending lots of different ways under different conditions so you may have elder kin bringing in young families to provide that support You may have aunts and uncles as coming in as they make a transition to other points and their life or a young mother and you may have families working together to To support an elder Ken and one of the things that within this environment you share caregiving. You grow through this ethic of care and And I think one of the as someone who's who also grew up in one of these families I think about how deeply I've been shaped by those intergenerational stories and those intergenerational stories are about culture and identity and family but they're in butte with so many values around How tweet how we treat each other. How do we deal with these different difficult circumstances so So I would say one of the models that comes out of the African American family and then the ways in which people are creating new families is that we're doing it in different ways. There's a lot of complexity There's one study that was involved in and there were a hundred eight different combinations of adults living with children. Let's not even talking about the cousins. You know the minor cousins and Nieces and nephews and the Fictive Kin So I think we're in an age of possibility and I think that The ways in which you can think about family think about family. These expensive ways opens up. Not only the chosen. But I to activate this extended family. That lives alongside. Us OF VICTORIA JOINS US now from Cape Cod Massachusetts high high. Yeah I was calling in because I'm sure a lot of immigrants are in a similar situation but my husband is from Although of a small town in a small country in eastern Europe and he really came here with no family and we know a lot of other people from the same country and it just kind of naturally happens where we create a new family so we spend holidays with people from the same country. We get closer with those people Almost like we cannot spend time with our immediate family overseas. And you almost reach out to those coming from a similar background and you just you really do create almost this new kind of family Where everyone's in the same situation and most of the people that we know don't have any family here either So it's I. I'm sure that a lot of other people in my mom is also from Brazil and it's the same thing growing up We just seem to. You know people from the same area just gathered together and almost create this new community and Family David Brooks. This is something that that you write about. Which is people Who really even if they want it. You could not Reassemble their extended family It's just not around but who do then create an extended family they They construct one. I'm I'm in one myself. I wanted to hear about that. Yeah so I went over to house in DC Maybe six seven years ago now and that that couple named Catherine David And they had a kid was in. Dc public schools and he had a friend who had no place to live or read and so they said well. James can stay with us and then James had a friend in the he had a friend and so on and so by the time I came over there they were like twenty five kids around the table and a bunch of them sleeping in the basement and we have an extended family. Call it A-ok dc all our kids DC and. We had dinner every Thursday night. We celebrate holidays together..

Catherine David David Brooks Robert Siegel Cindy African American society New York Times North Carolina NPR University of North Carolina professor of Human Development James Winston Salem Greensboro Andrea Dr Andrea Hunter DC David Notes Atlantic
"david brooks" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

09:37 min | 9 months ago

"david brooks" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Blood or your your talk Jay. That's it that's the last time to cover tanks Jimmy scene from a movie about What was it big extended family? I have to confess and one side of my family. There were two great uncles whose whose clans did not talk to each other at family. They would come but they wouldn't talk to each other. Tell me now what was so great about those extended families what was good about that. The families were messy of course but they were close and infuriatingly close sometimes in that movie. It's really about Barry Levinson's own family. He had five brothers come over from Eastern Europe and they formed a wallpaper business together and in the beginning They all more or less live together and support each other. These big sprawling tables and the thing Levinson emphasizes in those families. The grandparents were the storyteller so their stere- family lore which everybody was reunited by and then over the decades America starts to happen so some people move away in pursuit of opportunity. In this case they break the code of the family. The the guy who's saying you cut the Turkey without me. He was the senior male. He was the head of family and the idea of cutting the Turkey without him. To basically break up the family system and so F- family becomes less important speed and efficiency become more important and at the end of the toward the end of the movie. It's no longer big table with extended family. It's a couple with their kids watching. Tv on Thanksgiving on TV trays and then the very end of the movie. The hero is left alone in a nursing home wondering what happened and so basically the story of that is America moving from big extended families to have small families and then to know family. And that's happened to a lot of people I've got basically the story that I think has happened over the last century which has been fine for some people but disastrous for those a more vulnerable. We should point at one. Reason is that People had smaller families wise. I what they could The advent of birth control Another reason was that Women of became more empowered and having eight children of just made it pretty difficult to do any kind of work outside. The house Economically children long ago ceased to be a assets to the family mean. We Love our children but they don't bring money in when they're ten years old with it they didn't in Agrarian Day so so that family that that old extended family It if a died EDYTA pretty natural death. Well it sort of did But it died because farming ended as you say we couldn't make money off of Ah for children. In the roles of women changed and so with industrialization you see people moving to the big cities and basically starting nuclear families. Which is mom dad and one or two kids of start out with four or five? Now it's one or two And that is because extended families have a great strength which is their resilience if one relationship between a mother and father or between a parent and a child breaks or somebody dies. There's somebody around to pick up the slack in a nuclear family. The end of a relationship is basically the end of the family as we know it so they allow for greater openness but they allow for their much more fragile family structures and so when we switched to the nuclear family Because of a lot of reasons you cited for a little while at work in the nineteen fifties and sixties sort of worked. We had stable nuclear families. Mom Dad living in a suburban home surrounded by grass. And we had high fertility low divorce rates. But that's because every condition society favored that you had men making four hundred percent more than their fathers had at the same age so you could have a stable family on one income. You had Thai social capital high religious observance. You had everything to support. The family and the families were living in close proximity to another so they were basically forming extended families Anyway and basically. That was a brief window of time in the nineteen fifty s to nineteen sixty five when we formed our ideal of what a family should be but then in nineteen sixty five society went back to normal and the the security of those brief freakish ears vanished and since then the family has been falling progressively weaker and weaker. One one one change was that to maintain the extended family means Generations remaining in the same place. And we're a mobile society I think of in my lifetime To to professional decisions that were absolutely decisive. We're moving away from New York to Washington closing off to London to live for years You you can't do the same you can't have the same kind of Weaken work out relations with your with your family if you're living hundreds or thousands of miles away. Yeah that's certainly part of it America at least used to be a mobile society now much less mobile than we used to be but I think people left the nuclear family in part because they wanted privacy. They just want all. These people didn't choose in their lives and be. They wanted a little more flexibility And the market wants you to be a small family where you don't spend a Lotta time on relationships where you can spend a lotta time on work emails. So nuclear families make you richer and societies with smaller families are richer families. They happen to be less connected families and the story I tell about the last fifty years really is a story of these families. Falling apart it used to be like seventy percent of Americans were living in a nuclear family. Now it's like a third fertility rates are way down you have twenty seven percent of young men having no contact with their dads. You have forty percent of of Americans growing up in a single parent home. And so what you have wound up with is a lot more fragile relationships. And you've wound up with say single MOMS. I've a friend. Who's a mom who's decided to stay home with their kids in a suburb of Virginia and she describes the life that is brutally hard and lonely? A lot of the time because there's nobody around to help You've got older people who are dying alone. My My newspaper wrote a piece in about a decade ago about a guy who lived in queens and he just died alone and nobody noticed because he had no social context so we are Y We live with more. Annemie in modern society where we are individuals And yet that choice as you say the allure of all of that was again to draw upon my own family. My mother is the eighth of Eight Surviving there was an earlier baby. Who died in infancy of those eight siblings? Four of them had one child and four of them had two children. Nobody to replicate the life in a brood of siblings and cousins although is very happy family but it just that was not being American. It wasn't assimilating. It wasn't Being modern for them and my family's pretty much the same and I would say just looking around the society That's basically fine if your upper middle class That people frankly in my social class we can afford to buy extended family and when we need labor in the form of Nannies or coaches or somebody to cut the grass. We can afford to hire that. And so the nuclear family has worked out pretty well for those of us in the educated class for people who don't have the means to basically by extended families it has not worked at all. And so you go to neighborhood after neighborhood where you see stress families and then you see people trying to cope and the story ends on. I should say on a hopeful note that Americans are adjusting and re attaching to to extended family so the number of Americans who live in extended families now twenty percent of the population sixty four million people. That's a modern high. And that's because a lot of parents want their children and a lot of adult. Children basically have no choice but to live at home and a lot of middle aged people want. There's their parents to live with them. And so you're seeing a return to a new kind of family form so we did go through that period which your family. My family probably did about the same time to smaller and smaller families but I think out of the wreckage of that for a lot of people in a lot of social classes. You're seeing new family. Forums actually raising a challenge of what kind of housing there is in America. And how can an extended family live nowadays if all the housing that's being built is is is for nuclear families homebuilders ask consumers. Do you want us to build an in-law sweet where either what they call a millennial sweet where the adult child can live or senior can live and forty two percent of Americans now say they want that and so I I do think there's a return to that and the second thing which is even more to me is what I call forged families or somebody close forge families and that's chosen families and chosen families emerged in the nineteen eighties in San Francisco during the AIDS crisis? A lot of gay men lesbians hadn't were cut off from their families going through this trauma and they really created this chosen family structure where they bonded together to really create kin like forms and a lot of people have been sort of cast off in the among some of the failures of the nuclear family. And they're forming new family forms. These chosen families and I see that was All around the country emerging people bond together and create family out of even though they're not biologically related in a few minutes. I want to return to that subject in hear more about the the forged family led me. I tell folks that we're hearing from New York Times columnist and Atlantic writer. David Brooks We're talking about his latest.

