17 Burst results for "Dave Pond"

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

01:59 min | Last month

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

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"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

06:03 min | 2 months ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"So i go to be. Yeah i think so. I mean i would love to be in this house all the time But i don't know where else i would go. I really love it here. And i mean a nice. You know nice community here. No reading series here. You know. I do think the newsletter though and the catholic and that kind of stuff is sort of like my like stab at reading series or something. I have like a fantasy of having an outdoor reading series for a couple of months here and you know what my problem is that it's very hard to sustain when i reading search for me to sustain it over an extended period of time. I do it for two months. And i'm like well. That was a lot of work. I'm going to doing that anymore. That's you think the nets for free and you just get to make your own role. I don't know how to make stuff up and come up with come up with ideas. Yeah well you certainly don't need to provide the consistency. If no one is is paying you to ask you can try things right. I'll be honest with you even out of there's like paid subscribers. There's not that many but that there's enough describes on my newsletter that makes me feel like wow. I really have to do this every week. I committed to the newsletter for a year in my mind. That was really smart of you. Yeah i mean in my mind. that's it. I'm like i'm just gonna do it for a year. 'cause i i'm going to run out of things to say for sure and i would like to turn it into a. That's another protective of mine. Like i think that there is a way to take that stuff already exists and organize it in a certain way. I had really thought if i do this year. And i write a thousand words a week on it. That is actually going to be. You know fifty sixty thousand words by the end of the year. That's actually a book. And so i thought well maybe that's there's some way to turn this into a kind of literary motivational book. I have some other thoughts. That might be helpful. Yeah please i just think like. I just don't know what anyone doing whether their time if they're not a least helping other people a little bit. I don't know if that sounds preachy. Kinda like arrive at this place of like instead of like operating on instinct and china like participate. Where i could as i got older i thought how do i choose the best ways to use my time. How do i. How do i focus my energy in a really positive way and so i really thought doing the newsletter was going to be looking good and helpful. I love that you say that. I you know jamie time is truly are only finite resource. We think all these other things were finite resources like money but in truth time has no give whatsoever and so our challenge and it definitely applies to a conversation about careers but more of it's a broader conversation or challenges to figure out how to use it wisely and i think what i hear you saying is if you're not using it in service to others particularly if you've had some success already and maybe you're not using it wisely even if it's a little bit now also i just want to say one thing. Which is that. I have a book deal. I have a little financial stability at this moment. In my life. I do not have children. I have a stable home environment so this year has been for somebody like me all at had his time. You see what i'm saying. I have many friends who are married and have children and who are struggling to Make ends meet and you're starting to find the time to write or people who maybe don't have kids they have to work. You know five dollars or their caregiver to you. Know there's so many people who don't have the luxury of time. Like i do this year and i have been very conscious of that And also very conscious of people who are sell beaten down by the society for a variety of reasons and so this is a very small thing that i think. Do to support people who wanna right. Listen to me. It was so lovely to speak with you. It really thank you. That was jimmy burke. Her next book is a memoir. It comes out in about a year. It's called. I came all this way to me you. I can't wait to read it so this week on office hours. We're gonna talk about what it means to be. A giver wins. Have been helpful to you when who's helped you along the way so. Join us this wednesday afternoon at three pm eastern. We'll be on the link to news page. You can find us by following lincoln news or emailing. Hello monday at lincoln dot com link. Now if you like the show please take a moment right now to rate and review us on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen. We say this almost every week because it really is true. It helps listeners. Find us when you do this. Hello monday is the production of lincoln. The show is produced by sarah storm. Joe degeorge mixed our show put on was head of original audio video. Dave pond is our technical director. Mccague rear samantha. Roberson carrington york in victoria. Taylor give freely of their time in imagination. And we're so grateful. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. You also heard music from paddington bear. Dan roth is the editor in chief of lincoln jesse hembo. Our show is back next monday. Thanks for listening. We have this crazy brooklyn apartment with too many people who all are on top of each other and so today. I am at the neighbor's house in their babies nursery. So what you see around me are the trappings of a little boy named solomon who has two gay dads who ordinarily are like high style but kind of overwhelmed by two year old house like a tidal. The children's book day dad's it should be that yeah right..

Dan roth Dave pond sarah storm Joe degeorge two months jimmy burke lincoln today fifty sixty thousand words Taylor two year five dollars monday next monday china brooklyn victoria lincoln news this week two gay
"dave pond" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

02:33 min | 3 months ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"Word more than we're trying to receive it in so that means that it's more important that i'm talking my customer than she's talking to me not because i don't wanna listen. But because the more we can be they're hitting different facets of her life the more success we're going to have and you can't always see it as an roi look for it as that. Look for how you can keep communicating in keeping in touch especially when others pullback. That was rebecca. Mingka's be sure to check out her. Podcast silver women. I'm guest on this week's episode actually and we're gonna share it with you on thursday so watch for it in the hello monday feed and wow it has been a year a year since the pandemic really took hold in new york city and i started working from home trying to figure out how to make this show in our basement instead of our fancy studio and the empire state building. I remember my son would pick the equipment. He wasn't walking then talking now he runs and he won't be quiet and he's potty trained a lot can happen in ear. Come compare notes with us. This week at office hours will be convenient wednesday afternoon at three pm eastern remember. We've moved our meetings to the lincoln news page. So you can find us by following lincoln news or email us for a link that hello monday. At lincoln dot com. We'll always send one to you. If this episode really grabbed you. Please share it with a friend and we would love it. If he'd rate and review us on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your shows anx hello mondays. The production of linked in the show is produced by sarah store with help from madison shaffer. Joe degeorge mixture show florencia though is head of original audio and video. Dave pond is our technical director. Michaela rear in victoria. Taylor help us move. The needle on music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. You also heard music from paddington bear. Dan roth is the editor in chief of linked then. I'm jesse embassy next monday. Thanks for listening. So do this for forty five minutes for hello monday and then will reverse it and the only downside to that is You get to learn. I get to learn a lot about you before you learn a lot me so i feel a little shy to be really honest reverse that we can reverse it. I knew you and no no no. No i'm totally game for this..

Dave pond Dan roth madison shaffer Joe degeorge thursday Michaela jesse embassy next monday forty five minutes new york Mingka mondays this week This week Taylor lincoln dot com three pm eastern rebecca monday wednesday afternoon at
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

08:38 min | 4 months ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Ability of teams to have positive discourse difficult conversations. And i wanted to say this Gently because we all come from different affiliations here right. This is not about encouraging anybody to believe anything in particular. What i'm saying is conflict is a beautiful thing. When it is facilitated well and people have to learn to sit in each other's differences again we have forgotten how to be graceful in our difference and i am urging us for a return or maybe a bringing about for the first time of true empathy. This is not coddling but organizations. I think are not growing in their current. Da work because we want the staff to have transformative conversations in absence of conflict. Conflict is not yelling. It is satisfying okay. The word of satisfies. It is the combination of satisfying insufficient right. People have to be able to have satisfying insufficient conversations about what they believe. Equity assumes that every single perspective in your organization would be helping to define your journey together equity is not mandating one mindset. It says we want to co-exist in multiple mindsets. And i think that a lot of organizations have shied away from the productive yet transformative looked. Have you ever seen powerful change. Happen on the other side of silence entering quilty. I have not so. Why do we expect organizations to transform like that. I would venture to guess that inside a lot of organizations right now what you find a silence and fear. There's a desire to have these conversations. Lotta of people hiring for d. I in inside the organizations outside the organization a lot of discussion about diversity which as you point out in our first conversation is just the first step to this work but that is where we moved to and yet internally i think people are finding it perhaps more difficult to have a lot of these interpersonal conversations and shying away from it I think the biggest challenge for a lot of organizations as they haven't prioritized conversations. Y'all hear me and hear me well. Conversations are work. They are work. The ability to sit in non closure is also work. So it's we're not just having a conversation to go to a quick pd where we learn something for an hour. No people change when you allow them to have time to process their learning if we have not carved out things like affinity spaces if we don't have norms or brave space so brave. Space folks is different than safe-space see safe-space assumes that everyone has to feel safe and i'll tell you the hard thing. There are a lot of people who don't feel safe in the norm of safe-space. They don't feel comfortable enough to speak. Brave spaces are spaces that are created that allow for productive discourse so you encourage people to share their truest thoughts. We set up norms and conditions around feedback and helping people to understand the impact of something. You said brave spaces assume that you were going to be comfortable being uncomfortable. And if you don't create affinity space if you don't create brave space if we don't have prioritization around culture people will not talk. We have all been acculturated to leave our skeletons at home. No i want you to sit in this. 'cause you expect me to work like this all day and i just need you to know that type of conversation is not sort of taking over or ruining. Someone's day it is about creating the space for a truly empathetic to the way that the world shows up on different people that there are folks coming to work who have been heart on the way to work just because of how they look and they can't tell you and they should be able to tell you because of you expect them to work in those conditions. They should expect you to be able to hear the full truth of how they're living and it's not about bullying. It's about when you know how the world is treating me. you actually understand why equity matters. Equity is not. A checklist is not political. Complacency is not about ameliorating problems for people. It's about saying this world still doesn't treat everybody in the way that it should and it's deeper than race it also includes race but this is not able ism is about cognitive. Learning differences about sexism submissively about different language groups. It's about how much money you grew up with where you grew up. Oppression doesn't care who you are. It oppresses all of us. The differences some of us get more precision around race in others are getting more pressure around things that are not race but every single person is coming to work with a story they should be able to at least have space to discuss those stories. It doesn't feel good when your organization tells you they're doing equity but you don't have a chance to do your own storytelling and sharing about the kind of equity you need. So that's why these spaces matter even now more than other. I think just makes it clear what equity is really beneficial for everyone and not just a few. So donny said as we try to a close. I want to think about what you hope for. In twenty twenty one more hope for the year. I think the biggest one is that we continue to work on how we communicate with each other now. Communication to me is a long-term hope. But i want us to be able to have conversations by the end of the year where i could tell my story a narrative about growing up in east new york brooklyn at the same time. Somebody from rural community could tell me about the way that they lived there at the same time. Someone else from kham someplace completely else and we can leave that conversation. Feeling a sense of shared solidarity. I am hoping for empathetic listening and solidarity. That was doctor denise amande jackson. She calls herself a racial equity ghostbuster. I think it's a fitting description. Check out our work online at denisa. Samante dot com there. You can find information on her philosophies and the programs she leads this week on. Hello monday office hours. Were talking about working in diversity equity inclusion and belonging. If you work in the space cleaves brings something you wish you'd known when he started and if you're new to the space bring questions we'll convene at our usual time wednesday afternoon at three pm eastern and starting this wednesday parts new. You'll find us in a new place. We're moving to the lincoln news page to find us. Their follow lincoln news on in or email us at hello at lincoln dot com for the link if the subset resonates with you please share it with the friends. If you're a hello. Monday fed these rate and review. Us really helps. Thanks folks. hello. Monday as a production of linked in the show is produced by sarah storm. Joe degeorge mixture show is head of original audio and video. Dave pond is our technical director. Rear and victoria taylor sit with us in multiple perspectives. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. You also heard music from paddington bear. Dan rock is the editor in chief of lincoln. Jesse hampel cnx. Monday thanks for listening. like a little cute dog behind. Y'all that's my many puerto watch high body. Yeah can't that's scooter. Sasha monroe jackson. There's a name scooter. Also in k. A scoop macoutes. Scooby pie k. Eight scott scooter mick stephen's..

