20 Episode results for "Dave Nelson"

147 - Kamal MouzawakA Lebanese Kitchen Vision

The Kitchen Sisters Present

29:18 min | 5 months ago

147 - Kamal MouzawakA Lebanese Kitchen Vision

"Welcome to the kitchen sisters present. where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson N.. Nikki Silva. High. We have a quick favor to ask we're conducting our annual radio TOPA listener survey, and we'd really be grateful if you would take just a few minutes to fill out the questionnaire. Please visit survey dot pr x Org Slash kitchen sisters to tell us what you think of the show and help us learn a little more about you. You can also answer questions about all the other radio podcasts you listen to which I'm sure are many. It really helps our network of independent producers that survey dot PRI, Dot Org, slash kitchen sisters. Thank you for your support high. You might know Aaron Gibson and Brian saffy from their podcast throwing shade. They're excited to announce new episodes of their other podcasts groceries and yes, it's exactly what it sounds like a podcast dedicated to all things, groceries, the carts, the specials, the products, and the history of the places we all buy food you can listen to groceries for free starting August third. They'll see you in the aisles are misinformation and fake news threatening our democracy is democracy. Even a thing anymore does US military spending actually keep us safe Buckle up the new season of things that go boom gets bumpy. We may have been prepping for World War three when we were hit by world war see instead and that's only the beginning of the shadowy silent threats to our national security grab a beer and join host Lacy Healy as she watches over the things keeping us up at night. Find things that go boom wherever you listen to podcasts. Today the kitchen sisters present Kamal Mussa walk and his Lebanese kitchen visions. A on Tuesday August fourth a massive explosion devastated Beirut shattering the port and the heart of the city. Over one hundred and fifty people have lost their lives. Some five thousand people have been injured. Hundreds of thousands have lost their homes all while the people of Lebanon are facing catastrophic levels of the corona virus and devastating economic collapse. Our love and our sorrow or with the people of Beirut. David traveled to Lebanon in two thousand fifteen for our hidden kitchen series to chronicle the work of the Lebanese kitchen. Visionary Kamal Mussa walk an astounding man who builds community through food throughout the country. His Beirut restaurant talent that employs dozens of village women cooking their traditional village dishes was destroyed in the explosion. This week as we witnessed the shock blasts and their devastating aftermath the demonstrations in protest against the government and its negligence and corruption we saw that Kamal and his team at Tallaght we're at the forefront of the rescue efforts in collaboration with chef Jose Andres and the world's central kitchen. Come kitchen prepared the first fresh meals for local hospitals, isolated seniors, and first responders throughout the city Hamas sandwiches, Kef sandwiches, and Maloka. A traditional Sunday meal of chicken that reminds everyone knows it of home. In homage to the people of Lebanon. Once again, the kitchen sisters present this portrait of activist Kamal Mussa Walk. Within hours of arriving in Beirut. We met one of the most compelling kitchen activists in visionaries. We've encountered Kamal Mussa walk and began to tour the farmers, markets, restaurants, guesthouses, and refugee kitchen projects known collectively as L. Type that he and his kitchen community have created. Today. A road trip through these hidden kitchens of Lebanon, an expedition through. Kamal's vision of rebuilding an uniting this war ravaged nation through its traditions, its culture and its food between US Bredon Salt Kamal Mussa walk a Lebanese kitchen vision. Lebanon we see phoebe Nicholls Zuma said clean US breath and sold, which means we shared a meal together and unbreakable bond. My name is come on a work I'm a dreamer of positive social change. I founded the farmers market at two thousand and Ford called Super. Super Smart by it means good. Not only in the sense of taste would as a person and would as alive it's mainly giving back recognition wonderful farmers and producers. Our slogan is make food for. We are in downtown Beirut which used to be on the Green Line the dividing line between the two parts of the city. Is A woodlouse from nine hundred, seventy, five to nineteen ninety-one sece's engraved people's heart and mind you cannot live without sinking of said only few checkpoints recipes like a big noman's-land snipers from both sides, shrubs and trees grew since why? Because it's a Green Line? Beta is a difficult city full of contradictions. The city is violent driving is jarring. People are