America Barry Levinson Turkey Eastern Europe Jay New York Times David Brooks Virginia San Francisco writer queens New York Washington London
"david brooks" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:48 min | 9 months ago

"david brooks" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"From NPR and WVU ARE BOSTON. I'm Robert Siegel and this is on point. The Nuclear Family Mom Dad. Two and a half kids house in the suburbs and the white picket fence is arguably the American dream for it was. It's increasingly the dream of a bygone era American households and families very different today. They're more single parent. Households couples are getting married later if they're getting married at all and even our definition of family is changing the writing in the Atlantic New York Times columnist. David Brooks argues that the nuclear family far from being a venerable social institution enjoyed a brief time dominance after the old fashioned extended families broke up this hour on point. David Brooks joins us from Washington DC to talk about his article. The nuclear family was a mistake. Dave it's wonderful to have you on the program and good to talk with you. It's good to be on the air with you again. I should say that we should acknowledge straightaway that We spent many many many Friday afternoons with J. Dion Either Talking politics on all things considered me listening to my colleagues talk politics with you on all things considered into. I missed that. So it's and we also wants took part in a a small world experiment and discover that we have ten cent Morgan's of DNA in common so we have a common ancestor sometime back around the time of the of the black death in Europe or something. We are the extended family our family. Yes that let's start with the precursor of the nuclear family which you show us an example of it in your article from Barry Levinson's nineteen ninety film avalon. You started out me. You cut the Turkey but me come really big. Oh Ashley You're late.

David Brooks Barry Levinson Robert Siegel NPR Atlantic New York Times BOSTON Turkey WVU Europe J. Dion Dave Washington
"david brooks" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"david brooks" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

