19 Burst results for "David Being Cooley"

"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:21 min | 11 months ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in Philadelphia, this is fresh air. I'm David Being Cooley in for Terry Gross today are interviews with Gloria Steinem. She's the subject of a new bio pic based on Steiner's memoir, and that memoir was dedicated to the doctor who helped Steinem get an illegal abortion when she was twenty two. In return, he asked Steinem to promise to things I will not tell anyone my name second you will do what you want to do with your life. She'll tell us about the choices she made in her life a life that has profoundly influenced women around the world. We'll also hear about her unconventional childhood until she was ten, she spent half of each year in a trailer often on the road with her parents spending months at a time out of school. And I'll review the new season of Fargo. On fx which stars Chris Rock..

Gloria Steinem David Being Cooley Steiner whyy Terry Gross Chris Rock Philadelphia
"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

20:21 min | 11 months ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, , whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. . It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, , and here's a taste in this clip. . A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, , the son's mother. . Afterward the father gives his son some advice. . You remember what I told you. . On. . The buzzer gave you. . That's what I mean. . got. . To. . Sir. . Good sons of bitches out there. . One hundred. . These that many. . Cannonball. . In, , both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, , serial killers or preachers. . The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. . He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. . But. . Once he did start writing. . He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. . Acclaim. . Terry, , gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, , all the time was first published. . Donald, , Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. . I'd like to start with reading from your new book, , the Devil, all , the time <hes>. . It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. . So would you just set it up for us? ? What we have here is <hes>. . A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's <hes> following behind his father Willard and there and <hes> <hes> place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he <hes>. . Wants to communicate with God and <hes>. . So this is where they are. . You know early in the morning and their. . <hes> have finally reached this log. . Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. . Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. . As far back, , as he could remember, , it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. . Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. . He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. . Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, , half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, , knock him stiff in nineteen, , fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. . Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, , don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, , you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. . But the next time one of them starts his stuff, , I want you to finish it. . Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. . He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. . He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. . Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. . Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, , the Devil, , all the time. . You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. . So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. . A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, , the collections called knock him stiff. . The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. . You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. . Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. . <hes> so was is this a story that played out in your life? ? Well, , not so much in my life I. . Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. . But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very <hes>. . Uneasy relationship. . You've got to understand my dad was born in one, , thousand, , nine, , hundred, , thirty he's still alive. You . know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but <hes>. . He was born in. . Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. . He <hes> was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, , and then he was in the navy. . And, , my dad is a very tough. . Hard. . <hes> man Stra very strong man. . As and in contrast to that, , my mother is very shy kind. . Small Bone woman. . and. . Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, , I took after my mother and I believe. . When I was a kid, , my dad was. . Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. . So. . You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. . Lived in stiff. . That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of <hes> other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and <hes> they didn't treat their families very well <hes>. . You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. . I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and , pretty much left the family to <hes> take care of themselves. . So, , yeah father's <hes> have a pretty rough time and my work <hes> I just. . It's just. . <hes>. . You know I'm a father. . You know I have a daughter WHO's <hes> I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. . Wasn't. . As good as I could have been. . Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. . <hes>. . That's probably the best explanation. . I can give for <hes> why <hes> treat father's like I do my work. . Were you bullied in school. . You said you, , you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. . So and if you were bullied, , would you fight back? ? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? ? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, , I. . Mean a would fight back if I had to but. . That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. . No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. . But. . Yeah. . I mean I wasn't really interested in <hes>. . Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. . I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and <hes>. . My Dad. . Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, , even today you know his idea of success is. . Owning your own farm, , starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on <hes> what I'm doing now is. . A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. . Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, , when I was growing up there it was. . You know relocated for us. . Ok we'll knock him stiff. . is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, , which is you know southern Ohio. . It was its own little place. You . know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community <hes>. . There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, , and probably four hundred, , fifty, , five, , hundred people now I probably was related to. . At least half those people. . So did you find this <hes> nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? ? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. . You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. . Else and somewhere else. . And so from a very early age. . You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. . I just <hes>. . Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. . But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. . PHILADELPHIA, , which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. . I, really , didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. . Wanted to escape and <hes> them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. . I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today <hes>. . Ladder parents go to visit. . My parents are still alive. . You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and <hes>. . So I. . Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. . And I went to work in a meat packing plant <hes> much like Weller work, , Dan? ? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. . Hey, , I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. . I chose to come back. . You know the <hes> paper Mills Calling <hes> it was union job and great benefits and. . And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. . Ever got. . You had that job for. . How many years did you work at the paper mill? ? I? ? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. . Okay. . So how come it took so long did you know? ? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? ? Well. . You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. . And I think maybe in the back of my mind, , you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, , of course, I , was very naive about it. . The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, , you were your own boss. . To you could do it anywhere. . And three, , you made lots of money. . Wasn't until actually began writing it. . I found out. . That was a real true. . But I. . Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? ? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. . I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and <hes>. . You started daydreaming or whatever it was. . One of those things that you thought about right thought about. . But it wasn't really. . You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and <hes> You. . Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. . But then finally when I was forty five <hes> my dad retired from the paper mill. . And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. . and. . You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. . Bothered me and I. . Just. decided. . . I had to try something else you know. . To some other way to. . Spend the rest of my life. . So. . When you decided, , you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? ? Any. Writers . or anything in for <hes> a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. . And then I'd read an interview with <hes> a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. . But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. . and. So . I started doing that. . Who did you type out? ? I typed out a lot of different stories I. . I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. . So John. . cheever hemingway. . Flannery. . O'Connor Richard. Yates . <hes>, , Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. . <hes>. . Long I, , type it out, , and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, , and then I'd throw it away and do another one. . Typing a story out, , just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. . Moose from one scene to the next <hes> that sort of thing. . Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? ? Well when I first started. . Trying to learn how to write. . As. . I said like maybe I would <hes> copy out John cheever story. . So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. . Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, , and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. . and. . So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. . and. . Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, , I wrote a story that's included in the book. . Knock him stiff called back teen. . And it's a very short story. . and. . It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. . And that was the first thing that I had. . Written that I thought wasn't too bad. . And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about <hes> instead of nurses, , lawyers, , that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. . How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. . Mother always held this up as like what you could do. . If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. . We didn't have to look at it anymore, , but instead his mother just like. . Put It on the wall, , display it in the living room. . And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. . I love that sentence <hes> did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. . So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. . But for that to be like, , you know the zenith of <hes> somebody's life is. . You. . <hes> but did you feel that way that a war on you? ? Other People's accomplishments? ? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. . Successes or whatever. . But I, know , that I was aware you know by the time. . I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. . And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. . You know they own their own home. . Maybe. . They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. . You know in contrast to them. . I've been divorced twice. . I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. . Of. . Motel Room and I've been living there for about. . Four or five years. . I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. . You know for fourteen years of working there. . That's what I had. . And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. . Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. . I, , mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. . But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. . I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. . I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, , my dad would try to help me. . and. . That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? ? Now as a published writer, , you have a collection of short stories. . You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, , the pen, , Robert Bingham Award. . So, , what's different about your life? ? <hes> well, , I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. . Smoke and daydream. . Think it's a legitimate. . Yeah well, , at least that's what I tell my wife. . <hes>. . But my life hasn't really changed that much I. . Mean I get a lot more emails. . Now you know that sort of thing, , but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. . You know my daily routine is. . I really can't say that it's changed that much. . It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. . You know had at least a little bit of success. . You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. . And would. . Probably give their left arm. . To be setting, , you know where I'm setting today. . Well Donald Ray, , pollock thing you so much for talking with us. . Terry I appreciate. . It. . Made my day. . Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. . The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Donald Ray pollock Anna Konkan Meyer Erskine David Being Cooley Penn whyy Terry Gross Hulu Philadelphia Netflix writer Ohio
"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:16 min | 11 months ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy, in Philadelphia, this is fresh air. I'm David Being Cooley. In for Terry Gross, Today Donald Ray pollock author of the devil all the time which is set in knock him stiff Ohio the small town where he grew up pollock didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years, the local paper mill and got sober. A film version of the devil all the time start streaming next week on Netflix. We'll also hear from Anna Konkan Meyer Erskine creators and stars of the Hulu Comedy Series Penn fifteen about the extreme emotions and awkwardness of being in middle school. They're in their thirties but in the show, they play middle school versions or from cells. New episodes of Penn fifteen starts streaming.

