29 Burst results for "David Attenborough"

Travel to Singapore

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:51 min | Last month

Travel to Singapore

"I'd like to welcome to the show Ashley Hall who is coming to us from Singapore and coming to talk to us about Singapore actually welcome to the show, Chris How's it going? You're not originally from Singapore. Accent you might have that might have picked that up. I remember Ginnie British. I've lived in a couple of different countries in Europe but I've moved single six months ago. Got In Britain in Singapore are just so alike that they islands just once unskilled. Excellent and why should someone go to Singapore? So I was just reading this morning actually apparently now it's the fifth most visited city in the world. So lots of people are interested in right now. Really. Yeah. So what's really put it at the top of people's minds especially I guess in the US is film out Crazy Rich Asian Plus filled with an Asian costs and it sentencing a ball it's really about spying author who who live here is a great book to read as well logging maybe watching the film, but it's GonNa. Love people interested about the architecture. It's a Super Morton city I fell in love with a couple of times after I visited people think of Marina Bay Sands, which is the the futuristic hotel within a became. The tau is like a Super Modin accessible way to enjoy Asia. Excellent. And what would you recommend? We do when we come to Singapore. Burst important thing to think about when he come to. Singapore, is the climate. So if I can share with you the first time I came I was visiting because my sister married a Singaporean and I wanted to come and check out the place in. The family but I think I have my expectations about how hot and sticky was GONNA be. Status because I couldn't stand it first time offense even Singapore I'm like I'm so please beginning I WANNA go back somewhat cool because it just wasn't ready for it but. Time after time I sent back Bethel work and the the place grew on me so my recommendation would be. Be A wet. It's GONNA be hot and sticky at pack accordingly, pack light clothes and try and real your day. So the schedule so I'm GONNA give you. With that in mind that we're GONNA try and keep you indoors during the midday sun and then enjoying these nice evening shorts and tee shirt whether evening. I've is arriving during the week because the the attractions will be quieter. So if you're coming in from the US most US flights coming in the morning, some European direct flights arrive in the morning as well. Some Poli time ones come in the afternoon. So settling, arrive, get your bearings adjusting the trying walk around a little bit to walk off the Jet Lag I. Think a a great way once you've done that it's the head of. The flower the gardens by the bay. Just the other side of the Marina SANS EXACTLY BEHIND MARINA BAY SANDS TO ICONIC DOMES that you'll recognize from Lupul skyline. and. The great because they're conditioned. Fussy. Let's just be honest the inside and it's a really interesting place to domes one. Is called the flouting and it's quite dry. When you go inside, it's woman it's dry and it's X. exhibiting flowers from all over the world. So it's specialized stuff that's from Southeast Asia they also have a nice a subtropical garden as well. So it's just nice to walk around there and adjust, but the real killer, the the thing that I absolutely love about Singapore it's my favorite is the cloud forest dime. super interesting. They've simulated under get picky about this I'm a joker for by training. They seem the cloud for th. So sort of what you've seen as like Costa Rica, they increase the temperature, increase the humidity, but kept relatively cool. So you get this two layers to it and you've got one layer, which is I think stimulating like a thousand foot and then the next up another five hundred feet. So you see in this one attraction to different attitudes of short. and. It's amazing. They've got waterfalls. It's misty. You get amazing views of the city because it's. Greenhouse. You can see the downtown from that and yes just a really interesting exhibit. One reason you can see the downtown from there is that it's multi level. So it's not it's not a flat dome you're climbing up into this I. thought it was great to I. Completely Agree With Your assessment that I've only been in the cloud dome I haven't been in the Flower Dome Safe. You'll shorten time just do the. For they do a combined ticket so you can get a ticket to both, and then if you get that, you also have access to something cool to tree books, which is why I'd recommend doing straight ASTA. So anybody who's familiar with David ATTENBOROUGH BBC a series will know that I mean it's it's a pretty gloomy story about the environment but I found it really interesting how he ended one of the series by saying he held up Singapore's the example, the shots of of these magic trees and that's without artificial. Singapore's created this this area on reclaimed land within the last ten years, which is why is expected to come on the show and talk about it is the last episode was about ten years ago said anyone hasn't been recently does lose more stuff to do and they've created this brand new downtown area and they've given it over completely to this garden because the advantage of being in the tropics is. Amazing chlorophyll and really great environment to grow that stuff. The Tree Wilkes they've laced together artificial materials and then allowed plants to grow up them. So they all human creative forest, which is super interesting David Asmara's just saying, Hey, this is the future of what cities should be not keeping each our cities but bringing them in being sensitive environment. On the treetop walks can elevate which takes you up quite high and you between these trees but then parade. Ten stories off I. Guess See have again a really nice view of the city a number recommending the doing this in the late afternoon time four PM onwards when it's cooler. So yeah, that's a super interesting attraction

Singapore Marina Bay Sands United States Europe Southeast Asia Flower Dome Safe Asia Ashley Hall David Attenborough Britain David Asmara BBC Chris Tree Wilkes Costa Rica Lupul
David Attenborough gave Prince George a fossilized shark tooth

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

David Attenborough gave Prince George a fossilized shark tooth

"Renowned environmentalist and broadcaster David Atten borough has given Britain's Prince George a giant shark tooth fossil. After a private viewing of his new documentary at Kensington Palace, the seven year old prince, he said, You've been quite intrigued after receiving the fossil from the 94 year old Attleboro, who says he found it during a family holiday to Malta in the 19 sixties.

Prince George David Atten Kensington Palace Attleboro Britain Malta
"david attenborough" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

07:24 min | 7 months ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on Amanpour

"That are moon doesn't make a difference resiliency? I do think we're zillion see is kind of the common theme here. One of the things add surprises me as well is at resiliency was part of every other crisis. Reface it's what happened in England during World War Two and yet in America. We've polarized so much. Even this corona virus even whether or not be heard immunity or even whether or not we should keep a lockdown on for two more weeks becomes a partisan issue. Why is that well? I have an so troubled and dispirited Even though I'm trying to control my mood of divisions that are being created on purpose for political reasons I am Have I am a political scientist and I kind of love to study How governments operate and Decision. Making and the American system is endlessly fascinating. The constitutionists fascinating people. Forget that the first article of the Constitution is about the power Congress and the only the second one is about executive power. But I think that what is happening is because We I think waited too long to deal with the the virus Then you get into blame. Placing and the that creates automatic divisions between the federal government and the states and the governor's or blaming the mayor's or it's a blame game instead of a solution finding operation and it has been totally politicized I'd juicing by the President of the United States which I find very very sad and I have been asked whether I think he's You know doesn't believe in America. I think he's un-american because he doesn't understand our value system are and only propagates the divisions rather than trying to figure out how we find solutions together. You've written a new book which is just coming out about your life since being secretary of state and one of the many things you write about is organizing a group of What you could call madeline and our axes meaning former foreign ministers who you dealt with to keep meeting each year and thank you madam. Couple of years ago and then you took in Kansas City. This past year you went from the home of Louis the fourteen who said Lake Dot. Same Watt meaning. I am the state I you know. I'm in charge. I won everything To the home of Harry Truman who had a sense of humility that comes from being the president is at one of the lessons. You feel. We should apply today. I think definitely because here was a person that had risen to this incredible job through a variety ways of having served in the military and had a shop and then He was very political But I think the best thing about him was he took responsibility and one of the things that we saw there was the original sign that said the buck stops here which he had on his desk because he knew the thing. President United States ultimately meant that you that you had responsibility and that You worked with others. So they're all kinds of lessons from Harry Truman. I have to say he was my first American president. We came to the United States November eleventh nineteen forty eight and he had just been elected in his own right And so I followed his life and the way he talks And what he did but his clarity and responsibility is something that I think stands out especially you write that when you read about an international crisis you reflexively insert your name and place of the current secretary of state and think about what you might be doing in this situation so let me ask you. What would you be doing now if you were secretary of State? Well it doesn't make me seem very self centered but I am interested in the Secretary. States role is and how it works. I think that I would actually be doing much. Lower to reach out to those that we have to work with The partners and Really try to work and do kind of a a whole of government from the perspective of the United States because the secretary of State with the National Security Advisor can set the agenda and bring in other parts of their governments as well as mean foreigners that one has to deal with which would be trying to figure out how the intelligence community works together But I think that we're not taking advantage enough of the foreign policy capabilities of the State Department because in fact State Department has been kind of of Weakened in a number of ways by the number of people that have left or have been nastily and by the funding of it. So I don't know what the current secretary is doing in terms of trying to help the funding trying to in fact work with others abroad I think he's done some travel but is unclear what he's doing your famous for writing a book about those pens that you wear fact. It even became a traveling exhibition where your fans went on displays in museums around the country. What's you're wearing today? My father was with the Czechoslovak government in exile and his job was to broadcast over BBC into Czechoslovakia And he was gone. Bbc All the time. And I was a little girl and I listened to BBC and I know the following thing which is every broadcast open with the notes. The opening notes. Beethoven stiff done it. I knew him and in Morse Code. That is big Sherie and so I thought a V for victory Against the virus would be something that is appropriate or today and also reference back to my book. Secretary Madeleine Albright. Thank you so much for joining us. This evening stay well in Youtube Walter. Good to have this with you. Thank you one of her. Books was all about those broaches with a message and finally corona viruses causing some major cities to reimagined rethink the way they run. Milan is said to introduce a new scheme to cut the number of cars on the street. After lockdown thirty five kilometers of road will be transformed into psychopaths and walking space. That northern Italian city has been hit hard by the outbreak. And it's one of Europe's most polluted but under lockdown air pollution as we've been saying plummeted leaving blue skies and so let's hope it's a plan. Other cities can follow as we strive for Lena and Greener Future. That is it for now. Thanks for watching and goodbye from London..