"Today we close out our summer inspiration series where we've been looking back at. Some of kindred cast's most exhilarating moments and what better way to wrap things up than with new york times columnist and bestselling author. David brooks lion tree three ceo r._a._m. Borakove spoke to him on the eve of the release of his latest book. The second mountain the quest for more life and david laid bare the impetus behind hind what has become his newest bestseller to hear the full show checkout episode fifty also be sure to subscribe wherever you listen to your podcast so you never miss a new episode apps out when we return in the fall. I'm honored to be sitting here with with david brooks. Who's the award winning new york times op ed columnist and also the author of one of my favorite books the road to character. It's been the source of a lot of life lessons for me. As i built my life my family my career here at lyon tree and i really appreciate your sitting with us today. Oh it's a pleasure turn. Thank you for the kind words about the book mental meteorite it. I missed that book. I was fun to write that book so i miss work in but you actually say in the manuscript that i read for a forthcoming book that you you have coming out in april. Call the second mountain the quest for moral life that the rotor character left you satiated but a bit unsatisfied an approach this next book so tell me about that a little bit yeah so the road character was about the core idea and that was the difference between the resume virtues and the eulogy virtues the resume virtues of the things that make us good at our job and eulogy virtues of the things they say about us after we're dead whether honorable courageous capable of great love and we all know the eulogy virtues are more important jordan who tend to be more intentional the resume and so like how do you build up those eulogy virtues and the core argument of the book was that you figure out what your key weakness and you combat combat so if for dwight eisenhower was one of the characters in the book was anger he was just an angry guy a lot of hatred a lot of passion and he worked on that every day to be cheerful leader an optimistic leader and he really worked for him. He built a new personality and i think that is part of character development but going through stuff in my own life you learn more. I came seem to think that book was too individualistic that most of the what we do and the way we form our character is by our giving ourselves to others and not paying attention to ourselves and the internal l. drama ourselves but by simply giving ourselves to others more selfless and i mean that not just being selfless but making specific commitments to specific things so for example. I kid i sent him joshua. He was born many years ago now but when he was born he had a super low apgar score. We didn't know it was going to happen to the kid and so that first night was very scary. Sorry i remember asking sposi doesn't live out tonight. We'll have been worth it for his mother and i have a lifetime of grief and before a kid i would've thought no way he would not even aware of his life. I for thirty minutes. Whatever but after born you you get sucked into a commitment that you didn't even know what's possible right and so you want to be there for the kid you want to do things for them taking out for a walk and you suddenly become because you're captured by a commitment. You become a slightly better person overtime. That's earning does right so before we get a second. Let's talk about the first mountain and you are very very prophetic when it comes to the stages of life and this first mountain we can all identify with because we're building. We leave school university. You come out of school. You build a life yourself. The big family build a career. You try to excel that. We're we know so many high achievers and then you start to think about things and we'll words that really gonna take me and and you get to a point in your life were you valley heating your thesis and that valley can be personal midlife crisis speak it could be professional rational. It could be societal and i can't think of a better time right now. Then today will were hitting the valley in so so many ways like what's the political system. Look like really this is tough. Everyone wakes up a bit of a heaviness. What's the media look like it's all transforming where the technology platforms really stand for. What's our society really about and so i feel like we're in this valley so obviously you've time the book perfectly getting close. I was wondering how it would feel but i i think the timing is pretty good. Partly you know even the michael cohen. Hearings people are like i on political level which our political system going on a social level you know the rise of suicides the the right of opiate addiction the lies of loneliness and distrust rising mental health problems and then just as you say people just feel heavy that lack of trust in our institutions and i think it's a member of media institution you know the industry than i do but we struggle with getting people to trust us so we're not fake news and so just this tide of alienation and and i think you know one of the lessons of the book is when you're in a tough time you're either broken or your broken open and if you're broken you turn scared and angry and bitter. There's a phrase i love have pain that is not transformed is transmitted so if you don't know what to do with your own pain you tend to pass it along to the project but when you're broken open then you go go deeper into yourself and you realize what's at the core of yourself which in the book is your heart and your soul your desire to attach to other people designed to attach to an ideal and you realize those those are the desires of the most important desires and you say my first mountains great. I'm not against i but i found something better and i'm gonna have a second man and that second mound when you start to climb i'm out of the valley on that second mountain that.

david brooks new york times dwight eisenhower Borakove ceo lyon tree michael cohen sposi thirty minutes
"david brooks" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"david brooks" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"So we're at a big hotel here in new york with members of heterodox academy they include college faculty and staff a lively crowd is here in this episode we're gonna hear from new york times columnist and author david david brooks who speaks about how his professors shape the way he sees the world when he was a student and also today and the potential for colleges now to improve are mental and spiritual health some serious stuff yet also there are moments of humor david brooks it's easier to demonize the opening and a lot of people do but you know i i did this piece maybe fifteen twenty years ago called the organization kid about princeton and it was about how students never challenge their professors were over that and i think that's on balance a good thing i think it's you know david foster wallace and the famous kenyan address said there's no atheist and life we all worship something and some of the spiracy earnings come out as a political radicalism neck and take a fanatical form but it does grow out of a spiritual journey.

new york princeton david foster wallace new york times david david brooks fifteen twenty years
"david brooks" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

14:31 min | 1 year ago

"david brooks" Discussed on The TED Interview

"Hello. I'm Chris Anderson. Welcome to the Ted interview. This is the podcast series where I get to sit down with Ted speaker, and we take a deep dive into their ideas. Today on the show David Brooks. And how to lead a life of meaning and move toward less polarized politics football than fifteen years, David has been a political and cultural columnist for the New York Times, and he's the author of several blockbuster books. The diversity helped shape shift, a lot of people's worldviews books like Bo Bo's in paradise the social animal, and.