Donald Ray pollock Anna Konkan Meyer Erskine David Being Cooley Penn whyy Terry Gross Hulu Philadelphia Netflix writer Ohio
"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

"This is fresh air I'm David Being Cooley in for Terry Gross back with more of Terry's conversation from last year with actress Charlene. Darren She stars in the new Netflix's movie, the old guard playing the leader of a group of immortal soldiers. When they left off, they were talking about theran leaving South Africa at the age of sixteen shortly after her father's death. You mentioned your father passed away. This is a part of the story that I know you. Don't I think you might not WanNa talk about so I'll just mentioned what happened, and you can tell me if you like to talk about it, or if you prefer not to your father came home drunk. One night and Shot at you and your mother. She got her gun and shot and killed him. And that's how that's how he died I. Don't know if you're comfortable talking about that or. No. Yeah, no I I listen, I am I I think a lot of my just. The any reluctancy that anybody's ever heard is just that. This is usually the the headline that people walk away from and I think what's frustrating. Is that the trauma around having an experience like that of course is quite surreal and and and but it's more the fact that. you know. My father was very sick man. My father was an alcoholic all my life, I only knew him one way, and that was as an alcoholic. and. South Africa at that time was not necessarily a place where there was any that you didn't have access to. Any kind of support group where you could even acknowledge that this was a problem or go and find help. Our culture at the time was very much like well. This is what men do. Men Drink and the day today I'm predictability of living with an addict is what is I? Think the thing that you sit with an have kind of embedded in your body for the rest of your life more than just this one event of what happened one night. My father was so drunk that the he should have been able to walk when he came into the house, with with a gun, and he shot through my mom and I..