United States Harry Truman president Secretary Madeleine Albright President America BBC Secretary secretary State Department federal government Congress England Milan Europe scientist London Kansas City
"david attenborough" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

10:14 min | 7 months ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on Amanpour

"Up next. We will talk to governor Jay Inslee Washington state about how he's managing these twin emergencies corona virus and the climate but first here's correspondent Polo Newton with a closer look at that animal kingdom and that natural world that David has just talked about. They are loving lockdown hordes engines. Train whistles people out and about the background sounds of every day. Life gone quiet with corona virus shelter in place orders around the globe turning the tables on human norms. Animals are filling up the empty spaces from wild deer. Traipsing through the streets of Japan to lions lounging across the street's usually traversed by cars in Kruger National Park to herds of goats in Wales helping themselves to neighborhood bushes and flower beds. The animal kingdom is for now reclaiming spaces normally occupied by people in England. And No. It's not your imagination. Birds do sound lower phenomenon that some experts say comes in part from birds. Being less stressed by humans sounds causing them to congregate in larger numbers and more easily communicate with each other. What you're come in. The birds are more relaxed. They are not trying to get away from cars from the House of people even the heart of the city itself and in Thailand researchers. Say there's been a baby. Boom as sea turtle nests are at a twenty year high. Thanks to the absence of people walking in the sand where these endangered species lay their eggs. Some animals are noticing the void left by their human counterparts. Monkeys like these used to tourists feeding them on a daily basis swarm over little bit of food left behind the great apes and drafts and other wildlife used to putting on a daily show in the zoological homes. Some workers say they're now playing. The part of tourists mediate signs of sadness. They notice from the animals who still move like clockwork. Each day to the very spot they used to interact with spectators who are no longer coming to the parks but as spring blooms in much of the northern hemisphere the quieter gentler atmosphere may be beneficial if only for a short time. There's are waking from hibernation a bit more free to explore newborn ducklings baby elephants in the like emerging into the world at a time when the earth is vibrating. Just a little bit lasts and turning just a little more slowly. It's really a beautiful reminder of what could be and we turn now to the United States which together with China of world's biggest polluters. Let's not forget that Earth Day began in the United States. Fifty years ago offer a major oil spill off California back then. It was not ribbon. Bipartisan politics like it is today. Indeed Republican President Richard Nixon created the EPA the Environmental Protection Agency fifty years later Democrat. Jay inslee ran for president with climate at the heart of his campaign and as the current governor of Washington state he saw the first cases of corona virus appear in America. And the governor is joining me right now from Olympia in Washington Governor Inslee. Welcome to the program. I just WanNa ask you on on this climate. I want to start with the climate because you were really out there running for president on a climate platform just your observations on this fiftieth anniversary. How far we've come. How far we have to go. Well listen I know. These are hard times. But there's a big things to celebrate. Today we can celebrate that not even cove nineteen can still the voice of David attenborough. He is an international treasure. And so I thought I was. Maybe hallucinating that the birds are so much louder. Now that's not been confirmed by David attenborough. It's actually good news. We have good news that we continue to have tremendous achievements in building a clean energy economy. And I think this earth as a day to celebrate the potential of restarting our international economy by building a clean energy economy that can put millions of people to work 'cause massive reinvestment which our economy is going to need so desperately as we come out of this pandemic at the same time. We're building a new economy. That cannot destroy the planet. And I believe we're going to be able to do that. I believe the United States is going to regain its leadership position in the international community. We've got a great candidate. Joe Biden to do that so I think there's a lot to celebrate and I want to get a shout out to the guy who started this Washingtonian. His name is Dennis. Hays a good friend of mine with Senator Gaylord Nelson and he's still around in a vigorous advocate for these measures and we're making progress in our state. What we have a plan to decarbonised our economy. And I'm very proud of the work. We're doing let me just ask you. Do you remember where you were April? Twenty second nineteen seventy when the first birthday happened I was on my favorite planet somewhere on earth and that's as much our feet member to be honest with you but I was. I was fairly early to this endeavour I got started in this effort in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy two when I studied Environmental issues and I went to Stockholm Sweden. I studied we did a research project comparing the energy policies of Stockholm to Seattle Washington and we went to the very first United Nations Conference on the environment in Stockholm in nineteen. Seventy two. And so I've been at this for a long time and the lessons I learned way. Way Back. Forty nine years ago We're still the ones we're working on today. Which is you can embrace new technologies and you can reduce the impact on the environment will still maintain a really high quality of life. Those lessons have been good for forty nine years in every year. We improve our ability to do that. We just need the will to do that. And I can tell you from the United States. I think that is growing dramatically on this. Fiftieth Anniversary is certainly is in my state where we have past the best energy efficiency laws in the United States and the most aggressive decarbonisation laws for energy electrical grid and similarly good policies on transportation. So what's happening to my state? I'm very happy about got more work to do. So I look at today with all our challenges. It is a day for celebration. So let me just quickly ask you because it is also political. Now I in the introduction. I mentioned that is a hyper. Partisan issue and that the first EPA creator was a Republican president and during the last decades the world you all did manage to cure the ozone layer cure the holy ozone layer by very simple sustained appeal to get rid of. Cfc's if you could do it then. What is the problem now? Well it is a great conundrum and bit of a mystery of you. Know the first head of the Environmental Protection Agency was a Washington Bill Spouse who worked for Richard Nixon and in that regard so We have had good Republican leadership in in decades. Gone by and unfortunately it is. It is disappeared. It's a great void and we're looking for the day again when this becomes a bipartisan effort but while we are waiting and we cannot wait for the evolutionary process to evolve the Republican Party to produce some leaders. We have to act and frankly that means by electing people who will lack in the presidential race here in the United States this next year. I think we will have the greatest contrast of someone who has ignored science who has been deceiving trendy deceive Americans about the science of Climate Change. It has been an abysmal failure. trying to protect the health of Americans but we have another candidate who is introduced the first bill on climate change in the United States Senate. It was either one thousand nine hundred eighty six or nineteen eighty-eight and most importantly was very successful in helping rebuild their economy after the last collapse in the recovery act in Joe Biden led the effort that built ninety billion dollars worth of infrastructure in created three point three million jobs in in America. And I think we're going to have a really great race and I believe the person who is an optimist is going to win that and that is when American leadership will be restored okay. So you've endorsed Joe Biden clearly and all the reasons that you've just laid out and more probably but what I ask you is this because clearly the United States like the rest of the world is in a deep economic hole right now because of Corona virus the halting of the global economy and as always the poorest and the most vulnerable are going to be the biggest losers at the moment while all these disaster relief bills wanted better word go through Congress we also see the White House and the president tried to bail out fossil fuel fossil fuel companies.

United States president David attenborough Joe Biden Jay inslee Environmental Protection Agenc Washington Richard Nixon America Republican Party Stockholm Wales England Japan Polo Newton Governor Inslee Kruger National Park Cfc
"david attenborough" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

07:56 min | 7 months ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on Amanpour

"That time. Must have been about two billion on the planet. Now it's seven plus billion on the planet and a lot of this disease. Many assaying reputable doctors are saying is partly because of overpopulation and farming of these animals. What do you say to that? Overpopulation as dense population densities epidemics. Not New though. That was the black desk a few centuries ago. That was the great play in the Seventeenth Century. In which people are dying in huge numbers in conurbations in the in the big Conurbations but there were dense. Certainly London Pacific in waitress that of over the density of population was huge and people are dying in great numbers. So it's not new and anybody who knows anything about keeping animals TRAUMAS Well I'm anybody else. Looks off to a awfully peaches if you if you keep them in great defenses of the transmission of disease once it stops goes like bows and Benny difficult control. Well we all living in huge densities at home is happy has increased numbers of your sin three times as many as when. I was making my first program is extraordinary. So it's not surprising that in fact we're getting our come up from that point of view but it's not not nature. Don't make having revenge or anything like that. It is a basic facts life that you have huge densities population. You'll get diseases spread goody swift in one of the your latest film. A life on our planet was meant to have premiered last week ahead of Earth Day because of this crisis that has been delayed. What were you saying in that in that documentary? What were you saying about your experience? And and how you've watched these developments and legacy you want to leave the living world is your money. The filmmakers who suggested it a pointed out to me that actually I've had film record I've been making films in in the wild citizen. Nineteen Fifties Unin hundred fifties and before that I have bent memories of running in the in the English countryside and looking birds collecting fossils and being aware of the natural world and so I have seen that change but I guess I wouldn't notice that change. We're not very good at recognizing slow changes unless to have in fact been recorded until it's when I now look those films lakes covered in wildfowl Another I suddenly realized. Yeah that's gone that's changed and it's that record which has made it so busy to me as to watch us being going on in my lifetime and now while you're in lockdown you are also taking part in a in a BBC experiment whereby a lot of you at teaching young kids and you've decided to teach geography for awhile. What are you tending the kids? Why have you decided to jump into this fray? What's it like being an online teacher making special lessons in that sense? But an spend after noon. I've been recording An introduction in Psalm to some of the films which I've made in the past on which will be bought out and be showing again because they have a very precise educational quite a message in them and so I'm introduced. I look at the ocean. The Ocean to searches wild and they have creatures in them the data from this that and the other. And let me show you some of the things that goes on on the way toward into connected and then we will show sequences from who joined eat other series retired from the post and may all those being edited by people who are specialists in learning by television. In order to convey the messages that will be helpful Mike comment you're changed earning my introduction so I just want to end by saying you do have some solutions and you've talked about these make lodge no fishing zones to give stocks a chance to recover reduce land farming by half humanity must eat less meat. You believe and phase out fossil fuels. Of course that's a huge huge endeavor that the world is trying to get to but I also just wander ninety-three say you can't go out even to the park which is right outside your door. What is it like experiencing this at this point? I'm I'm unbalancing lucky. I've a reasonably large go. I'm an I walk and I woke found it more in the pasta three weeks. I suppose over a month that I have fears because I now cut asli different plants which on particular fund the way in which they eram began as I did updates quite yet so if I go out hoping that I'm going to see that particular change and of course The weather's been so lovely. The buds have been so beautiful It's it's such a consolation. It's interesting isn't it? The doctors of medical profession know of any well now that an appreciation of the natural world and contact with wild actually brings huge huge benefits in our pieces of mine. Peace Mind You. Pitch in terms of us are about happiness A relationship much. Well boy you have brought that to such massive global audience and we're all happy at you'll films. Thank you so much to David attenborough for joining us on Earth Day at fifty. Us BANK. Thanks you for going to work an for staying home for treating patients and having patients for being on the front lines while having our backs. Thanks for working together and playing. Podcasts you love. Us Bank can't thank you enough but we can do our part. That's why we have donated millions to help our customers employees and communities in need equal housing lender member. Fdic prepare yourselves. But time for brand. New Wreck and morty adventures is almost here wait what this is. What you've been waiting for. Neil Rick and Morty on adult swim governments around the world have been. Ill prepared to respond to the corona virus outbreak. But there's an organization that has been sounding the alarm for years about how vulnerable we all are to a pandemic the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation this week on boss files talk exclusively with Melinda Gates. About how her foundation is putting their extensive resources billions of dollars behind the development of a vaccine and what can be done for developing world including Africa which she says could be devastated by covert nineteen. Listen to the latest episode of Boss Files. Wherever you gave podcast.