Ted speaker Bo Bo David Brooks Chris Anderson David New York Times fifteen years
"david brooks" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"david brooks" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"And. Hi it. Diane on my mind is Friday a conversation with David Brooks. You know, him from his poetical analysis in the pages of the New York Times and the weekly appearances on NPR and the PBS news hour, but despite continued professional success a few years ago Brooks found himself in a dark place in his personal life. Marriage of many years had fallen apart. His Republican party was moving away from him is moment of personal crisis. He turned his attention to the question of how to lead a good life. His conclusion our country has become far to focus on the individual. The result is his new book the second mountain a quest for a moral life. I spoke with David Brooks on Wednesday. David Brooks it so good to see you again. Good to see again. It's been many decades we've been there. I know this book seems to come from a very personal place. As specially in. It's small bit obsessed disclosure, which I gather you had not intended to do an issue. No, I did not I was gonna write a book about the state of our society and about the failure of our relationships, and our failure to be kind to each other. And I gave the first draft to a researcher who's student, you soup, Pennsylvania. And she said you have to put yourself in the book, and I said if you're going to write about relationship invulnerability will maybe you have to talk about your relationships and offer little vulnerability, and I'd gone through hard time in two thousand thirteen my marriage ended in my kids had moved away. And I lost a lot of friends in the conservative movement because I'm not the kind of conservative that is popular now. And so. I was lonely and I went through a valley. And so I felt I had to describe that because we're going through something of a national valley evaluation. And I've spent six years thinking had he get outta valley. Howdy renew yourself morally, and so at applied to personally, but I also thought it applied to me nationally. You're talking about the Republican party end. It's conservatism the days how it my mentor when I was a young man was William Buckley. He came to the Chicago where I was he gave a speech, and I had written. This really mean parody about him. And at the end of his speech. He said David Brooks. If you're in the audience, I'm gonna give you a job he liked what I written about him. And that was the big break in my life and three years later. I call them up and say, hey, is that offer still open? And so for eighteen months, I was his surrogate son, he took me to concerts. He took me sailing introduced me to life of that. He had a life of luxury never imagined never confronted before. But it was very kind to me. And it was a conservatism that was about respect for tradition. Respect for wisdom and change should be constant, but it should be cautious. And that to me is real conservatism. Now, we have reactionary ISM and though respect for tradition. No respect for intelligent respect for expertise. No respect for moral values. And so I can't be part of what is called conservatism. Now tangle this that does second mountain describe press the first and second out a lot of us get at a school, and our egos released driving us we want to have a good job. We want to be well thought of we want to be admired. And then something happens sometimes you achieve success and you find it's not as satisfying as thought sometimes you fail, and you're not on your first mount anymore. Sometimes something happens that wasn't part of the original plan. You have a cancer scare or elusive child. And they make the desires of the ego seem very small, and you have a tragedy like that. And so you're down in the valley and in the valley, some people get broken by the valley, they turned bitter and hostile resentful some people get broken open. They turn more vulnerable. They they see deep into themselves and they see deeper into themselves than they ever saw before. And then when they see into their depths, they realized that only spiritual and emotional food will fill those steps and they operate not out of the ego. But out of the heart, which is a desire for love for another and out of the sole desire to serve some transcendent. Good, and when they make those realizations they're ready for of larger climb, and that's the second mound, and how do you fit into that second mountain? How does your life translate to that second now while in twenty thirteen I went through a bad period. And I realized I was over working. I was valuing time over people trying to be productive, and I live in an apartment about a mile from where we're sitting right now, and hey divorce after divorce, and no I was just working. So if you went to my kitchen, you open the drawers instead of silverware in that drawer. There was posted notes instead of plates. There was just stationary. I was just working and I re-. Realized I was misleading my life. I'd been sucked into the things our culture encourages us to believe that career success can make you feel fulfilled or I can make myself happy on my own. And so that occurred the a really a lot of looking at myself, and how it misled my life, and what a real life should look like. And then one thing I think is true as you have to get larger as incense you can't solve your problems at the same level of consciousness that which you created them you have to get a bigger consciousness. So what is getting larger me, David? It is getting out

David Brooks Republican party New York Times Diane NPR researcher William Buckley Chicago Pennsylvania cancer eighteen months three years six years
"david brooks" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"david brooks" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"And. Hi it. Diane on my mind is Friday a conversation with David Brooks. You know, him from his poetical analysis in the pages of the New York Times and the weekly appearances on NPR and the PBS news hour, but despite continued professional success a few years ago Brooks found himself in a dark place in his personal life. Marriage of many years had fallen apart. His Republican party was moving away from him is moment of personal crisis. He turned his attention to the question of how to lead a good life. His conclusion our country has become far to focus on the individual. The result is his new book the second mountain a quest for a moral life. I spoke with David Brooks on Wednesday. David Brooks it so good to see you again. Good to see again. It's been many decades we've been there. I know this book seems to come from a very personal place. As specially in. It's small bit obsessed disclosure, which I gather you had not intended to do an issue. No, I did not I was gonna write a book about the state of our society and about the failure of our relationships, and our failure to be kind to each other. And I gave the first draft to a researcher who's a student at your soup, Pennsylvania. And she said you have to put yourself in the book, and I said if you're going to write about relationship invulnerability will maybe you have to talk about your relationships and offer little vulnerability, and I'd gone through a hard time in twenty thirteen my marriage ended in my kids had moved away. I'd lost a lot of friends in the conservative movement because I'm not the kind of conservative that is popular now. And so. I was lonely and I went through a valley, and so I felt a hat to describe that because we're going through something of a national valley evaluation relation. And I've spent six years thinking he get outta valley. Howdy renew yourself morally and so at applied to me personally. But I also thought it applied to me nationally. You're talking about the Republican party end. It's conservatism the days how it my mentor when I was a young man was William Buckley. He came to the Chicago where I was he gave a speech, and I had written. This really mean parody about him. And at the end of his speech. He said David Brooks. If you're in the audience, I'm gonna give you a job he liked what I written about him. And that was the big break in my life and three years later. I call them up and say, hey, is that offer still open and so many teen months? I was his surrogate son, he took me to concerts. He took me sailing introduced me to life of that. He had a life of luxury. Never imagine never confronted before. But it was very kind to me. And it was a conservatism that was about respect for tradition. Respect for wisdom and change should be constant, but it should be cautious. And that to me is real conservatism. Now, we have reactionary ISM and though respect for tradition. No respect for intelligent over Switzer expertise, no respect for moral values. And so I can't be part of what is called conservatism. Now Tango, this that does second mountain describe press the first and second out a lot of us get out of school, and our egos released driving us we want to have a good job. We want to be well thought of we want to be admired. And then something happens sometimes you achieve success and you find it's not as satisfying as thought sometimes you fail, and you're not on your first mount anymore. Sometimes something happens that wasn't part of the original plan. You have a cancer scare or elusive child. And they make the desires of the ego seem very small when you have a tragedy like that. And so you're down in the valley and in the valley, some people get broken by the valley, they turned bitter and hostile resentful some people get broken open. They turn more vulnerable. They they see deep into themselves and they see deeper into themselves than they ever saw before. And then when they see into their depths, they realized that only spiritual and emotional food will fill those steps and they operate not out of the ego. But out of the heart, which is a desire for love for another and out of the sole desire to serve some transcendent. Good, and when they make those realizations they're ready for of larger climb, and that's the second mound, and how do you fit into that? Second mountain. How does your life translate to that second now will in twenty thirteen I went through a bad period. And I realized I was over working. I was valuing time over people should be productive, and I live in an apartment about a mile from where we're sitting right now, and hey divorce after divorce, and no I was just working. So if you went to my kitchen, you open the drawers instead of silverware in that drawer. There was posted notes instead of plates. There was just stationary. I was just working and I re-. Realized I was misleading my life. I'd been sucked into the things our culture encourages us to believe that career success can make you feel fulfilled or I can make myself happy on my own. And so that occurred the a really a lot of looking at myself, and how it misled my life, and what a real life should look like. And then one thing I think is true as you have to get larger as Einstein said, you can't solve your problems at the same level of consciousness that which you created them.

