17 Burst results for "David Blight"

"david blight" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:01 min | 2 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"It is monday december. Twenty eighth two thousand twenty. My name is sam cedar. This is the five time award winning majority report. We are broadcasting. Live to tape steps from the industrially ravaged gwanda canal in the heartland of america downtown brooklyn usa. Ladies and gentlemen. It is our end of year. Show cavalcade it continues to kabul in cade. Is that right. Emma did. Did i write grammar. Viglen is here with us as we wrap up the year looking at some of our best of shows we have got one of my favorite shows maybe ever David blight professor emeritus of history at yale university. One of the foremost experts on reconstruction and Has written a biography on frederick douglass. We spoke to him. I know a couple of months ago and I you'll hear me gush about him During the interview And i think he's. Before he joined the show emma at the Who incidentally all of our best of shows are before i joined. That is totally a coincidence. Except for the fact. I will tell you you join the show In the first week in november and we do our best of of the year on like a sort of a a a sort of like a fiscal year Like a for best out so we actually go from november one to november one so theoretically we could take bathtubs from twenty nineteen. We didn't this but we could just to make it clear that we are maintaining our our principles as it were about the best of series but one of the things that i think over the past couple years and and certainly it was Influenced by what. This country has gone through in terms of the polarization was. I have become very interested in. This is the period following the civil war into at about twelve years into Following the civil war where there was an a new opportunity for this country in many respects the And i think. I we talk about this with david blight. This era was really in many respects. The founding of of america as we know it today right and The the interview will explain more that but it's such a an incredible era and it's also incredible how under taught it seems to be in our education system and how how lacking it is in our consciousness as a country and as a people and it is also a time of of real missed opportunity or perhaps stolen opportunity and Some of the things that we talk about. We're gonna touch on this week. You know talk about that history a little bit And but i think to really understand. I think to understand the history of this country and to understand you get a greater understanding of history in many respects and you get a an understanding of the hundred fifty sixty years since The civil war to understand this period of reconstruction And of course frederick douglass a major figure so Ama- we're gonna come back at the end of this interview but we're gonna take a quick break and we'll come back with an interview. I did with Fesser meredith from yale university. David blight right after this one today. Sponsors is third love third. Love has an online fit finder quiz. That will help you.

David blight sam cedar gwanda canal usa frederick douglass kabul yale university brooklyn Emma emma Fesser meredith
"david blight" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:46 min | 5 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Alpha males are back. On the Alpha males are. Back. Just. The Alpha males of. backed. By the Alpha males of. Just want to degrade the White, man Alpha, males aw. Alpha males back back back. Has. Fails all got. Failed. By. Total. We bring back. Or? Put them in rotation these identical. The problem with those is there like forty five seconds long I don't know if they're enough for the break. That's I do have falcons. On the Alpha males psych. Fuck Fuck. Almost has what what? What what? What? What what? What what what what what? What? Out of A lot of back. Alley. Back. Back. Have you tried doing an impression on a college campus? I think that there's no reason why reasonable people across the divide can't all this. Psych. Album sales. By. Black. Males. Black? About their doesn't a little bar. You think that American deserves to be taken over by jihadists. Keeping at one hundred. For the game. Flint. Birthday. Happy. Birthday to me boy. I haven't. In the Alpha males on. Black. Males. Want. To pay the price possibly around here took. Total..

falcons Alley Flint
"david blight" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

06:48 min | 5 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"By eighteen eighty three is gonNA basically wipe out the fourteenth amendment in the famous civil rights cases of eighteen, eighty three and say that none of this discrimination issue whether it's a hotel or a train or wherever. It can only be settled at the state level. You know basically said in the fourteenth amendment doesn't mean anything. Anyway again and again to Greg and I mean that's how Reagan launched his general campaign after the Republican convention was the Nashoba County Fair talking about states rights exactly and they went after unions member he crushed the traffic control unions and then other unions. And the Anti Union movement in this country the so called right to work laws. Are. Are the uses I mean, let's face it. The right wing in America has been very effective at using the language of the Fourteenth Amendment, the language of equality to fight against those very achievements in equality for women and and black, and Brown, and immigrant people, and so on. They're very adept at that to say the least can I ask you one final question? That's a little bit sort of tangential but I the the Post, office? Honestly. Playing a very big role in all these questions about you know voting right now, the post office like this is another example of an. You know. Your work has taught me more about the concept of history. In many respects an actual. Point of doing history to help us understand why it's so important. Well, honestly like that. It's all around us I lament that it took me this long to sort of like understand that but I guess it's very well. But the post office is also another issue that like there was so much fighting in the radical Republicans who was sort of a gave birth to this notion of the post office in its UBIQUITY NECE I guess and and we're still. It's still a contention on some level. It's given me a renewed joy. When I walk into a post office, you know sometimes it's a you know it's boring and something you have to do. You gotta get some stamps. You GotTa mail something. But by God it's a democratic institution. You know it's it's it's it's one place. Almost, all of us us. Now not as much anymore because of Fedex and the Internet Amazon. But even Amazon use it. The the postal service guys delivered Amazon packages all day every day So yeah, and an attack on that is just yet another way. Let's be honest about this. Higher voter turnout serves one of America's political parties. Lower avert voter turnout serves another of America's political parties and the wanting lower voter turnout. Is doing everything it can possibly do. To depress to suppress. The turnout of Americans devote they are doing it because they've seen the demographics and the demographics of scared the hell out of them. One third of all votes cast this election will be cast by. African Americans Asian Americans and Hispanic Americans, and those numbers are growing like crazy every year. The number of vote the voter turnout among young people in two thousand eighteen was unprecedented. Republicans given the fact that they have become essentially the white people's Party. Are In trouble th they're fighting against the colliding with Moderna di again, and they're against most the great changes a modality. The can't even bring themselves to believe in climate change You know until they get burned forest I? Guess. So we're live in the post office. It became this visible example remember when When The delivery service had a strike A. UPS UPS. Sir You know. Those guys won their strike that year because people love ups turns they love having things delivered by ups and people got behind them because they were a service that people tended to. Rely on and even love the ups guidance brownshirts walks up. He she friend. So, there's ascension. What's the right in America? is fighting against MODERNA. Ty- itself. Now they winsome times big because they can. Manage the rules. Sometimes they're win because of ideology in some cases. but they're up against a demographic phenomenon that is not on their side. So there I have a new piece coming out in. Access in designed the German weekly they asked me to a fairly long historical piece on voter suppression, the history of voter suppression. And that's coming out I. Think next week is just amazing them the the measures, the methods. The Republicans have turned to, and by the way the template for that is reconstruction to I I mean there are all kinds of things that that were methods that were used to keep black people from voting. Actually in reconstruction though they ultimately just used guns. Well David Blight I can't tell you how how much I. Appreciate your coming on. We will put a link to Frederick Douglass, prophet of freedom on majority, dot FM, and also a link to your your audio course. On on the civil war, which covers reconstruction, and of course, the sort of the post reconstruction era I. It's it's been such an important work in in my understanding of so many things I can't tell you how much I appreciate you coming on. Well, thanks much thanks for having me. I. I should update the lecture Sir sometime because the jokes are getting old well, they still work they still fly. I appreciate it. All right folks we're gonNA take little break here and head to be fun half of the program this..

