13 Burst results for "David Broder"

"david broder" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

28:21 min | 1 year ago

"david broder" Discussed on The Book Review

"And totally apparently wonderful person who lived to be 99 or a hundred and spoke about her wonderfully. Sinclair Lewis was in and out of New York, far more than garbo. Gabo lived in New York for 45 years. She was not really American, although she became a citizen. She spent a lot of time abroad, but their paths didn't cross as far as I know. Well, I guess the one connecting the tissue is John Gunther, somehow, in between them. They are closest in this to my mind. In the sense that both of them hit the world like a cyclone when they emerged. When Sinclair Lewis wrote Main Street, overnight, probably the most successful novel of the early part of the 20th century in America and abroad. And when garbo, there was that same huge international furor. So they were they were catapulted into extreme fame. I don't know whether it was good for either of them or not in the long run. But that's what happened. It's surprising how many of Sinclair Lewis's novels have really endured. I mean, he wrote a tremendous number of books. 22. The later one's not especially good the early ones also maybe not as good, but when you think about the books that are still read today, babbitt Main Street Aerosmith Elmer gantry, it can't happen here. Todd's worth, dod you say is his best written and most affecting novels. But that one hasn't quite achieved the same enduring renown as the others. I don't know that I agree with that because it does worth was fortunate enough to become the subject of the best movie ever made of his work, which was called indeed. God's worth in the mid 1930s, but William weiler movie, which I recommend to one and all. I stand corrected then on Dodd's worth. It's the best written of his he's not a particularly good or bad writer. His writing doesn't have any strong quality of its own lyrical and is powerful. It isn't funny. It isn't charming. It's very capable. It works. It does the job, but you don't think of him for his writing. It was more in those early years for the subjects and to the way he anatomized America. That is what he really did. And those 5 novels, including Elmer gantry, where the books that did it. But he was the most successful novel other than maybe genre writers of the first half of the 20th century in America. You described that an atomizing of American life as a kind of all consuming attention to the services of American life how so he looked he listened, he noted, he obsessed on what he was seeing. Wherever he went, he took endless notes. He inventoried America. That's what I ended up concluding. He wanted to catch America describe and put it on paper. As I say, he didn't have a style. He had an all observing eye and ear. And he just took note in every possible way and laid it out for us. When you read him, you feel when you read all these books, you feel yes. This is what America was like in this period. Now we know, is it inspiring? Not necessarily. You've mentioned the success of Sinclair Lewis, and again, people might not remember all of this today, but he won the Nobel Prize in Literature, the first American to do so. Explain what happened with the Pulitzer prizes because it's complicated. Well, he was the center of a scandal, really, when Main Street, which had been hailed as the major book of its moment, and of its time, was chosen by the post surprise judges to win the award for its year, which was 1920. And then the trustees of the palace surprise rejected it and instead gave the award to Edith Wharton. That did not sit well with Sinclair Lewis, oddly enough. So when some years later, they awarded it to him for I believe it was Harris Smith. He turned it down. He was thin skinned and that happened again many years later with gravity's win Beau, when pensions book was also chosen by the Pulitzer judges and rejected by the trustees. Did not speak well for the press. Together, we're going to leave listeners with a huge list of books to read at the beginning with your latest book garbo. Then they can go on to read Main Street and babbit and dodsworth and Aerosmith. And then also, and we've talked about this in an earlier episode of the podcast, your memoir, avid reader, and your most recent collection of essays near death experiences and others. And I'm just going to throw in one other book by you that I especially love, which was great expectations, the sons and daughters of Charles Dickens. Thank you, pal, because that happens to be the Dickens book happens to be my favorite of my my books. Not that I sit around reading them or thinking about them. Why is that when your favorite? No one had done that before. Dickens was, of course, the most famous writer of the 19th century and remains one of the most famous writers in the world. He was a little family man, he invented Christmas as we know it. And he had ten children, but what were they? What happened to them? What's his relation to them? It really fascinated me. And I was very happy to be able to lay it all out. I second the recommendation. That book again is great expectations. The sons and daughters of Charles Dickens. Bob, it's always a pleasure to have you on the podcast. Thank you so much. These days, it can be hard to find and hire the right candidates for your small business. That's why LinkedIn jobs made it easier to find the people you want to talk to faster and for free. Create a free job post in minutes on LinkedIn jobs to reach the world's largest professional network of over 770 million people. It's so small businesses rate LinkedIn jobs. Number one in delivering quality hires. Post your job for free at LinkedIn dot com slash the book review. Terms and conditions apply. This is Rick Rojas. I'm a national correspondent for The New York Times. I cover the American south. Being on the ground to cover a story is part of the value of The New York Times, but it's also just part of the joy of this job. As someone who grew up on the Gulf Coast, this often means going back to places that I grew up in. I went there with my family. I fished in some of these places. I get to see them now as a journalist. And that's kind of a great privilege. I have people that I can check in with. Even when there's not breaking news. It's not just, here's the news. This is what a place feels like. This is the music they're listening to and the food they're eating. This is what it's like to be in a place. All of this is possible because of New York Times subscribers. They invest in our ability to do this kind of quality storytelling. If you aren't a subscriber yet and you'd like to join us, you can become one at NY times dot com slash subscribe. Okay, I just got the national editor is actually calling me. All right, so hold on one second. So here's a request for our listeners. I get lots of feedback from you, some complaints, lots of kind words, really appreciate it. You can always reach me directly at books at NY times dot com. I will write back, but you can also, if you feel moved to do so, review us on any platform where you download the podcast, whether that's iTunes or stitcher or Google Play or somewhere else. Please feel free to review us and of course email us at any time. Carl Bernstein joins us now, the author of many books, he joins us from sag harbor to talk about his latest, it's called chasing history, a kid in the newsroom, Carl, thanks so much for being here. Good to be with you. This book is about your early years as a journalist. Why did you want to cover this period in particular? Because it's very tightly focused in terms of the years. It's 1960 to 1965, which are the years that I was at the Washington star, the afternoon, the evening star, the afternoon paper in Washington, D.C., the opposition paper to The Washington Post and probably a better paper at the time than The Washington Post. And they were joyous amazing years in which I learned my trade. I became a reporter at 19. I went there when I was 16 and in danger of not being able to graduate from high school and occasional scrapes with the juvenile court and not knowing where I was going in my life. But it's also very much a book about the past it's really about the present because it is about reporting and these astonishing people that I worked with who became like my family. I mean, you were only 16 when you started and journalism that is quite young, as you said, you hadn't graduated from high school. What was going on in your lifetime that brought you to a newsroom? I'm spending a lot of time at the pool hall. I was getting terrible grades in school. I was working Saturday at a low rent department store in a bad part of town selling merchandise on layaway to people in a poor neighborhood. What happened was that my father was a union organizer and the star had covered a strike by his union, the government workers union really, with amazing accuracy and fairness, unlike The Washington Post. He called the government columnist of the star who got me an interview with one of the owners of the paper who was actually the production manager of the paper. And he thought I was too short too young to be hired, but he had me take a typing test. And I had taken typing with the girls in high school. And I seem to have a kind of astonishing facility for it because I could type about 90 words a minute. I took this test at the star and typing test. And I kept knocking on the production editor's door. I would come down there and sit in the lobby and say, hey, I'm here again. And I think he was kind of irritated by it, probably. But then he saw the typing test. And he called me up and he said, boy, how'd you learn to talk like that? And I did not tell him it was with the girls and the typing class. And he said, come on in to see me. And I got hired that day at $29 a week as a copy boy. He also took me down the center aisle of the newsroom, and they were reporters typing and click clack click and people acting as if they were in the most important errands in the nation and shouting copy. I'd never seen anything like it. It was the most exciting thing I had ever seen. And it was at that moment, I knew what I wanted to do with my life. Be a newspaper man. Let's stop at that title that you were given that you were hired as a copy boy, but so many of the titles in your book, these jobs. They don't exist any more copy boy, dictation, city desk clerk, church editor. Let's just go through them. I mean, what was a copy boy? And what did you do on the job as a copy boy? A copy boy did everything. He was almost a link between the editorial functions in the newspaper, the repertory of functions that were done by the reporters and the composing room, which was the mechanical part of the operation in which the type was actually set. But reporters would yell copy like that and a copy boy would run to the reporter. Remember, this is an afternoon paper. People are typing and writing on deadline. And you'll copy and a copy boy would literally run to the reporter of a reporter would take out of his typewriter rip out of his typewriter, a couple paragraphs that he was writing and typing the copy boy would then run it to the literally run it to the appropriate desk city state national foreign and then go back to his perch where he was sitting wherever it was waiting for the next cry of copy. The copy boy would also certainly for the city editor Sid Epstein, who was really my mentor, great mentor at the paper and a lot of the book deals with sit Epstein and who gave me these amazing opportunities. I would fetch his breakfast. He wouldn't yell copy. He called me kid. And I would go upstairs and get his same breakfast every day of grits and a toasted bagel. But copy boys did everything. And the place couldn't function without copy boys. The other thing we did is we made up books we called them 6 ply books of news print with double sided carbon paper inside almost like a bacon lettuce and tomato sandwich except it was made with carbon paper. And these are the books on which the reporters type their stories. And remember, we're talking about mechanical old fashioned typewriters, not electric typewriters, not computers, so that the whole sound of the newsroom