conurbations Melinda Gates Melinda Gates Foundation Africa London Pacific Us Bank David attenborough BBC Us Benny Fdic Morty Neil Rick BANK Mike
"david attenborough" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

10:25 min | 8 months ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"That balloon enjoyed mocking. The satirist enjoyed getting in there and saying actually he'll crude things. They said that he sounded more like a Juliet in Romeo girly. So there is already this sort of trolling culture. That is that because they've been they've been sold stuff is that because they bought some or is that just because of that missing thing from your five points the question of talent so he was talented. I mean what's interesting about Leeann? Leeann himself had also been a child star. He'd been this. Brilliant young poet become famous as a teenager and written this book of poetry coach. You've Nadia which was about him as a young person finding their way and so I think he was a little bit aware of what it was like to go through that himself and so I think his own interpretation was perhaps based on the fact that he'd been in the bubble and say it more clearly maybe maybe he'd experienced if but there is also the question of talent. What's really interesting is in nineteen sixty one. Daniel J. Boston was a very famous American. Social critic who wrote this book called the image which is all about sort of the way in which spin had taken over American popular culture. The idea that you know nothing mattered anymore. Everything was fake. Politics is fake entertainments. Appetizing was fake and he was complaining saying people that just famous for being famous. Which is this very famous phrase. Paris Hilton Kim Kardashian. Famous for being famous thing is that people been saying that and the seventeen eighty s and we do have people like Casanova who many of us will know that name because he's famous now to us as a seducer as you know this guy who slept his way around Europe but he was desperate to be famous. He really wanted to be a celebrity and his diaries and his his memoir is his recording his attempts to get famous and he tries all sorts of doesn't just sort of say right. I'M GONNA be famous by doing this. One thing he really is the sort of the guy who's like right. I'll try this. Try This. He gets involved in a sort of famous jewel. He tries to make himself a theologian. Or compensation list he has go being a fashion icon. He reports on other people being famous and he himself tries to hunt fame down and essentially steal it himself. And then you have people that Kitty Fisher whose cortisone. She's a high class escort. Essentially you pay an awful lot of money to to be professional boyfriend. I suppose and she doesn't have any talent really um that. She's beautiful and provocative and good at attracting column inches. She famously fought for horse while wearing knickers and people are sort of scandalized. But it's a sort of promotional stunt and she works with the greatest artists of the time Joshua Reynolds and he paints her several ways and and she takes control of her image and owns sexuality and does jokes about D- Reynolds Paint Sir as Cleopatra Dissolving Pearl in a cup of wine which is this famous story from ancient the ancient world of Cleopatra and Mark Antony having a bit about who could spend more money on a banquet and Cleopatra takes this very very big pearl and dissolves in her glass of wine and gloves down as joker going. Look I can drink it. I don't even have to spend. And Kitty Fisher is painted as that she says. I'm a Queen Cleopatra. Look at all the money I can eight. And the reason she just not is because the famous story told is that one of her lover's leaves her one hundred pounds for night and she doesn't think it's enough so she eats in a sandwich as a mark of outrage and then she passed this painting done to say look at me. I'm like Queen Creek road that I eat money. 'cause I don't even need it. I'm that wealthy. I'm that so it's A. It's a quick going on instagram. Lying on a bed of money or setting fire to it. It's it's that kind of thing of showing off how wealthy you are if that's her only talent. Talk Kim Kardashian. If that's their only talent why should we care? Why should we care about celebrities? Such a such a crucial question and the reason I wrote. The book is because celebrities so pervasive so influential in society. So dominant in shaping who we are now we want to be. When I began the book I was a little bit snarky. I was going to be a little bit more cheeky. And then I realized the truth is the. I began researching the book in Twenty Fifteen. I really started the book in January Twenty Sixteen and those are sort of curious irony or coincidence that the morning I began the book literally the morning. David Bowie died. And I'm not a huge Bowie AFICIONADO. But I was sort of aware that something sizeable just happened. And I switched on the radio and Lorna Verne who I really listen to show. She dedicated her show to him and fans phoned in and became a eulogy became a Three Hour Eulogy. Where people phoned in talking about what David Bowie had meant to them. And it wasn't just like people go song that's really good. It was people saying David. Bowie's music helped me identify who I was as a person my gender my sexuality my views on life my attitude towards my father or my brother he had become this vessel through which a lot of people had experienced their own thoughts feelings. The first time I'm what I realized somewhat naively actually I'd into writings book thinking I'll be a bit of fun just understand celebrities. And that morning I realized okay. Celebrity has a profundity to it and it can be negative and it can be transgressive can be vacuous. Of course it can be. We will know the superficiality of some of the people who may be going on reality shows just to get famous but the truth is that celebrity allows us in a lot of ways to express who we are as a society who we are as individuals who we won't be and we talk about a lot of ethical moral quandaries through the prison of individual celebrity stories. We talk about know. Drink driving through Anton- DAK- common which one it was. Maybe it was and I think it was ant mcpartlin We talk about drug culture through you know sort of rock and roll musician. Sending in the ninety s you know that kind of heroin chic in the ninety S. We talked about the ethics of that. We talk about body image. We talk about mental health issues. We talk about sexuality and gender so in through these lies to these person seen through these lives and what's Eddie does is that it pushes boundaries. It's transgressive it's it's by definition to be interesting you sort of have to push against the rules a little. Bit and celebrity culture is constant novelty. It's sort of endless. Firework display of new things just constantly going and we kind of go oo at all the new celebrities but what celebrity culture does as it pushes at the edges of what is acceptable in order to be interesting in order to be novel and exciting and sell stuff you know to sell stuff entered. Grab our attention. And every now and then celebrities will move the boundary because they'll overstep the mark and we'll either punish them and cancelled them in the modern Internet parlance. You're cancelled. You've done something that we find heinous an objectionable or they'll at the mark and we'll go ooh the MUTT was in place. Actually we're okay with this. We're fine with this. Let's move the mark so you say that celebrities are at the something that binds together in some say. Yeah it does and it can divide us to Henry. Sasha Rural seventy-nine divided the nation. You either with him or against him. He was a conservative theologian who divided the nation. His fans loved him and turn him into a political martyr. He helped determine the result the election in seventeen ten landslide win for the Tories. So the idea of Hugh grant telling people to vote Labour. Everyone was like modern celebrity. It's no no. It's the very very beginnings the very beginning tippety. Politics has already been sucked into it with this increase of technology. Social media have we reached a new phase where? There's such a thing as a celebrity politician or that's a great question. I mean that's a really good question because celebrity politician. I'll give you might say several was in that part. I mean certainly in the French Revolution just before we had Mirabeau. Who is the celebrity politician? He's he's sort of held up as the hero of the people. Who Sort of getting in there to try to create with the Marie Antoinette. And Louis the sixteenth. You get people like converts you get reformers. We now live in an age where I guess renown as I talked about earlier which you know is that famous without the the investment in the personal life. I think that is being tested in new interesting ways and been up close next Boris Johnson when he was It was it was a history book festival and he was about to go and talk about Churchill and I saw him look smart quite dapple. He's talking to his advisers. He was mayor of London time. Whatever and then some said you're on in two minutes and just watched him in the corner. Ruffle his hair loosen his tie sort of disheveled himself and he became. Boris Johnson and it was really interesting to see that up close to the character. He put the character on. Yeah and I'm sure he's Boris Johnson. All the time in most ways. He's still gonNA be the same person but he performed to that audience in a kind of cartoonish way. He he put on his uniform. Which is this sort of the buffoonish posh boy? You talked about hyperventilating when we meet celebrities embarrassing ourselves in the carry the canned food aisles talking from personal experience. I have not hyperventilate in the canned foods. I'll I've I've certainly bumped into liberties in unusual situations and been really thrown by it because Celebrities so context specific which we expect to see celebrities glamorous places and so when you bump into them in TESCO or in the I've I've walked past lot of famous people in Film Studios. I've been making TV. Show whatever and you just sorta go. Oh Oh your yeah your famous but you look kind of ordinary like once embarrassments. I said Hey. Jude to Jude. Law and scowled means like. I'm so sorry I didn't mean to do. It's not. It's not a baseball fan. I was just saying hello but he just came out. It came out like I was trying to be clever. Listen to this fascinating fascinating stuff. Thank you very much. Indeed that was Greg Jenner. Dead famous is published by violent Felton. Nicholson in the UK and in the US after the break. We'll be hearing what some of you have been reading during the outbreak and talking to Adam Douglas about how some of the great philosophical and literary works of all times have been created in the most difficult of circumstances..

David Bowie Kim Kardashian Boris Johnson Leeann Kitty Fisher Joshua Reynolds Europe Juliet Nadia Daniel J. Boston Cleopatra baseball Paris Mark Antony Jude Queen Creek Bowie Marie Antoinette heroin Lorna Verne
Nature and wildlife, critical to our existence