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"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in Philadelphia. This is fresh air I'm David Being Cooley in for Terry Bros.. We've got a couple tough characters on the show today. They're pretty tough, onscreen and TV and also displays some real inner grit in life as well. First, Charlie's Barron. She played a woman who rescues young women from the villain in the post apocalyptic film. Mad Max Fury Road and she's currently playing a superhero in the new film, the old guard. Also Danny trail. He's made a career playing menacing characters, including the TV series breaking bad and the film machete. As a young man trail was in and out of prison, once for armed robbery, and he struggled with addiction. And documentary inmate number one the rise of Danny trail chronicles those years and how he was able to transform himself. Today's.

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"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in Philadelphia. This is fresh air. I'm David Being Cooley. In for Terry Gross Today Michael Tilson Thomas Longtime Conductor of the San Francisco Symphony. On Sunday. Sunday he'll receive the Kennedy Center Lifetime Artistic Achievement Award. His grandparents were pioneers of the Yiddish theater when he was a kid. His grandmother took him up on stage and pointed to the last row in the balcony. Telling him up. There are the cheapest seats at those seats. Sit The people love the show the most also all we remember Mary Previti for thirty years she worked with teenagers in Camden. New Jersey. Were the detention center. She ran became a model for others across the country. We took terror out of their lives when boys and.

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"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Doing something bad and I think I had sort of protected myself from her because I was afraid of her in some ways and I think also I felt betrayed by her. When I was coming out in you you know I read about this a bit in the book at the end of the book but Mike Coming out was very challenging with my mom and she had been such a cool parent very openminded it went back to university and college as an adult had brought idea like racial justice and social justice and like we talked about gay people people who she was a really advanced forward thinking feminist woman and yet when I came out we struggled and she was she didn't handle it. The way that I would have imagined she was going to handle it knowing that she was so open minded and had this kind of like gay people are fine. There's nothing wrong with being gay and then I came out and she she was really mad. She was really disappointed that I hadn't older and we really struggled and we had a very difficult time and I felt mad at Teagan for not supporting me yeah. I couldn't tell reading the book while she was mad at you for lying to her because she had asked you if you like girls and you're kept denying it and if she was mad at you well if she doesn't matter you for having lied to her and upset because she knew things might be harder for you because you're a lesbian or their shows just upset that you're lesbian and you know. I think it was a lot of things I think it was that I had lied to her. I think that there was an angry reaction like perhaps she realized oh I could have been supporting my kid differently and maybe there was a a guilt or a or regret in in in the way that she responded you know she and I obviously now have repaired that that part of us that was damaged by that my coming out but you know she would probably tell you today that a big part of her anger was that she was was mad that I didn't tell her that I had lied to her that I had that she had done the good parent thing and sit down and say hey. I think you might be having feelings for girls. You can tell me and I was constantly saying no and I think you know what I've I've. I've said this to her now as an adult many times and I know it's really hard to forgive herself for the way that she she that she treated that experience at the time when she would say to me. I just don't understand why you wouldn't tell me what did I do wrong. What could I have done differently and and I think what's important for for me to tell other parents and other people is that I couldn't tell anyone because I couldn't even admitted to myself. I did not use the language I'm gay or I'm anything I was. I was utterly terrified to define myself using in those words and so even when my mom was coming to my room and saying hey you can trust me. I'm on your side. If you're doing this. I want you to tell me that would have required wired me having a conversation with yourself and I just was you know I was taking drugs drinking denying denying tonight I was I was so afraid I was running in the opposite direction direction from the truth and so you know my coming out was painful because I sort of had to I had to come out to a lot of people including myself at that time. Even though I had been having had almost four years of relationships with women and in some ways teagan again because I think I knew teagan was always was about to have her own. I'm coming out again. I was afraid of her. I was in some ways. I was taking on the the emotional labor of coming out for both of us and I resented her because I knew she was. GonNa have it way easier and she did years. UK headed easier. Yes I do agree that. I had an easier my coming out happened almost a year later and I want I'd also didn't really use the words you know just showed up with what was obviously obviously my girlfriend and everyone in my life was like okay so you're also gay and my mom. I three months after dating this woman going to move to Vancouver and move in with her and my mom flew in Couva and bought me a couch and a pot set and I felt Sarah's very very very puttable resentment at the way that that went down you know. Sarah took the initial blast for sure my guests are the musical duo teagan and Sara. They're identical twins. Their new memoir has called highschool their new CD comes out Friday after a break the tell us about going on tour with Neil Young when they were twenty and what was like to be queer we're identical twins in the music world in the late nineteen ninety s and David Being Cooley will review evil a new show from CBS which he says is worth checking out. Here's a song by Teagan and Sara from their twenty thirteen album heartthrob. I'm Terry Gross and this is fresh air.