was clicked like the kind of light motif almost like in classical music like a basso continuo. You really get a sense of how physical it was. I mean, earlier you said that the guys response was you were too young and too short, which wouldn't seem to make sense, but you're running around. This newsroom, you're running around and I was still 5 foot three and growing. I just finished the 11th grade. I was a good deal younger than the other copy boys. They were 1920 about that age. So it was pretty atypical for someone your age with your background to start in a newsroom the way you did. Yes. But the one thing about it that figures through the whole book and through, I guess, my whole life was that I got the job because I was persistent. I kept knocking on the door literally of this production editor until he finally succumbed. And the other thing about the book is that my 5 years at the star bracketed the Civil War by a hundred years, literally. So the book is also very much about what's going on in the country at the time, especially civil rights. The Kennedy presidency and administration, that same year at age 16, I started going to Kennedy's press conferences to dictate a text of the press conference back to the newsroom, and I got to go to almost not almost all but it probably almost all of Kennedy's press conferences are a good number of them. Since we're talking about the politics of the moment, talk a little bit about the Washington city, stars, politics, it was the more conservative of D.C.'s two major newspapers at the time, right? The post was the more liberal paper. How did that or did it affect the coverage and sort of the atmosphere of the paper during that period? Well, it's interesting because my parents were left wing people and my father preferred the Washington star because it had covered his union in that strike that I mentioned with great fairness. Unlike The Washington Post, which had read baited the union and in covering the strike seemed to be more interested or thinking that somehow Moscow had something to do. Remember, we're at the height of the Cold War, the height of the McCarthy period still, even in 1960, mccarthyism persisted. And my father thought that the star and he was right that the star was a much fairer newspaper that had no ideology driving its reporting, whereas the post did it was a liberal newspaper and that point of view bled into its reporting. And we had to star really had a view of the post at the time until Ben Bradlee became the editor of The Washington Post. And until Catherine Graham became the publisher. That the post really had an ideology in its coverage, especially its local coverage. And one of the things that we prided ourselves on at the star was that what we were really doing was the phrase that Bob Woodward and I came to use in the coverage of Watergate, which was the best obtainable version of the truth. And a phrase similar to that was literally said in the newsroom to each other that we were looking for really all of the truth that was contextual. It was accurate in its facts that was fair minded, but above all, it was the best obtainable version of the truth. And The Washington Post often fell short of that standard until Bradley got to the paper. So you mentioned when you got to the newsroom just seeing the energy that first day, you know, you knew that that's where you wanted to be. What motivated you at that time on the job to do your work to get ahead as a journalist and did that change over time. Sort of core motivation. Watching these great, amazing reporters like Mary Lou Werner, who had just won a Pulitzer Prize for covering massive resistance to integration in Virginia, Haines Johnson, Mary magro, David broder. The greatest reporters of their time, many of them were in this newsroom, and I saw what they were doing, and I studied what they were doing. And I knew that's what I wanted to do. Including some of what we would call investigative reporting. At the time, and we still call investigative reporting. But the other thing was it was about the country. It was about the capital of the United States. I'm a native a second generation native of Washington, D.C.. And I loved the city. And I knew the city and I learned more and more about the city every day. My first reporting assignment, I had been there about a month at the star and copy boys and the dictators who took these stories and typed them out with a headset on copy boys and dictations were sent out at night, earning $7 and 50 cents extra on top of their pay to cover citizens and civic association meetings in Washington, D.C.. And the distinction incidentally, a hundred years after the Civil War between a civic association in a neighborhood and a citizen's association was, that the citizens association were white residents of the neighborhood, and civic association was for African Americans. I grew up in a Jim Crow town, Washington was a Jim Crow town when I grew up in it. I went to segregated legally segregated public schools in the capital of the United States until Brown versus board of education when I was in the 6th grade. And my parents had taken me with them in the early 50s to sit in at the segregated lunch counters, downtown in Washington, D.C.. Black people in Washington, D.C., the only place they could eat in the 1950s up until the 50s were government cafeterias and one cafeteria chain called shoals cafeterias, which was owned by a rather forward thinking man. It was a segregated town when I was in grammar school. All of the swimming pools in Washington were drained by the recreation board of the city, so they would not be integrated. People in this country have no idea today of what Washington was like as a segregated town. The nation's capital. Well, I was going to bring up the fact that maybe people have no idea what Washington is like at all just given the changing nature of local news coverage. It sounds like the city itself of Washington D.C. not just the politics and the sort of the town industry of the government, but the city itself was covered very thoroughly by the Washington city star. What's happened to local reporting of Washington since then? I mean, how different was it back then in terms of the extent of the coverage? You've hit on part of the reason for the book and what it really is because yes, it's a memoir about the past and incidentally the book is written in almost the voice and point of view of this kid from age 16 to 21. It's not the old man looking back. It's really written from the point of view of this kid telling this amazing story of him having the greatest seat in the nation from age 16 to 21. And what happened then? And what it was like. So it's a book that's really as you're indicating about the past, but it's really in many ways about the present. And what resonates today, including a hundred and however many years it is now since the Civil War, and we still are looking as perhaps the most one of the most important questions in our country is what is happening to the descendants of slaves in America today. So there's a resonance in the book that comes through an authoritarianism during the McCarthy period during the tyrannical reign of J. Edgar Hoover at the FBI trying to root out communists trying to in fact suppress Martin Luther King and his movement because Hoover wanted to somehow show the king was really a communist, which was absurd. So to get the context of the book and the city, you have to look at it in terms of its segregation and in terms of this time that I was at the star is the height of the Cold War. And those two things, the pall of the Civil War cast over our daily lives as did the Cold War in the capital of the United States. What did you want to emphasize most for readers of a younger generation about this earlier era in journalism? Was there a record in particular about the landscape that you wanted to preserve? Absolutely, but again, it resonates today because it's one this is a book about reporting. This is about basic reporting. And in fact, there are a number of quotes on the jacket of the book from Bob Woodward from Doris kearns Goodwin from John meacham from Eugene Robinson about how this is a book about reporting and really the origins in some ways of investigative reporting. How reporting is really done and in fact it's almost hey America, this is how reporting was done how it leads to our coverage in Watergate, bob, Woodward and myself, because it's a road map of how you do reporting. It's not about looking things up on the Internet. It's what we need to be doing now, which is to be knocking on doors, getting out into the communities we cover. Really persistence engagement perpetual engagement with the story, not taking no for answers, not going to easy places like people in their offices where they're other people around and they're liable to tell you a tale that isn't true, but to knock on their doors at night as we did in Watergate. One thing this book is not about, it's not about nor effort. Perhaps the elephant in the room when word circulated that you had a memoir coming out, a lot of people said, oh, this is going to be his response to her version of the account of your marriage with her, which was novelized in her book heartburn. And then in the movie, obviously that's not what this book is. But do you ever plan to write about that? If I ever were to write a memoir about my whole life, of course I would write about it because that wouldn't have to do with the best obtainable version of the truth. It's a real part of my life. Am I ever going to write another memoir that is about my whole life? And look, I've had a big life. It's been an astonishing life. It's been a wonderful life and part of the wonder of it is my children. Our children, nor is in my children. So sure I would write about that if I did another memoir. It's possible that I might. It's a part of my life that's important. I've won last question. This is also about something that's not in the book, but I have to ask you at least one Watergate question and you started to allude to this that when you talked about the way in which people need to report as opposed to the way they do, given the newsrooms of today, given the pressures given the Internet, all of the changes you talked about, how do you think a story like Watergate would be reported and edited now? Would the process have been similar to what you will and Bob Woodward went through at the time? If in a newsroom today, as there are, I believe a reporter or a couple of reporters went out at night and knocked on the doors. First of all, the reporting on the Trump presidency is maybe some of the greatest reporting on The White House that we have ever seen and not just by one news organization the way to Washington Post was way in front of the story during Watergate by 8 or 9 news organizations. But really, in terms of what Watergate was and how it would be covered today, it would require exactly the same techniques that I learned at the Washington star and that Bob Woodward and I used that The Washington Post, which was persistence, common sense, not going doors at night, not in the daytime when people were in their offices and their under pressure. Just try to get to them at night. Work over time. Keep pressing and taking, don't take no for an answer. Go to the next door and knock on it. In a good reporting, is an investigative reporting. It's not just about a string of facts. It's about context. It's about fairness. It's about accuracy. It's about detail. It is rigorous and is that kind of reporting the norm in most newsrooms? No. It is not. It's the exception and in fact, the Internet in particular has undermined the concept of the kind of reporting that we did. It is very much the exception in newsrooms today doesn't happen enough and that's one of the things about this book is it's a road map. It's a road map about how you go about the kind of reporting that we did in Watergate. Bob, Woodward, still does today at The Washington Post and in his books, that's what this book is about America, about journalism, about a time in the history of the nation and I hope people really enjoy it because it's also meant to be a read about this kid who, as I say, gets the best seat in the country from ages 16 to 21. All.