UN News

06:44 min | 9 months ago

Nature and wildlife, critical to our existence

"It's time that humankind realizes that nature doesn't exist for us. The head of the environment programs office in New York said just ahead of World Wildlife Day Assistant Secretary General Suchitra. Patty described twenty twenty as a soupy for nature warning that we are currently standing on the precipice of complete annihilation. He said there's seldom being a year. When so many critical meetings taking place which could help avert the devastation of the natural world? Mr Potty began by telling this graffiti about the new documentary wild Karnataka which shines a light on the rich biodiversity of that Indian state. I've seen the film It's amazing the kind of footage they have managed to gather through different technology including drone photography and others. It's not deterred by the legendary David attenborough and what I was very excited about. Was that it released as a mainstream movie in the theaters to full houses. Which gives you hope that people still have a lot of interest in wildlife and given the right motivation they would protect it. Can you tell us how the film undisclosed the importance of protecting the environment? Who START IT presents? The mega diversity of other life forms a nut and how humans relate to it and also it does it in a very endearing way that you really feel for them and that you feel one with nature and I think that's very important because human somehow have come to believe and very wrongly. I would say that everything exists for us and each year exists for us. The planet exist for us which is so wrong. Nothing could be further from the truth. So that is why movies like wild Kamata really bring home. The roots that we are just one of the seven point eight million magnificient species that inhabit the planet. And that we are to live in harmony with nature at is the link to land degradation while I think the land loss and degradation story is also the story of the loss of species that we are confronting a million species are about to go extinct tanks to human behavior and and much of it can be ascribed to land use and land use change and so as agriculture and advances in the Forest Frontier Receipts and deforest frontier is home to the wildlife species of the planet. They don't live in. Auburn spaces with. Urban spaces are primarily created for you once you might have an occasional bird or a b. here and there but that's certainly not their habitat so as we advance and our greed makes us take over more and more territory or not. The species are rapidly going extinct because we're taking over their habitat and that's something that really needs to stop. This is the Superhero for nature. We have the World Conservation Congress in a few weeks and then we have the nature summit that the president of the UN General Assembly is hosting in September in New York which will then be followed by the Biodiversity Convention Conference of Parties in-coming that China's hosting this year and then of course in between we have the World Ocean summit which is happening in Lisbon Portugal. So when you look at all these things that has seldom in a year where you would see. So many critical. Gathering off policymakers from around the World Civil Society Actors Private Sector. And what have you so I think this is the superhero furniture. So I think if all these can be major milestones in our commitment to conserving nature. And doing what is right for the planet not just for us. Because that's what has brought us to the precipice of complete animation and why we really need to change course and there couldn't be a better year than this. How would you say the sustainable development goals tie into World Wildlife Day? I think we need to understand the web of life that sustains all life on earth and is basically the story of the harmony in which humans and all wildlife exist together and that is why it is so important that we understand the importance of wildlife to our own existence even if we are very selfish even if we don't see anything else as being of importance just ourselves as being of importance even then we should actually recognize what does for us. I mean you take the example of bees. We have never sent an invoice to anybody. Dip pollinate every food that comes out on the planet and when their colonies collapse we spend millions of dollars backing them into boxes and putting them in trucks and take the case of interest rates alone. People are carrying beehives across the length and breadth of the United States just to get their pollination done and so it is time we realized that nature doesn't exist for us we would finish as a species and nature would go on it will heal itself it has existed for millions and millions of years without us though even if we are very selfish we really need to understand the criticality of nature to our own existence. And what can an average person do to support this? Being mindful being mindful off the natural resources. We use this to give you a little later which I concentrate significant at this point of time. The poor capita use of materials by humans is roughly thirty two thousand pounds for year. One human being. That's how much resources we are using. It is not sustainable and it cannot go on like this and by simply being mindful being concentrate and being respectful of nature. We can actually turn this around. There's a lot of things that we do can easily avoided. Take the case of food. Forty percent of the food that we grow is wasted and we keep talking about. How are we going to ten billion people by two thousand fifty? That's what I call false. Bindis you astor wrong question. The right question to ask is. How do we conserve nature? How do we improve the factor of productivity in the same land so that we can actually grow more healthy foods and you can sustain as many species? You aren't what would your message before? World Wildlife Day. I think the biggest message would be for humility for us to understand that we are one of the seven point eight million species that inhabit the planet. And we need to respect the right of other species to coexist alongside humans because even if we are selfish that's in our interest because that's what sustains the web of life is there anything else you would like to add. I think this is a time to act. We've been talking for too long for decades now and we have reached a very critical point in the history of our planet and how humans behave in two thousand twenty and in the next few years will determine certainly our fate and also the fate of the other species and the planet as well.

New York Secretary General Suchitra Mr Potty David Attenborough Deforest Frontier World Civil Society Actors Pri Patty World Conservation Congress Un General Assembly United States Auburn Biodiversity Convention Confer Lisbon Portugal China President Trump
Digital vs. Traditional Marketing like Billboards: Lessons Learned

Planet Money

02:46 min | 11 months ago

Digital vs. Traditional Marketing like Billboards: Lessons Learned

"There is a long stretch of I. Eighty between Cheyenne Dan and Salt Lake City where I grew up that is almost nothing but highway and desert. I have driven this stretch a million times and over the holidays I was driving and again this time with my niece Katrine and my nephew Al Hundred John Reid received the majestic cargo train. It's natural habitat sir. David attenborough road trips eight miles and miles of mostly shrubs the occasional cargo train gene end billboards one set of billboards in particular large rooms. Great Rates Little America. My Niece Kaitlyn there. The billboards that we're seeing are all the same fancy truck stop slash hotel called Little America that is in the absolute middle of this middle of nowhere there for nearly a hundred miles these billboards show up every few minutes. Forty two miles to the little America. There's another one coming right up. After it and there in the desert we are a captive audience to running storyline of these billboards. Seventeen marble showers. Little even start intimidating them wings little America but there is one thing in particular that shows up on these billboards more than any other so often that people even write about this billboard in their online reviews of the truck style and this is the one that we've been decided about this. This one says seventy five cent cones fifteen miles little America rising up from the desert floor is a many many feet tall Paul delicious looking soft. Serve ice cream cone lawless world wing of that billboards like these have a special kind of place in our collective to road trip hearts. These days everyone online goes to the same websites. But once you get there we all get different personalized ads but with a billboard. Everyone drives this road. Sees the same ad and billboards they work the market for billboards continues to grow. There are currently about three hundred fifty thousand of them in America and more go up up every single day and one study. Found that billboards when you pair them with digital ads are more effective than print ads. And we're sorry to say than Radio Jio ads so it was probably inevitable that Katryn Alejandro and I did exactly as the billboards back into us to do all girl cheeses

America Salt Lake City Al Hundred John Reid David Attenborough Katrine Kaitlyn Radio Jio Katryn Alejandro Paul
Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

60-Second Science

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Documentaries are known for their sweeping natural vistas. This does their amazing footage seriously. How did they get that shot in often soothing baritone of Sir David attenborough strain incontinent what those documentaries don't do though is show the realities of environmental destruction historically particularly BBC documentaries have shied away from that Nikki Rust is an environmental social scientist at Newcastle University in the UK Russ studied work by the BBC in the World Wildlife Fund which had teamed up with Netflix to make what they said would be a whole new kind of production. They wanted it to reach. I think a billion people and that it was going to revolutionize nature documentaries except for the fact it may be that attenborough would be the narrator the Netflix series our planet aim to be different because it promised to reveal the threats facing wildlife in the natural world so did it deliver liver rust and her colleagues analyzed scripts of our planet along with three recent. BBC Series Planet Earth to Pimple Dynasties Twenty into hyenas and Blue Planet to spider cramps and logged everything they saw on the screen turns out planet only talks about threats and successes successes a bit more than Blue Planet to fifteen percent of the script did focus on the woes of the natural world but very little devastation was actually shown on screen. The spite being filmed the analysis is in the Journal people in nature. The lead author of the Study Julia Jones was in Madagascar at the time where net that flicks were there filming and she knows that they were there filming the destruction of Habitat and burning and lots of mental devastation so they've got fatigue is just unfortunately it wasn't chosen to be included. It's not clear if that's really a bad thing. Though we still don't really know whether showing environmental tragedies on screen green motivates people to support conservation but what climate change communication has taught us. Ross says is that the ideal way to motivate audiences is with optimism tinged with trepidation. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata BBC David Attenborough Netflix World Wildlife Fund Nikki Rust Julia Jones Attenborough Cramps Newcastle University Ross Scientist Russ UK Madagascar Sixty Seconds Fifteen Percent
Can pop culture fight climate change?

The Frame

06:08 min | 1 year ago

Can pop culture fight climate change?

"There's no question climate change is real. Even if one in ten Americans doesn't yet believe that so what what role can Hollywood play addressing climate change and offering potential solutions with us now is elaine low. She's reporter with variety who recently wrote wrote about this topic. Elaine welcome to the show. Thanks for having me John so it doesn't feel like climate. Change is a neglected topic in Hollywood from documentaries. Docu series to narrative narrative stories. Can you talk about some of the most recent examples. We've seen climate change touched on. I think more indirectly than directly in ways you may not even think about like for example the last avengers movie or the second last avengers movie avengers Infinity War you know people don't think of that as a climate change deep but then wipes out half of the population sort of a Nico terrorist moved try to wipe out half the population in an effort to save the health of the universe so we see it trickle in in ways like that you know less so indirect ways. I think the last time we saw a more direct addressing zing of climate changes of movies like the day after tomorrow which was all the way back from two thousand and four or you know any inconvenient the truth which was not fictional and probably I think the only time we've ever seen climate change address in a nonfiction way that has really brought audiences at theaters. There's also a very popular streaming series called our planet that is up for a primetime. Emmy lead us into a little bit from our planet all across our planet. Crucial connections are being disrupted. The stability that we all life relies upon is being lost what we do in the next twenty years will determine the future for all life on earth. Uh there's a quote attributed to Samuel Goldwyn but it actually comes from the Playwright Moss Hart which is if you have a message call Western in union. It feels like documentaries are pretty much on the knows about what climate change means whereas narrative films are trying to figure out how to incorporate that ATM message. Is that something that Hollywood is struggling with now because it doesn't probably WanNa make narrative films that feel too preachy. There's certainly an element meant to wanting to go to the theater and be thrilled right and are you going to be thrilled by listening to a lecture on the climate crisis or you're going to be thrilled. I I see a fifty foot soon. NAMI overtake Santa Monica Beach and I think that's kind of where you see more disaster movies at the box office and more nonfiction documentaries on the smaller screen. Aura shows like our planet you know I think there's an element there of perhaps perhaps wanting to see what will actually resonate with viewers at the box office in and some people don't necessarily believe in climate crisis at all well you know I I I think there's a risk of dividing your audience there so it feels like narrative films and documentaries can point out how real climate changes but what about solutions and let's start first with what Hollywood is doing. Are you starting to see some green practices on sets or in production companies. What are the town itself doing. I'm sure there are a lot of different ways that the industry is trying to combat the climate crisis. There are efforts on the corporation level and there are also efforts on production reduction level. I mean I was talking to Michelle King. One of the CO creators of evil she and Robert King also created the good wife in the good fight and on their set you they have won a production assistant. That's dedicated exclusively to echo training and will make sure that things are composed. It'd and that biodegradable utensils are used and that when all said and done and the set is wrapped that they will donate any decorations and furniture that they have have leftover two organizations like habitat for humanity in an effort to reuse those things so yeah. There's there's definitely an effort in pockets of the community and I think it's more just about seeing more institutional change at this point. Is it fair to say that network television is maybe taking a little bit more of an aggressive approach right right now. Programming wise sure you look at our planet on Netflix where you have a walrus throwing itself off a cliff. I mean five ten years ago. Would you have had David attenborough narrating seen like that you know about this walrus trying to fight for its own survival because of the terrible impacts of climate crisis you also have shows like you know a climate reckoning in the heartland which is a CBS original. It's a documentary on the impact of climate change on farming in Nebraska you have Leonardo DiCaprio's documentary documentary on. HBO This year is on fire trying to find you know never before seen solutions to the climate crisis so I think on TV in particular learn more so than on the big screen. You're you're seeing an effort there to document this crisis to show people really the ramifications of our behavior as a society society and how we're impacting the world around us the last question there's obviously a moral argument to address climate change and there's been a lot of debate about the financial financial argument about addressing climate change in terms of how Hollywood sees it. How are they figuring out why it is good business to go green well you you know when I was talking to Michelle King on evil and the chief procurement officer at CBS I was asking. Is there a financial disincentive to go green and he said You I know maybe ten years ago that would have been the case but we've found now that we can actually go green and make that financially beneficial for us in actually potentially save money in some areas so it's not necessarily an effort that winds up emptying. Hollywood's pockets with going green and making making money can go hand in hand