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"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That's Oskar wild gets out from the album, the diving board. We're listening to Terry's twenty thirteen interview with Elton John. We'll hear more of their interview in the second half of the show, Elton John's biofilm rocket man opens in theaters this week. I'm David being Cooley and this is fresh. Neubauer family foundation supports WHYY's fresh air and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation. Support for NPR comes from this station and from capitol, one.

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"TV critic David being Cooley in for Terry gross the Showtime drama series, billions starring Paul Giamatti and Damian Lewis began its fourth season this week. It's a drama about state and federal politicians and prosecutors and manipulative Wall Street billionaires. I usually don't return to TV series this far into their runs. But there are two reasons in particular to give billions another look and another helping of praise one is that because of events in the real world since the series was launched in the election year of two thousand sixteen billions has become almost astoundingly relevant its main characters and conflicts include prosecutors in the southern district of New York, opportunistic and wealthy power players and even media dominating lawyers and powerful Russian oligarchs. That's one reason the other reason is that the writing the acting and the directing on billions all of which started at a very high level have gotten even better each season and for season four all the chess pieces are being moved around. Former foes are now allies formerly tight relationships are now shaken to the core and new players keep being introduced, adding even more fire and explosiveness to the mix. There's an exciting by product. All this change, Paul giamati from HBO's John Adams plays Chuck roads. A former federal prosecutor who's now running for state attorney general Damian Lewis from Showtime's homeland plays. Bobby Axelrod, the Wall Street tycoon whom road spent years investigating and prosecuting. But now they're on the same side, which means these two powerhouse actors get to share many more scenes and Maggie Sieff who plays Chuck's wife, Wendy, and a psychological counselor to Axelrod and his firm finally gets to take center stage as the new season unfurled her husband's campaign for attorney general is proceeding nicely. But this season arrival politician blackmails Chuck into dropping out of the race or he'll release some potentially damaging personal information. Namely, the Chuck and his wife, privately engage in SADO masochistic sex play with her is the dominant initially Chuck is willing to risk that public school. Closure. But not Wendy. And don't.

blackmails Chuck Damian Lewis Paul Giamatti Bobby Axelrod TV critic attorney Terry gross Wendy New York Showtime John Adams HBO David Cooley Maggie Sieff
"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David being Cooley in for Terry gross back with more of Terry's interview from last may with British singer, songwriter and guitarist Tracey thorn. It's one of our favorite interviews of the year. Her latest album called record is her first solo album of original material in seven years, and I rock critic Ken Tucker chose it as his favourite album of two thousand eighteen from nineteen eighty two to two thousand Tracey thorn was half of the duo everything. But the girl with Ben watt. Her now husband with whom she has three children. She gave up performing to raise their children when we left off with their conversation with Terry. Tracey thorn was talking about the band's she was in before everything, but the girl, including an all girl band called marine girls. So after being a ban with guys, and then forming a band with other girls, you ended up going to college and at college you soon fell in love with Ben watt who became your music partner and your life partner. You've had children together you've been together since what year. Nineteen eighty-one. Okay. And so you you together, you form the band everything, but the girl, and you write that this was the time when you discovered feminism and made it made you question with it the right decision to be in a band with your boyfriend was it even to have a boyfriend was monogamy inevitably awful and oppressive. And should you really try to be a lesbian? Some of the questions you're asking yourself at the time. How did you work through those questions? In the way, you do when you're young which is you just kind of live your life. And you know, the the question sort of volunteer themselves on a day-to-day basis. You know, I think if if I was going to be giving advice to for instance, one of my daughters now who was doing what I did. Moving in with a boy on the first date university forming a band with him, you know, throwing everything in hook line and sinker with this past and I'd say that's really risky don't do that. Or at least if you do keep lots of other options open, you know, don't show any doors. But you know, I was reckless in the way that young people are reckless and I was in love, and I just what could possibly go wrong. So while I was asking myself these theoretical questions. On the other hand, I was just carrying on living my life in the way, you do when you're young, you know, you just crack on with things. So some of the questions you ask yourself about having your boyfriend now husband being the same band with. You was with the relationship take precedence over work. What if you had a fight what if they stopped being a what if you stop being a couple with there still be a band? Did you have to confront any of those questions? Not seriously. But I do think one of the reasons that when we stopped in two thousand one of the reasons we haven't gone back to it is because I think we both have looked at each other. And said, do you know, what we did quite well that we got away with it that many years, and it might be pushing lock to try any longer especially now, we've got kids, you know, our relationship now is even more complicated. We when we were working together we were working together. And we were also this those two relationships now, we've got that shared relationship if being parents and that in itself brings a whole nother level of complexity into a relationship, and now we have to navigate that thing of. Okay. How'd you carry on being a couple once your parents, and that tastes and work and some efforts and again, so far we're managing to make that work. But I don't think either of us want to risk bringing. Back the working relationship. So that, you know, this this kind of three prongs. Purge going on. I just feel like too much. And you know, now we're doing we're working separately. And that seems to me to work very well. Now, one of the things that you did have to confront when you were with Ben and everything, but the girl is that he got this rare autoimmune disease whose name I can't pronounce. Yeah. Strauss syndrome. Thank you. And it apparently causes vascular inflammation, and a lot of a small intestine had to be removed. You weren't sure he would survive. I mean, he was literally deathly ill. What kind of scenarios did you play in your mind when his life was in jeopardy? The, you know, the moments when his life was in jeopardy, again, it's that sense of you're just completely wrapped up in the moment. I don't think during those and it was weeks in hospital when you know, things kept going from bad to worse. And then things got a little bit better. And then things got worse again. So that that feeling of you know, is he going to survive on that that was quite long drawn out. So I I just remember getting very immersed in the day to day of that. I don't remember thinking ahead and thinking, you know, what's this going to mean for the long term for the future? It's it it sort of narrowed my focus just narrowing and sometimes just narrowing to what's going to happen in the next hour. You know, when you're sitting by someone's bed and watching those flickering numbers on the screen beside the bed or watching. You know, some little drop of fluid coming down from a bag into someone's arm. You you just get lost in this. Tiny little present moment. You know, wondering what's going to happen in the next hour? How do you think that that experience changed your relationship? It's.

