17 Burst results for "David Baran"

"david baran" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on The Science Show

"And if you picture what american science whilst at that stage it wasn't standing by the same level as as europe and really taking off it was going to be a test to see whether american science could cope with that spectacular eclipse and david baran has written the tail of that which published in june called american eclipse and it tells the story not only of the astronomers who brought it up with the women who are involved in of course this is what we're here to talk about could give him a picture davor of what it was like in that time 1870s and so on what was going on in me states most astronomy whis about position determining the positions of the stars for navigation calculating orbits of asteroids moons of other planets there wasn't much exciting breakthrough work being down by professional astronomers amateurs who are another story they could do the wild new things and one of the people who went to observe the eighteenth 78 eclipse all the way out west was mariah mitchell who was the first american woman to become famous as an astronomer she discovered a comet and then she was hired to teach at one of the first women's colleges vassar college and she was there with a group of her students and they made observations of the eclipse and thomas edison was in another group what was happening appalled the time harvard observatory was very much about position finding but a new director came in around that time who was a physicist and that changed everything people were worried that physicist might not do what an astronomer with.

david baran mariah mitchell harvard observatory director physicist europe vassar college thomas edison
"david baran" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"David baran wrote american eclipse to describe the frenzied that accompanied the total solar eclipse in the american west in eighteen 78 he's telling us why once you've experienced one at full totality you'll find a way to make an eclipse more than just once in a lifetime experience our phone number's eight seven seven three three three seven four to five and mike is calling in from fresno in california he mike hi rick how are you great deborah comment about eclipses for david baran a yet that i completely agree about the differences between the total eclipsed be soft partial eclipse here about five years ago i took my daughter uh who is an elementary school and that was very interesting however uh this year um i decide to attend the total eclipse which was about six hundred miles away from us and i was debating back and forth weather uh i should make the trip then a friend of ours who out works with nassau uh told us that he's going to take his daughter he's gonna flight from los angeles to boise and i said well i should think about uh taking my daughter to see this this is probably close to a once in a lifetime experience for her so uh sunday the day before the eclipse uh left very early in the morning and it took about twelve hours to drive the uh six hundred miles from feathers know we went close to my droughts saw oregon and uh we ended up uh camping and someone's front yard didn't everybody town of uh my draws so i i heard.

fresno california david baran nassau los angeles oregon front yard mike rick deborah boise twelve hours five years
"david baran" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Covering up more than enough of this and so it's basically an eclipse as an eclipse no that's an excellent question each eclipse is different so first of all when the when the moon is closer to us and therefore appears larger in the sky it will take longer to pass in front of the sun so some total eclipse as our longer than others the one in august of 2017 the longest duration was just over two minutes forty seconds some can lasts over seven minutes that's about the maximum nato in that case the moon will be very close to us and in your book american eclipse you talk about how there's a curtain of darkness racing at you at fourteen hundred miles per hour yes so if i could have been anywhere for the total eclipse in eighteen 78 it would have been on top of pikes peak in colorado and as i describe in my book the folks up there had just a breathtaking view they were able to look to the northwest up that path of totality they knew that that's where the moon's shadow would be coming in from and they could see he it as this palpable curtain of black from outer space coming down into the earth's atmosphere racing toward them at lightning speed swallowing the mountains as it came in science correspondent david baran written american eclipse to describe the nation's epic race to catch the shadow of the moon in eighteen seventy his book concludes photos from that historic summer the stories of those who took part including luminaries like thomas edison his website is american dash eclipse dot com.

colorado david baran pikes peak thomas edison forty seconds seven minutes two minutes
"david baran" Discussed on Nightline