Hollywood Michelle King Elaine Low CBS Emmy Samuel Goldwyn HBO Reporter Robert King Moss Hart David Attenborough Netflix John Santa Monica Beach Leonardo Dicaprio Production Assistant Officer Nebraska
Prince Charles, Prince Harry And David Attenborough discussed on Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Prince Charles, Prince Harry And David Attenborough discussed on Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

"A new eight part Netflix series chronicling life on earth and the threat posed by climate change has received a Royal sendoff at London's natural history museum Prince Charles lauded, the our planet series and its narrator. David Attenborough at a special world premiere event, he was joined by sons Prince, William and Prince Harry, the first segment features astonishing footage to tilling the variety of the world's wildlife and capturing the sound and fury as seventy five million tons of glacial ice collapsed into a sea off Greenland. Of an iceberg. The size of a skyscraper. Generates a titan. The emissions. Netflix series produced in conjunction with the World Wildlife federation was four years in the making involved six

Prince Charles Prince Harry David Attenborough World Wildlife Federation Netflix London William Seventy Five Million Tons Four Years
"david attenborough" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"This is the globalist on monocle twenty four. I'm not gonna go in and we're going to check the day's business headlines now with the financial analysts Louise Cooper good morning to you Louise morning. Georgina devils tell us all about devils. So this is the Japanese Prime minister Shinzo Abby he is going to become the head of the twenty. And if they've got a g twenty meeting in the soccer in Juny setting out. He's using the Swiss mountain ought to set out what he wants to achieve the two he wants to achieve is to rebuild the trust in the global trade system and to foster consensus to address climate change. So I mean, let's just put aside the irony of anyone at devils talking about climate change, given the global elite probably produce more carbon put more carbon into the the atmosphere atmosphere from flying to and from Darris devils and using jets pretty much every week, the let's just put the irony and the I win I win the David at number. Being the naturalist David Attenborough being devils an all over devils and taking a lotta money. I imagine to be all over dabbles talking about the damage climate change can do I walls big business. That is when they side, let's the trade trade thing. And and you know, he he talks about the commitment to free open trade rules based on international order. I call on you and Shinzo are. We said on the businesses to rebuild trust in international trade. There's a bit of in the background to this. Okay. As he does this as he sort of becomes the defender of globalization. He has got Trump snapping at his heels. We know the big trade was happening between the US and China, and he's got a threat from Trump to open up, particularly the carmakers. Remember Japan's what's very big success. We'll call makers and Trump wants to protect his. So you've got that in the background Trump has threaten Japan hasn't gone there yet, but he has. Threaten japan. So in this speech, Shinzo does take a little bit of a swipe Beijing talks about the importance of protecting intellectual property. That's why Beijing talks about the importance of government subsidies. That's why Beijing so he sort of alluded and giving listener giving Trump probably what he wants to hear. And he he does also allude to a massive problem with the World Trade Organization the moment, which is the US is blocking any new judges being appointed to the WTO. So the WTI has the minimum of judges to rule on international trade disputes. So the WTO is close to becoming pretty paralysed. He also talked about that. But this to me is a speech mollifying Trump and slightly taking on China. Very very interesting. Now, of course, there's a British delegation. There will be wanting to strike trade deals. Very afraid of what happens come much the twenty ninth or perhaps not we don't even know what the date. It might be. Gene. But one one company that is making contingency plans is so this is extraordinary to Airbus has released video you can say online, I looked at it on the Bloomberg sunny three minutes long, but the Airbus chief executive Tom enders has a damning damning damning damning critique of Brexit in those three minutes with threats goal. I mean, honestly thoroughly recommend watching this three minutes. I mean, first of all he plays to the crowd is what he's clearly this a script that was very closely worked he talks about that the u k gave birth to the jet engine that the UK's a world renowned field of expertise, and then comes the bite, and he says that Brexit could destroy a century of Bucay aerospace brilliance that you aerospace industry stands at the precipice that the Airbus could potentially make very harmful. Oh decisions to the UK that in a global economy. The UK can no longer go it to load. I mean, it's really quite an extraordinary threat. It's also quite extraordinary damning of Brexit. He says, please don't listen to the Brexit tears madness. Which asserts that because we have huge plants here. We will not move, and we will always be here. They are won't extraordinary. Video one thing to bear in mind with Airbus of courses, it has the French and German governments do own big stakes it, and they have a lot of control..

mollifying Trump Shinzo Abby Airbus World Trade Organization Beijing Georgina devils David Attenborough Brexit Japan Louise morning Trump US China UK soccer Tom enders WTI Swiss mountain
Pence Tells Venezuelans That U.S. Backs Efforts to Oust Maduro

Democracy Now! Audio

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Pence Tells Venezuelans That U.S. Backs Efforts to Oust Maduro

"So numerous soap awful, so all pervasive. The mechanisms that we have for destruction also wholesales so frightening that we can actually exterminate whole ecosystems without even noticing it. That was David Attenborough speaking with Prince William Tuesday, Brazilian present Shire Bolsonaro also spoke with the World Economic Forum calling and business leaders to invest in Brazil, citing the country's biodiversity and abundant mineral riches, environmentalists sable sonata will speed catastrophic climate change through deregulation by opening up. That's watts of the Amazon to Agra business giants. A new study published. This week finds the melting of Greenland's ice sheet may have reached a tipping point and could severely increased sea level rise over the next twenty years. The report confirms other recent studies which warned the Arctic is warming at twice the rate. Eight of the rest of the planet due to climate change a study by the university of Michigan and Utah found federal aid to Puerto Rico was slower and less generous after hurricane Maria than federal aid received by Texas and Florida after hurricanes Harvey and Irma hurricane Maria which slammed into the island of Puerto Rico in September two thousand seventeen was in fact, a higher category. Hurricane the nose, which struck the mainland United States just weeks. Earlier local residents have decried themes response to the disaster. Last year. A Harvard study says the death toll from Maria make top forty six hundred in the New York town of Greece. Police arrested three men and a minor on suspicion of plotting an attack on a local Muslim community. The suspects were said to be in possession of multiple improvised explosive devices and firearms and charged with criminal possession of a weapon and conspiracy. The suspects were allegedly planning to attack the small community of Islam Burg in upstate New York. Police discovered the plot. After the identity. Sixteen year old suspect made a comment to a fellow student about a school shooter. The other suspects are nineteen year old Vincent veteran male and twenty year old Brian culinary and eighteen year old Andrew Krystal police say the attack was planned on the gaming chat platform, called discord and in New York City, the and New York Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the New York police department for resting transgender woman and charging her with false personnel. Linda Dominguez told NYPD officers that she changed her name to align with her gender identity. False personnel would involve someone intentionally misrepresenting their name in order to conceal their identity. Officers also allegedly harassed and mock Dominguez on the basis of her gender identity. This is Linda Dominguez speaking about the case. Give about I decided to do this with a lawsuit. So they don't keep doing this. I am the realization of my ancestors dreams, and I cannot allow the police to abuse us trans girls, and those are some of the headlines, this is democracy. Now democracy now dot or the Warren peace report, I made me Goodman. We begin the show in Los Angeles where public school teachers are returning to school today after approving an agreement to end historic stay strike. The strike was the first in Los Angeles and three decades it came after more than twenty months of strain. Go she ASICs between the union the United teachers, Los Angeles and the school district the strike, effectively shutdown Los Angeles unified, the nation's second largest school district on Tuesday morning, union leaders and Los Angeles city officials announced they reached a deal

New York City Los Angeles Linda Dominguez Hurricane Maria Puerto Rico New York Civil Liberties Union Hurricane David Attenborough Amazon Irma Hurricane Maria Greenland Prince William Tuesday Brazil Goodman Shire Bolsonaro United States Arctic Harvard
"david attenborough" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"So I mean on one hand, I mean, you'd think human beings like easy prey, why don't they eat us? More often by you, at least from what I've seen on television and stuff the sharks. Really don't like us. You know, they the they know what their food is by Szekely. The the juvenile great watch they generally eight squid octopus. Listen ails rise in than the big shocks, the as I matured. I get big after move onto big bigger facial than move onto mammals like sales in dolphins in the bull shocks generally efficient ills and things like that. So they know what their foods. That's why not attacking that wanted to tax. We'd be dying. Yeah. Exactly. So I was just really it was just bad luck. And because of this whole experience you've you've gotten the chance to do work with shark week. And I know that something you're very passionate about a really enjoyed that. You know that? And like I was saying earlier about my heroes Stato David Attenborough up. Zinke old is amazing naturalist that the the wilds of night's show with the world through three eight I literally get to walk in the footsteps of minors. And that that that is an amazing feeling and not just that. But it's a great chance for military life. I'm not shooting guns all the time casually now in America. Blown stuff up. I'm not not not always jumping out of helicopters. I'm just on piracy close at the moment for my next. Right. Where are you? By the way, I'm in LA. Yes. I'm just about to get a couple of weeks of power Shing before I go into another shower parachuting to the South Pacific and survive the tonight's into knots while they chum shocks. Yeah. Laima lesson. I I'd love to talk to the insurance company that blessed? We're gonna do boys. Have you have you ever met our frontier shepherd? He's done stuff for shark week. No, okay. And he's a former brain. Yeah. Well, I I mean, I think it's been a few years since he's been on. But I know tarried did some stuff for shark week. So. You don't have the military sucking fun out of the adventure. Working with the film crews is way Molefe on. But it some it's it's become a passion as well. Because as you learn about the plot of the the shocks everything from pollution to plastic to commercial fishing to the shock feeding dried Yukon help but want to stand up and speak out for it. Because would which will literally killing Aaron planet and along the chime outselves side trying to help people understand the role that the shocks play. A he's just one little pace of the Jenga puzzle. That you don't want to be pulled out tidally and have the hall HI system top level. So that's a enduring problem the overfishing of sharks or is it more of like environmental pollution. What kind of issues facing that part of the ecology right now, man. This is a long section. Yeah. I know it is it is animal agricultural side. The farming animals is one of the big things it's problem creating dead zones in in the ocean, crystal areas because of all the the run off of the fungicides in the pesticides, and the Ol- that sorta stuff the may gas. But also plastic pollution is huge. That is a massive problem than as the commercial fishing, which is wiping out, the ussia fish stocks, and that's three black catch. It's miceli. It's not even through the fishing of the targeted spaces Spacey's. It's the the catch that they getting that one that they throwing back into the action dead which a lot of that can be shocked seals dolphins rise. It's wiles. Because if you get I think people get. Of two fish now. Don't they still have that little thing on? There says it's dolphin safe. Nets. And all that kind of stuff. With the current regulations. How around the planet, the there's no such thing as sustainable fishing there. Really, isn't because. It's unreal. Regulated in other areas that so much illegal fishing that it's just what and the cul raves have been destroyed by the massive football field next that dragged along the bottom of scooping up everything in their pasta. You're killing the environment that these animals living as well, not just the animal site, even if the Asunto repopulate, they don't have a harden to two Republican, I think the Transition's kinda nicely into next topic..