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

01:59 min | 6 months ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"You invite them and really encourage people to think seriously about doing on. That is great advice. Thank you dory that story clark. If you're looking for more information on how to level up your own plan b doors websites. Excellent place to start. She's at clark dot com. Now let's talk about you. Maybe the kovic shutdown made you totally rethink your life plan. Maybe it was peaceful protests across the world this month. Maybe you've already. Reinvented your career. And you have tips to share wherever you are on your journey. I hope you'll join me this week to talk about it over on. Hello monday office. Hours my producer. Sarah storm and i get together every wednesday at three pm eastern and go live from i linked in profile. It's our coffee break a chance to visit with listeners. And talk about the episode. What's in your mind when you think about reinvention. Hope you'll come and share your thoughts with us hello. Monday is a production of linked in the show was produced by sarah storm in madison schaefer. Joe degeorge mixture. Show put on cad ondo head of original audio and video. Dave pond is our technical director. My imagine victoria taylor and juliette pharaoh. Make sure to wear their masks when they go out. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. You also heard music from paddington. Bear den roth is the editor in chief of linked in. I'm jessi hempel see next monday. Thanks for listening. I'm going for tons of walks. Oh my god i That's been sort of my my little ritual. Because i'm sure this is the case for you too but like the time onscreen has maximize so much that i feel like i'm in front of a computer like seven consecutive hours. So you can drive you crazy pretty fast so i took a two hour rock this morning. i will probably walk tonight to just just to kind of get out also because my gym is closed so..

sarah storm Joe degeorge Dave pond victoria taylor juliette pharaoh clark den roth jessi hempel schaefer Sarah madison paddington
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

01:55 min | 6 months ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Of our products better all of our industries. Better thank you. That was deb. Lou vice president of marketplace at facebook. Check out the show notes of this episode for a link to the article that inspired this conversation. Today's episode deb speaks a lot about the importance of using empathy and feedback to build better products while we think that applies to hello monday to our annual survey is live this week and we would love it if you would take five minutes to fill it out for us. It'll help at the programming next year. And twenty twenty one. You can check it out at lincoln dot com forward slash. Hello monday again. Takes five minutes and we'd really appreciate it. That's lincoln dot com forward slash. Hello monday and don't forget office hours this week as usual producer sarah storm. I will convene wednesday afternoon at three pm. If you'd like the lincoln advance you can follow me at jessi. Hempel on linked in or you can email us at hello. Monday at linked dot com. Hope to see you there. Hello mondays a production of linked in the show is produced by sarah storm. Joe degeorge star show. Frontier yondo is head of original audio and video. Dave pond our technical director. Juliet farrow and victoria. Taylor are leaning into. Hello monday our music was composed just for us but mysterious brake master cylinder. You also heard music from paddington bear. Dan wrought the editor in chief of lincoln. I'm jesse both see next monday. Thanks for listening. Pause one second yes in the way that in the new pandemic life. The dog got into my lunch. And she's very loud. Unless i undo it so geology is no problem. You definitely make your lunch. The dog has finished the tortilla chips but luckily she stopped at the crunching very old kali. Who is very pleased with the fact that we're now home all day..

sarah storm deb Lou Joe degeorge Dave pond Juliet farrow Hempel jessi lincoln facebook victoria Taylor jesse Dan
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

02:04 min | 10 months ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"It's starting up a business or you know the rise of organic and sustainable food and and healing the environment while we're doing that. If. I could tell stories in that realm I. that. That's kind of where I'm hoping. That was Tom Deacon. You can visit his farm and learn more about their say virtually at fabled foods dot com. So, which of your passion projects have grown and blossomed during this incredibly unusual year? Where are you putting your time? How's IT paying off? I hope you'll join me this week to talk it over at Hello Mondays office hours. Our producer Sarah get together every Wednesday at three PM Eastern and go live from my Lincoln. Profile. It really is our coffee break a chance for us to visit with each other in listeners and to talk about the episode. How are you balancing doing the things you love against working from home or searching for your next job? I hope you'll come and share your thoughts with us. Now, if you like the show, please rate us in Apple podcasts, it really does help new listeners find us. Hello Mondays the production of Lincoln the show is produced by Sarah. Storm. With help from Madison Shaffer. Joe degeorge mixed our show for see it is head of original audio and video Dave Pond is our technical director Victoria Taylor and Juliette Pharaoh cannot wait to visit fable with us when we can take field trips again. A music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. You also heard music from Paddington bear. Dan Roth is the editor in chief of Lyndon. I'm Jesse Humble. See next. Monday. Thanks for listening. The reason wearing sunglasses last night I was was harvesting our second round of honey at of these hives and Again I played everything safe. I wore the whole be suit. We extracted the honey. Walk over to my car, and that's a thirty yards away from the APIARY and got out of the be suit and the minute I took it off once Deng the in the face right near my eyes. So again, that's why I'm wearing sunglasses my face..

Tom Deacon Lincoln Sarah Madison Shaffer Paddington Jesse Humble Deng Dan Roth Apple Dave Pond Joe degeorge producer Juliette Pharaoh editor in chief Lyndon Victoria Taylor technical director
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

03:07 min | 10 months ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Comes lack of loneliness comes connection of a different kind you know physical communities can be very isolated. So, the Internet providing almost literal lifeline to people more is. is newly possible uniquely possible because of this tool and so yeah I don't I'm not in the camp of like Shut it down completely not lead or Neo Luddite but I think I am in. camp. We have to exercise our power and we've. Engaged so much said like all the Internet over there. Those people make that we can make that decision. We built something different. We still can, and we're always going to be wrestling with this. Because there's nothing perfect in this world. That was Barrington date Thurston. You can find him online at Barrington date dot com. And his new show how to citizen Barrington Day premiers next week be sure to check it out. So it's August. It's that time in August winning normal year. Half the people I know have their out of office on their emails. But this isn't a normal year of course. So, this week on Hello Mondays office hours were talking about the last Hurrah of summer summer twenty twenty this summer. It's almost Labor Day weekend in the states. You might be on vacation or barbecues are parties. But this year, they may be happening in your own backyard. But. We're still playing it really safe. Are you? Join me and our producer Sarah Storm for our weekly office hours Wednesday afternoon at three PM Eastern you can find us on Lincoln live by following me Jessi, hempel on link. We, hope to see their. And now, if you like the show, please rate us on Apple podcasts, it really helps new listeners find us. Hello Monday is the production of linked in the show is produced by Sarah Storm with help from medicine. Shaffer. Joe degeorge mixture show foot. Is Head of original audio and video Dave pond us our technical director, Victoria Taylor and Juliette Pharaoh our beloved members of our collective. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder and you also had music from Paddington bear. Dan Roth is the editor in chief of Lincoln. JESSI hempel. Thanks for listening CENEX Monday. I remember that we've met a Dole, remember the meal. But what do you recall of this alleged meal? I feel a little bit better recalling nothing about it apart from really enjoying it laughing a lot. I. Think some friend introduced us and it was a wonderful lunch and then. Then we never emailed again. I Friend Day. Gone Wrong I. Guess. No we had to accomplish so much that we needed that that to breathe and it was it took eight years and we finally exhausted the good energy in. Karma from that..