America Amazon Anti Union Nashoba County Frederick Douglass David Blight Greg Fedex Reagan Brown Ty
"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:31 min | 8 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Douglas was a much <Speech_Male> better political thinker <Speech_Male> than he wasn't economic <Speech_Male> thinker. <Speech_Male> <hes> but <Speech_Male> he comes from a place <Speech_Male> of great <Speech_Male> defeat <Speech_Male> at times, <Speech_Male> but also great <Speech_Male> victory at other <Speech_Music_Male> times, and <Speech_Male> we soft and <Speech_Male> use this term <Speech_Male> pluralism. <Speech_Male> Don't we <hes> <Speech_Male> just loosely <Speech_Male> or a <Speech_Male> com? Multiculturalism <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> who uses <Speech_Male> so loosely <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> we don't know what it means <Speech_Male> anymore. Well <Speech_Male> Douglas <Speech_Male> would have men <Speech_Male> hit. It <Speech_Male> meant the dream <Speech_Male> putting a reality. <Speech_Male> The people <Speech_Male> of every kind <Speech_Male> of creed, <Speech_Male> every connor raise <Speech_Male> background <Speech_Male> ethnicity <Speech_Male> defense. <Speech_Male> Even though <Speech_Male> they're gonNA fight it out. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Like hell over <Speech_Male> resources, <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> meaning and religion, <Speech_Male> interpretative <Speech_Male> on fight like hell, <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> possible <Speech_Male> to create a democracy <Speech_Male> in which <Speech_Male> all of them <Speech_Male> can actually live <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> He, never completely <Speech_Male> gave up on <Speech_Male> an <SpeakerChange> I even <Speech_Male> in the face of lynching <Speech_Male> last night's speech <Speech_Male> of his life lessons <Speech_Male> of the hour. <Speech_Male> It's amazing. He's <Speech_Male> an old man of seventy <Speech_Male> five with trembling <Speech_Male> hands, but <Speech_Male> he goes out on the road. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Dozens of times <Speech_Male> in eighteen, ninety, <Speech_Male> four, seventy, six <Speech_Male> by then. <Speech_Music_Male> Giving <Silence> the speech. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> which is really <Speech_Male> an analysis? <Speech_Male> Really Analytical <Speech_Male> Treatment of <Speech_Male> wide lynching was <Speech_Male> happening, and <Speech_Male> yet still <Speech_Male> at the <Speech_Male> end of that he said you <Speech_Male> know you <Speech_Male> can kill us. You <Speech_Male> can lynch people. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> But you <Silence> cannot kill. <Speech_Male> These. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> These elements <Speech_Male> of natural <Speech_Male> law they <Speech_Male> will be <Speech_Male> sustained. <SpeakerChange> They <Speech_Male> will live through it <Speech_Male> now. I'm <Speech_Male> not just saying <SpeakerChange> that because <Speech_Male> you go <Speech_Male> to Douglas for some hope, <Speech_Male> because that's not <Speech_Male> what you'll always find <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but it, but he is <Speech_Male> an example <Speech_Music_Male> of a prophetic <Speech_Male> voice <Speech_Male> <hes> who never <Speech_Male> gave up on this <Speech_Male> idea and think about the <Speech_Male> monuments stuff <Speech_Male> now to stand <Speech_Male> on that where you <Speech_Male> began. <Speech_Male> Good Lore. <Speech_Male> HOW ARE WE GONNA? <Speech_Male> Replace this memorial <Speech_Male> landscape. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> I have a piece actually <Speech_Male> coming out tomorrow <Speech_Male> on the New York Times. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> some recommendations <Speech_Male> about this <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> you know it's the competitive <Speech_Male> landscape is coming <Speech_Male> down at <Speech_Male> it appears most of it <Speech_Male> is and <Speech_Male> Christopher Columbus, <Speech_Male> and so on, and so we <Speech_Male> don't know how far this is <Speech_Male> going to go. <Speech_Male> But how do we harness <Speech_Male> this energy <Speech_Male> now? What <Speech_Male> kind of new <Speech_Male> memorial landscape <Speech_Male> might this country <Speech_Male> imagine? <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> out of our pluralism. <Speech_Male> It's an amazing <Speech_Male> opportunity. <Speech_Male> If you think about it for <Speech_Male> artist <Speech_Male> and curator's <Speech_Male> historians and creative <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> and I think <Speech_Male> the Biden campaign, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> she get behind it <Speech_Male> instead of <Speech_Male> leading. <Speech_Male> From the back. <Speech_Male> I think they should <Speech_Male> take hold as this <Speech_Male> and try to <Speech_Male> help Americans, <Silence> imagine. <Speech_Male> How to <Speech_Male> create a new <Speech_Male> memorial landscape, <Speech_Male> not just about <Speech_Male> heroes, but maybe <Speech_Music_Male> about <SpeakerChange> ideas. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> David blight is a sterling <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> professor of American <Speech_Male> history and director of the <Speech_Male> Gilder Lehrman Center <Speech_Male> for the study. Slavery <Speech_Male> Resistance and abolition. <Speech_Male> Yale University the book. <Speech_Male> We were just discussing <Speech_Male> Frederick Douglass <Speech_Male> Prophet of freedom. It's an incredible <Speech_Male> piece of work <Speech_Male> and I really really <Speech_Male> recommend you. Pick it up, <Speech_Male> David. That was <SpeakerChange> wonderful. <Speech_Male> Thank you so much, <Speech_Music_Male> thank you. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Again my great thanks. David <Speech_Male> Blake you really should pick <Speech_Male> up that book and if you don't <Speech_Male> pick that up, just just Google <Speech_Male> Frederick <Speech_Male> speeches <Speech_Male> just google <Speech_Male> literally. That's Sherman. <Speech_Male> It's worth it. <Speech_Male> Their <Speech_Male> remarkable tax. <Speech_Male> We love to <Speech_Male> hear from you. Tweet us <Speech_Male> the Hashtag with pod <Speech_Male> email with pod at g <Speech_Male> mail, DOT COM. <Speech_Male> Why is this happening is present <Speech_Male> by MSNBC <Speech_Male> AND NBC News produced by <Speech_Male> the All