aggressive. There's a lot of anger. The government doesn't work. It's polluted I have an American passport. I can leave and people ask me why are you here? There's an answer that you can't even articulate. You taste it I'm not A. They do a communications for so they. I would love to take you to the mountains we're from Khuda it's your typical little village life is centered around making olive oil during the war in two thousand and six. We went up to the north supermarkets where emptying out there were no fresh supplies coming in and we survived off the land. There's a columnist just having food come from your garden. Soothed die is a huge mother organization that has many many children, most of our programs focus on women but not. For Lemon, the farmers market started off very very small with a few tenths and by word of mouth it grew it's teaming with treasures your. That had that salvage my husband Matvey. Lowest Beka I make a jam sugar results are good because Lebanon Gorz. Takao. On the Moon from Coveney Mooney is the natural preserves can do for the winter jam speaker. Dried herbs tried seeds, beans, everything that you have at home. So wintertime snow at school, we can eat for months from just. Will have to meet people who are doing I hope great saints. Will have live. Get Bama Shia Alba. Training programs, receded effigies, instead of people seeing them as victims seeing themselves as victims. To use whatever you have to have a better life. Some you're doing a very typical Damascene specialty. It's like a pizza was based of sweet pepper and onions sesame and a bit of. Louis. Wonderful, cuisine, very sophisticated and very rich. I'm taking one for you too. Miniature. He's used since maybe a month or two used to live in a very, very corporate world. The suit Mansur is some takes care of everything from logistics, the people themselves, the products, the welfare of the. To keep everyone's happy. Can Be, incorporated doing something routine or I can be helping people. It's something that has meaning at the end of the day. Through is a consequence to war and peace this piece probably there's food and if there's war food may be lacking I can't imagine we'll with everybody's eating well, Alec. gave a heretical. The. UNABOMB. On. This is through ship. Are Very concerned with them all dressed in very traditional way long dresses that light white scarf on their heads. Religion cannot be introduced. You have to be borne of Bruce. Parents. Look at his products jewels. It's perfection and allstates. Look at the Great. Unbelievable. This is local snake cucumber record met. Look at this wandered. This is human amid Lidge. Not translated all of the Traditions in Lebanon Cedars of Lebanon Beirut Archaeology Tripoli. Be Blows Muni to wonderful stories for kids. Look how beautiful it is. On. The weekend. Total traffic and people are going out of the city somewhere. Most of them go back to the villagers everybody today at the farmer's market wanted to take her to his village. It's like mom. Everybody thinks mom makes the best food is best. And the villages the same everybody thinks they have the best meet village to the best climate you know and can have two, thousand, seven food and Feast was born celebrating local foods in their home. Environment. Instead of taking cherries from in for example and bring them to the city we're taking people from the city to in to celebrate the Cherry. Finally. Young back. During this food and feast festivals, which would be on a Sunday on a holiday service farmers market for local producers, visits of equal activities, touristic activities, kids, activities at noon. We have lunch and bring all of these different wonderful cooks together, and each one do a typical dish of her village. When we started looking at the different regions, we discovered a number believable wealth and diversity of very typical local cuisine and every. One village would do some things that's village just nearby would not even know about. Peace stick microphones getting to. Army checkpoints. Mahama. Not Connection. People started wondering why do I have to wait every few months to taste food from a certain region and the idea Sola was born? There's a system of rotating shifts every day in Beta with at your table, you have a plate that is a story that is someone's culture that someone's heritage on the plate. My name is Anne Marie best sue I live in a district called Zarif in Beirut I work for me I send cakes where I use a lot of fruit I poach tally stick to the season people from all over Lebanon can give their experience or learn something from here this on generosity on fidelity also, they link people together because come on is fantastic. Lebanon Your Luck. Name. That the. Hidden from them. A. Has. GotTa I have my own business. I walked in catering I could kind of convinced get could lead the vaseline you could be could. Be. Too. When my children