JESSI hempel Sarah Storm Lincoln wrestling Paddington editor in chief Joe degeorge Dave pond Apple Shaffer Dan Roth Dole producer Juliette Pharaoh technical director Victoria Taylor
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

11:38 min | 1 year ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"I am not a hand holder. I am not nurturing but I do believe in encouraging my students to believe they are good writers and that they can become better writers because an academia there is this rhetoric that students are bad writers and that each generation of students is is bringing about the end of the written word with their Impoverished writing skills. This has been going on since the eighteen hundreds and it's really kind of adorable that we are so short sighted when it comes to our students abilities and so I tried to reset that narrative in my classroom and let students know that you can accomplish anything. But you're going to have to work really hard and I'm going to challenge you and I'm going to give you more work than you can probably get done. But I'm still going to do it and we're GonNa see what happens at the end of it. All and so some students love my classroom and some students hate it and call me a battle-axe and I'm fine with either one. But we have a good time and I love working with students. They are so interesting and they always show me how to take risks in my own work because I see the risks that they take. I see how they start to learn the rules of writing and then grapple with the realization that they cannot only work within the rules they can break the rules as they see fit as long as they do so with purpose. And it's always fun to see that realization to see what they do with that realization. What is the interplay like between your teaching and your writing? If tomorrow you were told you never had to teach again. Would it impact your writing? No it would not because I think that there are all kinds of ways to teach and learn and so even if I'm not in the traditional classroom I am going to be learning from reading and from engaging with other writers I think the one thing that would change is that I probably would write more because I would have to grade less. How much should commercial success matter? I think it should be an end goal and I think it's really disingenuous to suggest that it shouldn't because how do you expect to pay your rent and your health insurance and the light bill? You know the reality is that life costs money. And there's always this weird notion that you should only create for the love of creation and don't worry about material things but like who is taking care of the material things for a lot of people if you don't have a trust fund like you have to worry about the material things so I don't think that you should set commercial success as a goal but commercial viability should absolutely be coal Doesn't mean you shouldn't take chances or experiment or be radical but it does mean that it's okay to want to make a good living for yourself as a writer. It is absolutely okay you know. The problem isn't writers carrying about commercial. Success the problem is that it's so difficult to achieve Because there are so many gatekeepers who only allow very specific kinds of work past the gates. This goes back to what you were saying about empowering your students to feel that they can be good writers. How do you do that? I tell that they're good writers and it sometimes people just need to know they just need to hear that and then you know I want. I'm giving them feedback. I try to be as constructive as possible but I'm also really honest like all right. And W T F on a story and I will say like what the Hell you doing here and this doesn't make sense. This is nonsense. They need to know the truth. I don't mollycoddle them because they're not gonNA grow as writers if you just keep them in a safe little cocoon but I'm not there to tear them down. I'm not there to insult them or their point of view and so telling the truth while reinforcing that they are good at what they're doing and they're going to get better by putting in the work is how I approach that. So your late thirties. That meant that for fifteen years. Maybe more you consider yourself a writer but the the world hadn't bestowed commercially that distinction upon you. I WanNa know how you how you nurtured the writer in yourself. I just wrote all the time and I read constantly as well I. I exercised the writing muscle and wrote every single day for quite a long time every day I would go to work or school and then come home and right and not sleep very much and then do it all again the next day because writing was something and is still something that I find pleasurable. I enjoy it. I'm not a tortured writer and I it. Also in many ways was self-medication because it was a way to lose myself in the work and not have to worry about the seemingly trivial concerns of the day to day world so my favorite read of last year was Hunger Book. That really stayed with me and in fact knowing that we are talking this week. I read that it Last week and you said an interview with Debbie Millman who believes your partner now issues you said to her it terrifying to treat yourself to tell the truth about what it's like to live in your body and it just got me to thinking. Roxanne. Why is it so important to you to tell the truth? I think it's important to tell the truth because all too often we only hear one kind of truth And that is the truth of a white heterosexual able bodied men. And they get to be the arbiters of what matters. And what does not the more that people with marginalized voices are able to articulate their trues. Damore that we can have a better understanding of what it means to be human in different kinds of bodies and When we come from different cultures and different walks of life and so it's not a noble thing it's really more about just expanding our understanding of the human condition and in playing a very small part in that you have said that that was a scary topic to take on to write a book about. I mean it's been a year and a half since the book came out probably been longer since he began to write about it. And I'm wondering what distance has done for you as you look back at that book. It's a good question. I think distance has made me realize that it really is important to talk about living in different kinds of bodies that it's not a vanity project in any way and that everyone struggles with living in a body in one way or another and be the seeing how people have responded to the book regardless of the kind of body they live in has really expanded my understanding of just the challenges of being human and being in a body so distances certainly afforded me that. So what's the relationship like with your audience? 'cause you're pretty open about yourself so. I'm sure they must feel like they know you. You know it's a complicated relationship because on the one hand I am always happy that my work is reaching people in that my work resonates with people on the other hand. It's really challenging. Because people give me their stories and it's a lot to carry my own trauma and my own history as well as the stories and histories of other people and so I've had to develop very firm boundaries because I'm not a therapist and writing. This book was actually not therapy. It was work and it was a very specific kind of work and so I have to make clear to people that I honor their stories. And I'm I'm flattered that they trust me enough to share their stories with me but I can't always carry them in addition to my own. Do you think that that is specific to Memoir Agenda in specifically memoir written by women? I think it is and I think that people have very narrow ideas of the role that black women should play in that they often expect black women to be maternal and caretaking. And that's not my role in your life I'm a professional. This is not all it or emotion there is craft and rhetoric and choices that have gone into this show of the work the of it the articulation of the ideas. And I think it's important to remember that we oftentimes dismiss women's work as emotional and we act as if craft choices have not been made in the composition of that work and so I always try to remind people that this was work and I enjoy my work but it wasn't. It's not a diary few decades from now. When you're looking back at your career what do you want to have accomplished? I want to have created opportunities for other black women. Writers to thrive in this world. Thank you for taking the time to talk with me about why you do what you do how you do what you do. More than welcome thank you. That was Roxane. Gay Professor Critic writer you can check out her podcast here to slay which she hosts with Dr Tracy McMillan COTTAM. This week's episode. Got Me thinking about what it means to teach people. Well Roxanne highlighted this idea. She said it had a lot to do with having confidence in them and with telling them that it made me think of this amazing high school teacher that I had her name was ellen. Myers you know. She told me I was smart. And then I was a good writer and looking back. I bet she said it to a lot of the kids but I thought that that feedback was just from me and that made me feel that I really mattered and I think a lot of people probably have someone like that a teacher or mentor. Who made the difference for them and I want to hear about this folks so write to us at. Hello Monday at linked in or post on Lincoln using the Hashtag. Hello Monday and join US next week. For Conversation with Wilson Tang a decade ago. He inherited his family's Chinese restaurant growing up with immigrant parents. My parents wanted me to be able to have a white collar job and own restaurant and more specifically a Chinese restaurant in Chinatown was definitely far from what they would want need to do. The restaurant was a hole in the wall joint in Chinatown and could gone the way a lot of New York's restaurants do out of business instead. Wilson grew it into a global brand. That was so popular that he and his family are now in ads for the gap. Hello Mondays the production of Lincoln. The show is produced by Laura. Joe degeorge Mister Show. Dave pond is our technical director Mayenne. Genie.

writer Debbie Millman Wilson Tang Chinatown US Dave pond New York Joe degeorge Lincoln Laura Roxanne partner Myers school teacher technical director Dr Tracy McMillan COTTAM ellen Professor
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