Douglas David Google Frederick Douglass Yale University MSNBC connor David blight lynch New York Times. Biden NBC News Gilder Lehrman Center Sherman. Christopher Columbus professor director
"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

05:05 min | 8 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"He wrote. A speech called the composite nation. and the text we have of the comes from eighteen sixty nine. He gave a a number of times. But this speech this amazing speech. Is Douglas at highpoint. This is the moment when reconstruction has succeeded. Thirteenth Fourteenth Amendment. Passing ratified the Fifteenth Amendment has just been passed. It's not quite ratified, but soon to be you know. The radical Republican regimes are all being put in place in the south. And even by nine. You know grand ministration is about to move against the Ku Klux Klan of those. Terrible terror and violence practiced and sixty eight, but at this point. Douglas becomes such a proponent of this new America. The new America invented out of the. Civil War and the Second Constitution the second republic. It's almost like he feels himself a founder of the second. Republican in this speech, a composite nation. He does many things, but one of the arguments he makes of the United. States ought to now export. It's the allergy. It, he becomes a kind of the soft imperialist. He says you know we should be exporting this this new quality. To the Caribbean to Latin America to the places in the world overnight, and he wasn't alone in that a lot of other abolitionists began to think that to American now has has a chance. He says in that speech to do something. No people I've ever done. To create a nation, that is multiethnic multi-racial multi-religious. All living with equality before law. And then in the middle of the speech, he makes this. Robust case for Chinese immigration. which is just then becoming a big issue out in the West the first Chinese exclusion act doesn't come to eighteen seventy four, but has already brewing the huge Chinese exclusion act will come later in eighteen eighty two I, think but in the middle of the speech. He makes this amazing case for this multicultural America. This this this level of pluralism? No people have ever attempted and he says look Americans. Get ready they're coming in Chinese. Civilization is three thousand years old. Yes, they speak a strange language yesterday as strange religions, but they will similarly, he hasn't model. His theory is classic simulations..

America Ku Klux Klan Douglas Latin America founder
"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

04:16 min | 8 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"By that time by the spring of sixty five. he had come to note Lincoln from meeting three times. Twice at the White House in the oval. Office, to really fascinating pivotal meetings, especially, the second loan in August eighteen, sixty, four or Lincoln actually invited Douglas to the white. House solicited his advice his help and so. When Lincoln believed it was not going to be re elected that fall. At the last one being the second right after the second inaugural in East Room of the White, house. So by then. Lincoln and Douglas will start out at very different. Places had actually come almost to speak from the same script. If you read the second inaugural, maybe the greatest speech by an American President, certainly one of the shortest. But you read the second inaugural, it's essentially the use of that same apocalyptic language, and promises that every drop of blood shed by the last show as lead, but bloodshed by the sword. Now? I'm convinced in Douglas was in the audience that day he was right down to Lincoln's left about eleven or twelve rose out. He was right there. He heard it. and. I'm convinced I mean. I can't prove it, but I'm convinced that Douglas it which he could have written that speech for for Lincoln however that Lincoln wrote it. Made it all the more important? So when Lincoln is killed, especially given the moment you know the war has just ended. The surrenders just happened apple mathematics four days before. the death of Lincoln. And the portents now of possible continued fighting and division. was terrifying. And Douglas was on the road giving a speech as always heard back to Rochester. And there was a huge gathering of people as there were in towns all over the country when they got the news of Lincoln's death. And Douglas was in the audience they on him. They yelled out. Douglas come speak. And he went up and it's not clear. He had any notes for this, but we do have a text written later. He got up and made this deeply moving short speech to his. Neighbors. Really Fellow Rochester is. Saying that he had never felt such a quote, kinship with his countrymen as he did that night. Kinship. That's an interesting word that somehow Lincoln's death at the end of this war, and the prospects now for black freedom made him feel like kinfolk with his countrymen. What he does with Lincoln, the rest of his life for the next thirty years is fascinating because he basically invented about three different kinds of Lincoln's depending on the right, what everybody does with Lincoln? You want you want Lincoln to be this. You you create Lincoln Lincoln the. Support, that you create that? Lincoln and Douglas was extremely adept at doing that. Depending on what the audience that the death of Lincoln leads to to Johnson's disastrous, rain, his his impeachment, and then and then horrible, white supremacy, terrorism and violence in the south under a presidential reconstruction, which is then supplanted. By congressional reconstruction in the the sort of vanguard of radical Republicans, grant's presidency and US and military occupation, the south in an attempt at. The real first attempt. and which in some ways has never been rivaled since? Of genuine, full, equal multiracial democracy and talk a little bit about. Douglas's role in the Republican Party increasingly and in reconstruction as a project and his theorising of what this new version of American democracy looks like. A great question he story, but a great question I'd go now. Go right to the core of his most hopeful moment. In, many ways is most sanguine It's eighteen, sixty, eight, hundred, Eighty, eight, hundred, Sixty, eight and sixty nine..