Sinclair Lewis Washington, D.C. America garbo New York Times The Washington Post LinkedIn Gabo John Gunther Aerosmith Elmer gantry William weiler Charles Dickens Harris Smith babbit dodsworth Dickens Rick Rojas Washington government workers union Elmer gantry
"david broder" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"david broder" Discussed on Channel 33

"Is a good idea even if nobody around you is pointing at it and saying it our pella crystalline trump did the definitive bob woodward power rankings. Awhile back oh wow so. I consulted them to see. How many dual bylines. Bob woodward has had on books. He's obviously had a bunch of the washington post. I believe this is book. Dual byline number five. So the two famous ones with carl bernstein. All the president's men in the final days of course He had a book about the supreme court called the brethren that was written by armstrong. Chris ranked fifteenth out of twenty woodward books. And this is the really weird one. The man who would be president book about the nineteen ninety two presidential campaign co written with david broder. Wow that's kinda like tony bennett. And tony bennett. Yeah for real doing the book together. apparently it was mostly a collection of newspaper articles speaking of collections. But i did not know when chris ranked twentieth out of twenty. And i will just say this as long as we're talking about boundary pushing and changing the rules. Bob woodward gave us fear and rage. And so you. And i are thinking in terms of emotions. What would be the emotion that would be the title of the third book Payroll is a little different peril. Is the country payroll is the rule of law. Payroll is the chain of command from the stuff. That's already leaked out. But i feel bob woodward kinda pull the rug out from under us. Won't these easy. He's a creative force. He's always going to keep evolving in a minute. David i wanna talk to you about the elizabeth homes trial. I wanna talk to you about one of the worst questions. I have ever heard at a sports press conference and much more but first. Let's do the overwork twitter joke of the week where we celebrate a gag. That was so obvious that all of media twitter made it at exactly the same time senior nominees to at the press. Box pod where they are always always gratefully received listener. Andrew grant points to some weird news about saturday night. Live alum jim brewer. I have no idea where this is going. I have no idea nine terrified. I'll give you the headline. Jim was on tucker carlson. Show this week but this will explain it quote brewer. Jim breuer says he will not be performing at venues that require proof of cova vaccination for guests. Oh my gosh was that on your bingo card somewhere. Well listen comics and new. You know little not forgotten comics in news i assumed it was gonna be covert adjacent but but that's still. It's sad to hear some jokes on twitter about timber or a tell. Jim brewer to stick to comedy but people are suffering enough already. Once we get the amount of cova cases down to the number of jim brewers fans can finally put the pandemic behind us and finally. This is heartbreaking. Seeing jim breuer was on my bucket list said no one no one at all. Thanks to andrew for those. I just went to. Jim brewers website. And when you're post snl it's a little bit demeaning to have like an active comedians website. Am i wrong about that. It's like you should be just like it should be like Get in touch with my agent situation. Not like me for the laugh factory or whatever. Yeah exactly but the for the big thing that promoting something called breakfast with bru- where you can have a thirty minute zoom session with him at breakfast time for three hundred and fifty dollars. So vaccination doesn't matter mo it's kind of ironic right. He should be showing up at your doorstep coughing as you know doughnuts all over you. You're right though. It is humbling to have something. Like i have a website. Please contact me at info at jim. Breuer dot com or bookings at jim breuer dot com. Like i should be. I should be harder to find. That actually has one of those contact pages where you don't even get an email you just like type it into the to the html and someone will return your message. I tell you living in l. a. The kind of saturday night live allom. Who didn't really hit it. Big after the show is a mainstay at the comedy clubs There are a lot of rob schneider nights rob schneider. Interestingly enough kind of also a political animal on twitter david star of a movie called the animal if you know wow yeah. I had forgotten david. Spade is sometimes around After that Show went away that he had for a while anyway. Very funny This is headline from the wall street journal. David pre coverted office workers use commutes to decompress after a stressful day. Now we're immersing ourselves in tv drama to detach from job dramas was an over twitter. Joke to right did a car right. This never gets old. Thanks to our friend corbin dewa. I know myself In the commute era sports radio was my detached from work period Like you know whatever. I'm worked up about. I'm gonna listen to sports. Radio hosts having takes on my way home. And that'll be my moment. I guess now people you just put on like a quality television series. I don't i go the opposite way. The quality makes me think. I just want noise so sports radio. It is sports television or news. Finally david this people found a tweet from actress. Olivia munn from last december. No if you follow the story at all. Olivia on tweets in december sending so much love and support to john mullany. You got this very nice tweet to john mullany now as if olivia mon- had tweeted something that then manifested itself in a surprising way. She is dating john mullany and she is pregnant right. People went and found the other like. Wow you tweeted this and look what happened. You.

bob woodward jim breuer tony bennett david broder twitter jim brewer carl bernstein Jim brewer jim brewers Jim brewers Andrew grant washington post tucker carlson armstrong supreme court rob schneider cova Chris brewer
"david broder" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"david broder" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"The public sector in virginia to rights. You have on. The job shouldn't be dictated by county lines. Tammy could tell you more about her coworkers who've gone from one county to the next in search of better pay so they can care for their families. And we're really at risk as you say of creating this wild west workers are going to have wildly divergent rights And were counties that don't pass. Collective bargaining are going to be at a real disadvantage to recruits educators and first responders. They need so every locality every virginian needs the general assembly to go back and pass a bill that does two things one creates a statewide standard. So you don't have to worry about what rights do we don't have when you pass these imaginary lines that divide our counties and cities and two. They need to pass a comprehensive bill that will give every worker in the public sector collective bargaining rights. Because let's remember very briefly that all private sector workers have collective bargaining rights as enshrined in federal off but public employee rights are determined by state governments. You know we just need public employees to have the same rights that tens of millions of workers comp across the country when young workers come to fairfax county. They come to a a great place to work. The trainings are phenomenal. Is always training's going around on to enhance our skill sets but you know when these young people come and when they feel that they are not valued for what they bring to the table. What tends to happen could be come. They receive all of this training and their frustration will take them as many as i know to the next county who grabbed them right away. Because why they came from fairfax county and is they have to do. Very little training of our employees. When they go to the next county because fairfax county put you on that. You know you know you. You are a hot ticket item. Okay very good package. But if you're not treated fairly on the job you know young people don't stay for the long haul. I see them calm. Get what they need. And they're gone dislike that but if you if they go over to the surrounding counties they pick them up just like that so this is what we want to try to stop because of the fact that the county once again have to hire train recruiting and training workers and the same worker would turn around and go get all of that skill set to the next jurisdiction one last question before we wrap this up. Critics of collective bargaining say allowing this for employees of local governments will lead to higher property tax bills to pay for the increased. Cost david broder. Have we seen that and is that something that people should be worried about. Moving into the future. I mean critics of collective bargaining also. Think that we shouldn't have a minimum wage and we shouldn't have child labor law so i only take their criticism so seriously but to your question. No it doesn't lead to higher local property taxes. What we see is it leads to more effective government and yes they're increases in living wages and benefits as we want for our community. Those workers put that money right back into the community. It's offset by the improved recruitment and retention and the cutting down on wasteful spending and the money that's lost in having to replace the workers who leave collective bargaining is an unequivocal. Good for everybody. I would david you now. It is a it is very necessary at this point in time in our lives. Due to the fact that workers like myself I am retiring out of pay. I have you know given over thirty two years at this time. Okay but new people coming in. But i want them to have better than what i have of. This is why the fight is critical in our life and death there the life depends on it because they want better for their families. And i just wanna say whereas. I used to live in fairfax county. But i've moved out so that i could have my salary to work better for me. Impressive county in the same house. That i live in fairfax county now. Possibly cost him over. A million dollars in fairfax but i have that same luxury in prince william county okay. People should not have to leave the county for better living think. Hey your people it. Oh let's enter into a great ordinance where they will have a say say-so around the conditions that they work in so that they won't have to flee to other jurisdictions just because something quite go right. I think i would just add to those out. Local elected leaders to those state. Legislators who are looking at the question of establishing collective bargaining rights for their employees or for all workers. I would point them to the nonpartisan center. All that shows that nearly seven in ten virginians support collective bargaining rights. We would point to the polling that shows that unions are more popular than they've ever been. The community wants this. The community wants their first responders. Educators mental health staff to have a seat at the table and elected officials should follow their lead. So that's all for this episode support on patria on or send us an email to transition the podcast at gmail.com like and follow at transition. Va on twitter and anywhere pods or cast. Read the transcripts at transition. Virginia dot com and special. Thanks to emily cottrell for figuring out what the heck were saying. Thanks for being on the transition team. Where your host thomas bowman and i'm michael pump..