Tracey thorn Ben watt Terry Ken Tucker partner autoimmune disease David Strauss Cooley seven years
"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. I'm David being Cooley in for Terry gross back with more of Terry's. Twenty ten interview with Brian May, he's a founding member and lead guitarist of the band Queen whose lead singer was the very theatrical, Freddie, Mercury who died in one thousand nine hundred eighty one the band Queen is the subject of a new movie called bohemian rhapsody, starring Rami malicous, Freddie. Mercury. The title of the film also is the name of one of queen's most famous songs, I think we should play here bohemian rhapsody, which is perhaps the most theatrical. Bohemian rhapsody of Queen is very theatrical, isn't it? Yes. Yeah. This is Freddie's great baby. And yes, we'll contributed to the way it developed in the studio, but really was so much constructive in his head before he ever stepped in. How did he demo the song for you before the ban started performing he sat down at the piano in duty integrity? And and he said and here's a bit where everything stops in is an acapella bit, and then we come back in again, he had it all mapped out. And that's the way it was done. The backing track was piano bass and drums, and I was sitting in the studio, and it sounded great I've intriguing and crisp and lively and challenging and then as the days went on in the weeks went on we started over dubbing all the the different vocal parts. And as you probably know, you know, there's many of us on there. We would do each part a number of times until it was right? And then go to another part and multi-track everything in those days you working on twenty four track tape. So you run out of tracks quite quickly. So when you put down say half a dozen tracks you have to balance them you have to combine them into one track. And then move on which is dicey process because you're losing information at that point euros losing generations. And we did it so often on beaming rhapsody that the legend says and it's true the tape war out. We suddenly realized we were losing top on the vocals they were getting a bit. Dull? We held the tape up to the light, and you could see through it. So we there was hardly any oxide left on it. So that point we swiftly had to make a copy and carry on. So it was a very different way of recording to the way. You would do it now because there was no going back. Now, you mentioned that this started as a piano, and then peon obeisance drums, but you do have a guitar solo a very one sided. After. Yes. Yeah. And any kind of bridges two sections of the song. So I thought we'd hear an excerpt of the song and here. Here you're a guitar seller. Bridging those sections, so here's queens Brahimi and rhapsody with my guest Brian May on guitar and also doing some voices..