Nightline

02:22 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Nightline

"Yeah exactly if ever there was april fifteen we would not be selling it's been more than a century since there was total eclipse in wyoming the last one was a very big deal to author david barron chronicles that in his best seller american eclipse the eclipse an eighteen seventy eight was experienced much like the eclipse of 2017 scientists knew that it was coming the path of that eclipse went right through the american frontier the wild west and among the scientists who went out to witness it a young inventor named thomas edison who came back with a big idea i do think if edison had not gone to wyoming to see a total eclipse and 18th seventy eight he probably would not have been the first person to come out with the successful incandescent four decades later a different total eclipse gave astronomer arthur eddington proof of einstein's general theory of relativity by closely observing a constellation of stars he gave the strongest evidence that we have that that gravity was bending lay and that is crucial to the theory of relativity that was very crucial to shelling general theory of relativity in another small town in wyoming they're wondering how they're going to get through all this we're and glendow glenda wyoming yes population two hundred two hundred people plus one hundred thousand eclipse fearless while the town now has a onetoone ratio of four to parties to people no hotel rooms here the visitors all watching soap hacked farmers are attracting buyers in the center of the universe that's right where the sinn minutes for two minutes twenty eight seconds where the center the universe had oh what a two minutes and twenty eight seconds it was david baran says more than anything this is a moment of wonder the closest thing on earth to space travel is a certain amount of sadness that it's over it was so brief and so beautiful he was in jackson wyoming catching the cosmic light show from a mountain top ten thousand feet up it's that feeling of of being in the presence.

thomas edison einstein wyoming david barron arthur eddington david baran twenty eight seconds two minutes ten thousand feet four decades
"david baran" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Discovery

"American eclipse and nations epic race to catch the shadow of the moon and win the glory of the world david baran told me why this american eclipse a hundred and forty years ago have been such a big deal about then this was a period the mid to late nineteenth century when total eclipses were very very important to astronomy when scientists were just starting to unravel the mysteries of the sun and there were certain studies that could be done only during a total eclipse owe a total eclipse anywhere in the world was was a really important event for scientists to study but the one an eighteen 78 was critical for the united states because this was a time when the us didn't have a very good reputation in science we were a young country frankly looked down upon by europeans as not terribly intellectual but here was a scientific event that the whole nation rallied around aware our scientists came out to the the american west to study the eclipse and it just got america excited about science and it was sort of like the moon landing in the 1960s it it helped propel the united states to try to challenge other countries in the realm of science now you there with several key characters in the world of science and invention in fact too were you know taken up with the coals of this eclipse in aging 78 i'm young thomas edison famous inventor that's right yes oh thomas edison here the time was just thirty one years old and 18th seventy eight was a key year in edison's life he had just invented the phonograph which launched him to international fame and just after he returned from his eclipse expedition to the west.

david baran united states thomas edison america thirty one years forty years
"david baran" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm steve mirsky all i expected to have this interesting intellectual experience and instead it was just completely visceral author and journalist david baran talking about the first time he saw a total solar eclipse in 1998 in aruba had just tapped into something very very deep in my in my brain i mean i i really think even though i knew what was going on the gut reaction was one of absolute horror and at the same time uh that it just sort of put my whole existence into a whole new perspective of appreciating just how powerless and puny i am but at the same time just how marvellous and spectacular the universe is and so it's both incredibly humbling and also incredibly empowering emanates this great paradox um and that's i think what makes it so addictive and why why high chase eclipses and why there are other people who are eclipse junkies and why i think frankly after august 21st of this year there will be thousands more people who will find themselves chasing eclipses all over the world it's just an experience unlike anything else that you you just want to have again david baran will be in jackson hole wyoming august 21st to see his sixth total solar eclipse you can hear my entire halfhour discussion with baron available on the scientific american website as a science talk podcast we also talk about his new book american eclipse a nation's epic race to catch the shadow of the moon and win the glory of the world it's about a scientifically and socially important eclipse back in eighteen seventy eight.

aruba david baran baron steve mirsky wyoming sixty seconds
"david baran" Discussed on Live from the Poundstone Institute

Live from the Poundstone Institute

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Live from the Poundstone Institute

"Okay adam let's continue our on ending search for knowledge where does our next deep dive into the pond of wisdom take us well it's time for us to learn about the big solar eclipse as you know a total solar eclipse is crossing the united states just a few days we'd like to learn everything we can really quick so we can avoid having to make a virgin sacrifice or something david baran is an eclipse chaser an author of the new book american eclipse david welcome to the poundstone institute thank you hello pa okay david's a you've traveled the world to see eclipses tell us some of the links you've gone to justicy a good eclipse well so when you for your good equip when i'm talking about art total solar eclipse suit pay only occur about one for every eighteen months somewhere on the planet and it usually someplace very hard to get too so back in 2015 the total solar eclipse that year passed only the faroe islands up in your iceland and savall barred off of norway in the arctic so i went to the faroe island at the end of march uh where it's notoriously stormy to enjoy all of a couple of minutes of darkness wow venetian blinds at home because that would do to turn those babies downed and so and so you'd after it was just like three minutes to bring about a total solar eclipse is that you actually see a guy that you can see it no other time you're looking toward the center of the solar system and the and the sun during those two or three minutes.