fairfax county david broder Tammy general assembly virginia prince william county fairfax david emily cottrell Va twitter Virginia thomas bowman michael pump
"david broder" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"david broder" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Was first proposed. But it's really problematic that they don't have the ability to even bargain discipline. And i'll tell you why Many times people say. Oh this is an issue where the union wants to protect bad workers. That's totally untrue. And it's an anti-worker lie. Why it's important is workers need to feel safe that they can speak out when something is going wrong. And we saw this. During the pandemic in nursing homes nursing homes that had collective bargaining where people could speak out because they bargained safe transparent discipline processes. They were able to say what was going wrong. Get with they needed and it unionized. Nursing home saw thirty percent fewer deaths among clients and workers than nonunionized nursing homes. This is literally a matter of life and death and we need everything to be on the table for frontline workers everything on the table so you have an ordinance that sets the rules of the game then the workers themselves is assuming that ordinance passes the workers themselves have a vote. Do we want to be represented by a union and you need thirty percent of workers to vote in favor of entering into this when thirty percent of workers sign membership cards. It triggers a union election. And then the union is one when a majority of those in the election. Vote yes for the union just the same way that we pick our elected leaders. It's that same open. Transparent democratic process that workers us to choose whether or not they wanna have a union represent them. Then you have your collective bargaining agreement negotiations and those as you were saying what include things like discipline or it should pay working conditions benefits. Tammy i'm wondering if there's been a time in your role with. Sei you five twelve with that. You can speak to where the union has directly improved the situation for these workers. One situation that we can talk about and we're very proud of it. Is the paid family. Leave prior to pay family. There was only roughly two weeks of leave for the workers whether they became new parents or it was mainly for people who have given birth but there was nothing else for the other workers so we fought and we put forth before the border supervisors stating that pay. Family is very necessary. Leave know due to aging parents in sickness on the job because you cannot work when you're sick of course but that six weeks of pay family would be alive changer and it has been a life changer for many of our workers just having that cushion there for if they exhausted current legal they have. They can move over into the paint family. Leave so you know that is one item that we raised and we presented. We fought for it and we wanted. We talked about why a worker might want to be represented by a union. But it's not just the workers who can benefit from a union representing them right. Why would a locality like fairfax or like richmond or like buckingham county. Why would one of these localities want to do that. So the benefits to communities are so clear and tammy can talk about the amazing work that she has done with families and children and older adults and how that's made the community richer but here is why it's so important. Here's why when. I take my union off as a dad of two young kids in fairfax county public school system who used the local libraries and the local parks. Here's why i care about it. When frontline workers have a seat at the table they can improve the services for everybody. They know best. what's needed. They know best how to deliver great services they know best where to find cost savings They know best how to keep the community whole and safe. When localities pass collective bargaining they see their recruitment and retention dramatically improved which is another area that we can lower costs for local governments and put that money put those savings into better services and into livable wages and benefits so that workers like tammy can do what she does best for our regions families. And i also would like to add that i have been employed for thirty two years in the county and i started as a sack worker. Many of those children are now young adults with their own families. And the beauty of what. I can see that they have gone off to school and came back and have taken jobs in the county. So it's just that they didn't leave to go to another state or another jurisdiction. They came back home after receiving education started their families where they are now raising their families. And giving back to fairfax county as fairfax county. Gay to them as they were coming up as as young children. That's what you want to do. You want to retain and they need to come back. Give back work in their community and grow old in their community in l. Best best more or less what we're looking for him. I can attest to see many families. Even the older adults being able to thrive in their communities without having to be placed outside of jurisdictions because their money's is not enough but you know what services will put their. They can stay in stay within the communities where they affordable for them because that's where they raised their family and that's where they were but now they need to age in place and that needs to be their final resting place. I'll tell you one other reason. Real quick why it's important for local governments to pass collective bargaining. We are all seeing in the news. How hard time businesses are having attracting workers back to work in the pandemic and it's impacting local services. My children go to the school aged childcare program. It's an amazing program in fairfax county that provides after school education for local students. We have one daughter who got in and our other daughter was on the waiting list because the county has had a hard time recruiting enough educator. She just got it and so providing a contract having clear benchmarks pay and benefits. That workers can count on is gonna make it easier for local governments to recruit the educators and the first responders that all of us rely on. And we're never going to get out of this pandemic if we don't have them in place so we've been talking about employees of local governments. You guys represent employees of local governments. But what about st workers so when the general assembly was considering the legislation back in two thousand twenty the house wanted to allow collective bargaining for state workers but the votes were not there in the senate. David broder should state workers also be able to engage in collective bargaining. And if so should that be on the agenda for the future yes. Every single worker deserves collective bargaining rights every single worker so state workers deserve collective bargaining rights. Homecare workers deserve collective bargaining rights. Higher end employs deserve collective bargaining rights. The legislature absolutely needs to come back next january and pass a comprehensive bill to ensure that every worker has the right if they want to to join together with her co workers former union and bargain a contract. The law that they passed in twenty twenty really sets up. Virginia is a wild west for localities. That can pass whatever the ordinance is going to be. And there's no set. Your collective bargaining shall include at least right a outlined what changes what. Sei you like to make to improve the state law if any and the process of collective.

fairfax county buckingham county tammy Tammy fairfax richmond David broder general assembly st senate house legislature Virginia
"david broder" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"david broder" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"Friend of the podcast. Sarah taylor and you're listening to my favorite podcast about virginia politics and i'm not just saying that because sometimes i'm a guest transition virginia with michael pope and thomas bowman and we're back on transition virginia. We're gonna talk about collective bargaining now this year for the first time ever employees of local governments have been able to enter into collective bargaining agreements with their employer. How would that work. And what can local governance expect. Got a great panel to dig into this issue for joined by a human services assistant for the department of family services at fairfax county. She's joining us in her role. Is the fairfax chapter president for. Sei you five twelve. Tammy gung thank you for joining us. It's great care. We're also joined by the president of sei. Twelve david broder. Thanks for joining us. Thanks so much for having us. So tammy what is the service employees international union. and who do you represent. We are local government workers and our physicians consist of homecare workers childcare workers social workers mental health maintenance mechanics disavowed everything. It takes to take care of daily living. So that's where we are david broder. What exactly is collective bargaining. How does it work. What does it look like. Why start listeners. Care about this issue. It's a great question. So collective bargaining is the process by which workers come together form a union and bargained with their employer for better a benefits and working conditions but more importantly collective bargaining has proven to be the best tool for improving the lives of workers for improving the services delivered to a community for fighting poverty and for advancing equity throughout our region. Whether you're in a union or not and a little bit closer to home for me collective bargaining and union contracts. Are the reason that my family entered the middle class. And how i was able to grow up healthy and safe virginia for the first time passed a law that would allow localities to enter into these collective bargaining agreement. What was that twenty twenty legislation. And how did it change. Things for working families in virginia david so for forty four years virginia banned all workers from collective bargaining. And i just wanna point out how out of the mainstream we have been workers public sector workers in forty seven other states and dc have had collective bargaining rights but virginia workers have gone without and what the legislature did. Last year was to repeal that ban for local government employees like tammy and or co workers and allow local governments to choose to opt in to granting collective bargaining rights for frontline essential workers. So alexandria was the first out of the gate here to pass an ordinance for collective bargaining and the agreement. They struck allowed for collective bargaining for pay and benefits but notably not for discipline. Timmy how important is collective bargaining for the issue of discipline. It will be very important. Workers often come to the union and when they come with their concerns is mainly because they are fearful of speaking up because if they speak up you know there's retaliation they feel in some sort of a way so they come because they have the support of the union and sometimes things do happen. They just found that some work. Say i've just got to let it go and look for another job. I don't want to bother you know. So the fear of fighting for what's right. They been have that but collective bargaining will reign that to the front when there is a concern. They can speak up. They will be able to sit with their supervisors to work this problem out with the correct policies and procedures that go along with it more so than just leaving their employment out of frustration or fear that nothing can be done. Arlington has also taken action by passing one of these ordinances and and loudon are currently considering it. And there's discussion that richmond and charlottesville are up next david. Is there anywhere else. We can expect local governments to take action. I hope to see every local government take action to give workers this fundamental human rights. And i think this is a real opportunity for local elected officials to live their values. Especially as we've gone through the pandemic if you have called the frontline. Essential worker a hero. If you've put out a yard scientist thank them. Then you need to pass collective bargaining rights so that those same workers whether their mental health workers social workers librarians trash collectors will have the ability to have a seat at the table so that they can bargain over. Do they have enough. Pd so that they can bargain over. Flexible work schedules. That allow them to care for the community and their family and took bargain for better services for all working families. I'm curious about how this works with the process here as we talked about. Ordinances alexandria passed an ordinance. Arlington has passed an ordinance. What exactly does that mean. tammy one dong. How does this process work. Well when the Ordinances passed a becomes we say a ratify contract and no longer. Can the worker be put in a situation where your job is changing all the time. You're supposed to have a set duties as to what your job title says. It is what you do. But since the pan-demic is canada where they have placed people to do additional jobs. And i can speak to that myself. I have pretty much been all around the county. Doing workers jobs filling in just to stay employed myself. Okay but those are not the duties of my assigned position so with an ordinance in place before that can happen. That has to be a negotiation. You must able to sit down and say this is what has come for. You just can't put it up on the employees to do this just to maintain employment. David broder ordinance. That alexander has passed. that arlington has passed. It's not the end of the process. It's the beginning of the process right. Doesn't it start. Start things moving forward as opposed to being sort of the end result of this agreement. That's right the ordinance really kind of lays out the rules of the road. It's kind of like legislation and it set some very important things for collective bargaining. It sets out who's covered. What's the process by which workers choose to have a union because we wanna make very clear collective bargaining Ordinances don't bring the union workers decide whether or not they want to have a union collective bargaining ordinances merely. Lay out. how that happens who's covered. And what they have the right to bargain over. It's really the start of the process and it matters greatly as we've said it is fantastic that workers in alexandria pushed and got an even better ordinance than.

virginia david broder michael pope thomas bowman department of family services Tammy gung tammy Sarah taylor service employees internationa fairfax county fairfax alexandria david Arlington Timmy legislature loudon charlottesville richmond
"david broder" Discussed on Transition Virginia