Lincoln Lincoln Douglas Lincoln White House Rochester Republican Party President US Johnson
"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:48 min | 8 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Example, and then right on through up into eighteen sixty three dulles is not an insider in the Republican Party. He does not know them yet. He's GonNa later, but he doesn't know these people. He's not inside the circles of this. He doesn't know some of the machinations going on in eighteen sixty two. He doesn't know that Lincoln's been over. Over at the department crafting this proclamation, nobody knew and frankly, but Douglas's not an inside, so he's he's. He's sitting there. In Rochester New York reading every newspaper he can get and then weighing in himself in his monthly newspaper, and trying and then going out on the road, constantly to speak and trying to have a voice in this terrible crisis that is existential existential for the country for his family for his people for everything that he knows and then after emancipation proclamation. It's existential especially for his sons, because he recruits two of them into the army that's right, and and that is a good point to to emphasize something and I just WanNa. Make sure that we emphasize in this conversation. Which is that you know Frederick Douglass is obviously as we said in the beginning. He's A. He's a genius. He's A. He's a sort of one in a million talent, but the you know the story of black resistance to slavery, the story of a black abolition, as as as a story of self determination, as opposed to the Garin Sony and tradition of. noblesse oblige or or or spiritual emancipation for these other people? Who are you know that you take? Pity on is is a story. That I think has been obscured for very long, but has moved in the scholarship towards a more central place, which is to say black Americans Frederick Douglass perhaps most famously among them, but by tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands take their sovereign rights into their own hands in the way they act in the war in their listing in their. In their meetings in their Ami. Church Douglas is part of a broader movement of black liberation and self determination. He surely was although it is true. American abolition movement was Biracial Douglas. Actually learned a great deal from garrison garrison's both in technique and strategy and a lot of other things, and he had tremendous respect for many of his fellow white publishes. Hey, also had terrible rival ratings breakup with some them to Oh, God the factional fights are insane. Yeah! Oh! Yes, it's like the old argument is no fight like a fight between two Marxist well, there's no fight fight between radical reformers, all gonna disagree and then after the war he has terrible rivalries with the next generation of black leaders. That sometimes is really just personal. They want to knock him. anyway, but yeah, IT'S A. But you know abolition. Abolition is the prototypical American. Reform Movement radical reform movement everything that's happened since in women's rights, you name you know right on down the line, the Labor movement and on and on and on. Have always been modeling this. Antebellum movement against a system. An institution, but frankly almost nobody frat. They'd ever lived to see end. The great fact in the middle of all that of course is that it took this massive war and seven hundred thousand lives to actually end it. and Douglas had so much to say about that too brilliantly about what it meant that slavery had only ended in this country tremendous violence. What is his reaction to Lincoln's death? Well, it's amazing. Actually it's Fascinating A..

Biracial Douglas Frederick Douglass Lincoln garrison garrison Labor movement dulles Republican Party WanNa Rochester Garin white New York Sony
"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

04:56 min | 8 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Thanks for listening. Choose to go to the mall and do the other thing, not because they are easy, but because they are hard. I'm chuck. Rosenberg on my podcast youth I speak with those who sacrificed for the common good who do things because they are. This week warmer, National Security Council official Fiona Hill we can ourselves have a serious rational discussion about where we want the relationship related to go, but we have to stop using Russia as part about domestic politics. Join me for season. Three of the oath and MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and please subscribe new episodes every Wednesday. It is through this period. I mean this is the time when the Republican Party is founded, obviously in you know and right around with with with Lincoln's election, and then the secession crisis. Soon thereafter his assumption and then what? What is the relationship talk about the beginnings of the relationship, because there is one between Douglas and Lincoln because that's one of the most fascinating relationships in American history. It becomes. Douglas I is aware of Lincoln. Only in a buddy team fifty eight, he became aware of Lincoln because of the Lincoln Douglas. Stephen Douglas Debates Illinois for the US Senate. In fact Douglas was actually in Illinois during at least a couple of those debates, I couldn't determine whether he actually attended. One wouldn't be. but but he was there. He followed it in the press. He was entirely aware of of the. Of the substance of those great debates in that these two guys were debating the future of slavery Then in the eighteen sixty election still didn't know quite what to do it. Lincoln he viewed Lincoln as essentially what Lincoln was at that point. Certainly on surface, which was this old Henry Clay Whig who had become a moderate Republican, but who was anti-slavery and fact, he admired, he said in eighteen sixty. Lincoln's anti-slavery tendencies tendencies well to a radical abolitionist tendencies. What still wasn't enough, so he wasn't sure he actually I'm not even sure that voted for Lincoln in eighteen sixty, because there was still this thing, this tiny little far out party in New York called the radical Abolition Party and I think he may have thrown his vote away. In that election I know he didn't eighteen fifty eight, but at any rate once the war was on..