grow. From Internet. I called this the year after with come on I count to Dolly. I said one year I built my own kitchen in my town I, give training for city woman and the his. Of Five. It's a great idea for woman. Circle type cherish all my life. What are you showing them? The heck tackle is. Simply to laugh and smile up do they come usually shy and someone willing to work, and then they end up being proud and hard workers they end up being forced to become a community and that can be difficult and I think the. After three woman can trust in person. Could you introduce yourself your name and where you're from it's data analysis in. Years, and she lives in the Shuki dumber. Though is what goes on here and it gets Chevrolet Thomason had my work with a very peaceful spirit. They had each other in a way that if one of them is done, she goes and helps the other one. They don't fight together. They don't pick on each other's work on the country. Once one is done, she goes on, she hopes other one. Pin You, ask her to please introduce yourself and save what she cooked today. emitted. What's facility on Yom shoot about a million she's from is it assure Shouf mountains and today she prepared Pumpkin Quebec. Also got. Crack tweet onions Suma. Was introduced to the restaurant via league manages the restaurants. Told her should cook some food and let them say stood and she was afraid to she said, how can they prepare for people that are not my own bamboo? She feels like everyone here has a family and she's happy to know that her food is appreciated people like it so far so did. My name is Layla. I'm breast cancer survivor mother of four kids dot lights. Arabic. Stable. They have organic and homemade food even the desert it's less sugar from honey not white sugar. When you eat you feel you are really in the south really. Really in Gupta each suburb they cooked fish and dries but different color the way they prided the kind of fish command do also a bed and breakfast. You can sleep and have breakfast in amazing old house the beautiful place Duma you should see it. Recently, what's been taking off is the Bates project which means home the farmers home opening up guest houses you get a room and the whole house is yours you go to the restaurant and you eat and for some reason, it's the best thing you put in your mouth. It's because the woman behind the counter smiling and she's proud and she can't wait for you to tasteless she's made. We are in Beta, Lamar Lamar means houses, the Moon's the home of the Moon Bates are these new homes that we're trying to create all around Lebanon where one can come and be like it's his own home or House it's an a very beautiful village, Cord Daily Amar. Convent. Of Simone's civic. Avid is one of the most for Thailand's Lebanon. So Land of Agriculture Transform. Into natural traditional preserves pickles and jams moon. We are in the area says a lot of people from St Louis Community of here, describe what that man was wearing men were shallow the wides Penn Black, shirl, and black checkered was very light. White Veil of her head and woman would like very black dresses and beautiful light valence our heads. In Our area and truth area pleasure to have you. Million graphic designer originally from Beta. Come on. This is my mom's house. It's the village house she lives in her own where she grow her things as worshiper the money for the entire season. If this isn't as the apple season, they do Apple Jam if it's pomegranate they the palm again season, we're going to see the Lebanese who have led me made up smoke they also preserve the go-to one. So that's why it's an full of olive oil oriented on and it stays. Spicer for the culture preserving. Describe what you're doing here. This morning I put we eat at Florida train. Lower. On News. Put The Flower Week. And they're lashing values mayock I'M A. And put word. Okay and make my hand. We'll be right back. This episode of the kitchen. Sisters present is supported by Trivia start if I were to ask you to name a member of the Beatles or new kids on the block, could you answer in under fifteen seconds if the answer is yes. Then you are a perfect candidate for Trivia. Star Trivia Star is a free mobile quiz game that's entertaining and challenging. You can choose categories like music sports, movies, TV animals, celebrities, there are over sixty categories to. Choose from the questions get harder overtime. But if you're stuck, don't worry, you can use coins and gems to get a hint and beat the level right now trivia star is offering you two thousand, five hundred coins and five hundred gems when you download and play just go to the apple or Google store and search for Trivia Star again, Search Trivia Star and enjoy two, thousand, five, hundred coins and five hundred Champs Download Trivia Star for free today. Affect today. My name is Zephyr Soon I? Twenty years old I live and I should have