Transition Virginia

19:39 min | 1 year ago

"david broder" Discussed on Transition Virginia

"In traffic is nowhere near as fast they thought it would be therefore they want to get more passengers and they want people to be able to fly to get on planes easily. Offer planes easily with minimum disruption. So on that side. I presume do not like the idea of testing on the other hand off. People won't fly unless this testing will evidence One has been vaccinated blows. I think you have to look at the longer term picture if people do get any form of a transmission flights and has demonstrated. The airline industry will herald problems in the longer term so the airlines are in a tricky position but buyer might also be an a tricky position because as bill if it becomes law would be challenged in court. Here's what virginia legal expert rich kelsey says about the potential legal challenge. He has to brew that his bill which he says will help prevent the spread of cova that the vaccine actually does that. And i'm not really sure. I know a lot of people feel that way but i'm not really sure that anyone has ever actually said that with the vaccine does according to the cdc is. It helps to prevent the severity of an outbreak of kobe. But everybody knows that a person that has been vaccinated can a get covert and be spread. Covert and so. I think the problem that we're going to have here is this idea that merely being vaccinated prevents the spread of. I do think he'd have a better chance. If he just simply said you wanna fly. You have to show that you've been tested in the last seventy two hours because that goes to whether or not a person has covert and so. I think there's a legitimate challenge there so thomas. What do you think about this debate here. In terms of requiring a testing mandate instead of a vaccine mandate for domestic flights people who are unvaccinated are eleven times more likely to get cove and there is a long legal history of vaccine mandates across the spectrum for hundreds of years in american history. So any thought that it wouldn't stand up in court is just wrong. The supreme court has already ruled on the legality of vaccine mandates and found that absolutely. It's legal and they did that over a hundred years ago. Schools have vaccine mandates in fact win the covert vaccine gets recommended for school. Children by the cdc then. It will automatically become part of the regimen for virginia school children. Thanks to a law. That the virginia democrats passed in two thousand nine hundred thousand nine before cove. It was even on the scene so because of that yes. The vaccine. Mandates will absolutely stand up in court. Anybody who tries to fight it is absolutely wasting their money and these vaccines are absolutely effective at preventing the spread of kobe. In the first place in addition to making it far less likely that you would have a severe case or hospitalization or god forbid even death. As far as the airlines go michael the airlines actually have incentive to mandate vaccines for their passengers. And there's a few reasons for that one the people who don't want to get vaccines are also the people who don't wear masks in many cases who are presenting problems to airline workers and they're having to actually ban them from flying altogether on their airline. The other thing is that they've already lost customers and the reason that they've already lost customers is because they perceive flying as an unsafe activity in this pandemic and rightly so because we know the science if you are in a contained area with covert around and for an extended period of time and by the way delta allows for fleeting transmission. So somebody can literally just walk past you even outside and transmit cove to you. That's how quickly. It transmits compared to the original wild strain of kobe. Michael which used to take about fifteen minutes of exposure so yeah airlines are not frankly safe right now. So people are more likely to travel on an airline where they know for sure that everybody around them is vaccinated and this is not rocket science right so they had like for example in the past polio vaccine mandates to travel on airlines smallpox vaccine airline mandates You have to show your smallpox vaccine card or your polio. Vaccine card as recently as the sixties or seventies so. This is not a new thing. This is not something that anybody can legitimately challenge because in order to legitimately challenge that you have to prove that you were harmed by the policy and by definition there will be not a single human being that can prove they were harmed by vaccine mandate so i think it would just get dismissed outright from core or just completely shut down so i mean michael. These airlines know that they can attract more passengers by having these vaccine mandates. You're already seeing some airlines starting to do this specifically i can think of qantas is the first airline to mandate vaccines for all their passengers. And i know other airlines are considering it including american southwest and some very big carriers in the united states so And now it's more likely that you're your fellow. Travelers going to be vaccinated. With biden's new mandate that requires a vaccine for workers in businesses with over one hundred employees. So we're going to get there. We need to get there faster and people like rich kelsey. Who are trying to throw up false legal arguments. And i'm not sure why. But the science is available the case histories available. You don't have to be an expert to know it's going to stand up just fine. So the point he was trying to make. Is that if your concern is that you don't want to catch co vid on the flight and there's this person sitting next to you that you're worried about there are sort of two choices that we're presented with here and this sort of discussion one is that person has been vaccinated in which case kelsey makes makes the argument. That person actually could have cova. Despite the fact they've been vaccinated or the alternative is that person has had the test within the seventy two hours and tested negative so from his perspective that you know you would rather want the person sitting next to you to have tested negative and probably be negative versus having been vaccinated and potentially could be positive but wouldn't know therapa zip or not. Yeah but why does he think it's gotta be a binary choice to science is very clear that you should be doing both will. The legislation buyers legislation is a binary choice to get on a domestic flight. The choices a or b. Either you haven't been vaccinated or take the test okay. But it shouldn't be a binary choice the best policy that would actually be rooted in science is to be vaccinated and show up with a test. In fact they have rapid tests that you could actually if you wanted. Take in the airport. That's what the school guy said. Actually when i interviewed him. Is that buyers. Bill would be better if instead of being a or b was a b. Yeah well then. I would agree with that is. That's where the sciences. What maybe congressman buyers people are listening to this and they make make an amendment do their legislation. Okay so let's move on to the next part of our show where we check our messages. This one comes from at like. I give a damn on twitter he asks. Can we get some update on how the legislative races are shaping up. Well thanks for the question. Adam and thanks for being a regular listener and an og fan of the podcast from way back in the day before the pandemic even so adam. Republicans are targeting about a dozen incumbent. Democrats the republican state. Legislative committee actually has a list like a published list. The thirteen democratic incumbents that they're targeting for defeat so the most competitive races are roz. Tyler and south side and chris hurst in blacksburg in northern virginia. They're targeting wendy godiva so josh cole. Elizabeth goose mon- dan helmer and the richmond area. They're targeting dawn addams scholar van. Valkenberg and rodney. Willett down in virginia beach. They're targeting kelly converse fowler. Nancy guy alex. Ask you and martha mugler thomas. What do you think about this. List of specific incumbents that republicans are targeting well from the republican perspective. This is exactly who you want to target because these are the people who are most likely to lose if you feel too high quality candidate against them and to they're to have very expensive races just because you're fielding a candidate against them. Nothing is for sure in virginia politics and so these are the people. If you're the republican party that you want to go after because you stand the best chance of winning and you can potentially just beat them by having more money than the incumbent does and michael. I also on this issue checked in with a member of the house of delegates about these races and this delegate said they were particularly worried about six races in particular. Josh cole kelly fowler nancy guy chris. Hurst rose tyler. And alex ask you. These are some of the most competitive races. And that's six seats. And that is enough for the fifty-five that are currently in the majority to lose that majority the bare minimum right. That's the bare minimum. They would need right like so they were. That gives them no room for error. Correct now the democrats believe that they might be able to flip a seat or two and they're targeting Glenn davis in virginia beach. Some republicans in the richmond suburbs. And exurbs like kirk cox in colonial heights roxanne robinson in chesterfield and rob block some in apac county on the eastern shore. Now the problem is that they go after these republicans every year. So i don't really feel comfortable saying whether or not they're like easy ones because the democrats already have the easy wins. They're sitting on them. So the good news for some of these people is that they're not all running against strong republican challengers particularly. I can think of when they died is running against what many people consider to be a week republican candidate and loudon county and most observers that i've spoken with think that she should be able to hang on but like i said my god. There are no guarantees in virginia politics. So the democrats have had two election cycles. Were they picked up a lot of seats. most notably the one in two thousand seventeen where they picked up a whole bunch of seeds. So i guess the real question is are there any democratic incumbents out there who are actually in. What should be republican seats. Roz tyler comes to mind. She just had her District redistricting did after the racial packing court case and she is now in as lean republican district very slightly. Lean republican one. That some buddy who was an active candidate could potentially hold on for the democratic party. But roz tyler. She is not as active compared to like. I can think of a candidate like irene hsien. Who's knocking doors all day long even in a democratic district. She's not necessarily doing that so that is going to be one. That is very difficult for the democrats to keep Not impossible and certainly given enough turn out. They could keep it. But that's going to be a tough one. I think that's the one that they are most likely to lose chris hurst in blacksburg to is one where they're likely to lose because again turnout. Margins are not amazing there and you need a very activated democratic base in order to keep a seat like that so we'll see it's not impossible they could of course just keep everybody but there are also could lose some people and some of the reason for that. Michael is fundraising. Now that democrats have the majority and the trifecta even it's a lot less compelling of a pitch to donors to say help us keep the majority then to help us take the majority so when they were trying to take the majority they had partners like mike bloomberg and a lot of money pouring in from california and new york democratic donors who wanted to assist with that but those people are gone. Now michael now that democrats have that majority. There's no incentive for them to try to take it so what we're seeing is that a lot of lobbyists money becomes more important and normally for the average members at least twenty to forty thousand dollars depending on your rank and your committee positions of lobbyists money available. Where all they have to do is call. But i'm hearing that. Some lobbyists are refusing to contribute especially to the leadership. Pacs the speakers. Pack and the reason that i'm hearing for this is because they're playing footsie with unions. Luke torian specifically came out in favor of a number of union pro union issues including the repeal of right to work on his labor day edge. Yeah i actually thomas. That was a huge moment. Because luke taurean such an influential member he's part of the legislative black caucus. He's chairman of the appropriations committee. He's an extremely influential member. Do you think. Thomas luke torian moving in the direction of overturning. Right to work will bring other democrats along with him. Yeah i think it does. And luke torian by the way was never previously known for super progressive policy. Stances and i think that this reflects a couple of things one luke torian as a pasture and so he believes in doing things because of the right thing to do luke torian is also a relatively high ranking in the black caucus and because we know right to work history as a jim crow law this could potentially be an issue that the black caucus decides to take on and i think it would be who've them to do so and that could absolutely shift the tide in virginia because the black caucus has often been very cooperative with the republican party when they were in the majority and so they've built up a lot of credibility among some of those people in those with those relationships that they have and it could at the very least cindy signal that it is time to consider such a policy and michael because he's chairman of house appropriations because he's so high ranking that could very well send a message to people like terry mcauliffe who's running statewide. That says come on. We're ready for this. Let's do it This is a bill. That would likely pass the house if they thought it could pass the senate which right now. I mean unless something changes with the senate. That's not going to happen. Thomas i mean like i. I've interviewed these. Senators are not on board with it and it's for unless things change and things of course could change but the way things are now the senate just not gonna go for this at least the current senate and so you would really need to wait until after the next senate election to get any movement on this. That's right michael. The virginia senate is a far more conservative institution. Just all around and there are a lot more. It's not fair to call them southern dem's because they're not southern dims the way that they would be known colloquially but they have the inherited spirit i would say of the southern dams and they're they liked to be far more pro business. I can think of at least like people like monty mason and lynwood lewis and cree deeds would not support this or would only support it under arrest. It's gonna take something like terry mcauliffe coming out in favor of repealing to work in this campaign. i don't get. That sense was gonna happen. Thomas even if the senate decides they want to go for this or or let's even say after the election after the senate election and enter in the next governor potentially mccullough or potentially glenn youngin is in the second half of his term. I get the sense that a governor mcauliffe a potential future governor mcauliffe would sort of use his powers of persuasion to prevent that bill from ever arriving on his desk. I just don't think he's in the cab of people that want to overturn right to work. And so you know. I'm kind of wondering about torrens movement here. Does this actually change the potential course of future events or is terry mcauliffe's unwillingness to move forward with this. Just going to put a stop sign on that. I would consider to shot across the bow michael. Most of the lobbyists in richmond are republicans and they represent nonunion or anti union organizations. These people are in their ears all the time. They have a purse that they can use as a stick or a carrot if they don't like the things that the democrats are trying to do and they are overwhelmingly in favor of big business. So if you support any of these policies what you need to do is get in touch with your elected representative or someone like chairman torian and you need to tell them one that you're glad that he's taken the stance or that they've taken the stance that you want to see the right to work repeal. Because they need to hear from more people than just the ones who are lobbying them representing big businesses. All right we gotta take a break because when we come back. We're gonna talk to david broder. And tammy dogs from sei five twelve about employees of local government entering into collective bargaining agreements with their employers. We'll be right back. Hey look transition. Virginia has another voicemail. And this one's from richard crouse. Let's see what he's got to say. This podcast is so jack. Clegg that john. Frederick's radio show is five steps above it never mind. It's just another crank call we want your voicemails and it's easy to do just launch the voice memo app in your smartphone record a reaction to something. You've heard on the podcast. It's that easy. Send the sound file from your smartphone to transition. Va podcast at g. Mail dot com. We might even play your voicemail on the air..