Freddie founding member Mercury Terry Rami malicous David Cooley
"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David being Cooley. And this is fresh air. The Neubauer family foundation supports WHYY's, fresh air and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation support for NPR comes from this station and from progressive insurance, offering its homequote explorer so shoppers can evaluate options in one place when buying home insurance custom quotes and rates are available online. Learn more at Progresive dot com. And from log me in makers of Goto meeting. A collaboration meeting platform that comes equipped with features to help people stay focused to get work done. Learn more at Goto meeting dot com. On the next Commonwealth club radio program my hand, salon considers the country's immigration challenges and urges a new path. Tonight at eight PM on D. Support for K Q, we comes from Sutter health, and it's not for profit network of doctors and hospitals offering personalized care from doctors who know their patients and same daycare options, including walk in care and urgent care thought. Her health dot org slash open enrollment. And from log me in makers of Goto meeting. A collaboration meeting platform that comes equipped with features to help people stay focused to get work done. Learn more at GoToMeeting dot com. You're listening to weei eighty eight point five.

gotomeeting goto npr
"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Succeed. San Francisco cake, you we I north highlands, Sacramento. From WHYY in Philadelphia is fresh air. I'm David being Cooley inventory gross on today's fresh air. John waters. There's a new retrospective of his art photographs and more water set new lows in bad taste with such films as pink flamingos in which drag Queen divine plays a criminal whose title is the filthiest personal life is threatened when she gets a disgusting package in the mail. Happy birthday. They are no longer the personal lives. People. I thought deliberate attempt to my will listen back to our interviews with John waters. I always liked the villains. Love the stepmother. I love the wicked wedge. So in all my movies and all my thought of graphs, really? There is no such thing as the Orangina was the villain. Also, our view Matt weiner's new series, the Romanoff's. First the news. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. The official death toll from hurricane. Michael is now at least thirteen the law enforcement and rescue personnel. Expect that number to rise as they move into some of the hardest hit communities in the Florida panhandle in the town of Mexico beach where Michael ward is sure this week as a powerful category. Four storm with a hundred and fifty five mile per hour. Winds the devastation is extensive NPR's. Joel rose says it's going to be sometimes we'll things are back to normal. I think the concern here is sort of long-term can people live there. I mean, there's no power. And it seems like not really any great chance of power being restored in the near term. I mean, I think we're looking at weeks if not months, given sort of the scale of damage that I'm hearing about until power is restored. There's also no water throughout the city. There's no cell phone service in general communication is still just like a huge challenge. NPR's Joel rose, Florida. Emergency officials say they rescued nearly two hundred people and inspected. Thousands of structures. Pennsylvania's top prosecutor is calling for changes to state law that would allow victims of clergy sex abuse to pursue decades old cases in court. Bobby Allen of member station WHYY has more on the latest move from the state attorney general who oversaw a sweeping grand jury report on sexual abuse and cover ups in the Roman Catholic church in Pennsylvania victims of sexual abuse have two years to file a civil lawsuit against an abuser. State. Attorney general Josh Shapiro says he doesn't understand how lawmakers can read the damning August report and not want to change that law. A grand jury revealed decades of abuse and cover ups involving three hundred priests more than a thousand child victims attorney general Shapiro told NPR's all things considered that the time bars got in the way of the case if we lived in another jurisdiction where there was no criminal statute of limitations. I would have charged every single one of them who is living the Catholic conference has opposed lifting time limits on sex abuse claims saying it could bankrupt the church for NPR news. I'm bobby. Ellen in Philadelphia. Medicare announced today premiums for its part B plan will go up next year though by a relatively small amount. Medicare officials say retirees will see their premiums rise by a dollar fifty resulting you'd increase of cost or rather about one hundred and thirty five dollars a month. Stocks finished a wobbly week with gains, though, not enough to make up the five percent loss the market sustained during two big down days this week where we're some analysts are pointing to stabilization White House. Economic adviser. Larry cudlow telling reporters today, it's not the first time. The stock market has had ups and downs corrections come and go I've been around.

NPR Michael ward John waters Joel rose WHYY attorney Bobby Allen general Shapiro Philadelphia Florida Roman Catholic church Medicare David Jack Speer Matt weiner San Francisco
Donald Trump, NPR and Washington discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

00:47 sec | 3 years ago

Donald Trump, NPR and Washington discussed on Fresh Air

"Air I'm David Cooley in for. Terry gross today we continue our series of EMMY nominees Alec Baldwin who's been. Nominated for his portrayal of Donald Trump on Saturday. Night Live tells us how he created his Trump. Impression I, always say the same stupid thing, to myself I say left eyebrow up right eyebrow down stick your mouth at as far as you can try to bite. Somebody's nose off and kind. Of growl with that irritability he's also written a memoir he fell in love with movies by watching. Old black and white films. On TV with his parents I watched track fifty times listen to. Them children of the night what the music they make we'll also hear from Brian Tyree Henry who's been nominated for an EMMY for his, role as rapper paper boy on the. FX series Atlanta

Donald Trump NPR Washington Emmy David Cooley United States Christopher Freeland Scott Horsely Terry Gross Paul Taylor Alec Baldwin Brian Tyree Henry John Mccain Canada Whyy Marianna Granddad Debbie Elliott Justin Trudeau Brain Cancer
Manafort accused of amassing "secret income" at second day of trial