David Brooks Republican party New York Times Diane NPR researcher William Buckley Chicago Switzer Pennsylvania Einstein three years six years cancer
"david brooks" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"david brooks" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

"Takeaways of the dossier. Which is what we all know. Now is clear as day that Putin had a vested interest in Trump, and as has been confirmed. The Kremlin has been developing Trump for some years doesn't ask that the tap when they needed him. None of that has changed. The facts have not changed. What has been confirmed with Sarah? And I have always prepared everyone for is that do not rely on Robert Mueller. Do not rely on an on an FBI that has failed us repeatedly in recent years alone in its really weak attempt to try to fend off the Russian mafia, the Kremlin's infiltration of our democracy. Do not rely on them we've gone over their track record many times, we're gonna do it again today to point out important things to undo law the gas leading going on right now in mainstream media, we've always prepared everyone for this. What you need to now do when you're faced with these authoritarian tactics is to restate the obvious to read the facts again to remind yourself at the facts are still the facts, nothing has changed. An a really really good book too. To wrap your head around all of this. That's happening. That will help you. Stay grounded is a book by the historian. Tim Snyder called the road to unfrozen them. Russia Europe, America, get your hands on this book. It will make you feel less crazy by the atrocious gas, lighting and conformity and submission. That's going on right now with the mainstream media and on all these pundits, David Brooks, who's always reliably David Brooks. And every piece of his gets just trashed on Twitter. Yes, that's true. But David Brooks even came out and saying that John Brennan and Bitta work own apology to Trump for calling him a traitor. That's bullshit. That is bullshit. It's like we've seen again. And again that Trump believes the Kremlin over US intelligence we've seen again. And again, how Trump puts Kremlin interest before American interests. It's all everything you see believe your eyes. Believe your ears believe what you see do not allow these. People to gaslight you. That's why the show exists because we point out. The facts remain, the facts, nothing has changed. This has just been the cover up. We've been preparing you for for weeks now and just in terms of the case of bar, and then months prior that were preparing you for molar being not the savior that everyone thought he was for obvious reasons. The FBI's failing us for years now in its losing battle against the Russian mafia and Kremlin infiltration of our democracy. And if you want to get deeper insight into that and how that all works read again the road to freedom Russia Europe America by Tim Snyder. If you're not familiar with Tim Snyder, he is a renowned historian at Yale University. He's a very serious guy. His very serious job. At Yale University depends on him being a very serious guy. He has written this massive book called blood lands. You're at between, Hitler and Stalin. How those two mass murderers influenced each other another fascinating read, it's a bestseller. He stopped what he was doing. When trump. Elected and quickly wrote on tyranny, providing lessons of authoritarianism and how to resist it. It's deliberately publish to be a little pocket guides. You can carry it around in your pocket. And so you could be reminded on how Thawra -tarian is works, including the gas lighting, including the purging, including the cover-ups and the utter lack of transparency. There's a reason why Mitch McConnell doesn't want us to see the mole report. Okay. This is all part of those types of authoritative, that's what we're experiencing now in Tim, Steiner's book the road to freedom. He talks about how for instance, the rise of Kremlin aggression, the rise of Kremlin imperialism, and how it worked, and he gives as an example, how Russia invaded Ukraine originally in recent years alone through Yana kovic, how Yana kovic was installed, of course, as we all know what the help of Paul Manafort, and when Yanna kovic came in. He started ROY..

Tim Snyder Trump David Brooks US Kremlin FBI Russia Yale University Europe Putin Yanna kovic Robert Mueller Mitch McConnell America Sarah Twitter Steiner Thawra
Ex-Trump adviser Roger Stone indicted in Mueller probe

All Things Considered

04:36 min | 1 year ago

Ex-Trump adviser Roger Stone indicted in Mueller probe

"A few hours later before a Florida judge stone was indicted on seven counts, including obstruction of an official preceding making false statements and witness tampering all the charges stem from special counsel, Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen election outside the court stone vowed to fight the charges. Okay. So let's dig into what those charges are. And what they may reveal about the Malar invest. Education to do that. I am joined now by Jennifer dascomb. She was a Justice department lawyer in the Obama administration. She now teaches at American University school of law. Jennifer good to have you here. Thank you. So your take on the central question of how this indictment may advance. Our understanding of what happened between Donald Trump and his campaign and Russia. So in a lot of ways the indictment confirms what's already been known. But it does so in a very detailed and diligent way, highlighting the great number of channels of communication between the Trump campaign and WikiLeaks WikiLeaks, of course, was the recipient of Clinton campaign communications that we know were stolen by Russia. There's a line that's drawing a lot of attention and kind of clue that's dangled. This is page. Four of this twenty four page document. It's referring to July twenty sixteen in. It describes a senior Trump campaign official who was directed to contact stone about releases to to WikiLeaks. What we don't know. Is who directed a senior Trump campaign official. We assume Bob Muller knows right? We assume that Molinos than we think that I mean, this looks like another building block in in. What is increasingly looking like, a pretty strong collusion case. It's it's not a smoking gun. But it is another very solid building block that shows that a senior Trump campaign official was was directed to context stone. The Trump campaign was involved. It was active. It was working via stone to to learn about an potentially coordinate to some extent that the dumps that that were ultimately released other emails when you say, a strong collusion case, let me push you on that. We had David Brooks of the New York Times in the studio earlier, and he said to him. The takeaway is that the president then candidate may have surrounded himself with a lot of questionable people. However, would they have needed to go through all of the things that this? Indictment lays out as you say in great detail. If there really were a direct channel street to the Kremlin. So there's there's collusion doesn't necessarily mean that there's a direct channel straight to the to the Kremlin. There's there's other means of establishing collusion. And this again is a is one building block that shows a lot of different connections that that lead back to the Kremlin. And ultimately, I mean, we have to wait and see what molar ultimately produces. But you're seeing I think a very careful building structure of of what may very well be a collision case at the end of this. So did we learn anything today in your view that tightens the web around the president himself? So there's nothing here that leads directly to the president necessarily again, we're there's language about a senior Trump campaign official. There's other language in the statement about senior campaign. Trump officials, and so it certainly suggests that people that were very close to Trump if not Trump himself knew a lot of what was going on. But again, there's nothing in here that specifically leads directly. Back to Trump and based on your close read what does this indictment? Tell us about the direction that Muller and his team are heading again. I think they're they're building. A very careful case there this is now the six Trump advisor charged. It's building a real web and at suggesting some some potential collusion, at least coordination and next shoe to drop a miniature said, this is this is the sixth who's who's left of significant stature and interest. But who has not yet been indicted or charged or cleared? So, you know, it's it's it's impossible to predict we don't know for sure. But of course, Bannon's around Miller's around there's there's other folks that are still out there that may have information, and we've just got to wait and see. All right. That's Jennifer dascomb. She worked in the Justice department under President Obama. She now teaches constitutional and national security law at American University. Jennifer Daska, thanks for stopping by. Thank you. Roger stone is also a self-described dirty trickster, the white haired bespectacled stone has been a force in conservative politics since the Nixon