united states david baran poundstone institute iceland norway solar system adam arctic three minutes eighteen months
"david baran" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"I will be in jackson wyoming in northwestern wyoming up in the tetons near yellowstone national park and i live in colorado so wyoming is the closest state to get to to to go to the path totality jackson is just a beautiful beautiful place with the mountain backdrop our plan on august 21st is actually to be on the top of a mountain up a ten thousand feet at the ski resort and the reason i want to be up there is not only because at altitude the s the solar corona should be especially beautiful looking at it through a thinner atmosphere but because from an altitude we'll be able to look to the west and actually see the moon's shadow as it races in from idaho as it just basically this black curtain from outer space rushing in at two thousand miles an hour i've seen five total solar eclipses i have never gotten a really good view of this of the moon's shadow racing in and so that's my goal for this eclipse is to to just see that wash over me as the eclipse comes in so if you see a silverhaired radio host in wyoming that's our regular host bob mcdonald please wave and say hi absolutely i will look for him at i'll look for him with the bill beneath the silver hair of the solar corona and aspect david baran thanks for coming on the show oh it was my pleasure thanks very much and i wish everyone clear skies on monday david baran is a science writer and his new book is american clips and nations epic race to catch the shadow of the moon and win the glory of the world.

tetons yellowstone national park colorado idaho david baran writer wyoming bob mcdonald ten thousand feet
"david baran" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Joe lim fifteen don't look of the approval from who where we're going to leave south africa hajek would you are genius who fifteen over overcome man tom we can hold out of paine that's a little sample of the 1937 adventure movie king solomon's minds and a scene in which a conveniently timed eclipse saves the heroes they convinced the astronomically unsophisticated tribesmen who were about to kill them that the darkening son is a result of their magical powers and in a way that's understandable an eclipse is one of those moments where science is as impressive as magic and one of the fascinating things about eclipses is how much sciences learned and still has to learn from them my next guest is an enthusiastic eclipse watcher and science journalist his new book is called american eclipse and nations epic race to catch the shadow of the moon and win the glory of the world it looks back to the eclipse of 18 seventy eight another moment when eclipse science was looking up so to discuss eclipses and a clip science past and present i'm joined now by the book's author david baran hi david hi thanks for having me how many clips his have you seen what i have seen five total solar eclipse as i saw my first in aruba in 1998 in fact as a science journalist but i was just completely bowled over by the experience just as a human being just the kind of the emotional spiritual spectacle of it and i got hooked so i now every couple of years head off to see a total eclipse and i am normally it means going to the other side of the planet and i am so grateful that the moon's shadow is coming to me this time and i can see it here in the united states what makes an eclipse more than just a curiosity.

Joe lim paine solomon aruba united states africa david baran
"david baran" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Report address karam who writes for all high out aminul thanks very much for your time to digitize thank you mark royal okay change of pace now where will you be next monday if you're lucky you'll be among the millions of americans and visitors from outside the country who will be witnessing that total solar eclipse we've been hearing so much about and believe me if you've never seen one you really need to try to get somewhere under the path of totality fortunately you've got lots of places a choose from since this eclipse will cross the entire country from west to east through fourteen states from oregon to south carolina total solar eclipse as can be life changing events believe me i've seen two of them but were lucky because we know what's going on imagine what it must have been like in the past for people who didn't here's the world's religion correspondent matthew bell through much of history experiencing a total solar eclipse was about one thing being very afraid for the ancient greeks and eclipse was confirmation that the gods were angry the ancient chinese apparently believed that an eclipse meant a giant dragon was trying to devour the sun and they would make as much noise as possible to scare the dragon the way his new book american eclipse david baran writes about one in eighteen seventy eight he says some american scientists understood what was coming but many others were just plain terrified when the son disappeared on a july afternoon they were absolutely convinced that this was jesus returning and this was judgement day.