David Attenborough LA America Shing Ol football Molefe Yukon Spacey Aaron South Pacific one hand
Join Blue Planet II Live-Tweet

60-Second Science

01:27 min | 2 years ago

Join Blue Planet II Live-Tweet

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky Lou planet to is a critically acclaimed two thousand seventeen BBC documentary series about the world's oceans hosted by the great, David Attenborough. And it's now available on Netflix, which presents a unique opportunity. Shark researcher David Shiffman a post doctoral fellow at Simon Fraser university in Vancouver explains. This Sunday Monday and Tuesday, join us for synchronized viewing where everyone no matter where you are presses play on Netflix at the same time and follow along on Twitter with hash tag, blue planet chat as a team of ocean. Science and conservation experts watch the show some of us like me for the first time and provide our own running commentary where also happy to answer any questions that anyone has about ocean science or conservation issues as the series progresses. The live tweeting commences with the first episode of. Blue planet to at six PM eastern time on Sunday. December sixteenth followed by episodes, two and three four and five. Start at eight PM eastern on Monday six and seven beginning. Eight PM eastern on Tuesday for the full schedule. Go to hashtag blue planet chat on Twitter. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Twitter Netflix David Attenborough David Shiffman PM Simon Fraser University Doctoral Fellow BBC Vancouver Researcher Sixty Seconds
"david attenborough" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Savage on the Savage Nation. So this the nuthouse our kooks fail. I don't know what you want to call it. We're just one sound bite after another. Kooks. It's just crazy. Okay. Here's the Serb. David Attenborough guy. He's kind of like the crown he's kind of like the crown prince of the green movement. So they're having these big green global governments, governance talks. And Bernie Sanders is out there. Got twelve years. We've got twelve years. That's it twelve years. In the meantime, I'm gonna be flying around in my private jet. We've got twelve years twelve years. Now, here's this, sir. David Attenborough already. Here you go now to kooks. Video clip thirteen right now, we're facing a manmade disaster of global scale. Gracious thousands of years this climate change, the world's people who've spoken. Their messages, Kim. Time is running out. They want. You the decision makers to act now if we don't take action the collapse of civilizations and the extinction as much of the natural world is on the horizon. I will never you know, I love the programs that he narrates. That's what he is the voice over God. I love the programs in areas that earth series, which is just so awesome. Okay. So David, David. And I know I probably sound like an idiot compared to you because you've got the British accent. And I'm just this guy who slip. I was born in east, Los Angeles. Go figure. With the high school in Chicago. Live in San Francisco. That's me. Dumb compared to you. But can I tell you what was going on when we had this incredibly warm period of time on planet earth that coincided with the Hebrew exodus from Egypt. Are we going to blame it on the Egyptians? What what are we going to blame that on? I just wanna know. Then we had this incredible cooldown which followed. And I mean, it got really cold really, really cool. This is just before the the bird. We're we're celebrating this time the birth of Jesus, right? So just about the time that that he was born we were coming out of a very cold period. What caused that could've been an eruption of a volcano like mount Vesuvius and Pompeii destroy you ever heard about that demonstrate and probably had something to do with the big cool down. Can you blame that on the SUV? Don't think so we had a warm period. The follow that Roman empire became very very warm. Then there was Krakatoa Indonesia right after that about the year five hundred five thirty five right? And there was an incredible cooldown what caused that. That's when I don't know what was going on during the dark ages all sorts of plague and horrible things happening on the planet. Again. Can we blame that on the SUV.

Egypt David Attenborough Kim Savage Nation Savage Bernie Sanders David mount Vesuvius Indonesia Los Angeles San Francisco Chicago twelve years
BrainStuff Classics: Why Do We Fart?

BrainStuff

06:27 min | 2 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: Why Do We Fart?

"In two thousand and four in a tiny town. A young woman named Rebecca Gould was brutally murdered nearly fifteen years later her killer is still on the loose. It's just really surreal walking around. Don't mention so much. Guys out there yell. I'm Katherine towns, and this is Helen gone catch new episodes by subscribing at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff. I'm Lauren Volvo bomb, and I've got another classic episode for you today in it. Our former host Christian Sager answers, a basic yet nonetheless burning question, why do we fart? Rain stuff. It's Christian Sager. So in the late eighteen hundreds there is this French guy and his name was lapel Mon, and he was one of the stars of Moulin Rouge, people would come from far and wide just to watch this guy fart. Yeah. To watch him fart, lapenne them on you see was a professional flatulence, which as it turns out is still sort of thing. And certainly it's a dream job for some. But if you want to move out of the ranks of amateur windbreakers, an into those stinking hallowed halls of the professionally flatulent, you will need to know if thing or two about farts, like what are they why do they happen? And why do they smell so bad? Well, first things first everyone farts every single person. Yes. You to listening to this. You do to to not far would be medically fascinating and probably dangerous on average. Most people are passing about one. Leader of gas a day spread out over thirteen to wait for it. Twenty one incidents. That's Twenty-one separate times in one day, the composition of a fart varies widely. But usually what we're smelling is something that's mostly nitrogen along with oxygen carbon dioxide and even methane. This gas itself comes from several sources the air you swallow gas that enters your intestines from your bloodstream and so on but about seventy five percent of your farts are created in your lower intestine. And unfortunately, not by you see the bacteria living inside you right now, they comprise a micro Buyum all of their own. And when we say, it's intricate. We mean it so intricate that David Attenborough could make a documentary about it these bacteria form this thriving empire with billions of tiny separate organisms living inside their host. And that's you. They're living with you. And symbiosis. Now flatulence occurs when food passes through your stomach and small intestine without fully breaking down. So what does this mean, this means that the food hits the large intestine in an undyed jested state? So for example, let's look at lactose which is present in dairy products like milk and cheese, if you're lactose intolerant than you lack the enzyme that breaks lactose into sugar molecules for the bloodstream without this lactose just breezes through your stomach and small intestine into your large intestine where it becomes the special of the day for billions of Hungary bacteria, those guys love lactose. And if you're not going to digest it they will as they digest this lactose, they emit a number of gases, including methane, hydrogen carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, which is responsible for the unpleasant, aroma. This process is similar to how yeast produces carbon dioxide to. Leaven bread. And speaking of food. It's true that some foods do produce more flatulence primarily because they contain more indigestible carbohydrates. I'm looking at you beans, nutrient dense, vegetables and fiber, rich foods all have a reputation for nibbling flatulence, that's not necessarily a bad thing. See a scientists learn more about the relationship between diet health and a person's microbiome they're discovering that these flatulent foods may encourage the growth of beneficial bacteria in your gut when they're producing that next embarrassing puff of gas. They're also making molecules to protect your intestinal lining and prevent infections. So remember the next time you're silent crime accidentally ends up sounding like stuttering, trumpet, your intestinal bacteria are the real culprits. They are the ones actually farting. And and look I want to emphasize this. They are farting inside of you. You and then you fart their farts out. Are we clear on that part, which leads us to the bigger question of the day? Who are we fighting inside? Episode was written by Ben Bullen and produced by Tyler clang to hear more weird and funny true stories from Ben check out his show ridiculous history. Available wherever you get your podcast. And of course for more on this and lots of other easily digestible topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, Brian Steph listeners in Lumine today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel and explain the universe in which physicist, Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions and science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You can listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explained the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Flatulence Daniel Whiteson Apple Christian Sager Rebecca Gould Iheartradio Ben Bullen David Attenborough Helen Lauren Volvo Moulin Rouge First Things First Hungary Brian Steph Lumine Physicist Tyler Clang Seventy Five Percent
"david attenborough" Discussed on The Health Code