11:34 min | 1 year ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Four two thousand five. This is going to be the most challenging moment for a business leader and founder and he startup. There's never been anything like this Brenna hand It it's going to create some opportunities that we we just can't even begin to imagine you know for example. Think about your relationship to home. I mean how how many of us have spent so much time concentrated time in our homes. Most of us get up in the morning. We have a cup of coffee and we are out of the House and then we come back at night and we have a quick dinner and we watch TV and go to sleep. We don't spend like I think. A lot of people are discovering parts of their homes or apartments are discovering their appliances. They're discovering the the food in the refrigerator. I feel like that has followed three distinct segments so far from me that relationship with home. And it's something that I'm hearing from a lot of people as well. There was that first window of time week two weeks where everyone was just so overwhelmed and people were like how the Heck Hucker we supposed to do this and then there was this period of time where people kind of figured out a new rhythm and maybe they were happy with it and maybe they were. You figured it out. But now we're opening into this new period of time in the most interesting thing I hear from people is when they say about any aspect of their former life. Oh I can't go back to that. I can't go back to eating that way or I can't go back to being in an office for nine hours at a time because every I can't go back to. That is an opportunity for something new to exist. A thousand percent right like think about how many people now around the country who are lucky enough and privileged enough to work from home are asking themselves. Why am I commuting? Forty five minutes to an hour a day or asking themselves. Why do I live in such an expensive city when I can? Do this clearly. From anywhere else you. Why do I need to live in in San Francisco right? I think companies like we are going to have already had huge challenges. They're gonNA have enormous challenges after this because people are going to are going to start to to have these conversations. Do I need to be there every day? Can we replicate things via zoom? I mean I think companies have spent a lot of money on marketing and on team building exercises which are important And I'm bring teams together for you know. Retreats are going to start to say. Well maybe we. Do you know three retreats a year via zoom. But we only do one in person. That's really where the opportunities are going to be. I mean part of me is sort of. I hesitate to to sort of push this too hard. Because I'm a big believer in human connection you know and I think most of us are we needed. It's a cliche right. Humans are social animals. Right Blah Blah Blah. We all need that that human to human connection. It's true that people are in the same room. There's an energy you know in energy that we know exists but Can we get pretty close to that? through video conferences as a as a substitute for that sometimes. I think the answer is probably yes. I think we're figuring that out and we're also on the cusp above all kinds of new technologies that could take us closer there and may now be sped along right exactly guys learn so much about how other people start new things but of course. He's an entrepreneur to he left radio for podcasting before that was even a thing that people did and eventually built his own show and then many shows so I asked him to tell me about how he got started with. Podcasting will that really was a result of a failure? I mean my whole career. I I loved being a reporter. I loved it so much. I started out As an Internet. Npr in the late nineties. And all I want to do is be a reporter and I the thing I loved about being a reporter was that gave me a Guinea cover to talk to anyone. 'cause I'm I'm naturally introverted. And I'm very shy and I have a hard time just walking up to somebody and saying hi. I'm Cairo's I it's just I don't have that personality. Always admired people like that. Who can just talk to anyone? And I'm I I just have a lot of like self conscious kind of energy but for some reason having no in my hand gave me this like ability to talk to anybody I felt like I could just go to somebody at notepad and I could say hey. I'm telling story and and so early on you know writing for the Washington city paper or you're seeing my name in Prenton in a in somewhere that pay me twenty. Five bucks just so thrilling. It was so amazing to an end so for me like my whole career. I thought you know I WANNA do this. I want to do that. I WANNA be. Foreign correspondent was covered covered wars. I I mean it was like a totally different world. I was overseas for six years in Iraq and Afghanistan and in Jerusalem and Came back to Washington and And I became a host on. Npr on all things considered the weekend host. But my my thought was that you know I really should be the weekday host like that was the important job and that was sort of the brass ring. I was kind of going for because I thought that that was that was the important job with respect and all these things and And when it was time when there was a slot opened I DIDN'T GET IT I. I wasn't selected for it You know I I worked on weekend. All things considered for three years three and a half years. I really put every single part of myself into that show and I didn't get it. It was really crushing because I thought well maybe it kind of forces you to to sort of sit back and say well maybe I do suck you know the Like if these people who making or making decisions about what sounds good on the radio. Don't want me won't maybe I suck and maybe I should like look for something else and I really did. This is about two thousand eleven. I really did start to think. Okay I've got to find a different line of work and Just want to pause right there. Second first of all to acknowledge the amazing contributions that you made to that show. I mean you introduce really. Oh my God I played you. That wasn't the writing contest. You yes three minute fiction and what's amazing. I love that. But you don't need me to tell you that you were in fact this and that speaks to something that I think. We can't say often enough to often. We were going along in our careers and we land inside institution. Maybe one that we respect and maybe one whose values are pretty closely aligned with our own and before we even really think about it. We look up. And we realize we've made that institutions objectives our own without really thinking about what our own paths and passions are in wherein successes. I think that's where that feeling I just resonates like maybe I suck. Maybe it comes from that. Yeah I think that's right and I think also familiarity. You know when you're working somewhere. I mean there are people that NPR who've known me. Since I was twenty twenty two years old you know I'm forty five now so it's also different. You know I was looking for something else. Anything Really And I was also really frustrated with the news I I was already at that point in two thousand twelve. There was already a lot of polarization. I was just tired of it. I didn't I got into news to like because I thought I wanNA make a contribution to the world in some way to make the world better place and I didn't feel I was doing that In around that time Ted came. Npr and they said we want to collaborate. And I heard about this and I found the people who are sort of trying to figure this out. I applied for that job and there was a process and there were a bunch of applicants and I got the job as Ted Radio. Hour host in two thousand twelve and the crazy thing about it was when I left all things considered when I left the news side of NPR. I literally got emails from some of the most respected brilliant journalists and NPR. Who were like? What are you doing like a? Why are you leaving the news division to do a? What a podcast. And why would somebody listened to his show about one theme about one the same thing for an hour? We came up with this concept which became Ted Radio. Hour and And the first year was kind of quiet. I mean it was a podcast. And but then man when Syria launched when that show launched it like changed everything every boat out there like rose with that tied including Ted Radio Hour and all of a sudden to lots of people. I became a podcast or like I. I always thought of myself as a radio journalist for like a radio host and I would get people saying I love your podcast and it took me a couple of years to to kind of like not to kind of flinch. Right heard that because I was like I have a radio show or you know but now almost everywhere I go introduces a podcast. Or which is so cool. You know like I and it's I fell into it as well. You say accidentally and I just think back to ten minutes ago when you were telling me about the shop guy. He came up with this thing. But then something shifted in the culture and the economy and the world was ready for that thing and maybe cereal was your chop fan was it was. That was our shop. If I'm moment cereal was such a big deal because it was the first podcast. It was so main stream like it was covered on Saturday night. Live and you know they were on the late night. Talk shows thank you guy that sort of a wonderful moment for us to wrap up with. Thank you for joining me today. Thank you so much. That was Skyros his new book how I comes out in September and check out his show. Wisdom from the top on luminary guy will be with us this week for office hours. We're doing them every week. Now it's just been a great way to get to know a bunch of you. You can find us on linked in every Wednesday at three PM EASTERN. Follow me on linked in if you. WanNa get a reminder. Sarah and I will grab our mid afternoon. Coffey's sitting are most comfortable chairs and this week guy will be with us. Come ask him you own questions. Time is especially limited these days. We're trying to work care for kids. Keep it all together and I'm just really glad you've spent some of it with us. If you liked the show we hope you do. Please rate US ON APPLE PODCASTS. It takes two seconds and it really helps new listeners. Find US Hello Mondays. A production of linked in the show is produced by Sarah Storm with help from Madison. Her Joe degeorge mixed show any Ondo Head of original audio and video. Dave pond is technical director. My Man Genie Victoria Taylor. Michaela greer and Juliette row are leading from their living rooms. Right now our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder and you also heard music from Paddington bear. Dan Roth is the editor in chief of Lincoln. Jessi HEMPEL BILL. See next Monday. Thanks for listening.

Npr Ted Radio reporter Brenna founder Washington San Francisco Paddington Sarah Storm Prenton Jessi HEMPEL radio journalist Genie Victoria Taylor Joe degeorge Dave pond Dan Roth Michaela greer Syria
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"And I mean it helped me or get out of my way. And that's what people who have resources and who have the ability to help a day. What you're not going to do is get stopped me from getting what I want you can. You can talk about it on the wall. You can say all you want you can tweet about it with your little thumbs. But YOU'RE NOT GONNA get in my way to do it. You talk in that answer about the necessity of community and doing things. Sometimes that they will or maybe they won't benefit you but they will benefit the person who comes along after you and keeping that in mind and so I do want to bring us back to out in tech which is part of the reason why we are here today. It is the primary reason. Why we I Sat entity this this It's a pretty powerful organization. You've spoken to their events before and so why. Why does a community like out? In Tech Matter Ooh a post pandemic I mean I do recognize I am black first and then I'm gay then I'm Queer and then I'm a woman though those the order that I think about and I'm thirty nine I I remember when I when I was sixteen or so after I had been outed after my mom knew I was out. I pretty much was okay and I said something in a class once where I wrote I wrote this story about coming out and I kind of came out in the class. Do the story project that we had and I got a lot of flack for it and I was very nervous to talk about it and I had to read it out loud to the class and you know people some people laugh. Some people didn't say anything. Some people are like clapping. Whatever but I knew. Some people didn't like it fast for ten fifteen years later this was when I was sixteen fast forward ten fifteen years later. I get a message on facebook from someone who was in that class when I read that out and to me she had always been like the girl next door all American. She was a athlete. Very smart. Very Blond Very Texan. You know where I was living and I thought you know she is what she is. She's dating this guy. She is what she. She told me she was gay and that by hearing me she couldn't make a sound. She couldn't cry. She could say anything to me. She couldn't even move her face to make a reaction but by hearing me. Tell my story that day in that class. I saved her from ending her life because she just knew she couldn't be gay and be okay and the way in her body right and you just never know who you are affecting and these types of organizations aren't just for accolades or just for membership or just for conversation. Even they can be a lifeline to some people because it was very recent and still today and a lot of ways where people were not accepted for being who they are in this way and so it's it can be really important especially when you're looking at your career. Maybe you've lost your job. Maybe you're you feel uncertain. Maybe your company's not doing well and you have these groups that you can. You can feel a kinship with and go to. I feel so similar I feel so privileged about the fact that in two thousand twenty. We have the opportunity to be so much more present in every aspect of who we are and it's such a privilege that how can we not? I think about that all the time on the podcast talked pretty openly about my wife or my son and I don't even think about that but in your breath lamb. I'm coming out. I'm just I'm being who I am and every once in a while more than every once in a while I'll get a note from somebody listening. Who says a listen because of that because I feel seen when I hear that even interested in tech or careers I feel seen when I see someone who sounds looks like me. Intern An Arlington. That is what you do for our community. It's what you do as a leader intact it's what you do as a founder and investor and it's what you do with your book. We're really excited for it. And we hoping that it has a great launch we to thank you very much appreciate it. So that was Arlan Hamilton. Her Bug comes out in May fifth. It's called it's about damn time. Thanks to Arlen to out in tech for supporting me and for making this conversation possible and here it. Hello Monday we really do want to hear from you. This idea. That Arslan has that she is underestimated and that itself is her superpower. It's really cool idea so I want to hear from you about how you've been underestimated and how you manage to turn it around. What's your secret superpower? Join our conversation by emailing me. Hello Monday at Lincoln Dot Com. You can also respond to it on my post on lead-in using the HASHTAG. Hello Monday also studying Wednesdays. I'm going to be holding office hours if you follow me on Lincoln or if you show up my profile at three. Pm Eastern on Wednesday afternoon. You can find me live and we can chat. I'd really love to see you there if you like our show. Please rate US on Apple. Podcasts IT takes two seconds and it helps me listeners. Find US hello. Monday is a production of Lincoln. The show is produced by Sarah Storm and Madison Schaefer. Joe De Giorgi Mixture show. Francie does head of original audio and video. Dave pond is our technical director. My Man Genie Victoria Taylor. Michaela greer and Juliette Pharaoh invest in the show. Every week our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. You also heard me sick from Paddington. Bear Den rock the standard or and chief of Lincoln. I'm Jessi Hempel. Stay home if he can and I'll see next Monday. Thanks for listening..