rich kelsey luke torian virginia cova chris hurst michael virginia democrats cdc polio wendy godiva josh cole Elizabeth goose dan helmer dawn addams Valkenberg kelly converse fowler Nancy guy alex martha mugler thomas blacksburg Josh cole
"david broder" Discussed on The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"david broder" Discussed on The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

"The brooklyn boys and make some noise. It's the podcast of the brooklyn. Boys us it's up. We're here sometimes. I think all we do is make noise and not a whole lot of sense. I walked away from last week's podcast scratching my head. And i'm like why did we really do we make any points. Did we make anyone laugh this week. I don't know. I can't sleep on i. I usually do the podcast. And then when. I go to bed after we uploaded. It's usually like later at night on wednesday right on wednesday and i and i just i always like lay there for the first fifteen minutes before i go to sleep. I'm staring at the ceiling. Like did we move the needle with our slices. No it's funny because people will tweet us and ask us questions about something from three episodes ago all behind but what you said about cheese. Yeah so we've talked about this. You guys listen. In order. By the way we have not played any listen an order jingles. And wow we should have one ready for tonight. Have one of them pearl jam. One of them yeah. We don't have here at home. But i'll have to go get them suck. You have to bring them so a skewing. Our podcast ends right baseball. The voice in brooklyn brooklyn and then. We'll great okay and breezy off the mark. Because he's at home. And i want to address that in a minute. I want to address that. Because we've got some tweets about and so scary. Says i just put this together and calming ten minutes. We'll come up with a title. I call him back he goes. I'm right in the description. We'll be talking about. I gotta go back and look at my notes and a lot of a lot of times. We finish after like seventy eighty minutes. And i'm just wiped. And i'm like what did we talk about. So it's a rollercoaster for us to know for you guys listening. Like oh my god. They're all over the place. Yes yeah we are. We all over the map. We are all over the place with someone. A listener wants did a flow chart. I one of my favorite slices a flow chart of what we talked about. And if you want to see the way this thing is it is also instagram. Scroll back a year or so at david broder blue and orange. of course it's just the flow of conversation and how it goes and how we're always we sidetrack ourselves. I i'm not gonna do it because it would be. We can't do it in the moment but like that. The the directors commentary on some. Dvd's like back in the day. Watch them indirectly though what we were thinking here. If you look at the dinosaur right and you get like the commentary you know what the director was thinking. And they'll they'll stop and they'll go look by on the wall. You may have missed this. And they give you the rundown narrate the movie that we could narrate. An you know we could do what we can be. Open up only fans page By the way the band the band is is temporary lifted. I heard about that you can. Actually you can actually upload porn fans always. They were gonna band right. But now you can you can upload porn again. They never october. It was supposed to go away ten you you did right now. They're not changed yet. This yes that's right. You can still do a director's cut where we listened to our episode and then we chime in with. That wasn't planned planned. I meant to say that. I didn't catch that. Yoga background schedule. Yeah we've tried. We've tried to be better. With streamlining right recent episodes. No we don't everytime we you and i sit down before we start. You say we should really kind of structure this gets back on it. Got it restructure. I think we should stay focused. I think he's really just make listings. Wanna talk about. That's not how do we do now consultant. Sometimes radio consultants will do. Don't ever. I don't ever want be in that box. Never come that when you get radio consultant so-so just a pull back the curtain on the the balls of my ass and without a job then then maybe radio consultant it'd be radio consultant come in charts and graphs and research and they your prank phone calls need to be three minutes and forty seven seconds that we put it into a computer and optimally we figure we calculated your entertainment segments. Should be no more than a minute. Three point nine seconds only doing two stories about singers and one story about an actor or actress here and maybe a death in a laboratory in their mixing chemicals and things in there like their bunsen burners rolling over people. Either in a room or on a computer. But there's really no good way to test people as their showering and shaving and getting dressed in the more in their car right or in the car with things going on so so if you listen to something if you listen to a song in the car you drive in baba all that was great it. Was you experience it in a different way right now is a great song sitting in a room alone and listen to a song studying it paying attention to the lyrics and deciding whether you like it that's long becomes nine minutes right or prank phone call or a news report or anything else. Yeah if you're alone and you're focused on it. It seems like forever right right. Well you're on a roller coaster like twenty seconds are you pulling up in the drive thru you. Get the kids crying in the back here. And you're you don't really you experience it in a different way and it goes faster. Well i'm going to do director's cut. Here's a freebie ready. Yeah go for what we're listening to now was not planned. It just came out of nowhere it really got. We did not play that it just happened just fell out of our ass now. Speaking of me not sinking up at the end. Because i'm on a little bit of a. You're wearing a correct that really soon. You know how we're going to get back to the fucking studio. Well we'll see about that. So david hugo he's a hollywood hugo thirty one Why am i excited for the boys to one day. Get back in the studio together. So david broder can sync up with scary jones on their intro. Altro love you guys. And i laugh every time. Scary says you're off again. That's right after. I hear the echo on brooklyn. Because you you hear and then. Capi kaplan kaplan capi. He says that goes double for free ship for us. The jingle and David says i was trying to figure out how to type brooklyn and then brooklyn an year and for how it comes across but couldn't now but yes the free shift furniture. Here's a little backstage had with. There's been another podcast. We would have edited it. And i would've i would've sync up the tracks to make sure hits it right but as you know this is like a live to tape podcast where it just falls out of our mouths right on. And you're hearing things on edited. We don't podcasts. I would suggest listening to last week's episode. I believe it was one ninety three eighty three walk on walk. Dog walkers and talkers podcast because the way we end every episode is i say jamie time it is. She's what time is it. And i say it's time shut that shit down because that's the line from megan from the walking dead right. He says no excuses. I will shut that shit down and we have shirts that say it. So that's how we end the podcast. So i say jan. What time is it. She says what time is and i say it's time and we both say to shutting down but i said she.

brooklyn david broder baseball david hugo Capi kaplan hollywood jones David jamie megan jan
"david broder" Discussed on Snarf Talk

Snarf Talk

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"david broder" Discussed on Snarf Talk

"He's asking me printed out while while while while we while within like lower refund local lamb and local libations lamb meat bought with yogurt sauce recommended to enjoy local beer. We'd better find out. I suppose bring arnold my babies. Do i have to bring my own beer. Poos poland pork salad charred local pork. What would we do you know. Poo poo who is a famous neighbor charred local pork. Tamarind palm sugar. Fish sauce pineapple green apple red onion mint and peanuts recommended to pair with poos favorite scotch. Bourbon whiskey or white wine carpaccio tacos. I love capriccio beef. Capers greens wonton recommended with white wine. While while wow boo. I can't read because of the font. But i think it says. Be bua boozy barnyard buffet. Buji love everything. That's moving. She lamb chops garbanzo bean relish beef and corn relish pork and watermelon. Relish recommended a pair with red wine. I'm i'm i'm a red wine fin. Are you not a win win fan. But i'll i'll i'll. I'll take the recommended parents. So i'm not. I love white wine. I don't like a hard red wine dry dry and get them off. No i'm not a big fan. And then it is man i can't read that be el tito stotka. Greens pickled green tomatoes. Pork recommended a pair of pickled green tomato martini. Ooh by then. There's a boozy milkshake flight. It looks like for dessert. I'm telling you david you're going allow. That's pretty it's pretty impressive. He doesn't not go all out i. He gave us tacos and it was all out. That was incredible. I mean came over there. And it's like the whole freaking island which island. Your kitchen was huge. The whole thing is all the different. I have an island eight by four. It's like four by sheet apply. What basically is my island and solid was covered. It was covered with what david broder dinner and it was a taco. It was unbelievable He says many are subject to change literally until it's set in front of you. I've never cooked veal. Which is the base of tammy glazed. Glass used lots of homemade stock in my cooking specifically sausa- excited marley's listening while this is going to be amazing i can't wait. Yeah it's going to be really really is going to be good. I'm like we need to like. I almost feel like have competence. 'cause i've probably is so expensive. No no lost your and it would have cost us a lot to do this. King thing because i was like fifty dollars a month is a snarky one hundred hundred a month. It's a hundred a month. Either way he wins. He loves doing this. Yeah no i'm sure and that was the bet. It is what it is. It's going to be one time. It's not like we expected all the time and we do vary greatly appreciate it. It will be fun for friends to get together and have this meal. Thank you david. Yes and nolan mayes. Welby david is a gourmet chef. So he really is. I don't understand how he does it because he's dumb as a brick just absolutely just a moron all right. let's i got. We got more stuff to cover here. Let me get to it. I got some more things suicide squad. James gunn suicide squad comes out next week. You heard of it yeah. I didn't realize it was next week already..