Bagel battle. It's very beautiful. Sit Day I like. I'm a taxi driver. song the. Make me. Lazy and cruel can make anything I prefer Francis both of. Months. We ought not. Be, Lipoma. No. Do this. All weekend about as the almost how we choose our chickpeas. Choose our seamy and how we choose our special olive oil and Hamas is flagged may name you still need Army I am co owner and general manager of Anki cafe. This. Is My grandfather is. One of the Best Thomas and Nebanon. In Lebanon when you want to know if the restaurant is good, you always look at the house if the most is. That's mean the is good. Our culture it's not to come to a restaurant and order a salad. I dish Sagan dish you order. Amazing. Evidence that it presents something. It's Hamas or Montebourg, or Selah that or fattoush cheese olive oil data was it. So it's assortment of many plates. We are not the fast food as you know you are enjoying would you have the pleasure of the corner of the Mesa one hour and a half two hour with your friend? You have less of that you eat mazy run you finish your measure, you order an assortment of law meet. Then you will enjoy the fruit for another half an hour or an hour. Come out doesn't like to make money. He liked to serve good food and good quality only. and. This is something very beautiful. He could with passion and he enjoy doing business with special. This is very important because our cuisine is all about bashing how much you love your meant. It's very important that you like your kitchen. We hope that the situation in Lebanon and the war will finish soon and will help to have tourists from all the were that come and our vestment. And our own homeless. I see the remnants of the civil war in the fragmentation of the country that remains to this day. When he was killed in two thousand and six. I remember friends who are Muslim. Asking their parents at Meissner. Shia. Sectarian tensions exploded once again, my parents talk about going to university and dodging bullets and bombs. Food is so undoubtedly essential to the survival of family unit here. No matter what happens everybody has dinner at eight. It creates a focal point for people to gather around into support one another. I I heard that almost most was in. Israeli. Food when I went to college in the states and I laughed, this is very sensitive grown because we're talking about come list but we all know that we're not talking about from loose. You could tie homeless to any people you would have to tie it to a land no matter who's living on. I don't feel very strongly nationalistic about homeless in particular. The Greeks have a word senior people hospital that's our culture. Maybe, the whole region needs couples therapy where we talk about what hurts and we work through it, but it's like we're playing the silent treatment game. Last part of our project is the capacity building program which focuses on training underprivileged communities like Syrian refugees or Lebanese women, rural environments we do all kinds of trainings starting from working with farmers on agricultural techniques to improve their soil or training women, Culinary Arts. So they can start their own culinary and become independent. There's a huge transformative element to the entire project that builds a network that doesn't dissolve. IDEA. With. My Name's trae about what we are in. And the capital of Lebanon. Beirut. We driving toward the coin where we will deliver a training for sock Thai woman interpersonal skills focused on entrepreneurship. The podcast is named entrepreneurs achieve combination of entrepreneurs. We are empowering along to be entrepeneurship by sharing stories of entrepreneurs and IRA board. Our listeners are in one, hundred, twenty, six counties. Are So proud of that onto the put energy kilos. On her word. Thallium Yom animals. In. These photos. Come on. A Hello Silo Kifah alumnae how? Business Chicago, but Anonima the business and the MEKA. One of them preneurs interviewed was coming. The founder of you've had a very unique interview. We connected very fast command chose the social entrepreneurship empowering people in extreme need and especially the woman. I wanted to support no, it's the first time I deliver training for the woman of Today, we're going to tackle the team building. We have seen that some of them have this defensive or offensive attitude towards other women who are from another country. Or another level. Let's say of society. This woman are in need some of them are widows some of them are illiterate some of them left the country like CNN people or Palestinian people. Some of them have not at home in Suka Tai find the way to express themselves and escape. If you would like to show the real analogy, a lot of them have real potentials but environment are not letting. These. I started my training by asking them what changed from less time to no one lady started to know how to communicate