Lincoln Lincoln Dot Com Jessi Hempel Genie Victoria Taylor Dave pond Arlan Hamilton Joe De Giorgi Michaela greer Paddington Arslan Arlen Intern Apple founder Francie technical director Juliette Pharaoh Arlington Sarah Storm
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Of course even if you're not doing that and we aren't doing that neither of us is To be perceived as during that could be problematic. What is the balance? Yeah thank you for all. You're doing for artists. It's really cool. Thank you Jessie. So what have we got coming up next there? We have an incredible array of artists. A we have a Gregoria Rabea coming live from Columbia. He's Billboard Charting Artists Madeline Peru. One of the best jazz singers of all time. She's losing her materialist. Half French inspired half American Inspire Mandy. Gonzalez who stars in Hamilton will be appearing on the broadcast Janna Hurson. Who's the founder of Grammy Award? Winning motamer records will be there and Claudia Acuna is a Latin. Grammy nominated artists as well so incredible artists. And we're going to be had We have household names that will be sharing with you soon. Some big celebrities who've expressed interest in. We're just kind of working out the logistics in day so stay tuned. We'll hope you'll see some some beautiful work coming through on the quarantine concert series wonderful. Thank you conveyor athletic. Thank you that was Kabeer. Sehgal to see the quarantine concert series. You can tune in to Lincoln or facebook or youtube or twitter or instagram every night at ten PM Eastern. If you're a music fan at all I really encourage you to check it out. Laura dern anti a Broadway star in a TV after. She's got an incredible voice and she can pack a theater with fans but as a teenager. She said she felt a little bit more out of the loop like an ugly duckling highschool musicals where where she felt seen so in high schools canceled musical across the country. Laura invited the young stars to sing for her on social media with the HASHTAG sunshine songs. She expected maybe twenty videos. Here's what happened instead now. It's like almost five thousand videos that have been sent in in the my original post has been seed like almost four million times. Will I said that they should Post a video of themselves or any rehearsal footage or anything that they may have had and tag sunshine songs but it's grown so far beyond just kids who are disappointed about their musical now. It's become like parents in their kids singing and dancing together. And you know kids in college and four year olds and it's really expanded beyond even my original intention which is fantastic and now my friend. Kate Mary Day. She's a mediator down south. She and I are partnering with an Organization Organization called K. Four. We're going to Sort of put curate These videos into like thirty minute. Virtual variety shows which can then be sent to senior living centers hospitals and to any isolated person or anyone. Frankly who would like access to these songs but doesn't have social media so I asked for people to please email us their submissions to Gosh can remember The sunshine concert at gmail.com So you can either submit a video there with the understanding that it will be sent to hospitals senior centers etc or you can request it so if you are a hospital worker or if you work at a senior center or if you know someone who's isolated you can request on their behalf and what it'll be is basically in e newsletter so as long as they have email and can click a link there. Good this is a one hundred percent of charitable endeavor. No one's making money off of this. This is just purely. You know to bring some joy to people who aren't on instagram and twitter. My friend Kate and I were talking about. What can we do to be of service? This is a way that I can be of service but I think during this time that is just a global emergency. I think we're seeing this desire for interconnection and I think the best way we can facilitate that right now is using the Internet. That's Laura Ben Anti on the sunshine songs if you want to hear sunshine songs for yourself. Search the Hash tag on twitter. I do it at least a couple of times a week and it really cheers me up. And if you want to hear more from Laura check out the bonus episode. We release last week. You can find it anywhere you listen to. Hello Monday. We've been in this new normal for well over a month now and we spent a lot of weeks speaking to it as best we can and now we wanna know where are you at. What do you need from us? What's Monday look like to you right? Now what kind of stories help you get through yours? Write us at. Hello Monday at Lincoln Dot com or respond on linked in using the HASHTAG. Hello Monday and if you like our show please write us an apple. Podcasts takes two seconds and it helps me listeners. Find US hello. Monday is production of Lincoln. The show is produced by Sarah Storm. Joe degeorge mixed our show floor at Endo is head of original audio in video. Dave pond is technical director. My Engineer Victoria Taylor and Michaela. Greer and Juliette Perot are steadfast creative community. Online music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder and you also heard music from Paddington bear. Dan Roth is the editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jessi Hempel. Stay home if he can see next Monday. Thanks for listening. It's really nice here. Haven't spent this much time in the closet since I was fifteen. You got dresses back here. This weird shirt I got in Turkey at a flea market. You know this is my parents. Dining room are you in Houston. Houston LANTA yeah..

twitter Laura dern Lincoln Grammy Award Kate Mary Day Claudia Acuna Gregoria Rabea Madeline Peru Columbia Jessie Laura Ben Turkey Jessi Hempel highschool Lincoln Dot Janna Hurson Houston LANTA Kabeer instagram
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"I've achieved a level of proficiency and mastery to the point where I can feel confident in what I do. I can read a script and break it down. If I'm acting and enter directing I I know the the the dramaturge I've studied this for over forty years. I've been doing it for so long. I do it reflexively. I don't have to think a lot about it. And and I think that's where my current level of confidence comes from. It's it's it's a knowingness right. That is just not available to us when when we're just starting out. Yeah you'd like to believe when we're young that that we know at all like I said we were really just bullshitting. Yeah I mean it is so you know that that confidence it makes me think about how in your profession a critical part of your profession. Is that other people. Watch your performance. Take it in and judge you for constantly and I'm curious what that experience has been like for you over the arc of your career. One of the reasons why I I became so attached to developing different skill sets was the discomfort that that that aspect of being a performer created for me. I was a lot more concerned when I was younger. About the opinion of others and the opinion of others occupied a much larger space in in my overall personal zeitgeist. The older I have become the less. I rely upon that for for feedback that I feel like benefits me and my process. I still care about what other people think it. Just I just don't care as much or in the same way because I have more confidence in my ability to execute at a level that more often than not results in an outcome of which I am proud my opinion of how I do. It has taken on a greater weight in my life than the opinion of others. Wow Gosh Lavar. I hope that one day I can say that looking back on my own career. It's a solid thing to strive for. I wished that for re body because we we. We live in a society where we are constantly seeking the approval of others and it's baked into the equation where performance or concern you know you. Are you depend upon the approval of others in order to be cast and to make a living right so reaching a place in my life where again I give more weight to knowing that I'm professional I I show up. I read my eight-game I said Brie. Brie bring your a game where you might as. Well stay at home right totally. My standard is to bring it and and bring all of me to the moment. And if I'm able to do that if I do your best more than your best you cannot do if I'm doing my best. Then that's all require. Yeah if I look back and see what will you know I? I was really slacking in that moment and I could have done better. That's my fault that's on. Yeah I walk away knowing I did everything I brought everything I could to that effort then. I'm good I'm good. Say More often than not it's GonNa result in a positive outcome and when I say positive outcome means a something that has value not simply for me but for all parties concerned which brings us back to now and where we are and I don't WanNa end our conversation. Lavar without asking you. What would you wish for everyone listening right now? If you don't already know what your purpose in life is I I wish for you that you discover it discerning who we are in. Why we're here is fundamentally I think the most important thing a human being can do. And so I. I wish for everybody that they come into an awareness of of their purpose in life. Whether that's being a parent or a paratrooper. It doesn't matter. Discover why you're here and then do that thing with all of the purpose passion that you can muster thank you. Gosh I feel so hopeful about the world now. Lavar thank you well I do too. You have helped me Jesse. Remind me in this now moment of who I am and why I'm here and you. You have given me opportunity to get outside of myself. You've given me an opportunity to just show up and be me Jesse and for that I thank you. Well I'm wishing you save times moments of joy in the weeks to come and please whatever you do keep reading stories Jessi Hempel. Thank you very much for reminding me of who I am today and giving me an opportunity to stand in that. That was Lavar Burton if you want to hear more from him. He's reading live on twitter three times a week. Visit him at Lavar Burton. So what are you reading this week? I'm not gonNA pretend that I have a lot of spare time for sitting back and reading books right now with the kid job. I really don't but books are offering me a certain escape Right now I'm reading Glennon. Doyle's untamed because she's coming on the show next week. I want to know what you're reading. Give me some recommendations at Hello Monday at Lincoln Dot Com. That's hello Monday at Lincoln DOT COM or post on Lynton under the HASHTAG. Hello Monday if you like our show. Please rate on Apple podcasts. It takes two seconds helps me listeners. Find US hello. Monday is the production of Lincoln. Show is produced by Sarah Storm with help from Madison Schaefer. Joe De Giorgi Mixed. Show put on C. Show is head of original audio and video. Dave pond our technical director. My Engineer Victoria Taylor. Michaela rear and Juliette Fro can't go anywhere but they can do anything. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. You also heard music from Paddington bear. Dan Roth is the editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jessi Hempel. Stay home if he can see next Monday. And thanks for listening by in this place. I can go twice. Hey Look it's book Reading Rainbow. Need that right now. One brands to know ways to grow the Reading Rainbow..