The Health Code

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on The Health Code

"I would never feel like regular pancakes, oil, anything like that. But even just after a wake of aiding, not so healthy foods, my taste buds have completely changed. So I feel like it's kind of a blessing now that I can be like put myself in everyone else's shoes and say. I can totally understand why it's hard to not be one hundred percent healthy. So I feel like since we've been back with definitely gotten back on the fitness grind where going to the gym and everything, but we've been being a little bit more flexible without food. So I think those because we were about to go away for another chunk of travel. I, we're going to get a New Zealand and then we're going to fly straight from New Zealand. The big cone so icon we decide before we feel like life is on pause because yeah, we go way this choose day and where away from my birthday, which will get to it where wife my birthday, which will get into in a second. But yet this month has just kind of been on pause for us, and it's a really bad mentality have and it's about excuse, but kind of like all, we'll just go to the gym and let eight semi healthy. It's we really need to get out of that mindset because it's just not getting us anyway except to the elephant enclosure. I, I don't really mean say, when you ate that top of food to help dodgy, you feel like you just feel gross. Like the next day? I swear my joints and everything else. Implant echoes sugars, like train swings, my ballot movements Sawyer by with both been so goodly. Got Abe rates and his tummy was I was on file night. Listen, this little black, boom, the all those few squeaks or not. Actually listened to about. I want talk about slipping. That is like the highlight of my life. What Kurtz alter egos? No, I can't. So my gosh, I get like a little puppy. I get like little outbursts of energy consume is. If you guys have a puppy or dog, you know, when they randomly go crazy, like after a ball and they like, and they run around the house. We Google because I was like, is my dog crazy. They called Zuma's cut zoom east, but he like he has like multiple personalities. So like you guys have heard Frederick, who's the little kid master? You guys have heard David Attenborough, Kurt, Attenborough, welcome to the podcast, but lost night. I was introduced to a tardily new character that I had never met before, and I honestly nearly wet my pants. It was the best and her name was Madame order. That's. My name is Jenny. Knows ginny. You you've got wrong again. You so silly is Jenny. I don't know why they always turn into like English accents, but you know, it's just quite a funny way to go. I think sorry, English, you know the ins and the homeys they do have a bit of rivalry going on. This literally lost like an owl loss, not trying not to love because I was like, shut up. I'm trying to sleep and he was like, just kept going on. Oh my gosh, she's a good time. She's actually a housemaid. So when Sarah cokes curve decides to cheat, leaves it up to code to wash up off to her like how rude and you know what ends up happening. Pases it onto me. Jenny the house made of the house. He's so rude as well. What happens is like it goes in my head. I feel like you pick the pots of your life that you despise, like washing up washing IB, and you turn them into all too eager and myself on a daily basis. Good for your mental. Oh my gosh. We are going to New Zealand again on shoes day and two days off to that. Is my birthday. All right here. Dance. I'm turning big bug twenty six. Ooh. Womanhood have used wing. It feel pretty womanly could say gray his you did. Do you wanna talk about. I'm really excited for my birthday. I have no idea what we're doing. What going to New Zealand with mas- doll, and I know it during some fun copying and testing out very exciting. They've got some new technology and they Cobb which we probably talk about right by the way, I drive a masters, six, three and drives a six, five. We love them, love them, like honestly, best car of my friends call was actually a messed up anyway..

Jenny New Zealand Google David Attenborough Zuma Abe Sawyer Kurtz Sarah cokes Cobb ginny Frederick Kurt one hundred percent two days
"david attenborough" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on AP News

"The wildlife environment the counts backed by celebrities including naturalist David Attenborough and depends on people devoting. Fifteen minutes. To counting butterfly species movie than sixty thousand volunteers took part in the butterfly conservation survey last year the annual survey began. In two thousand ten. And the group, says it's become the largest butterfly monitoring project in the world The group says. Suffice react very quickly to environmental changes making them excellent indicators of bio-diversity the. Counts which also helps to identify threatened, species goes until August the twelfth the clock is ticking for Britain to come up with a plan to leave the u. while agreeing to. Future relations. With Brussels but now foreign secretary Jeremy hunt says there is a very real risk of a Brexit no deal by accident Big differences remain between Brussels and London over the terms of a. New trade setup there's also the issue of how to regulate the UK's only land border with the u. between the UK's Northern. Ireland and the, Irish Republic a substantial number of lawmakers, in British Prime Minister Theresa May's, conservative party, favor a complete break with the. You a so-called hard Brexit but. May has proposed a soft option which calls for a common rulebook with European nations that would govern trading goods the EU parliaments. As well as national, parliaments of nations and Britain needs to ratify a deal before the, UK leaves in March Hi, I'm making crane AP.

Britain David Attenborough Ireland Theresa May Brussels EU Jeremy hunt Prime Minister secretary London Fifteen minutes
Eritrea's leader visits Ethiopia as dramatic thaw continues

Morning Edition

02:21 min | 2 years ago

Eritrea's leader visits Ethiopia as dramatic thaw continues

"And correspondents bbc world service right here on wnyc am fm new york you're with the bbc world service on saturday science in action we've much ado about almost nothing nothing is well neutrino tiny goes lewis almost weightless subatomic particle but this one was forged on the roiling fringes of a distant black hole and then travelled almost halfway across the universe until hit an atom in a telescope this paul and it's got astronomy that's very excited to find out why join me after the news for science in action abc news i'm john shea thousands of people have thronged addis ababa's main thoroughfare to greet era trae as president his arrived on a three day visit to ethiopia some waves giant eritrean flags president assize of workers visit comes less than a week after the two neighbors declared an end to a two decade long conflict when ethiopia's leader be matt travels to us mara former fox commanders have appeared at a special tribunal in columbia described as a historic event which could help heal the wounds of a fifty year conflict their leader rodrigue donyo elliot's timoshenko asked for forgiveness for kidnappings carried out by the fog and for the pain and suffering of many families funerals have been taking place in western pakistan for the victims of one of the country's worstever militant attacks one hundred and twenty eight people died when a suicide bomber struck an election campaign rally in the town of mustard on the province of balochistan has declared three days of mourning officials in western afghanistan say at least seventeen troops were killed when taliban militants launched an attack on an army base in farah province israel has carried out a fresh wave of air strikes on the gaza strip it said it was responding to over thirty terror acts by hamas on the gaza perimeter including volleys mortar shells to daily arson attacks launched from gaza using kites and balloons britain's new polar research ship named after the broadcaster and naturalist david attenborough will take to the water for the first time today the.

BBC David Attenborough Britain Arson Gaza Taliban Rodrigue Donyo Elliot FOX Matt Addis Ababa John Shea New York Hamas Israel Afghanistan Balochistan Pakistan Columbia Ethiopia
Five Days, Twenty Nine Minutes and Three Decades discussed on Programming

Programming

03:45 min | 2 years ago

Five Days, Twenty Nine Minutes and Three Decades discussed on Programming

"What makes them take from heist to horror wrong comes to coming of age why do we love them what are the rules on why do we keep coming back for more not secrets secret cinema staff on tuesday night at nine on bbc four and the weather it is going to be mostly dry and very warm at least for most places today some rain in the far northwest today i'm ready for michelle hussein adjusting at the time is just coming up to help us seven zap is over the summer the news in belfast and explosive device has been thrown at the home of gerry adams the former shin thing leader and other senior party members homes also targeted no one was injured shouldn't fain has suggested the attacks were carried out by dissident republicans who are opposed to the peace process it follows nights of rioting in the city of londonderry which police have blamed on dissident groups six people have been arrested in connection with those disturbances has flown a paraglider close to the gulf resort where president trump has arrived to spend the weekend he flew to scotland yesterday evening after meetings with theresa may and tea with the queen mr trump whose mother was scottish and his wife bologna staying at his turnberry hotel officers are continuing their search for evidence in the poisoning of a couple with inova jokin we'll chill last month the met police say bottle was found in a surge in one of the victims house in amesbury and was tested by scientists to porton down charlie rarely who's forty five remains in hospital in salisbury in a serious but stable condition his opponent on sturgis died last weekend the twelve boys rescued from a flooded cave complex northern thailand are expected to be released from hospital on thursday toilets health minister told reporters that the boys in their families needed to be prepared for the meteoroid tension they would receive when they came out the survey for the consultant deloitte found that consumer confidence from april to june was it a seven year high it said the results were boosted by the sunshine and the football world cup the research which came from three thousand consumers fan confidence to be the highest since its inception in twenty eleven the uk's new polish ship which is named after the broadcaster and naturalist david attenborough is to be launched today is the largest commercial should built in britain in three decades the vessel was originally voted to be called boaty mcboatface but the public by the public but ministers intervened the time is twenty nine minutes to eight the syrian city where the first antiapartheid protests erupted seven years ago now has the national flag flying again in its main square darah was taken back by government forces this week they also now hold much of the surrounding province after an offensive that the un says has displaced tens of thousands of people aid agencies say via convoys of supplies are being blocked at the jordanian border as our middle east correspondent tom bateman reports this is your lori five days now three for five days you have inside freaks i met ibrahim on the dusty frontier rose from jordan to syria his lori is among more than fifty we counted filled with aid supplies bound for data province but stock at a desert town on the jordanian border the engine runs day and night to keep the food cool of his do the same to preserve medicines the second abraham is himself syrian from data he left in twenty fourteen and hasn't seen his home since nobody knows what's going to happen whether we will go in or not i feel optimistic i haven't seen my relatives in four years okay.

Five Days Twenty Nine Minutes Three Decades Seven Years Four Years Seven Year
"david attenborough" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

Accidental Tech Podcast

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

"Anyway so it's a busy time i swear we we'll talk about that not on this show yeah yeah no we're not so dub dub it's it's now it's happening the keynote was good i think we'll talk about it for boring year i have i was going to do visual aid but that's not useful remember this is a podcast so so there was apparently nothing happening this year yet i have three pages of notes about nothing that's turns out so it turns out nothing there was a lot of nothing's and a lot of things and i honestly we did our predictions last week and we talked about what we expected and everything and even though there was no new hardware always like the flashy easy thing that we all want all the time which just kind of unreasonable but you know we all like hardware even though there was no hardware it was still a really good ww dc and there's still a lot of stuff to keep us busy at least lot of busy this summer and need help i know my aunt doesn't seem tested enough prescriptions that's what it is but i guess we can try to do this keynote order and we'll probably bounce around let's let's start with that migration video that was awesome i'm glad so i was scared because the internet connection there this is the first first we'll problems but the internet connection there was terrible on my phone on my laptop whatever so i am i'm tweeting saying oh this was enjoyable waiting to just see this wall of tweets about oh my god that was so stupid i can't believe they did that this is actually didn't see any of it i can give you some of that now if you want stupid like it was so i kind of knew that what the video would be and it's smart because you've got a bunch of developers in the audience and if you want to tell if you clued developers in the video we knew some people in the video people in the audience will feel like they're part of the experience it's not pandering so much as how could that room full developers dislike video that featured developers and it was silly right and they got david attenborough to the voice and everything i try to have a good attitude about it but i also think if you if you wanted to game this and say what video can we show that the room is guaranteed to like you show that video so i do think it was a good video but also kind of felt like i was played did anyone hate the video in this room only one person i hated the video but but who who's not gonna like it get the video the end to its smart smart apple pr good job well i really enjoyed it and in fact i saw that you had retreated something i'd said and i was very nervous for fleeting moment that was like a how did this dummy like this video kind of re tweet like one of those re tweets or not endorsement connery tweets but then i realized that you liked it as well video how could you not love it how could you not love it yeah i would say best apple video in their events in years the what was the one with the the blind gentlemen walking through the woods i thought that one was really that was excellent too but this one i think played to the audience so well like if you if you were that kind of person to enjoy poking fun at ourselves and knowing the developer stereotype this that's my other complaint about is that lynn pretty heavily on though or basement dwellers or hiding hiding in our houses and don't go outside in the sun hurts us which is you know it's the stereotype or not not everybody some developers run surfboards make an iowa avs jumping base jumping doing all sorts of things that in the front row right here looking at me rock climber anyway yeah it's fine i thought it was good so then we start with s because that's the only thing that matters stays and my right and in perform who clapped for that come on doing your irs development echoed for ipad yeah where's that yeah how's that feel teach anyway so we start with performance which i was very happy to hear that performances is a real priority which is great and obviously they said you know we.