Ethan Bearman

02:35 min | 3 years ago

Manafort accused of amassing "secret income" at second day of trial

"Twelve o'clock good luck. To, you I'm, Kim McAllister Brett burkhart firefighters are rolling. Into the reading area from faraway trying to, help, with, a car fire it has. Burned one hundred sixteen thousand acres and is thirty. Five percent contained. San Diego city fire captain Jason Shanley working the. Fire you told Keijo eight. Ten people can't say enough kind words really touching that's another one of the things, that that helps firefighters To continue is because no one left there's. People that are counting on us, to to keep them safe indicators this fire contained as much as we can the, White House says President Trump's criticisms of the special counsel Russia probe is not obstruction press. Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said today. At Trump's broadsides are simply the president fighting back President Trump tweeted today that attorney general Jeff Sessions should stop a rig witch hunt right now Sanders. Said the tweet is not, an order it's the president's opinion federal judge and Paul manafort's financial fraud trial trying to. Place some limits on. The court proceedings. Warning lawyers that they shouldn't be rolling their eyes at him or introducing evidence that's irrelevant US district. Judge T S Ellis the third said some documents and photographs were not relevant to the, charges that Manafort tried to hide millions of. Dollars in income on, his tax returns and the White House says the. US will be imposing sanctions onto Turkish officials over a Detained American pastor being tried on espionage and, terror related charges President Trump warned last week you might impose sanctions against Turkey which is a key NATO ally. For its treatment of Andrew Craig Brunson and Alaska Airlines is facing outrage. From people on social media after a gay. Couple had to give up their seats on a flight from, New York City to Los, Angeles on. Sunday so. That a straight couple could sit together an apology came from the airline yesterday which said there was a seating mistake and it wasn't reflective of disrespect during the. Incident and David Cooley says he and his. Traveling companion his partner told the, flight attendant that they were also a couple that they wanted to sit together but, the agent insisted that his companion had to move to a coat to coach or get. Off the plane a couple took. A flight on another airline the news is sponsored by MGM resorts humans weren't born to be board that is why they created MGM resorts to entertain. The human race visit MGM, resorts dot com room starting at thirty nine dollars a night MGM resorts welcome to the show we'll get your. Traffic coming right up on k. g. o. forty second annual bridge to bridge run is back on Sunday August. Twenty six in San Francisco.

President Trump MGM Sarah Huckabee Sanders Paul Manafort White House David Cooley Kim Mcallister San Diego Brett Burkhart Keijo United States San Francisco Jason Shanley Andrew Craig Brunson Alaska Airlines Jeff Sessions Secretary
"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:37 min | 3 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It will be hot again tomorrow especially in the interior portions of northern california a spare the air alert a red flag warning and a heat advisory will all be in effect on saturday cooling is expected on sunday the forecast high for san francisco tomorrow is eighty four oakland should reach a saturday high of eighty eight in san jose expect a high of ninety six the forecast high for sacramento tomorrow is one hundred four this is fresh air i'm david being cooley editor of the website tv worth watching sitting in for terry gross there's a mix of the terrifying the absurd and the bureaucratic in the book by garrett graff about the government's secret plans for the continuity of government following an attack on the united states by nuclear chemical or biological weapons based in part on recently declassified documents it describes the secret bunkers built to protect government leaders who is designated to succeed the president and other leaders in case they are killed which agency lists the dead and so on gary graphs book is called raven rock the story of the us government secret plan to save itself while the rest of us die graph is a former editor of washingtonian magazine and political magazine he also is a contributing writer to wired magazine terry interviewed him last year when his book was published it's now out in paperback garrett graff welcome to fresh air what did you want to write a book about the government's doomsday plans to keep the government going i've covered national security for the better part of a decade in washington and you bump up against these programs in when you're writing about other related subjects i mean i've talked to people who had been evacuated on nine eleven to some of these facilities i've talked to people who had been involved in these plans during the obama years or the bush years but my interest was really peaked actually when one of my colleagues at washington ian magazine when i was working there came in one day with a government i d that he had found on the floor of one of the metro parking garages the subway parking garages in dc and it was a government i d for someone from the intelligence community and he gave it to me since i write about that subject and he's like i figure you can get this back to the this guy and so i look at the id and i turn it over and it has these driving directions on the back of the id and curious where these lead and so i get on google maps and google satellite and follow this road out through virginia out into west virginia and figure out on the satellite that the road dead ends into the side of a mountain and you can sort of see very clearly these big concrete bunker doors this little guard shack a chain link fence and then this set of concrete bunker doors beyond and it was a facility that i had never heard of that wasn't on any map and i was like wow like this is one of these facilities that i've heard about but this is one of the new ones like this is something that has been built in added since nine eleven as part of the modern incarnation of these plans and it just made me so curious to go back and understand what the history of these plans were sort of what they are in in modern times as well another thing i'd say about that is it means your ideas a constant reminder that nuclear apocalypse might be imminent and you have to go to an assigned place if it happens yeah and that's really in my mind one of the most interesting aspects of these plans is this strange mix of these very concrete you know black and white plans written down in very neatly organized into documents and binders and maps and in the way that they interact with human psychology over the course of them and the way that the people who are supposed to be evacuated to these mountain bunkers or up into these airborne command posts or out to these special ships at sea struggle with the psychological weight of realizing that they are chosen to be the.