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"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"You really think you're going to change that. So you can decide to be the person waiting around to be the person change it how do I how do I get him? Development of how do we get them to overcome this problem? And you have to decide. Is that really an upside that you WANNA play? What if you accepted? You're never going to be a VP in this company. What would that then free you because it starts with Ono and then you get over the Oh no you get through the Oh no okay and now it's just oh Oh Chicago no two. Oh Oh oh says well how could I make my life more interesting here? How can make more money? What do I want more interest? Do I want more influenced to? I want more income. What what am I after? So if I wanted to make more money here will the sales guys have this unlimited upset with bonus. I should go out into the field you know if I would have more influence. Well that's the project. Were this really important qualitatively around here not have very strong influential voice but I'll never be VP. If I just you know a really what is a level? I probably have to do it. At another more interest on wikipedia lateral could become the internal consultant. There are a lot of ways that can go. Then I'm now able to. The trade off. Decision is that alternate available reality attractive enough to accept the compromise and not becoming a VP. And if it's not I gotTA GET OUTTA. Here we have. That's unstuck the yeah. There's a thing in the book about the best. Theoretical option versus the best doable option. And most people are stuck on the theoretical. You know it's not fair that I can't have what I want. I should be able to have what I want because theoretically right it should just be merit based well the world. Isn't that way in. The best doable option might be right. Go lateral go sideways. Influence a project start a special project fairness thing the fairness thing it's so human. We just want things to be fair. It's not fair. It's not right well but it's more than just it's not fair to suck it up. It's in the human condition. There's lots of variables. There's lots of reasons why things are the way they are any most companies. It's not corrupter weird or you know bad. It's just is so once you understand how power and influence value is exchanged in organizations. You can go. This is pretty obvious is pretty simple. you know. There's there's an old joke the politics at the university where I now universities where I now work. The politics of university are so intense because the stakes are so low. You win nothing your actions. You don't get a promotion. You don't get a raise. It's all done on publications and doesn't matter best you get is a better office next to the copier so once you realized that that these you're not victims of these things you can see through them. They've caused it x Ray Vision when you when you understand politics you understand organizations really work and most of its just human. It's not bad. Well you know if you peel back all of this and you speak to the acceptance speech the dust steps zero. I'm realizing I listened to you. Talk that you're starting with a very basic human assumption. That maybe we shouldn't start with. Which is that every human feels that they are worthy of work that is fulfilling to them that they find whatever they consider valuable from. Do you just assume that everybody feels that or they were going to be available. I'm GonNa Fail Ability and worthiness not the same thing I mean we're all living aspirational. You know the The have we have. We created a society. In which the fullness of each of our you know Worthwhile if not divine humanity can be expressed. No we're a long way from done here so If we can make it a little bit better and that's fine but that doesn't mean we aren't worthy worthy but a a little bit. I think you're asking a little bit of a question worthy at you. Know worth something and deserving something at work. It's pretty modern idea. That work is going to be. You know your happy place in fulfil you and also feed your soul and your children the my money making my meaning making deserve to be the same thing. Yeah that's just one form of alive and by no means the only way to do it and there's lots of reasons you might want to work for money and keep the thing you do for love. Passion her for you know for for fulfillment out of the marketplace. Because you know if you if you're a an artist and you have to produce on the markets terms then you've got to produce pretty ugly art Maybe you WanNa keep your poetry your art or something as as a side hustle and maybe some day like you know I took a fifty percent pay cut to go to the university from industry but I did it because I wanted to increase my impact in the world and put on my goal was put ten thousand kids in the world that really wanted to work on climate change in heart problems. So you can trade off money for impact you can trade off money for expression but be careful that you don't accidentally you know say. I gotta get it all from the same place. I'm only covered a lot of ground. What haven't we talked about guys? If it's true you're gonNA work six or seven years. You're going to a bunch of times and there's a way to quit well and we think that people you know most often the model is just turn in your two weeks notice do nothing and then son got the back door and that's not good because that doesn't that doesn't support the people who are coming after. You doesn't keep the stuff you've been doing. You know going strong. And you've been building something that's worth continuing and it doesn't keep your network going so we got him quitting. Well we've got a thing on how to redesign your job Because a lot of people don't don't want to take the big risk of quitting and trying something brand new because you don't really. I mean you don't really know in the interview process whether what they told you the Jarvis GonNa be his what it's actually like and we have a a a a story in the book about somebody who really did get lied to and found himself in a bad situation. It's probably one of the big ideas as the you know sort of. I think you could argue. Chapter Seven is kind of the centerpiece of the book. Which is the. Don't resign redesign. I mean a lot of people use. We started with stock. A lot of people feel stuck in the seven ten people frustrated And so I don't like my choices. I feel that my choices are suck it up and take this difficult job or this boring job or this whatever dead end job or go through the incredible difficult painful process scary risky process of quitting and starting all over again. I don't like my choices and we really wanted to give people door number. Three endure number. Three is wait a minute. You know you now that you know you can't have exactly what you want. You're stuck with what you've got. No no no you have much more agency able to get exactly the Unicorn thing you had in mind but there are a lot of moves you can make. So we have these strategies We can redesign in place in a bunch of those redesign strategies require no permission from anybody but yourself to make things a little bit better in a little. Bit Better can be huge. It's a profound difference as alowing steel or spice in food. It changes everything so you can make small moves with big changes without having to get the job picture. Thank you very much. That was Bill Burnett Dave Evans. Their new book is designing Your Work Life. How to thrive and change and find happiness at work last week. We dropped everything to bring you stories about how people are staying connected as we all adjust to this new more physically isolated world. I don't know about you but I feel like I've lived a year in a week since I last came to you. I've transformed our bedroom closet into a podcast studio. I'm trying to get out for a walk every day and have started to get really excited about all the new topics we can cover now. That work really is changing a whole lot right now and it's really changing us. Thanks to everyone who's been sharing stories. I'm GONNA keep sharing them with you on this show. This week's voice memo comes from Mignon. She's an entrepreneur in Portland Oregon and a longtime listener. Men was a student in China during the SARS outbreak. Seventeen years ago she was finishing her undergraduate and thinking about Grad School. When suddenly she was thrust into a lockdown scenario for a longtime hersman. When SARS broke out I just started college in Beijing. Suddenly the campus was closed for quarantine. Some of my friends at home. I didn't have luck. I stayed for months. No classes no activities. No online entertainment like Netflix. No all my shopping like Amazon. No all I community like linked in honestly at the time. We had no idea what will happen. No one had experienced that before months later. Whistle weived justifying now. I don't even remember much about the time I do remember the day they opened the door. I run to have my hair dyed with some queasy colors. I also remember peaking ABC. Gre Test to kill the time. I know I'm a nerd. I think it helped me when I set up ago and put a plane place. It helped to focus on something else today. A someone who has spinster this before. I'm confident to say we can definitely do this. It will pass trust me. It just takes time and space literally. Thanks men and listeners. I WanNa hear from you your notes or keeping me going so send me an email or a voice memo to hello Monday at Lincoln Dot Com. Tell me what your new reality is like. And how you're coping if you like our show and we hope you do please rate us on Apple. Podcasts. It takes two seconds and it helps new listeners. Find the show hello. Monday is a production of Lincoln. The show is produced by Sarah Storm. Joe degeorge mixture show for John DOE is head of original audio and video. Dave pond is our technical director. Miam- Ngoni Victoria Taylor Michaela Dear Juliet Pharaoh. Help US design our best work life. Our music was composed just for us but mysterious brake master cylinder and you also heard music from Paddington bear. Dan Ross is the editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jessi Hempel see next Monday. Keep watching those hands and thanks for listening. I'll just say that there's there's `tigers there's Pusan's piglets in the World Dave tigger and I'm more of a Pu you know maybe any your And but I can be the happiest. Dior you've ever met because I can't change the way I perceive the world around my own personality of being a little more shy a little more reticent to to Be Out Front. What's piglet just curious piglet somewhat nervous person? It's it's it's it's in your pocket..