Lincoln Douglas Lincoln Stephen Douglas Republican Party Douglas I MSNBC Henry Clay Abolition Party Fiona Hill National Security Council Illinois Rosenberg US Senate Russia official New York
"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:59 min | 8 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Hayes appointed him to his first federal appointment. He never made any money except what his voice in his pen. A you know there are people today making a living with their voice in their pen, but that's never been easier. Let's talk a little bit when you talk about his anger there. Obviously, that's sort of like an that's an emotional characterization of a state of mind, but it relates to the the the evolving political. I think it's fair to say kind of political theology of Frederick. Going this was a very comes up through a very churched university. He pointed counters written world. Through through Hamas. World. And that it for the people that know the famous speeches of his what to the slave is fourth of July, and the one that he gives it the the Friedman's monument in in Washington. What's so fascinating is he begins to develop political theory that is. At once kind of radical end liberal it's. It's it is in a in a fascinating space in that it is. It is full of appropriately righteous fury. At the nation, and it's utter evil and hypocrisy. Find something to. Redeem in it ultimately. As a project. He does and you hit it right on the head. He he is at times. A genuine radical who flirts with by eighteen fifties uses violence He is willing to use a almost any strategy available. He can speak revolution with almost anyone. However he's also an evolving. Political liberal in that he wants to believe they actually does believe in wants to believe in even in the bleakest of moments. That solutions can be found through politics. through the vote. If if blacks could ever get the vote he much prefers somehow changing the country through law through politics. If it's possible, but of course, the eighteen fifties is a decade. An extremely important decade in American history when that kind of faith is put to the ultimate test. How do you keep faith? In ultimate future freedom for black people. After the Kansas Nebraska after especially, the jets got this is now the day after the dread Scott decision, which said people had no rights which white people are the nation whatever need to adhere to?.

Hayes Friedman Hamas Frederick jets Washington Scott Kansas Nebraska
"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

05:05 min | 8 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"The European tour because it's fascinating to me. His reception there and that is a turning point in his life, but is twenty-seven. He's just published the narratives summer of eighteen forty five. He plans this visit to the British. Isles under the sponsorship of the. Of Garrisons operation in Boston. It isn't clear how long he had intended to stay, but ends up staying about nineteen months. Among one month in Ireland several months in Scotland, and then most of the rest between Britain and Scotland. they call in lovely they especially their reform world of Ireland Scotland and Britain by then of course. Britain had freed slaves throughout its empire. you know with with mixed results so with eleven. Britain saw itself as an anti-slavery nation and here was this young African American brilliant speaker. He took the place by storm They loved him in Ireland in fact to this day. You'd think he was a born patron. Saint of Ireland or something only spent one month in Ireland and at least two monuments Evan at least two or three murals. Scotland was perfect because he arrived in the midst of a classic Scottish Ecumenical, war they were having huge battle over money that have been raised among American slaveholders, and there was this crusade going on called. Send back the money well. This douglas favorite subject religious Apocrypha. He hit the ground running. They loved him. They wrote songs about and they wrote poems about him. He would walk into. into a small town in upper, Scotland and there'd be a little children's choir singing a song about him I. Mean it said Douglas's twenty, seven, twenty eight? He's overwhelmed by this. It makes an enormous. He is blown away to, and he'd never experienced the place that what he experienced some racism and the British isles, but nothing like in the US he was warmly accepted. He was admired. It almost overwhelming and then in Britain. He meets all the famous reformers politicians, and and he makes a lot of a lot of lifetime British friends, a group of whom raise the money to purchase his freedom from the all brothers back in Maryland, and he returns to the US, but not until. Had those free papers in his hand, he was formally and legally free once he returned to American right and we should of course for call for people that don't remember their history. This is amidst the great battles over the domain of slavery in the nation in the run up to the civil war, the future slave, of course, the most famous legislative blow to essentially. Allow for. For the federal government you essentially. Bless the operations of of slave..

Douglas Britain Ireland Scotland US federal government Boston Evan Maryland Scotland.
"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:53 min | 8 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Let me three or four or five of them. At a time they would hold anti-slavery meetings, and sometimes outdoors sometimes in churches, sometimes in city halls wherever they could get a venue and they weren't always welcome. But then they would, they would have resolutions to speak to, and the speakers would speak to her against it and so. But one of their purposes, especially, these these Gareth Sonian followers, William like garrison, was to stimulate a response in their audience to anger, their audience to rile up their audience, and indeed if the audience ended up throwing a few things that and that was a success. But what happened early on I three years? He's out on the circuit. Was So adept at Mimicry. And so adept at making the case, especially against religious hypocrisy, and these are all well churched people upchurch towns are often speaking in. You Know Protestant pulpits he'd gave this this speech over and over and over again, the became known as the slaveholders sermon. And what was Douglas would sometimes go into a performance. He was a performer to say the least, and he's only in his attorneys. Let's remember he was dashing. Handsome Tall. You know kid right out of slavery. So it seemed until till he started to talk, but he would go, he would Mimika a pro slavery preacher slaves below to your masters, and he'd quote that stuff out of the Bible and entertain people, and they'd laugh, and they'd cry, and there were times when I have a couple examples of this in the book. Where the abolitionist speakers would be speaking to this resolution or that resolution and somebody in the audience would shot out. Hey, fred, do the sermon. And he paid break into the sermon, so he learned early on the performance of nature of this kind of oratory, and then later he does the same thing. All kinds of political issues. All kinds of you know the the politics of slavery whether that was about the fugitive slave act. The Kansas Nebraska Act fugitive slave rescues bleeding Kansas and on down the line. He understood as any major order that time had to. That this was about public persuasion. It was about performance and he had learned early on. That you had to reach the moral. Of Your audience, and then hope that you could reach their political behavior and he happened to be very good at it. in fact, he was so good at it that by the eighteen fifties it became again I. Say this in the book. It became a kind of n even after the war than more so. It became a kind of an American thing. To See Douglas. To go here Douglas and I have many examples that I didn't use in the book. Especially later in his life of people reflecting in newspapers about the first time they heard is the first time they saw. Douglas was like seeing Niagara Falls. It's funny..