with her neighbors. One lady now has better communication between her husband and her children one lady stopped beating her Chinden. Kamal, can you talk about the camp? It's ghettos, POW cities or titles country at the same time it's places where people are trying to live and to make a living and to continue our life. It's Built, very anarchy way they have to do the best out of. And Bushel what is nate and Woman Association I am flooding would that the loans manager the? It's fully riches. Let's Tinian, and now there is a lot of Syrian here about thirty thousand. You can't hear your neighbor stoking and what he's cooking you can. I, think, a lot of people they don't need food. They need these small important van four. Foot you can't find it anywhere, but you can't. I believe in what Gandhi said Visa Change you want to see I, don't give a shit about the farmers market I believe they should about restaurants about products is about the recipe it's to prove to people that are all similar. They can get together around common ground beyond defenses that are around them. And Lebanon we say fee beneath macazoma has is between US bread and salt, which means we shared a meal together and if we shared together, it means it's an unbreakable bond. Between tween US bread and Salt Komo Mussa walk eleven knees kitchen vision was produced by symbol Shelton Robinson, and the kitchen sisters as part of the hidden kitchens, war and peace and food project. Special. Thanks to the national, endowment for the humanities and the National Endowment for the arts. Art Works, if you'd like to lend support to these projects and to the people of Lebanon during this unfathomable time, go to go fund me and look for help us rebuild Dow. Let cal is spelled T. w. l. sat or go to the kitchen sisters website kitchen sisters dot org and you'll find the link there. The kitchen sisters present is produced by the kitchen sisters with Nathan Dalton and Brandy Howard. The kitchen sisters present is part of radio. Topa from PR axe a network of curated cutting edge. PODCASTS produced by independent producers. Thank you for listening. Radio.

Lebanon Lebanon Beirut Kamal US Hamas Kamal Mussa Kamal Mussa apple Nikki Silva Lebanon Gorz Lebanon Beirut Archaeology Tri Aaron Gibson Lebanon Cedars Dave Nelson N Tallaght David CNN
150  Floating City - The Mirabeau Water Garden, New Orleans

The Kitchen Sisters Present

20:44 min | 4 months ago

150 Floating City - The Mirabeau Water Garden, New Orleans

"Radio. Welcome to the kitchen sisters present. Six. where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson. N.. Nikki Silva. Check all your workouts with Apple Watch step one choose a workout. To Walk Up. The workout at makes it easy to track your every move with workouts like running yoga dance and almost anything else you're into? Now, there's an apple watch for everyone starting at one, hundred, ninety, nine dollars. iphone six S or later required. Going today to new, Orleans for a kind of biblical reckoning. It's a story of science and prayer with the cast of improbable partners, environmental architects, and nuns coming together to create a vision forward for New Orleans. The kitchen sisters present floating city the Mir. BOOP water garden. New? Orleans. In plain dealing North Louisiana Woods. The first memory I have of water I was a small boy, the little town I lived in flooded. Remember. Going downtown to get the newspaper and. Hearing that some drown. then. They'll lakes of the town to catch the raw. That was prime water. I've always thought water sometime me. And David Wagoner an architect in New Orleans. New Orleans surrounded by the Mississippi River pontchartrain besieged by hurricanes and tropical storms permeated with man made canals and levees and pumping stations. Water is a deep and controversial concern and New Orleans but to do with it. Where to put it. Had to get rid of it. How to live with it? David Wagoner of wagoner and ball architects and environmental planning has been thinking and dreaming about these questions for years we in. Louisiana live on Finland. The occasion people have phrases about float on. The land floats is very shallow. It has no real root. This is the Louisville soil always mixed with water. This is a floating city. But you don't let the water come to the ground. You don't let the water come to the surface you're pushing it down, pushing it down. It's like you refuse to. Dream. Having always lived here. I was fascinated by the fact that I had grown up on the Mississippi River. But when you were on street level. There, at the river, you didn't see it. I'm sister Joan a-plus sisters of Saint Joseph. The forecast for the New Orleans metropolitan area of an umbrella today cloudy. In the morning. Just in case. It's raining as it is about a hundred fifteen days a year in New Orleans city with an annual rainfall of sixty two inches. Picture. Lemon