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"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

11:27 min | 1 year ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Out with my friends and I got a notification on my phone that a press release was released by the mayor saying that gatherings of people fifty or more should not happen anymore and then a second press release basically saying I really it. No more gatherings and so that does affect my small business acutely and so many of the people that we've spoken to here. Hello Monday have jobs that led them work at home. They can open a laptop. They can make it work. But your job really doesn't work that way so when you walk into a Coffee Shop and a nonprofit restaurant that's operated by an organization called farming. Hope they hire train. Formerly homeless formerly incarcerated individuals in the kitchen. And then there's a bookshop where you buy books physically in its physical gathering space and I have been staff whose whole jobs are facilitating the in person events. So every employee that I have CanNot work really from home because my whole concept is about creating community in person. I know it's only been a couple of days many well. What's it meant for you so far? Are you seeing events cancel? Are you canceling events? Yeah we have seen a lot of outside bookings cancel Most of them for the next couple of weeks which is hard because that is a big part of our business. So I'm not gonNA sugar coated. A march is going to be very very hard month for not just us but any venue. So what does that mean for you as somebody who's has to employ people to come back hours? I haven't decided yet. All Small Business Owners feel a certain degree of loyalty and a burden on our end. A responsibility to their employees. You know the hardest part about all this is staffing and payroll is the biggest line item for any business for any small business especially any brick and mortar specifically small business. And so there. Depending on how long this goes There is gonNA probably needs to be a choice between the you know the amount of hours that people's employees work and other operating and keeping the business open we right now. We're still open for business. We're still doing events. Were still asking people to come. Were taking a lot of extra precautions to keep. The space sanitized in clean were I got a letter from the Anti Town. Coffee which was a beloved local coffee roaster which which with much more dire Look at what's happening because especially if you are catering is a big part of your business. Very people are doing events and very few tech offices are open and so all the restaurants and coffee distributors and all the other vendors for offices in the city and and events that relying catering there seems huge hit too. How do you think about what Manny says absence that IRL gatherings? I'm not I'm not going to stop manny's right. There are some tools our disposal right now. My staff is looking at some kind of webcasting tools where people can either for free? Or if they're willing to pay a little bit tune in to US conversations that we will put on maybe one on one conversations may be digital conversations utilizing social media to educate inform the public. But I'M NOT GONNA LIE. That's not my preference. I built Manny's because I believe that these conversations are best had in person. It's not what I want to do. It's not why I built the space I built but it's stopgap measure. How long do you think many can do this? It's hard to say we're GONNA keep putting on programming and we're going to experiment with with doing programming in a way that is still allowed and that might work and so we'll be able to continue that until We're allowed to do it in person. There is there's a piece of this that is about the public mood in his a piece of this. That's about public health and the thing that I'm more I am as concerned as the public health ramifications of all. This is just the need to stay calm and not panic and to keep one's Chin up and the way I see might put myself in my position right now in the community and with the space that I have is also to model good behavior in terms of what I'm saying how acting what I'm doing because this this virus is serious and should be taken seriously and also we have to be aware of our emotional reaction to it as well and let you're talking about there as leadership. That's what it means to be a leader in our community to be balanced in our approach to this to be a connector to other people and to bring other people the energy that will help us all to thrive rather than to live in fear. And it's important to have some historical perspective. It's important to to take take a step back and to not let Into not lose sight of kind of the context of where we are in our lives and that you know humans have been through a lot and we will beat. We'll get through this as well. That was many you could tell he wants. Manny's a cafe event space in San Francisco which brings us to our final guest a familiar voice when we heard from Kate. Bersin in our special episode recently on quarantine. It seemed like things were getting better where she lives in Milan. The days later Italy. Shut everything down. And now kate lives in a red zone from our perspective. Kind of out of nowhere to in the morning. Sunday morning The National Government announces that the entire region of Lombardy. So again that's ten million people They said were creating a red zone there. And you're going to be contained in that area until further notice and they gave everybody kind of Ajay to get back in their homes. But another thing that led to was people who lived in the north which is in Lombardy needed. Felton needs to go back and be with their family. That might have been in Sicily or wrong and so even though they were the community there was not supposed to leave because they could be contaminated. They couldn't imagine not being able to be home with their relatives. Potentially take care of them so in that process over the course of a day people violating the the lockdown firemen's and shortly after the entire country was under lockdown. You some pictures today from going grocery shopping. What was that like. It was very strange. I was shocked to see a huge line. Outside of the store and people were wearing masks in you know separated. Kind of the government's Mandate is distance apart in the line and I noticed that the store was only letting in like two people at a time to be in the in the shopping center and there was a line that wrapped all the way around the store. I felt like a different world. And how long did he wait to get in? Well so I was not gonNA wait in line even a wells baseline Coca Cola. Wasn't that important. Wasn't that important but there is a super size grocery store not too far away so I walked in the super size one and there was actually not a line outside but inside over the loudspeaker the whole time I was in there. That were yelling. Not Yelling they were saying to us. Please be sure to stand a meter apart from each other. Keep your distance and there were signs all over the store answer guards outside making sure people were Keeping their distance from each other cash that just makes me feel so sad inside even to be out among the people is to try to stay far away from the people. How are you doing with all this? I will say after coming back from the grocery store. My husband tried to give me a kiss on the cheek. What are you doing? I'm not supposed to touch you. You're another human. So it's It feels very schizophrenic. Type of experience. I mean where I actually do get. Humanity is to take my dog outside and fortunately dogs police do not from transmit the disease to him so for our purposes they play a lot and all the owners we stand far apart but we talked to each other and it's kind of a nice a nice very human authentic moment to share with each other. Yeah so you're looking at being in the situation now for weeks at a minimum. So how are you thinking about? What kinds of things that are going to do over the next few weeks to make sure that you keep your faculties intact? I I need a structure. will say Having my husband in space is wonderful but we probably need to coordinate calls and who takes the dog out says. She's not barking. When we're both on calls does things but so structure trying to get some exercise created routine because I don't see it ending tomorrow. We'll listen kate. I didn't expect when we spoke last week that this would be the situation. But I'm glad to see that you're looking good and that you got your Coca Cola today and I hope we can catch up again soon so make sure you do a better job stocking up than we did. Talk to you later. Bye again that was K- person. Thanks to everyone who wrote in posted to share your stories. Please keep them coming. Do you have any routines right now. Are you helping anyone out anyone? Helping you write to us and I may give you a call or follow. Becky's lead recorded voice memo on your smartphone and send it to us at. Hello Monday at Lincoln Dot Com. I'll keep sharing these stories. I think it's important and well. We'll continue to cover covered nineteenth impact on our work. It cannot be our only story next week will bring you a fresh episode on designing your work. Life with Bill Burnett and Dave Evans professors at Stanford you like our show and we hope you do. Please rate US ON APPLE PODCASTS. It takes two seconds and it really helps me. Listeners finds hello. Monday is a production of Lincoln. The show was produced by Sarah Storm. Joe degeorge Mister show flood. Nca was head of original audio and video. Dave pond is our technical director. Miami Genie Victoria Taylor Michaela Rear and Juliet. Pharaoh bring the hand sanitizer. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder and you also heard music from Partington bear. Dan Raw is the editor in chief of Lincoln. Jessi hempel please wash those hands. Cenex Monday and thanks for listening. Hey Jude this is my office. This microphone well if you press that everything. Crashes Press it anyways..