Donald Trump Official Jennifer Dascomb Roger Stone President Trump Bob Muller Wikileaks President Obama Florida Malar Jennifer Robert Mueller Jennifer Daska Witness Tampering David Brooks Russia Obama Administration Special Counsel Molinos
"david brooks" Discussed on With Friends Like These

With Friends Like These

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"david brooks" Discussed on With Friends Like These

"I'm glad you. Qualified that this book is sort of for the newly woke the alarm clock. Just went off the air now away because there was a part of me reading this that I was like, wow, you're giving a lot of amunition to the David Brooks is of the world. Who I do think? Who have their own kind of very powerful megaphones and influence, and I think for instance, the people like my husband who actually totally newly woke completely newly woke. He's the kind of person that's like system to the argument that David Brooks is making because David Brooks, basically, make an argument looking at the extremes of culture and saying see it's bad. So let's not do it. But that's not a exactly what we should take away from some of these extremes. No, my my argument is always nuance. Right. Like you have to decide for yourself. What's what you can handle what's appropriate for you? It's the to go back to my even gelato roots, the Romans fourteen approach of of saying that you you feel what it out what's appropriate for you. You feel what you can handle and stuff and you find trust. It'd voices that you can follow in that. And when something problematic comes up where it's something very serious or something you can join in that call out culture and stuff, but you don't want to make that the entirety of your feminism. I feel like one lesson that I wanna say to people who see culture as an example of of over correction, and therefore we should abandon its funny people who who who critique the left always see over correction as proof that we should just abandon the project entirely. Unlike like capitalism, they're like over correcting will this just tinker the inker on the edge is with capitalism. No is that. We should always be asking ourselves who had something to lose had something to gain by doing the call out. And that's one of the reasons why I always grown when people like David Brooks, and Jonathan Chait and all those people do these essays about call up culture because it's always a white old dude in the establishment. He has a lot to lose if call out culture finally gets to him, right? As i've. So they're always writing position of fear where they are like, well, what if this one thing happens in its twisted, and people don't believe me, and whatever it's the it's the man who gets a frayed of being accused of a false rape Alec and allegation or something like that. And where they have a lot to lose in that situation. Whereas the women doing the call out. Depending on what where they are in relationship to the man often are trying to do their feminism crash. Right. And make sure that like the people that have the make phones are the people who should have the megaphones. We look to the James Gunn example again. And like those are people who did not have anything to lose my making doing this call out they were trying to inflict damage on someone who they actually saw as an ally, social Justice. Yeah. For wanted to make him go away. Yeah. Those horrid s j ws, and I also feel like I want to make very clear to people who are in the position of kind of newly raised consciousness that you will get called out. Because soon as you kind of make public to the world in any way that is is available. Whether it's, you know, wearing a pussy hats or announcing on Twitter that you're feminist or however, it is in your social circle that it works out that you have present now claimed the identity of someone who cares about these things. There will be a time that someone tells you you fallen short. Yes, it is. There is no way to exist in this world as someone who cares about social Justice and not. Do something quote, unquote wrong. Yeah. Especially if you are like much of the hashtag, resists people a white cysts het woman as if you haven't rich also. Yeah. Speaking. Yeah. You have much. Less to lose a lot of in in in a lot of ways because you have all this privilege and software as where I as a queer woman and stuff have had to look at things differently for a long time and had noticed these things..

David Brooks Twitter Jonathan Chait rape James Gunn Alec
President Trump, President And President Putin discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

President Trump, President And President Putin discussed on All Things Considered