tree was here. It was outside the kitchen sister were classes showing us around a twenty five Acre piece of property in the pouring rain where the Convent of the Sisters of Saint Joseph once stood. The confident self the sisters always just referred to it as Mirabeau, because it's on Mirabeau avenue parallel to the Lakefront and to our west. Is By you Saint John The old portage way that the Indians they say us from Lake Pontchartrain into what became the center of New Orleans almost at the Mississippi. River. The Sisters of Saint Joseph? International since one, thousand, nine century. The land they had, it was home to them. It was a place they had fellowship it was their community center had shade birds were there. There was life on the ground crawling. Twenty five acres sites in Gentilly. Which is a neighborhood north east of the French quarter had never really been developed in the ideas, Wagner and ball architects the neighborhood around it was formerly swamped. That was reclaimed with the drainage system and turned into suburban scale housing in the nineteen forties, fifties and sixties. But this site always remained is this kind of big parcel that nuns had their convent on it flooded during Katrina. Of the levies may have been over top this morning the water started to rise Canal Street underwater one or just blowing up through those gamble covers so much warranted. Handle Dangling. Once Katrina hit the convent was under eight feet of water for about six days the pews in the chapel were floating around. The IT float away. There was an old organ it was floating. When I actually able to see it oh, I can't tell you boats on top of trees. nightgown stresses underwear they're all hanging out of these buildings. This is eight months later. When I walked up to Mirabeau somebody had broken in. It was just ransacked. We had already spent two hundred and fifty thousand dollars to get the water out. I'm sister Pat Bergen I'm on the leadership team. My first job was this building that had been wrecked in Hurricane Katrina. After Katrina, the discussion that was occurring there was all about protection nobody was talking about what was going to make this place safer better to live within it. I went to the Netherlands in two thousand six. We went to see flood defence structures they dose around. I kept looking out the window on the water and the landscape inside the flood system. The Dutch kept saying about New Orleans. You know you have a water problem but where stillwater almost like where's Waldo, you can't find it's hidden it sucked down to low it's buried in the ground and very expensive country trenches. You fundamentally once you get below sea level have to have water Lansky. The landscape is going to continue to collapse them. Which is where we've been. So the idea is instead of trying to drain the water away in the underground, letting it come to the surface and it's the water appears along the edges of the street. The street then is a floating street with water on either side he's old canals can turn into parts of circulating system got pulmonary system. We talked about water and it's being the blood of land everything's Fed together these vessels vascular system starts to. This land to. Stay where it is, you know grow the trees. We'll. Be Right back. The kitchen sisters present sponsored, by Sikora a nutrition company that focuses on overall wellness starting with what you eat their menu of creative healthy chef crafted breakfasts, lunches, and dinners changes weekly, and it's delivered fresh anywhere in the United States along with delicious meals Sikora also offer supplements and herbal teas and the foundation there curated daily vitamin pack and right now Sikora is offering our listeners twenty percent off their first order. When they go to Sikora, dot, com slash kitchen sisters or enter code kitchen sisters at checkout. That's a Kara S. A. K. A. R., A. dot com slash kitchen systems to get twenty percents off your first order Sikora dot, com slash kitchen sisters. After Katrina, the convent remained vacant. So we have eleven months where we have a building that the downstairs has got it. We hadn't made decisions about the future I think we would just pussyfooting around because we know what to do. I can think of God's saying you kept wondering what was going to happen to this property how are you gonNa take care of it well, I'm going to show you a way that you'll have to do something. June two, thousand six. This is almost a year after Katrina. On a perfectly beautiful Sunday afternoon. Lightning struck the convent foreign. Mirabeau Avenue. It was the roof that caught fire and the blaze. These were high flames. The, water pressure was so bad in the city. Still they were bringing water by helicopter from by your Saint John to douse the fire. People in New Orleans knew that we had just gotten the water out. They knew that would be