Douglas garrison Gareth Sonian Kansas Niagara Falls fred William Nebraska
"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

04:33 min | 8 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"I mean we see that in the wake of the fall. Fall of the confederacy, when the FREEMEN's bureau set up, just the every school is just you know oversubscribed and people of all ages huddling towards the schoolhouse to learn how to read the Douglas's story. I mean one of the things you cannot help, but wonder in is at Douglas is obviously genius and singular. But how many Frederick Douglass is there were it is it is sort of this Kismet? Because of the it could have been right like the because of the wife of the ones owner who is kind of sympathetic and taught him how to read, and then he you know the situation. He ends up with the power of language that's denied to millions, and he's just the one that we know. Yes, and it is, it is an age of language. Let's remember it's an age of oratory. It's an age of the spoken written and published word I mean to Douglas. Like other abolitionist, the other the other technology in his life that was so important, was the road repress the printing press, and of course one of the first things he does. When he comes back from England in eighteen, forty seven as he tries to. Create his own newspaper which he will run for sixteen years that newspaper you know today today with so many other kinds of technologies which you and your business masters. But that printing press, and that newspaper was his voice, and back to words again when he sat down in the winter of eighteen, forty, four, forty, five, after three, and a half years out on the circuit as this itinerary abolitionist, or you're basically telling the stories of his youth mostly and also aiming directly at a at American, secular and religious hypocrisy. Has Nobody else was? He publishes that I narrative that I auto biographies only one Hundred Fifteen twenty pages in that he could take that book out now as he did, he went off to England Ireland Scotland Britain. He couldn't keep it in print. It was so popular he could hold that book in his hand and he could say look. I was a slave, and I'm black and the world believes that black people don't have a history. Don't are not literate people. But look at me. I. Here's my life I wrote this I..

Douglas FREEMEN Frederick Douglass England Ireland Scotland Brita England
"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:36 min | 8 months ago

"david blight" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Resistance and abolition at Yale University and ever since I read the book I've been wanting to talk to him about it. So is my great pleasure to welcome, David Light David thanks for coming on. A. Thank you Chris it's great honor. Let's talk about your way into this man who you know. He's one of these figures where. I think this. This is sort of the case, a little bit with Hamilton and Chernow's biography, and then the the musical, which is at sure, it's not like acts Alexander. Hamilton is not famous. He's famous. We all you know. We know Hamilton's founding father. The depth of complexity of the guy's life. You read it and you're like Whoa wow and Frederick Douglass is in somewhat similar category, insofar as like Yes, Frederick? Douglass beat. We know is when we see his picture. We recognize him, but the sheer volume of his thought his writing his speaking his political influence, his life experience I had no idea the life. This man lived while the go right back to your central point in year introduction he, he did have of a multi-ethnic multi racial multi religious America. In a more robust way than.

Hamilton Frederick Douglass David Light David Yale University Chris America Alexander Chernow
"david blight" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