"With the president of China this weekend. Both are locked in a multi-billion dollar trade war. Civil rights leaders say the indictment of four Saint Louis metropolitan police officers reveals a troubling mindset. Inside the department Saint Louis public radio's Rachel Lipman reports. The officers are facing federal charges for their roles in the assault of an undercover officer during a two thousand seventeen protests. The charges include excessive force obstruction of Justice and lying to a grand jury four officers have been suspended without pay the undercover detective was among hundreds of people arrested at downtown Saint Louis in September of last year. It was the third day of protests after a white for a police officer was acquitted of shooting and killing a black, man. That's Rachel Lipman reporting. This is NPR and I'm Jimmy Floyd for WNYC. Some New York City council. Members are introducing a Bill to make the government bidding process with corporations more transparent. The new law would prohibit officials from signing nondisclosure agreements with companies as happened in the Amazon deal councilmember Brad Lander says he feels that level of secrecy should not happen again. If the law had been in place, the city would have had to say we can't sign a non disco. Agreement. So there's two choices. We can make a bid, but it has to be public and people would be able to see it. The Bill is cosponsored by council members Monty Williams and Jimmy van Bremer atop regional Federal Housing administrator is calling for the arrest of three Niger officials after a report found they regularly lied about elevator. Inspections. Lynn Pat overseas region, two of the department of housing and urban development, which includes New York and New Jersey yesterday. She tweeted that the Niger employees should be jailed after they were charged with dozens of felony counts. For falsifying inspection reports. Daily news reporter, Greg Smith says Patten has little authority to pursue the case herself. She has almost nothing to do with this. I guess it's well intention that she does ask a question that is important. And that is did anybody higher up the ladder condone this behavior that isn't really important question. That's the most important question. Smith says the case will be handled by. The district attorney, and Shirley Chisholm story is coming to the big screen and Oscar winning actress viola Davis is bringing it to life. Davis is set to produce and star in a new film about Chisholm for Amazon studios called the fighting, Shirley Chisholm Chisholm, the first black woman ever elected to congress represented New York's twelfth district in the house of representatives from nineteen sixty nine to nine thousand nine hundred eighty three. She was also the first woman to seek the democratic party's presidential nomination in nineteen seventy-two Chisholm died in two thousand five at age eighty and we'll have a retrospective later on all things considered tonight. We've got a twenty percent chance of light rain, otherwise cloudy with a low around thirty four degrees. Currently forty two degrees and cloudy at four oh, six support for NPR comes from farmers insurance committed to helping people understand the ins and outs have insurance. So they can prepare for lives ups and downs. Coverage op. Options and more information can be found at farmers dot com. This is all things considered for men. PR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish all is run. President Trump's first day the twenty summit in Argentina. He's working his way through a series of meetings. There Trump's visit comes on the heels of a big development and special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation a guilty plea by his former attorney Michael Cohen, and what it revealed about Trump's efforts to land a business deal with Russia during the two thousand sixteen campaign NPR White House correspondent tamra Keith is traveling with the president and joins us now from when his IRAs their town. Hey, ATI sometimes when a president goes overseas. The White House is trying to leave all the domestic troubles behind is that the case this time, the answer would seem to be no. And and the reason I say that is that President Trump was supposed to have a meeting here with Russian President Vladimir Putin, he abruptly cancelled that on the way to Argentina via tweet saying it was because of Russian aggression against Ukraine, but then this afternoon there were. Reports of a possibly an informal meeting happening between Trump and Putin. Those reports were being pushed from Russia and the White House put out a sort of an odd statement referring to the Mueller investigation. Sarah Sanders sent this along she said the Russian witch-hunt hoax, which is hopefully now nearing an end is doing very well. Unfortunately, it probably does undermine our relationship with Russia, which was not entirely the answer to the question that we were asking another way that we know that the president's thinking about it is that he's been tweeting about it from here in Argentina a little while ago. Reporter's got to ask the president questions, and and one of the questions was about why he cancelled his meeting with Putin. He insisted it was because of Ukraine, hopefully, they'll be able to settle it out. Flowers amazing with president. The basis of what took place. With respect to the ships, sailors that was the. In the meantime, what else has been going on at the g twenty one big thing that happened today was before the g twenty started a signing ceremony at the president's hotel with the leaders of Canada and Mexico signing the US MCA that is the trade deal that will replace NAFTA. One interesting note is that during remarks, President Trump and president Pineyro of Mexico. It was his last day on the job both referred to it as the US MCA, which is the preferred title that President Trump likes, but prime minister Trudeau kept calling it new NAFTA, even though President Trump does not like the term NAFTA at all. But you know, this is a notable moment because this is a step in the process of President Trump, keeping a campaign promise that said congress and legislatures in Mexico and Canada still need to sign off on this on another subject. The Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman is there. He's of course, been under scrutiny since the killing of journalist Jamal kashogi has he actually interacted with President Trump yet. So a White House official says that they just exchanged pleasantries that there was no discussion. This comes in pretty big contrast with a video that's been circulating of Russian President Putin, and m Bs exchanging sort of an intricate high five that looked very celebratory the president is under some scrutiny about this because he has questioned the CIA assessment that NBS ordered the killing of Jamal kashogi. That's NPR's tamra Keith tamra. Thank you. You're welcome. And we're going to start right there with the g twenty talks in Argentina for our regular week in politics chat. We also need to take stock of another wild week in the Russia investigation. David Brooks of the New York Times is here in the studio as he often has on Friday, David with you and Susan Glasser. The New Yorker, welcome to you. Thanks so much. So President Trump signed this new NAFTA deal today, except as we just heard we're not supposed to call it NAFTA anymore. That's controversial. We are referring to the United States Mexico Canada agreement the US MCA, Scott, I'm tempted to call it also maybe prospects for a trade deal or some sort of agreement with China that may be coming together down at the g twenty Susan. Let me start with you does this count as progress in a year where we have spent a lot more time talking about trade wars than trade deals. Well, look, I think President Trump made a decision to sort of pull back from the brink and to declare victory with the reincarnated NAFTA. Whatever you wanna call it, most experts, and I'm not one on this subject. Do believe that it essentially is a reincarnated NAFTA that it builds on the foundation substantially of the original went and by the way, it's not attend deal. I should point out that there's going to be a real political fight. I think. Up here in Washington on Capitol Hill over approving this. So it's not over. Although President Trump was was taking it as a victory lap. Today was also strengthened by government coming in Mexico, which will inherit the steel by a president on his last day there. That's right. And and I thought you saw the lasting hard feelings as a result of these very tough negotiations with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who did appear at the last minute was uncertain at the signing ceremony today in Buenos Aires. But had some strong words for President Trump, and you've had this amazing spectacle. What have we taken to get here of the United States going after candidate one of its closest allies, David your takeaway, so far from the g twenty well, so far the image of Muhammad bin Salman and Putin doing an end zone dance together is the big takeaway video circulating of them doing a hi fi. Looking very cheer an image. It's a symbol. It's a symbol of an era in which the wolves of the global international order are on the March and undeterred because there's no one. Deter them. And so that's one thing. The second thing I think is the China US relationship and this thank heaven is not a Trump related story to me the big change in US China relations is that we used to have people who were friends of China somewhere, foes of China and the foreign policy establishment sort of split. That's no longer the case. Now, everyone sees China as a challenge, but as a foe Hank pulse in the former treasury fare gave a speech in Singapore recently in which he laid that very clearly and he was very much in the camp. So when Trump talks tough on China trade, he now has a lot of people who are not normally his friends actually thinking he's doing the right thing me loop.