Manny Kate Coffee Shop Lombardy Lincoln Coca Cola US Milan Sicily Italy Dave pond Anti Town Jessi hempel Joe degeorge Chin Nca Sarah Storm Partington
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"What advice do in half so. I think my biggest advice is that the precious resource is a understanding understanding. You yourself understanding what things drive you enough that you could devote hours a week for years and years and years to doing so you know. I was lucky enough to find that in journalism where I was willing to just it being perfectly fine to me that other skills and abilities that will take decades to learn. And I'm going to. I'm willing to put the time in and I 'cause I I think this idea idea of a passion of some internal driving force is a necessary precondition but for most people. It's not you don't. It's not obvious right away so I think in a weird way. It's kind of combat that recognizing that that's the core per more than getting a master's degree peach more than achieving a particular career career path. That the this life. If you want the life I'm describing getting that is going to is work and is like whatever else you're doing doing to make a living whatever job you have just paying attention to what turns you on. What do you hate what are you? What are you seem a little bit better than others at what you seem way worse than others at and seeing that that that's a multiyear goal? Some of the people in this book didn't find their passion until well into their thirties or forties. He's which which sets us up for the second person I want you to about a second. Somebody who's been added job that they're ma- about for maybe a decade and a half breath and maybe maybe they were laid off. Maybe they're choosing to do something else. What what advice do you have them? So it the hardest conversations I have have is someone with acute financial need and who wants the passion economy. Because I don't want to give the wrong impression that it's there are people where it's somehow all comes together all at once and it really in a very short period of time happens But but there are other people were it takes a while to figure it out for yourself. Fake take a while to refine your story and then it takes a while to You know communicate that story find the right audience and to me. The the single biggest barrier to stepping into the passion economy really is Some some insecurity fear period that You know that seems to be an independent force of your actual financial condition. Because I know some people genuinely really do have financial fears and but a lot of people who come to me there okay financially. They could take a year to try something but they're just terrified and and that is the part that That I struggle with personally. I think the kind of if we can say the I was GonNa say the coward's way by the way I've been a coward. I've worked for big entities. I just went out on my own like six months ago so so I I should talk. I'm almost fifty and I've spent most of my career working a big institutions Russian's where he got a steady paycheck But what I did do is I found institutions that supported the passion. I had and were places where I could develop that passion action so I do think that it is unacceptable now or it's just incredibly unwise to keep a job where you feel that your passion is being stifled rather other than the place where you can develop that passion. I would also say that people with jobs in big corporations often misunderstand understand or or undervalue. How much entrepreneurship and autonomy they could have? I've done that at planet money at NPR NPR's a very structured structured rigorous frankly bureaucratic organization. And I was like I WanNa do this other thing that no one else wants me to do and just fought for it and I eventually built allies and senior leadership and eventually I had to prove it out. It took a long time but I made it happen and I have please now and I like it when they take that initiative. If you have a company that won't allow that it it makes sense to put yourself in a different context But Yeah I think the group of people I worry about what if I can just say the group of people were I talked to and I'm like oh I got nothing for you or people who don't have any particular passionate and curiosity and don't particularly want one there you know. I met people who they WANNA job they go to they wanna boss to tell them what to do. And those folks I think are going to have a tough time. I think an increasingly tough time and I don't I honestly don't know what to say to them someone who scared but hopeful someone who has a spark of wanting something different but a whole lot of fear and Uncertainty that's something you can. There's something there that can build into a passion economy life. Thank you. It was great to talk to you. Yeah this was is really great to talk to you. Thank you so much again. That was Adam Davidson a staff writer at the New Yorker. You can check out his new book. The Passion Economy the new rules for thriving in the twenty first century. Thanks for all the notes he sent over the holidays especially the great stories about getting away. It was hard to choose. Just a few you to share on our holiday episode and we'll probably do another episode of the summer so keep them coming into Oliver listeners impacted by the fires in Australia our hearts arts or with you listener Kim Ruth semi some great suggestions for how to support local efforts there and have already shared them. So you can find them in. Tell us about your own experiences on my linked linked in profile. If you've enjoyed listening subscribe and rate us on Apple podcasts. It helps me listeners. Find the show. Hello Mondays production of leaned in the shows produced by West Wing. Go and Laura Sim Joe. degeorge mixed our show for NCA. Dondo is head of original audio video. Dave pond is our technical director. Miami Angie knee and Victoria Taylor cheers on from the sidelines. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder and you also heard music from Coddington nineteen bear. Dan Rock editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jessi Hempel. Thanks for listening..

NPR Jessi Hempel Laura Sim Joe. degeorge Coddington NCA Dave pond Dondo Oliver editor in chief Dan Rock Apple Adam Davidson Miami Angie knee technical director West Wing Lincoln Kim Ruth Australia
"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"dave pond" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Again that was Julia Weissberg. She's a copywriter. We have one more the story for you after the break. I WANNA stop for a minute and ask you to fill out our listener survey and so here at Hello Monday. We WanNa make episodes about the topics that you care about. So let us know what you want more of at Lincoln Dot com slash. Hello that's linked dot com slash. Hello hello it takes five minutes and if you fill it out five responders will receive a hello Monday package sent straight to your door. Thanks and we're back. Our next story is from Brendan Murphy. He works as a partner at the design firm. Lippincott Brendan grew up in a working class family in Ireland. The oldest of five kids. This was one of the first vacations is family ever took. This story is goes way back right. I was probably four four or five years old and it's the first traveled story. I remember at this stage was just tree kids kids. I'm from a family of five and and my mom died. Didn't have a whole lot of money so our vacation was competent holiday. A soda was five of us in to my tent down in West Cork and thankfully Weta was relatively okay. We did get rained out a a couple of times and ended up sleeping car. Ima Dad worked very hard. He at this stage he was working on a machine floor oftentimes he who would walk three shifts. He perfected the art of sleeping standing up in front of La which was pretty dangerous and but on vacation then his treat to himself. He didn't drink was too by himself. A crate of coca-cola's right and he did the deal with a local shop owner that he could keep the crate in to freeze are off to shop and he wants a day he would call on you. How cat at the end of the day after dealing with the kids he would reward himself with a Cold Coca Cola like the commercial unfortunately gently on the first day after freezing them they all burst so the deal with the Shona quickly deteriorated and my Dad? Add bought another crate and found a hiding spot in a local river and probably Shannon and again at the end of every day he would and go down to the river and find his hiding spot and have a coke and if we were really really good or if my mom had enough of us he brought one of us with him we would get to partake in having a coca cola at that stage. We weren't allowed sweetser anything like that so that was quite the trees. But it's like it's my fourth memory of vacation my first first memory of really bonding. We might add that age and and was pretty special. Why do you think you remember this story? I think mostly because of the sharing the sharing thing sharing with my dad. What do you remember about the paint me the picture you know if you think about on the sort of sibling rivalry and and your hair with your brothers and sisters like all day? What are not what we're doing like going to the beach or just hanging around the farmer's field take chasing bees and catching bees and such are picking up worms but my sister? I brought our who what you know younger than me. And certainly my broader order. Who at that stage was probably like a year a year and a half would have demanded all the attention so I was telling him on the Totem Pole and rightly so so how it was out of my my opportunity to get that little bit of attention in today? Assuming wasn't a painted that day. Am I got to go my dad and shared a drink with him. Did you have a lot of moments like that over the course of life with your dad. Yeah like I I. We spent a lot of time with my dad and later years and like when he drove a taxi anytime he would drive to. Belfast was always a challenge because to You know do you cross the border and British army teams that you're going to you. Have a car bomb into car right and because a lot of times taxis were used for car bombs uh-huh so anytime I'd I'd get a job of tobacco fast. I will go with him. You put a kid in the car on his like does a bomb at a car and I remember remember you know staring down to St like a tank and it's big set of gunnery staring at the car and and kids kids like sixteen and seventeen year old soldiers like pointing to rifles out you. Who was quite scary? My Dad who was you know now like Long Dad. And he's very much beside me and he's very much a part of my life in an odd way like anytime I've fixing something I can hear him him beside me telling me what to do pass. He passed I'd say maybe ten or twelve years ago now and I was over here and in the latter part of his life was very painful and when I was eighteen nineteen he started. Having trouble got progressively worse he. Dan had sort of a little bit of arrest by then he had a stroke so he lost a use of the right side of his body which he jokes that it was a blessing because he was left handed he never lost his sense of humor like he obviously was in a great deal of pain right But he you know he was a character. It also gives much more resonance to this image of you. You four or five on the Bank of a river with a healthy young man who just wants a coke. Yeah again that was Brendan Murphy. Thanks to Oliver Storytellers. Everyone who wrote in with your own tales about getting away way before we sign off for twenty nineteen. I just wanted to bring my producer. Laura behind the MIC. Laura joined us a year ago and she helped to create create. Hello Monday she's been a staple of our production team all year and this is her last week with us so I wanted you all to meet Laura before she goes on your next project. Hi Jessie Laura so here we are. It's been such a year together. You know when we sat sat down together. We didn't know what kind of show. Hello Monday was at all always knew was the title of the show and we knew who the host would be and and that is all we knew we did. We know that it was gonNA come out weekly no but we did know that the producer would do and you did a great job Laura. Thanks what's what's one thing that you know now that you didn't win. We started before coming to Lincoln and I actually had never developed a podcast before I joined existing projects existing podcasts and it was just really fun to learn that I could just start something on my own and see it from beginning to end and I I'm GonNa leave give you guys on the show will continue. And that's that's like wild to me. I'M GONNA have to like watch my emotions a little bit because I'll all get jealous but just hearing you guys continue on. Well I think one of the coolest things is that if the show grossing it's better and I hope that it will No matter how it changes when you listen to it you will always be able to hear what is foundational to it because he helped create it and that's pretty special. Yeah I hear that all right well Laura we will follow you from afar. Good luck. Thanks Jesse all right. That's about it for twenty nineteen we'll be bringing more new episodes in twenty twenty and in the meantime time whether it's for an hour or a week I hope you get away and enjoy some time to rest and recharge if you enjoyed what you heard. Please let us know in review on Apple. PODCASTS Hello Monday is the production of Lincoln. The show is produced by. Laura Sim Joe degeorge mixed our show for NCAA. Rondo is head of original audio and video. Dave pond is our technical director. My Man Gene Victoria Taylor hopes Santa Claus is good to you. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brakebast or cylinder and you also heard music from Paddington bear. Dan Roth is the editor in chief of Lincoln from all of us. Thank you for listening and happy holidays..

Jessie Laura Brendan Murphy Dan Roth Lincoln Dot Laura Sim Joe degeorge producer Julia Weissberg Lippincott Brendan Lincoln Shannon coca-cola La Paddington Belfast NCAA partner Dave pond West Cork