oregon south carolina matthew bell karam david baran
"david baran" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Next month on august 21st specifically for the first time it a little while there will be a solar eclipse as the shadow of the moon crosses in front of the sun it is expected to occur just past noon eastern time just passed nine am pacific and the event is expected to cover a variety of states across the us it's going to produce a seventy mile wide band of darkness that will be seen by tens of millions of people the same event happened back in eighteen seventy eight at the height of the wild west and it was an important event for at least three scientists wanting to learn more david barron chronicles that story and those of those scientists a which includes inventor thomas edison in his book american eclipse a nation's epa grace to catch the shadow of the moon and win the glory of the world david baran joins us right now david welcome thank you dan good to be here thank you i i mentioned thomas edison but you also profile james craig watson who was a planet hunter and astronomer maria mitchell why these three well so be equipped of 18 seventy eight which passed over america's wild west to basically went from montana territory down to texas attracted dozens of the air is great scientists out to that part of the country to study this on in the solar system and in the end i chose those three characters because they all had something really on the line and something to prove.

thomas edison maria mitchell solar system david barron david baran david james craig watson america montana texas
"david baran" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"That was all fat and amber file david baran talking to steve maskey you can listen to the longer version of that interview on science talk scientific americans weekly podcast find not at scientific american dot com or on your favorite podcast app time now for this week's news chat and richard von northern has poked onto the stadium pirate hire them so genetically engineered salmon have finally arrived on canadian dinner plates it's been a really long johnny to get to this point right yup this is aren't core bouncy technologies a company massachusetts amounts noga's goose that veith sold some of that genetically engineered summon at to customers in canada eating uh you really wouldn't be able to tell the difference between a genetically engineered summon on a normal summon up butts they reach market size in about eighteen months normal salmon takes twice as long and they went genetically engineered recent need this technology has actually existed for some time as quesada shing when you think of all the fuss about gene editing and mudinjian announcing this was first dumb 25 years ago 1989 scientists gave the samina growth hormone gene from another him and some regulation elements were third species and this allows the summoned to produce a continuous low level of growth hormone akwa bouncy formed in the early 1990s armed it's then spent almost twentyfive years waiting to be approved for consumption which the us fda did in november 2015 in canadian authorities did six months later but it's canada where the fish is being sold first for food.

david baran johnny quesada shing fda steve maskey canada growth hormone twentyfive years eighteen months six months 25 years
"david baran" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

02:37 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"I think probably some very youths more insect divorce but this does not preclude the extinct mammals to differentiate themselves into the spectacular ari of diversities that was paleontologist ju sheila talking to geoff marsh find the paper in the usual place move this week i learnt a new word umbro file and under fire is a person who travels the wild chasing solar eclipses literally shadow lover on the twenty festive august amber files will gather in particular regions of the us is the first time a total eclipse his crossed the span of america in almost a century many amber father hooked on the majesty of the spectacle itself but for some it scientifically fascinating to one shudder another david baran has written a book on one very special eclipse a didn't take me long to discover that the best equipped stories are not from today but from the 19th century because of the mid to late nineteenth century was a time when total eclipses were not just fascinating natural spectacles were they were really important to science david spoke is about the eclipse of eighteen 78 which was visible across america's wild west darkening skies from montana to texas via wyoming in a guest slot for this week's show scientific americans put cost host steve muskie sat down with david to find out more who in the book you talk about the three big scientific issues that research done during the very brief period of a total solar eclipse could help you figure out one of the most important probably one of the two most important was trying to figure out what the sun is made of and what the corona which today we know is the sun's outer atmosphere what it was made of uh and that's really what made total eclipses most important in that era was the advent of spectra scopes which enabled scientists to actually look at the light coming off of heavenly bodies and look for fingerprints look for what the what particular colors of the spectrum showed up in a speck risco that would tell you what chemical elements were up there but also very important was using the eclipsed to look at what's a right around the sun in the early in the inner solar system.

us america david baran montana texas steve muskie solar system geoff marsh wyoming
"david baran" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:48 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Fresh Air