"david attenborough" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast kill is supported in part by hellofresh the milk had service dedicated to making cooking fine easy and convenient each week hellofresh creates new delicious recipes with stepbystep instructions designed to take around thirty minutes for everyone from novices to season homecooked short on time these source the freshest ingredients measure to the exact quantity needed so there is no food waste all delivered to your doorstep in a special insulated box for free for fifty percent off your first box visit hellofresh dossier slashed q podcast or enter promo code q podcast when you subscribe think of the last time you watched in nature or a wildlife show glueck sort of picture or here the narrators voice in your mind what is the sound like sort of low study a little like this industry that is one of the most extreme it's a slight oh that is that has been one of the most distinct voices in television that is sir david attenborough saying blue to a sloth or is he calls it a sloth he's making shows about our planet since the fifties and tonight in new york in recognition of his career in television and the impact that is he's had on our understanding of the wildlife here on earth sir david attenborough is being given one of the top prizes in conservation the audubon metal so congratulations sir david now if you didn't get an invite to the ceremony don't panic don't run out and checker mailbox you can still catch sir david on your tv his latest show blue planet to is being broadcast now it's a really incredible look what goes on in our oceans and it takes the idea of a wildlife documentary a step further so this might sound simple the hear me out blue planet to is entertaining what i mean is it manages the turn thousands of hours of just nature footage into something you want to watch like a big budget.

new york david attenborough sir david thirty minutes fifty percent milk
"david attenborough" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And indeed all life now japan which home david attenborough not only fines and photographs and champions our planet's natural treasures he's one of them david be and coolly as editor of the website tv worth watching he reviewed the bbc documentary series blue planet to on monday show cartoonist an essayist tim crowder and his new collection of personal essays he writes about writing a circus trained to mexico with a friend pretending to be your husband having a whirlwind romance with a performance artist and prostitute and about his beloved cat who turned him into someone who believes a man without a cat is not a man i hope you can join us the man entered the no no no no tom freshers executive producer is danny miller our technical directorate engineer resolved read bent them with additional engineering support from choice lieberman and julian herzfeld are associate producer for digital media is molly saving esper roberta shore directs the show for terry gross i dig deep then david the man man and in the mid goodman man either bon iver however.

david attenborough editor tim crowder executive producer danny miller engineer lieberman julian herzfeld producer roberta shore japan bbc mexico molly bon iver
"david attenborough" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Claim he was an agent or an informer for new tenants agency was in tani sound the stalled sir david attenborough has become an unlikely party gone for students images from his blue planet series of being shown dong video screens behind a dj at funk so and house music nights which also features samples of his voice the paper says the raves have being dubbed sir david attenborough as jungle buki key at that time is a quarter to eight imagine a morning news program that had real influence over the thinking of those in power no not this one we can only dream of the effect that fox and friends has on the white house fox and friends as a mix of news and lifestyle and commentary school quite a small audience feel than two million people watch it regularly but one man watches it with great attention the bbc's nick brian spent some mornings watching donald trump's favorite show who would ray we are they able to fit all those people in the shower just three hour we have a big rundown for a year review he'd be forgiven for thinking you're listening to a country a western station this is fox and friends donald trump's favorite show a major source of join us we've got him busy tuesday why from new york city it's fiercely patriotic as a reaganesque morning again in america field this is how it cover the news at the pentagon dropping a megabomb in afghanistan setting the black and white aerial video of the explosion two jingoistic bronze third as laura it is more freedom looks like cuts the red white and black well what am i favorite things in the sixteen years i've been here at fox news is watching bombs drop on bad guys votes infringed regularly provides the inspiration for donald trump's morning tweet take this segment on the death of an american football stopped hit bakar allegedly driven by drunk undocumented immigrants and for republicans and for the president is a prime example of why the country needs a secure border the president's response was almost instantaneous 28 seconds ago the president sent out the second of two tweets he just tweeted my prayers and best wishes are with the family of edwin jackson wonderful young man whose life was so senselessly taken at coal stocks of friends often fails bowl like a foot and french or another dialogue with one viewer when you are a child.

sir david attenborough fox nick brian donald trump pentagon fox news bakar president edwin jackson tani new york america afghanistan sixteen years 28 seconds three hour
"david attenborough" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on KPCC

"Time on the new yorker radio our david attenborough master of the nature documents three on the desperate situation of the earth's climate i couldn't look my grandchildren the eyes of they shed grabbed that you could see that was happening he didn't do anything about it all you didn't mention that would be terrible and have no alternative david attenborough next time on the new york radio al joyner saturday mornings at ten on eighty nine point three kpcc it's members supported eighty nine point three kpcc i'm nick roman for the second year in a row the women's march happens tomorrow in cities across the country including los angeles the march in la will start at pershing square mit will move on to grand parked in late ron for a rally kpcc's healthcare reporter michelle faust will be there and michelle tell us what the march organizers are going to talk about all the win of the main themes this year is they really want to get people to the polls for the two thousand eighteen election's so there's going to be a lot of advocacy they're they're they're expecting to have some people there signing people up to vote and then we can expect you know this is the hashtag me two year so we can expect to have a lot of people speaking about that as well as other issues you know as a healthcare reporter and particularly watching the people who will be there who are trying to get favor for their health care type reform issues um i've already spoken to several organizers that will be there canvassing in talking to people about single payer efforts in california and of course that's an issue that you've covered a lot in 2017 in it's going to be a big issue in 2018 as well right kpcc's michelle faust should be at the women's march tomorrow in downtown los angeles and you can hear her report starting live on weekend addition tomorrow morning at eight o'clock and of course throughout the morning we'll have more reports from michelle plus join us at 1 o'clock in the afternoon.

al joyner nick roman ron reporter california kpcc michelle faust los angeles new yorker david attenborough new york pershing square mit two year
"david attenborough" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the actions behind the word i think that's probably fair assessment that was bill mott mad the chief executive of vanguard of the us from manager so are we to read them what he said as that this is a warning he's making he sounding a warning note about where stock markets harass he's making a clear warning and he easily learn that many of fund management and investment professionals think the same thing here with markets gone higher and higher and higher than eventually history tells us the will be a correction and we're in quite an old extended period of highs drew given largely by the actions of central banks around the world the pump money into the system which is floated stock markets up now it looks aren't then that quantitive easing as it's known is coming to an end and there is a a natural feeling that there was going to be a correction of some con we hitting to the end of this year the 1987 market crash black mondays is called here in the uk we markets fell by 25 percent roughly i think mcnair probably hopes that is not going to be a 25 percent correction something a little more gentle than that that was that dominic o'connell thieves his business correspondent and a reminder that you're listening to business daily from the bbc with neiman white as sacrosanct later this month will see the release of the latest blue planet to be seen series written a narrated by the broadcaster and naturalised said david attenborough it is asked the title suggests all about the earth's oceans and in a separate bbc interview ahead of the series launch said david told the told us about some of the things he's come across while filming looking at the oceans and him a mother albatross comeback after having scour their own dr to go to feed this chick been away for weeks the bring about food and she opens her beacon the bags of food an outcome what rushdie the she found floating on them and the ball and food legit.

bill mott chief executive stock markets central banks uk mcnair dominic o'connell bbc rushdie neiman white david attenborough 25 percent
"david attenborough" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on Business Daily

"That was at dominic o'connell the bbc's business correspondent and a reminder that you're listening to business daily from the bbc with neiman wait i sat across out later this month will see the release of the latest blue planet to bbc series written a narrated by the broadcaster and naturalist sir david attenborough it is asked the title suggests all about the earth's oceans and in a separate bbc interview ahead of the series launch said david told the told us about some of the things he's come across while filming looking at the oceans and i am a mother albatross comeback after having scarred their own darty go to feed this chick and been away for weeks bring about food and she opened her beacon the bags begs food and outcome what plastic that she found floating on them and bore and field pray our well the new blue planet to series comes amid growing global calls for cutbacks in these of plastic earlier this year dame ellen macarthur the recordbreaking sailor threw her ellen macarthur foundation warned that there will be more waste plastic in the sea than fish by 2050 unless industry cleans up his act so what is industry doing well i spoke to unilever it makes a lot of consumer product shampoos detergents soaps and in less developed markets they sell these products in small single use plastic sachets great for low income consumers but a nightmare for the environment many of their sachets end up in landfill waterways and oceans david blunt shot is unity this chief research and development officer.

bbc david development officer dominic o'connell david attenborough ellen macarthur david blunt
"david attenborough" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"david attenborough" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Whoa i'm not an expert on this virus for more of right it takes over the brain a makes them climb towards the light is really quite craft the virus rarely because by making them climb high and then causing him to kind of not quite explode is not as dramatic as that but that surprise the virus over a wider area so you've got a better chance of infecting more caterpillars and also put by making him clients the top of the vegetation though a target for thirds casino birds flying on the go oh that's that's a cheap mailed ice on it the bird picks up the caterpillar and then spread stiff ours to new price where it can affect more caterpillars so it's really quite crafty barra similar is doing so basically this virus renders caterpillar basically useless other than tells it to go up the tree to the light and really march towards death yeah a it's a death march i mean there are any of its time the i've seen it isn't a david attenborough dvd in in in that it was at a tropical rainforest with the arrogance and this and climb to the top of the vegetation dr aid and then a mushroom grew out of its head so you're you're a staunched by what you what i'm saying i really was astonished on uh spoken to some of my colleagues and some of of obeyed working a lot longer than i happy that twenty five thirty is a knife never seen either so is quite special incredibly gruesome but i find it really really fascinating.

david attenborough