13:16 min | 1 year ago

"david blight" Discussed on Amanpour

"Is back to America's past, as we take a deep dive into the extraordinarily life of Frederick, Douglass, born into slavery. He rose to become the most prominent abolitionist of the nineteenth century using his eloquent, and powerful voice to argue for both racial and gender equality author and Yale University professor, David blight, expanse his Mazda work on that period of American history, slavery, the civil war, and the Douglas affect he has fascinating new insights into his life in his Pulitzer prize winning biography Frederick, Douglass, prophet of freedom. David blight. Welcome to the program. Thank you. It's good to be with you. So this book is causing huge waves. You've got the Pulitzer prize. But tell me what it is about this period in American history because it's not the first book of this, period. You've done the civil war. Several times you've even written about federal Douglas before. Yes. Well, the civil war period is the pivot of American history. It's the it's the central event of the nineteenth century, it's when the United States toward self to pieces. And then had to find a way to put itself back together, we reinvented a second Republic out of that war and Frederick. Douglass is as good a spokesman as good a commentator on that entire epoch, as we ever had his origin story, though, is what really I think, everything centers around in other words, his escape and what he did with that escape and how he escaped so so take us back to that beginning. Sure. He was born in a backwater of the American slave society on the eastern shore of Maryland, in ever knew who is father was although his father was probably one of his white owners, and he knew the name of his mother, but barely knew her. He grows up twenty years, his first twenty years as a slave on the eastern shore of Maryland. And then nine of those years in Baltimore and the fact that he became an urban slave living in Baltimore which had a large free black population and a and a distinct and very active community as everything to do with why he escaped his literacy, also had everything to do with why he escaped he did finally plot his escape at age twenty in eighteen thirty eight by a pretty clever scheme of writing three trains, and three boats ferry boats. From Baltimore to New York City crossing the Hudson river into lower Manhattan after about thirty six hours on the road. Obviously, you know he didn't go to school. He didn't have full training and from your book. It's obvious. Obviously transpire is that the wife of his white ONA decided to teach him literacy, tell me about that. Her name was the feel he's about seven eight years old living in Baltimore, he sent there to be an effect, the playmate of the nephew of his owner. But while there's feel teaches them his letters alphabet and reads aloud with him for more than a year and particularly reads the bible with him. And once he sees the pawn, his literacy, once he sees depan, the ability to read, and eventually to right? That's gonna take a lot longer. Nothing seems to have been more important to this. Slave child. And then later teenager, then his mastery of words, he also then had the tutoring, so to speak. Of a black minister, preacher named Charles Lawson, who was a kind of a storefront, informal preacher who loved to read the bible out loud. And once he found this teenager who could read, so well at age, twelve thirteen and fourteen Douglas than Frederick Bailey, sat with all Lawson day in and day out whenever they had time and read the bible out loud thing, I guess, you would say then in today's pollens Frederick, Douglass was really fortunate to have been embraced by so many important mental that's unusual. Isn't it for young black slave? It is it is. It's his greatest. Good fortune, while the slave to encounter language and to encounter people who aided him in gaining that language. But then he also had to seize upon it because he is sent back to the eastern shore, when he's seventeen and eighteen years old, and he's been. Entire year being savagely beaten by an overseer name Edward covy. That though was one of the fomative moments of his life, not the beating but the way he stood up to it. And you write about that saying that it also laid to serve the full mislaid story is the establishment of his manhood by ritualized violence. I was nothing before he wrote I was a man now. Yes, he writes about that experience, of course, in retrospect, as an auto biographer, he claims that his fight when he stands up to covy blasted two hours and so forth. I doubt it ever lasted that long, but Douglas as the writer transforms that into the metaphor of kind of resurrection. He's a he's an eighteen year old kid who has been beaten into submission week after week after week by this deranged overseer this beside. Good man who apparently enjoyed beating his slaves. Douglas tells us by standing up in this ritual of male violence. He then forced covy to never touch him again, in the last few months, he lived with covy according to Douglas, telling Doug covy never touched him Douglas makes that a pivot in his autobiography he says, I have shown, you the ways a man was made a sleigh. Let me now show you the way a slave became a man, we can we can make too much out of that. But Douglas did show us there that in his own memory, at least some kind of ritualized violence was the way that he saw himself resurrecting himself. I actually really glommed onto that because I think that it's stands to reason that, that he made so much of it because maybe it wasn't the violence, but it was his resistance and his bravery to stand up, which then shaped him for. The rest of his life and grid. Because as you right. Even the famous mental that he found in Massachusetts. The, the abolitionist William Lloyd garrison. They were very close. But ultimately, there was a break between them over politics and, and how to move forward about the constitution about what America really stood for. And he also had the temerity to stand up to the great ABRAHAM LINCOLN didn't he on some of Lincoln's proposals to, to send black slaves off to colonize central Africa, Central America or Africa? We did he get that bravery from maybe from beating covy and telling him to quit it. That's possible. Indeed through the eighteen fifties. Douglas gains the confidence of an extraordinary order who could go into any hall, any church or any park in, in an Italian or city and just wow, an audience. But by then he had also written two very important. Autobiographies hundreds and hundreds of the short form political editorials he had written one novella and some of the greatest speeches in American rhetorical history, especially his fourth of July speech of eighteen fifty two such the by the time, he means ABRAHAM LINCOLN in the middle of the civil war. He was a bit odd by Lincoln. That's make no mistake. But he stood up to Lincoln. He had a very serious conversation with Lincoln in their first meeting, and especially in their second meeting. He went to Lincoln with protests against the discriminations being experienced. By black soldiers. Two of them were Douglas's own sons in eighteen sixty three and eighteen sixty four you mentioned the fantastic independence day speech of eighteen fifty two. So allow me to quote a little from that dramatic speech. This is what he said the existence of slavery. In this country brands you'll republicanism sham you'll humanity as a base pretense and you'll Christianity as ally. It destroys your moral power abroad, it corrupts your politicians at home. It saps the foundation of religion. It makes you a name a hissing and a byword to a mocking us. I mean that is just, you know, or inspiring. It is that speech is what I like to call the rhetorical masterpiece of American abolition isn't. But it's hard as it is a classic Jeremiah. That's the rhetorical form named after the prophet Jeremiah, which is the prophet taking his people or his congregation. If you like to the altar calling them to the altar and chastising them for their declenchant for their sins for how they poisoned their society and warning them that if they do not change their ways their world is about to be destroyed. But the fourth of July speech is much more than that. It's a beautiful use of language it's almost like a symphony in three movements. He draws in his audience by telling them that the founding fathers would geniuses he calls, the declaration of independence, the ring, bolt of American liberty, but then about one third. Third of the way. And he says pardon me, why have you invited me here a former slave on your fourth of July and then he uses that that word you, your, you your over and over and over. And then he takes his audience through the whole middle of the speech through the litany of evils and horrors of everything from the slave ships, to slave auctions to slavery itself all over the United States. And then he ends by tell ins that section by telling them, you have a reptile coil that your heart break away break away break away. It's like Jonathan Edwards. And the fact that does Jonathan Edwards one better. And then the ending of the speeches simply Douglas, gently letting them up and saying, but your country is still young. Your country is still maleable. You may have time to repent reform and recreates yourselves, but that's speech is in the in the great tradition of the jazz. Ramaya add the delivery of the warning about the hypocrisy of the people. But if they don't rise up and change their ways they are probably going to be destroyed. And that is in part, of course, what the civil war brought about sit even obviously Frederick. Douglass strove, all his life for suffrage for for for his black Americans. But he also was one of the earliest to join the birth of American feminism. He was one of the first to be there at Seneca falls in eighteen forty eight but he seems to have had a pretty rocky relationship with the idea of who should get this offering who deserved it, most, when and what for and just to read these two quotes on the positive, he, I said the history of the world has given us many sublime onto takings, but non more sublime than this. He said about American Suffragettes, but then later, he said with them. I women it's. Desirable matter with us. It is important a question of life and death, and he came to rhetorical blows at least with some of the great figures of the early feminist movement. Like Susan B Anthony. Yes. Well, those are two very different context and both are true. Douglas was one of the only males speakers at the Seneca falls convention of eighteen forty eight the great women's suffrage convention that Susan Anthony, Elizabeth, Katie Stanton and Lucy stone and others planned, but when it came to the fifteenth amendment in eighteen sixty nine eighteen seventy the voting rights amendment, which was, of course, a whole package of compromises and everybody. With one eye open understood that if you put women's suffrage into that amendment, it never passes, it just simply never would have come out of the congress, and certainly never would have been ratified by three quarters of the states. Now Douglas knew that everybody knew that, but the leaders of the w-. Women's suffrage movement. We're no longer patient. They had put off their movement during the civil war saying it was the black man's our. But now they wanted equal suffrage rightly so how ever they fought.