"As the clips got underway baron vividly describes how the temperature plummeted nocturnal animals emerged from hiding and familiar colors of mountains and trees shifted the total eclipse itself lasted about three minutes the same span of time predicted for the upcoming august twenty to clips but barron makes those three minutes seemed transcendent experiencing a total eclipse he says is like falling through a trap door into a dimly lit unrecognizable reality the sun and the moon are thoroughly foreign and ebony pupils surrounded by a pearly iris it is the i of the cosmos if david baran is obsessed with eclipses hellenes to pinski is obsessed with family history but she is not one of those genealogy bores predictably intent on proving her relation to royalty rather stipend ski wants to get to the bottom of a long ago murder case that propelled her great great grandmother vida from southern italy to jersey city in eighteen 92 still pinski's atmospheric new book murder in mid tara is part memoir fiction and travelogue and it reads like a detective story with stu pinski playing the part of her plans colombo as she tantalisingly tells readers in her introduction by the end of her 10year investigation stepan ski would travel deep into the countryside and dusty archives of southern italy and discover one shotgun blast and five dead bodies most of them belonging to my family transatlantic family calamities of a more comic sort are the subject of frencesco segel's novel of manners called the awkward age segel's heroin julia alden is a middle aged widow with a teenage daughter julia has fallen for a divorced american obstetrician with the teenage son the foursome move in together into julius north london home and the teenagers at first low the cia other but when a truce is called trouble of the erotic sort ensues this is a smart and rolled domestic drama reminiscent of the work of those two magical lorries lori coal one and laurie more.

baron barron david baran murder stu pinski colombo frencesco segel julia alden cia italy stepan heroin london laurie three minutes 10year
"david baran" Discussed on Beats and Eats

Beats and Eats

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Beats and Eats

"Some am that i was down washington covering the celtics recover from its sports reporters walls all right we're the these things that he saying our translating over to i i guess i don't want to sound condescending but uneducated people and we're also the media were going up in the elevator titled think i told you the story and the the they're elevators are shared with the fans literally we went up nine floors and got heckled as liberal media finally one of the reporters said do we cover politics we cover sports like they were hackel leading the meet the sports media the euro you're you're you're all the same boat you're the if you if you have a press pass in a you know and admire right near the you're the liberal media yep yep scary but what are you debt whether you cover sports or or or muddy your politics or whatever all of a sudden you're you're being lumped into the liberal mainstream media and it's it's it's quite unfair the the debt is oh the death though of print journalism has been premature the post in the times are for killing it right now yup they're doing amazing they're doing a male and work guys like guys like david baran hold with at hosted maggie haberman i mean they're doing they're do jewish euros work and it's great and you know they're doing a job and and people like data and and and and tapper and and people that i've been privileged to know and and uh you know meet over the years you know they're just searches doing their job it's checks and balances they're holding you know they're holding uh they're holding the powerful to account.

washington celtics mainstream media david baran tapper maggie haberman
"david baran" Discussed on Decode DC

Decode DC

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on Decode DC

"David baran is not just an outside observer of the tension between the president and the congress when it comes to war who was actually a part of the obama administration and for that matter he was a part of the obama wars he told us the story on the very first day like came to the office uh to take over my responsibilities there was on my desk a manila envelope with an opinion in that had been written by the last person from the outgoing administration to serve as the head of the office in the outgoing person had made it clear he really wanted me to see this opinion what it was wasn't eleven page singlespaced memorandum signed the very last day that that i have been in office reviewing all of these legal opinions from earlier people in the bush administration who had served in the office that had asserted the president alone had the power to conduct war and it systematically went through and explained why those were no longer the opinions of the office which i thought was really quite a striking reflection of the grip that this historical concern about a president viewing things that way had even on persons charged with advising present who earlier and enter his term had been operating honored by suggesting he had exactly that kind of sweeping power what power does the president of the united states today have when it comes to fighting the war on terror versus the power of the congress in light of everything that you have just told our listeners.

David baran president congress obama administration bush administration united states obama
"david baran" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"david baran" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Um the new york times is failing insane and it's fake news i dunno washington posters i don't know yeah yeah i mean they're rolling in but uh david baran hold won the pulitzer right right well you know trump is going after bases as as an extent shots to really you know you gotta go you got to shoot for the for the for the top of the the masthead if you really want is here has amassed actually that's a good point i don't know i don't think he is there is a good story about their businesses influence on the post a couple of months ago where he handle those cockamamie ideas of like having people pay to put vowles and story up let's go there yeah yeah also would it be good asked about that anyway yet but otherwise it was an exciting topic across all these these various people in the end seems like news jessica said at the outset news has become the news but the business actually interesting now is actually interesting to begin to be if you're on the media beat as a reporter little lane beat them but now it's got an interesting ours ex right right use you instantly become that much more compelling at a dinner party so i guess we have trump to think thanks for helping me speak fluently at her party's trump cory thanks for stopping by see you i i guess will reconvene next year at this whilst you before the end of was kind of voted that we could have some of a long time okay here all right thanks lori.

new york times trump vowles jessica david baran reporter lori