el tito stotka Poo poo david broder arnold tammy glazed poland apple david marley nolan mayes Welby david King James gunn
"david broder" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"david broder" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

"Just do there you go. There's your one. Excuse me you're one thousand dollar. Mac walden free money phone tap getting all choked up. That was such a great phone tap. I didn't even hear it. Anyway let's talk to Greg hey greg hey i was doing you know what i'm doing. Well now that you're here. Tell me all about you greg. Who are are bomb gregson. Ah bronx Minoa mechanic for the city. I'm headed into work right now. Trying to get the day started. Yes about it. What thank god. you're listening. I do wonder why people listen to this mess. I listened to you guys all the time. I actually got thirty one other time. And you guys are talking about Alcohol bracelets and being under house arrest and stuff like that. And i was telling you about the baloney in between the center. Remember that conversation. But it's turning me on so you put baloney under your house arrest sensor and it doesn't tell us where it can't sends the alcohol. Thank you oscar. mayer greg. You know not only. Did you win one thousand dollars that's awesome. You're my favorite call of the day to alcohol martini. Me some too. I love that. Look greg thank you be careful at work today. Thank you for working for our fine city and your thousand dollars is on the way. Thanks to mike weldon okay. Guys made my thank you very much. Feel free to call anytime. You want your fabulous. I will hold on one second. Okay oh by the way question When's the last time you pooped yourself. It's been years we. We were having that conversation and in and people were texting. I put myself like at least once or twice a year. I'm like really haitian what are you eating. Ice normal i. I don't think it is hold on greg. I'm not gonna make you take part in this i want. I don't wanna talk to yourself or bologna under your sensor. Back that really. I know we're running really late. I don't care i hate. The clock is such a human construct. I know ignore the clock. What what are you going to do whatever you want now. Pooping myself seriously trying to daniel. Yeah the last time that. I put myself did. Let me maybe a little bit now. I have not proved myself in a while. I have pete myself. But that's because i had to kill the tomorrow show gandhi seriously. You're out on the road. You're off the grid. Sometimes you time oh. I could not tell you. The last time that i did that. I've heard that it happens a lot. I have two friends. You say on average. It's about three times a year. So i don't really know but for me. I couldn't tell you the last time it happened. They got not now that. I said that something terrible. It's usually when you gamble on a fart and loose. Usually what it is i'll on. I'm sorry for grossing you out but you know what. It's one of those things the last time you did it did you tell. I cannot recall. Oh alex does it all the time. The first time. I took the. I took alex's santa fe the food there is very spicy. Oh god remember the last time we went to lunch and he did it in the car right home and like oh god and you said it got into the heating little heating whole no. Get those seats. I have seen trump. They have the you can push the button and cold air comes up to the holes in the seat it got in the got in the seat the thing is. He refuses to go to a bathroom in a public place. I'm just like if you gotta go. You gotta go no better than in the car. Don't put my seats. But nassfeld unusually your. Gps doesn't fail you. It knows when you're close to home when it starts to you. Know you gotta go no your. Gps can fail you miserable anyway. Bit knows you're right by the toilet all that's we really have to. I'm so sorry. I brought this up but i cannot stand us. I really love the fact that people are texting in and admitting because you're on text we don't see you know you can say whatever you want. There are texting in how many times on average they put themselves in a year. And it's like two or three effective medication. It could be many things including hold on back through unbelievable. I'll brody went who's this of we're still talking about poland. There's brody happening brody. He's hoping there brody david broder not on all right never mind guy he was farting and he got kicked exactly when it was this was february of twenty sixteen. I was on house m sullivan. And i put myself in. So you know you're you're not allowed to put yourself in. So i gambled and lost like froggy said all right lost about the text area code eight six. Oh says that he was pushing on a fart. Okay please they got mad at him and kicked him in the stomach and he accidentally pooped his pants. Sonic really. let's talk about that. Call us call us now.

greg mayer greg mike weldon gregson Greg oscar alex gandhi daniel brody brody david broder poland sullivan froggy
"david broder" Discussed on The Besties

The Besties

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"david broder" Discussed on The Besties

"I want it to be fairly You know I don't want to you know closed garden. But i want to close enough where i don't get that i think my for people that are looking for that kind of quote safe garden. I think people just use the steam functionality. Anything on steam more or less is going to work fine and you'll know Certainly hardware standardized. There'll be reviews be like oh this runs really great on us team deck for example for people that want something more a versatile you have that option to like go online and find like weird That you can flash onto the device to turn it into whatever the hell you want and that's os windows. I mean yeah. I mean i guess you could throw windows on insurance and i mean i i. I'm excited about is the competition right. Like i don't even know if they expect us to be a thing that lasts for the next five to ten years and that they're just in the hardware business. I think for them. They just want more people making portable video game machines like this that allows you to access this team store right. Yeah that's big. So i have to imagine that we will see companies like razor getting into this market. That have a lot more experience making this sort of hardware I think like. I hope that this finally forces the hand on Microsoft till i think what does a portable gaming focused you know hand held. Look like you know they. They want game pass to be anywhere and everywhere but like that doesn't that doesn't work super well. When the best ways to play games portability are switch in the steam. Dak and neither. I you tax us came pass. I would really like to see a version of this. And i don't know if over get it but like a version of this that is built specifically with Position remote play in mind. I mean there's like solutions for that but nothing that feels like a hundred percent like even the Using the backbone. Right is is a nice solution. But i have to take my case off yeah to use the backbone and you know it's still my phone so i do. I can't do phone shit with it. I've got these the control that would be a device. That would be very surprised if sony does not support this very close to launch. It considered that sony supports ios remote. Play windows remote. Play macrumors like every platform is effectively supported. There's no downside for them to support on this. And i know valve would be eager for it. So they're not trying to push vida. Sales tells her we didn't talk about this. The steamed incorporates some of that steam link controller. Shit where they can simulate a mouse with to To individual track pads and mouse buttons on the back or like a programmable buttons on the back of the thing you esteemed worked really well actually steam links alike even games that aren't controller based you'll still be able to maybe be able to play. I don't know i i. I'm stoked. I think it's going to be awesome pre ordering. It was a fucking nightclub. Oh god in very predictable way you know what i mean even think i tricked myself right before like this valve man. Maybe they've got it all figured out here and instincts'll instantly the whole thing is is crapping. The bed i was. I had a genuine like bottom pit in my stomach. Fear for almost the entire day. That what if i had bought ten i i clicked enough things that valve i think could legally send me ten and be like. I don't know a bit your phone. That'll be six thousand dollars. Hey we got any questions from the audience. Yeah i'll talk to them. The first one is a little long and restroom shorter. This one's from the smallest possible. E nintendo has a frustrating track record of not including accessibility options and their games remaking emotion control game lead to some awkward results calling l. for camera and didn't leave them room to provide control remapping even if they had tried with intentional. Accessibility design and tripoli games. Becoming more common. Do you think we will see control remapping or any access options and breadth of the wild to or will nintendo games. Stay at you get what you get with little to no customization. Yeah that's interesting. I never thought about that but it is true that like i really can't think of any nintendo games that allow control remapping some. I feel like there might have been a metro. Maybe but generally speaking with yeah. They don't jump to end run in a breath the wild one but not in the way that you would want to write very limiting very limiting. Yeah i would love to but but the point is well taken that they they have always been really reticent to do that and i. It doesn't make a lot of sense to me. I know they feel like they're crafting. The perfect version but obviously not. Everyone plays the same way. So i love to see it. I wouldn't call that too much. Probably isn't out if you want things from them they won't give them to you. Let's let's remember nintendo. We won't give you what you want. But you want. But we give you and just to add a codicil in this case but you may not be able to play it because we did not think about you. I'm sorry next question. The next question is from noah. Who's your favorite character in the franchise. And why is it groups. No no card is. The is the guy who runs the cannonball mini game in Wind waker the one. Who do you played battleship. Y'all know taga route reds of any game in that first. How'd you get to and tries to simulate this sounds of ocean combat with his mouth so he does a lot of sh- that the fucking best. Yeah i know. I said story can tend to be pretty weakens. Although win wicker's story and writings really exemplary. Yeah it's one hundred percent david junior. Obviously david broder. David david judy. Who who is david. Well david junior is at the top of tingle tower and he works as he's one of the single siblings and his name's david junior you guys. Don't fuck david judy. He's in wind waker and four swords adventures and minhaj cap. I looked up his his zelda wiki pages. Name's david june. There's a david senior at might between rush. What else have you been plan this week. Clap han okay. It goes without saying that playing games. Baby don't always mix. But i think clap hands golf. I listened to your your episode of mary. Gov and i've listened to that episode. Where you guys were talking about the best games the first half of the year seriously class hands golf is really spectacular and continue to play on iphone and i started playing with the backbone which initially didn't love but a totally clicked for me that came fucking rocks and It's great to be able to just like do a whole to and stop and have it's your progress. And it's it's terrific. Did you say you play with backbone. I started playing it with the backbone. Yes how does the swinging work It's with the right analog stick. it's kind of like. How does tiger woods gains. Used to work where he was appointed back and then push it forward works. Great love it. Just i sent you a link to the cannon game from wind waker. Can you play a little bit that for everybody. Sh you get good..