Douglas Douglass ABRAHAM LINCOLN Baltimore Pulitzer prize Frederick United States David blight America Charles Lawson covy Doug covy Mazda Maryland Yale University Lincoln Edward covy Susan B Anthony
"david blight" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"david blight" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This hour with David blight. He's author of the new biography. Frederick Douglass prophet of freedom and professor blade. I have to say we've got a lot of response coming into this conversation online someone over Twitter. Someone calling themselves on T entity was reacting to earlier in this conversation. I was struggling with saying that's that white Americans owned black Americans in slavery and aunty entity says say owned, the persistent whitewashing of American slavery. And indeed all of American history is exactly why this country is riddled with festering, social cancers of all kinds and auntie NC. If you're still listening, I have to say, I definitely take your point my struggle with it was not an effort to whitewash history. But rather just feeling the pain of the truth of American history still to this day? So I just wanted to let her know that and I keep going. Back to Frederick Douglass his own writings themselves and David Blake. I'm just going to quote him again here because you know, in the pain and the truth of slavery. There was a another section of one of his own autobiographies where Douglas was writing about hearing men and women sing sing songs as they were enslaved. And he says that the hearing of those wild notes always depressed his spirit filled him with ineffable ineffable sadness that he has frequently found himself in tears while hearing them to those songs, I trace my first glimmering conception of the dehumanizing character of slavery. And I can never get rid of that conception, so. Yeah, beautiful words, but what is describing there's his memory as a child at the White House plantation. He said this always happened on allowance day, which was one day every month when all the slaves from around the vast why plantation would come to.

Frederick Douglass David blight Douglas David Blake White House Twitter professor one day
"david blight" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"david blight" Discussed on WCTC

"The is that you know the left believed history is somehow fluid in interpreter bowl and the constitution can be interpreted conservatives believing the fact the constitution is with the constitution is the fact in history of what had a history is it history not history when it comes to civil war in fact it it is history uh is that but it but the left believes in interpretation so you got all these let all these ripples interpreted what kelly will say but everybody who is on the right side or ric conservative her story knows exactly what he meant david blight i love throwing these liberal historians out at you craig david blight aptly named a history professor at yale and author of race and reunion set of of kelly's comments this is profound ignorance that's what one has to say first at least of pretty basic things about the american historical narrative i mean it's one thing to hear from trump who let's be honest just doesn't really naughty history but but general kelly has a long history in the american military he his argument is an old reconciliation as narrative about the civil war in its show in in he said it's just been exploded by historical research sense lincoln ran in eighteen sixty compromising on the issue of slavery he did not run as an abolitionist but look us but if we are historically accurate let's take a straight line projection from 18 fix be up until today john kelly would be who is a republican and he therefore would be an abolitionist you'd be an abolition of i'd been abolition of is that hillary clinton chris matthews over in the democratic party would be the party of slavery taken a straight line projection from eighteen fixed the up the today if absent civil war so so let them explain why that there what why they were parties slavery well i think that it is it is stunning i think this is what kelly was getting at if stunning that one cannot say anything positive the things that have been said by as among the most respected figures in american history on though you're a bowl of republicans and democrats from eisenhower to jfk to fdr to gerald ford we all these people who you know last time i checked were okay by the law i've used words like noble brave finest soldier a sacrificial all these words used if.

civil war professor yale lincoln democratic party eisenhower craig david blight john kelly hillary clinton chris matthews gerald ford
"david blight" Discussed on CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"david blight" Discussed on CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

"A memorial landscape churned minefield is familiar terrain for david blight and yale university was there is some resistance to changing the name oh yes there was resistance the namechanging among alumni amongs earlier this year the university renamed dormitory dedicated to former vice president john see cal home citing what it called cal hoon's primary legacy as one of the 19th century is most ardent defenders of slavery but determining a historical figures primary legacy ease where things get tricky i'm sure you've heard this but this university has a very conspicuous connection to someone who made a lot of money trading slaves and his name is will who you yeah well i can assure you as our previous dean said the the name yale is not on the two yes gail is named four le who gale a slave trainer so where to draw the line after all ten of our first twelve presidents were slaveowners some warned against drawing lines at all we need to move this nation exists the blood and sacrifice and echo ish of many many men many got it quickly many missed gotti virginia tech history professor emeritus james robertson isn't new to this debate in nineteen sixty one president kennedy tapped robertson to lead the civil war centennial commission we need to learn from the mistakes of us and they just as well is we need to be inspired now the good things it good people have done and robertson believes there was a lot of good in confederate general robert e.

vice president cal hoon dean yale gail james robertson president david blight yale university professor kennedy robert e