President Trump President Putin Nafta NPR China Donald Trump Mexico Argentina Us Mca New York Shirley Chisholm Chisholm White House Russia President Pineyro Congress Robert Mueller Jimmy Floyd Rachel Lipman David Brooks
Talk of entitlement reform takes over as midterms near

Joe Walsh

04:31 min | 2 years ago

Talk of entitlement reform takes over as midterms near

"There were not politically, correct. But they've done what needed to be done in order to unleash the animal spirits. Alan greenspan's. Alan Greenspan, Stephanie. It's pretty tough to argue with him. Are you sure he said he loves the Trump tax cuts or you gotta sit there constructive. Now. He loved he loved it. They were politically incorrect. Now, what he doesn't love is that we haven't done entitlement reform to accompany them. I wanna you know, it's coming to that. But he loves the Trump tax cuts one of the things about entitlement reform that we need is it surprises me the young people. Don't get more engaged on the entitlement reform ya you know, they sort of latch onto issues that are very very popular in the news. Entitlement reform or something I think people should really care about. Listen, the issue with the tax cut is it's a clear positive for corporate America. The tax code as it was far too complicated. But the amount of taxes that they cut you could ask Jamie Dimon. He will say, listen, I'm glad we got the tax cut. We didn't need it to be as much as it is because we are facing a massive deficit, and as far as the tax cut goes we're seeing corporations do so well two weeks ago. I the business council summit there hasn't been a hundred fortune five hundred there tickled pink, and they're saying they're spending there investing hiring and even without the tax cuts. Deregulation has been a huge positive for corporate America because remember in the Obama administration. It was not a pro business administration. And even if companies weren't faced with new taxes, the threat of regulations of threat more could be coming down the pike was preventing companies from spending. You're definitely seeing corporate America in a very good place book at the stock market one of the reasons the stock market is doing so. Well, suddenly. Corporations have twice as much cash on the books. So it is a positive obviously have a very tight labor market time to see wages push up more than they have this far. So Stephanie role year in the second bluest bubble in America. I always think that silicon valley's a bluer bubble the Manhattan, but I just had Marsha Blackburn on she's had a nineteen point swing in her direction over two weeks, Heidi Heitkamp has fallen apart. And she did a pratfall releasing the name of abuse survivors against their will yesterday that is blowing up. You've got mic. Sally surging ahead of cinema. Do you sense that the blue tide is a thing of the past? And that in fact, we're looking at it read time, I've talked about this a lot. I've never seen a massive Blue Wave coming thing that distresses me isn't are we going massive, bluer massive read the thing that distresses me is the hollowing out of the center on both sides. That is what I think is the most concerning and I think we're seeing it in both parties. Did you read David Brooks piece yesterday about the eight percent on the left? China today. Oh, are you really? Because that is that's the most interesting thing. But the noise comes from those two groups, that's the note, and by the way, our cable channels both left and right that noise. I don't know how we're ever going to break out of this you you are one hundred percent, correct. On a us. An example for you on Monday when I woke up I wasn't on TV. I heard what not the media thought of what Hillary Clinton said on Monday on Sunday about her husband, and Monica Lewinsky. Okay, saying it was not an abusive power. So I said via Twitter take something clear what the president of the United States has a sexual encounter with an intern. It doesn't matter how she behaved, blah, blah, blah. That's an abusive pallet. I'm not saying I'm not saying it's a soft. It is an abuse of power. When I tell you, Hugh, I got a nihil lead on Twitter, and I should hold on a second. Because of course, I've wanted what about Trump what about companies both things can be true abuse. Power is not unique to one industry wants sport, one one nation or one political party. But the tribalism we are seeing the absolute forgiveness of one side and an assault of another. Stop. It's unreasonable. It is going to be very difficult to break away from the profit motive of super serving the six in the eight percent. But I'm glad you're doing the David. That's what that's why I watched up and he going do the David Brooks. Brooks column is the smartest thing I've read in ages. Hey, man payments. Definitely real good to talk to you s rule on Twitter American, of course on MSNBC. Don't go anywhere. I'm coming right back America time to keep talking about these midterms. The red tide is coming everything

Alan Greenspan America Twitter Stephanie Heidi Heitkamp David Brooks Jamie Dimon Monica Lewinsky Hillary Clinton Donald Trump Obama Administration Marsha Blackburn Msnbc Manhattan Assault China Hugh United States
"david brooks" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"david brooks" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"Are they think oh he's kind of a buffoon whatever but at least is still basically trying to say the right things and so i don't think will have any and is part of trump's support that that you know that core thirty five percent of the country are strengthened every time the media criticizes and because the last thing they want to do is to give you the satisfaction of having been writing about one of the things we learned about the class structure in this country is that people in over my class where people in the workingclass for people who voted for trump don't mind billionaires they do not mine rich people what they mind our bossi professionals teachers lawyers journalists who seem to want to tell them what to do or seem to want to tell them how to act and if you had to pick the classic capada me of that person who most defense them that would be hillary clinton and so he she was exactly the wrong person and so i find them remarkably stable in their support this been some seepage around the edge for donald trump uh but so far it's just seepage david brooks pleasure have your thank you next on gps henderson island is right in the middle of the south pacific by all rights it should be a paradise instead it said dump liberals find out why when we come back for the nearly seventy years since chinese nationalism barricaded themselves from mazda don's communist revolution china has considered taiwan its territory it does not have diplomatic ties to any country that recognizes taiwan's independence and brings me to my question which country cut ties to taiwan last week to establish diplomatic relations with china panama guatemala nicaragua or honduras stay tuned in we'll tell you the correct answer this week's book of the week is ed loses the route treat of western liberalism this is a sobering analysis that suggests that the open democratic order that has sustained the western world is crumbling the reasons are many from soaring inequality to slowing growth to rising mercantilists powers like china and india loses intelligent throughout and his tone is urgent appropriately so.

trump hillary clinton david brooks south pacific taiwan diplomatic relations china panama guatemala nicarag honduras india donald trump gps henderson island mazda thirty five percent seventy years