california one day
"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air i'm david being cooley editor of the website tv worth watching sitting in for terry gross today we're concluding our tribute to philip roth who died tuesday of congestive heart failure at age eighty five as an author in the nineteen fifties and sixties phillip roth made a major splash early on writing such notable and controversial bestsellers as portnoy's complaint and goodbye columbus novels that spoke frankly about sex lust in jewish heritage and identity and his status like his output kept growing as he got older in nineteen ninetyseven his novel american pastoral won the pulitzer prize and was followed by other important and well received books including every man which was a very personal account about the indignities of aging terry interviewed phillip roth on seven different occasions over the years and two more of those will be featured in today's show one is from two thousand six when every man was published but i will listen back to their conversation from two thousand four when his novel the plot against america had just been published the novel takes off from this premise what if the famous aviator charles lindbergh were the republican party's nominee for president in one thousand nine forty and he defeated fdr and what if president lindberg a nazi sympathizer may deals with germany and japan kept america out of the war and instituted policies in america to relocate jewish families to the heartland to encourage them to assimilate although.

editor terry gross portnoy pulitzer prize republican party president fdr lindberg america david philip roth columbus charles lindbergh germany japan
"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air i'm david being cooley in for terry gross let's get back to terry's nineteen eightyseven interview with author tom wolfe who died monday at age eighty eight can i ask you the the dread questions about your white suits now we're getting serious real business i mean you're you're you're signature as far as your wardrobe goes it's always been the three piece suit tailormade usually white something i've always wondered about wearing a white suit is that you really have to protect yourself because anything is gonna get you birdie and as a journalist it seems to me you really want to dive into a situation and do it needs to be done but if you're wearing all white you have to keep everything at a certain distance two things that come to mind when you s about that one is i have discovered that for me you know maybe it doesn't work for everybody for me it is much more effective to arrive in any situation as a man from mars than to try to fit in i've tried i started out in in journalism and magazine work particularly i used to try to fit in i remember doing the thing on customize on stockcar racing and went down to north wiltshire north carolina do store in stock raising in junior johnson and i tried to fit into the stock car scene i wore a green tweed suit and a blue buttondown shirt and a black net time some brown suede shoes and a brown borsellino hat i think that was really casual really stockcar races and after about five days junior johnson who is writing i came to me he says i don't mean to be rude or anything he says people i've known all my life down here in england that was where he came from say they keep asking me junior who is that little green man following you around and is then it dawned on me that ain't nobody for fifty miles in any direction was wearing a suit of any color or a tie for that matter or a hat and the less said about brown suede shoes.

tom wolfe north wiltshire north carolina johnson england david terry gross five days
"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"david being cooley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Financial protection at earthquake authority dot com the next time on the world reporter catherine hernandez texas to visit her grandfather in brooklyn and during holy week there's always a pot of coconut milk sugar and cinnamon the ingredients for cooking a sweet dessert from the dominican republic a dessert that few people there make anymore catherine gets the recipe from her grandfather and shares it with us on the world you can hear the world thirty minutes from now it starts at two this is fresh air i'm david being cooley in for terry gross our next guest today was part of president obama's inner circle at the white house but she isn't famous in fact in twenty eleven she was included on the new republic's list of washington's most powerful least famous people but now her name is becoming better known because of her bestselling memoir about working in the white house her name is alissa master monaco and her book which is now out in paperback is called who thought this was a good idea it's not an expose it's about what it takes to make things work at the white house and how stressful the process is master monaco was assistant to the president and director of scheduling and advance at the white house from twenty nine to twenty eleven and then served for three more years at the white house as a system to the president and deputy chief of staff for operation ones she's now an executive at amc network's terry spoke with her last year unless semester monaco welcome to fresh air so when president obama came to the white house and you came with him you were working hunt events and you said you know and you had to like create and schedule events that the secret service was especially unwilling to do anything remotely risky because president obama was the first africanamerican president.

catherine hernandez texas brooklyn obama white house washington president executive amc network terry reporter david assistant to the president director of scheduling and adv deputy chief of staff thirty minutes milk