nintendo david junior sony Microsoft tripoli david broder David david judy tingle tower david judy david noah wicker golf
"david broder" Discussed on Ac entre nos

Ac entre nos

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"david broder" Discussed on Ac entre nos

"La vida travel hard then where we are seeing go the total. Look demus your sake. And nobody does his facile sagir so young we they the Through our whole sigi Trust eunice but a solo park tina's responsibility that s tina's guitar hud. No seyni fica can know whether saves on yondo no cine fica can no say ye scandal. Look at the try. Bus pacione illuminated dry philly. See van look at they ass in deed i'll go then through the diaz segel scandal away so north sector leaders years on yondo knowing fourteen. Lucas this past sando though the is lavi that lucky boy. This is so year. Sonia no pariser land and no middle threes. I'ma at the only small gain the economic into propia fairly see dod is moi moi important career west appropriate felici. That is more important they say. Murphy's lissi the grisafe mooch has basis. I spade almost alliens amick galliano skara. Get no saga cynthia. Neto paris in dida. Sam morgan's medicine was better. No sort of me's muslims pornos. That are more nosotros muse most great and also throws e savage kit for them mos. Enjoy nadi in mass. Get the Where they create in tacoma grade. Andy numero guada- que- that they though the low suspect physicals mentalities esp twenties. Gomo persona eater built the illuminate quadros tonton important but i mean more. Get three stem. Mente mo- chaz personas individuals cmos grendel gasoline porculus bareness funcions ellas. Mostra honey lonzo. So jose avenue need an illusory though cisco chain stomas vian bakeware that dole los reyes physicals mental main spe- dementia cuarto case emotional mente 'simple To noise stas van min aluminium speedy tournament. The almost unanimity diplomat. Okay known gamble. Sit back in illo physical. Uniforms yona on Happier onuma know overdress. Do we stop bio physical coil. Quiapo said cancer to dns gifts that began in those low suspect. Those but up. Oh s- aguirre the land. But boy there is star. Bien immature our mutual sorta sinister relia- so intones asparagus statistic within choice dan. You're basilica passe. Illustrator la vida and no scenes. Go blue-sky up. One necessities muchas personas in which was and also throws. I species mental nachmani. Latina a this was personas. Knauss grimace or no screen. Spiders mr subway. Las familias spent sandokan. Okinawa sita's i. You know necessarily does anatolian to whether solo sola. Biddle lavish Advances stella's personas march fourth. This funding necessary are less personas. Must ford banner necessarily see nope. Puerto may h. Nominal yes or no is algal. Milo is for noise. i'll go the guinness either. Thread ghanem mea. The organization drill wednesday They've it a welcome of weather. Secede joep wale the men. David broder the unisys. He thought ula seal aniseed thus and no medal says this on. Not ereck wear lazarus peadar but meet at the sun not estimates sake is san lopez silo. They look as we though they locate. Rice senate corazon lament yosick in which was annot soto's special Dan mr comey latina Dramas expediency as the sequel this game. I've assist us tyson. Core is Only cook animals. Patterson that lanta borough threaten they can be at a severing gore east son at the bear. Von now get yano whereas needed cylinder. Gotta see yeah. Allante gwen drop bass entity me's mob but oppo their thank The speed up or game vs nor says that the embo la vida escorted corey bama's modern woman..

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"david broder" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"david broder" Discussed on WTOP

"It's 9 30 right there. 9 40, now on w T O P. Virginia lawmakers are set to start this year's legislative session focused on covert 19 relief efforts and also legalizing marijuana. The 2021 session will begin Wednesday. Lawmakers will be meeting away from the Capitol building in Richmond as the state continues to wrestle with the impacts of the pandemic. The House of Delegates plans to meet remotely while the Senate will meet it. A large conference center near the capital, Fairfax County Residents say taking care off essential workers should be a priority in a hearing ahead of the upcoming General Assembly session in a spotlight on the inequities in our economy. But it's also given us an opportunity to build a stronger, more resilient, more equitable economy where every worker regardless of the color of our skin, or the language. We speak or zip code can thrive. David Broder, president of the S E I. U Virginia 5 12 says there are three things lawmakers can focus on, including fund vital services for struggling families. And raises and paid sick days for a central health care workers and expand collective bargaining rights for the union. He also thank the delegation for the work they have already done to ensure hazard pay in PPE for health care workers. Andrea Cameron w T o P. News the Corona virus pandemic has proved challenging for school systems across our area. In Virginia Governor Ralph Northam says one of the options being considered to help students who have fallen behind with at home learning. His year round schooling. I think my brain would explode. That's Noel cost his reaction to the news that discussions about your round schooling or already underway in Virginia. Now we have more homework and last time to ourselves, so we don't really have time to get off that mental stress as much and having a perfect like winter break was very relaxing. But even that seemed too short. 15, year old sophomore at Fairfax County's Lake Braddock Secondary School, says high school especially Since remote learning began has been stressful. Mom Jenny, who calls year round schooling, an interesting thing, says she doesn't believe a one size fits all approach is the right one. I think treating them as it's just this big catch up game is going to make it even worse than it's already been Matt Small w T o P News. Your parents are calling on Maryland Governor Larry Hogan to reopen schools to in person learning. Parents from six public school districts, including Montgomery, Frederick and Howard counties have written state leaders about their concerns off the impact on Children. Teachers union say their members are willing to return to in person learning when schools improve building ventilation. And established protocols for hand washing, social distancing and mask wearing. Majority of students from the University of Maryland in College Park say they found learning during the pandemic this fall somewhat too very difficult. 75% told a survey that studying is been tough, 81% say they struggled with maintaining motivation. 72% say research productivity was difficulty. Mid covert. The vast majority of those surveyed say most, if not all, of their classes were online this fall. The state of Maryland based rather, the state Song of Maryland. Based on a Civil War era. Pollan refers to President Abraham Lincoln as a tyrant. And the union is northern scum. This year, the General Assembly may do something about it. We are in the midst of a racial reckoning in America is a name. Choudhry is with the Maryland office of CAIR, the council on American Islamic Relations. She believes calls to repeal Maryland State Song can be successful this year. Now the House speaker Speaker Adrienne Jones, has that moved that support that she needs to move this forward, referencing everything from the removal of Confederate monuments in Virginia Toe a push in South Carolina to kick Confederate battle flags off license plates. We're seeing this wave sweep across the country in different states Christi King. W T o P news. Stay with us in just a moment. We'll check up on NFL playoffs 9 44. When would be great. If Holmes.

Maryland Virginia Fairfax County David Broder Governor Ralph Northam University of Maryland Richmond House of Delegates Senate Lake Braddock Secondary School marijuana PPE Jenny NFL Choudhry General Assembly Andrea Cameron president Christi King Montgomery
"david broder" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"david broder" Discussed on WTOP

"Metro area medical centers. It's 7 40, Virginia lawmakers are set to begin this year's legislative session focused on covert relief efforts and also legalizing marijuana. 2021 General Assembly will kick off Wednesday. Lawmakers will be meeting away from the Capitol building in Richmond as the state continues to wrestle with the impacts of a global pandemic. That shut down schools, closed businesses and left more than 5000 Virginians dead, including a state senator. The House of delegates plans to meet remotely while the Senate will meet at a large conference center near the capital, Fairfax County Residents say taking care off essential workers should be a priority in a hearing ahead of the upcoming General Assembly session in a spotlight on the inequities in our economy. But it's also given us an opportunity to build a stronger, more resilient, more equitable economy where every worker regardless of the color of our skin, or the language. We speak or zip code can thrive. David Broder, president of the S E I. U Virginia 5 12 says there are three things lawmakers can focus on, including fund vital services for struggling families. And raises and paid sick days for a central health care workers and expand collective bargaining rights for the union. He also thank the delegation for the work they have already done to ensure hazard pay in PPE for health care workers. Andrea Cameron w T. O P. News the Corona virus pandemic has proved challenging for school systems across the region. Right in Virginia Governor Ralph Northam says one of the options being considered to help students We're falling behind his year round schooling. I think my brain would explode. That's Noel cost. His reaction to the news that discussions about your round schooling are already underway in Virginia. We have more homework and last time to ourselves, so we don't really have time to get off that mental stress as much and having a break like winter break was very relaxing, but even that seem too short, 15, year old sophomore at Fairfax County's Lake Braddock secondary School, says. High school, especially since remote learning began has been stressful. Mom Jenny, who calls year round schooling, an interesting thing, says she doesn't believe a one size fits all approach is the right one. I think treating them as it's just this big catch up game is going to make it even worse than it's already been. Matt Small w T. O P. News More parents are calling on Maryland Governor Larry Hogan to really open schools to in person learning. Parents from six public school districts, including Montgomery, Frederick and Howard counties have written state leaders about their concerns of the impact on Children. The teachers union say their members are willing to return to in person learning when schools improve ventilation and established protocols for hand washing, social distancing and mask wearing. A majority of students from the University of Maryland in College Park say they found learning during the pandemic somewhat too very difficulty This past fall, 75% telling surveyors studying is been tough, 81% said. They struggled with maintaining motivation. 72% say research productivity Difficulty Mid Cove it. The vast majority of those surveyed say most, if not all, of their classes were online this past fall. Check out the NFL. Stay with us. 7 44 If you don't know, PPC, if you don't know s e O if you don't know O t t If you don't know, targeted display, social Media Man website development male market and you don't have to. All you need to know is 2060 digital. We can help you with the digital marketing your business needs but maybe doesn't understand or have.

Virginia Fairfax County David Broder Governor Ralph Northam General Assembly Richmond Lake Braddock secondary School marijuana High school Jenny PPE Senate Andrea Cameron w T. O University of Maryland Noel senator NFL