the end of the building. Practically everybody in New Orleans had been in this building at some time or other. There is a Montessori school on that land It was a novitiate. For New Sisters, my guy was seniors would gather there quilting or painting watercolors or learning how to use computers or you're doing ballet. We were like wondering, what are we going to do next? How is this GONNA in? Is God trying to tell us that we need to phase out or are you trying to tell us that you want to do something differently we had housing developments that would have wanted to buy it but. But this was an area that floods didn't want people to move in two houses that would flood again there. We really began praying. For some kind of vision just make it clear. How you want to use this land to minister to the people of New Orleans and keep on letting them know that they're lovable and cherished. What do you want this land to do? That was our prayer. Then, David Wagner showed up. This is not a normal story Katrina the flooding the lightning strikes the building. This is not politics. This is not economics. This is something deeper. Sister. Alison mccray knew about the water plan the Dutch dialogues efforts that we're doing. She knew if we were trying to develop something, she introduced us and we toured the site. I wasn't seeing what we would do to it. I was trying to see what was there. The vision of David Wagoner it was a so in line with what the larger congregation of sisters was looking for. I'm sister Alison mcleary. I'm a Catholic nun I'm also a social justice attorney. Every prayer we prayed the four generous promises for one of them is to care for the earth that is dying and to you know find creative ways to respond. In the conversations with the sisters about the land. The trees were always very sacred and special to them, and they said no matter what this little corner we always want to be oak tree grove, and if we can preserve the lemon trees or other fruit trees on the land, that would be great too. He came and spoke to us and showed us some drawings and proposed. This piece of property could serve as a pilot program living with water as opposed of fighting water. He presented this dream using these twenty five acres a beautiful garden with flowing water. In when it stormed, the pipes would open in the pumps would begin letting the water from the canals flow down the property, and it would fill up with water it would actually flood. Then, they could open these pipes again, let the water from our property flow gently into the canal at a rate that the levees could take it. The site actually welcomes water from outside into. That would have flooded all those other people all this water that we're talking about storing in in this property is eleven million gallons would have been downstream from it. It should have a beneficial effect you should begin to spread the healthy city. The minute he came. And told us about his vision of this water garden, the leadership team just sat there with our mouths open. Your was this person coming in talking my language that this land could serve the people of New Orleans and could spare the flooding around and highlight the beautiful oak trees and swamps. My heart was beating so fast. After, he loved the men that were hired to help us with finances kind of sitting there. Absolutely silent. Liked aghast that we're talking like this. I think there were people who did not believe. It would come to be that sisters whatever. Actually give this land. Why would they. They believe that we could do something that would be transformative not just transforming Orleans about this message about the earth. We knew we had to take down our building. The marable, Mother House. We had sisters common. They walked the land. We had rituals around it and just remembered all the things that had happened on that land. This mother house was a center especially on Saint Joseph Day for what they call a saint. Joseph Table. And people all over New Orleans would bake goods income and spread it throughout the building and people from all over the city would come and make donations to the poor. We. Formed a circle around the building and head prayers of gratitude and prayers of grief and lament. And blessed it. Thank Ted. This was the draza floor of the lobby. It's the shield which was the symbol for the sisters of Saint Joseph. And they saved it because they said well, maybe. They'll want to use it for this memorial they're gonNA put over in that area. Oh I always love coming back. It's that mixed feeling of love it and you can't go back but it's a beautiful place and wonderful memories. When I read some of the coastal reports in the newspaper about. The rise of sea level. And you know the predictions the day may come when there won't be a New Orleans. So I just. I kind of just decide. Well, you know we still going to do this project. It'll be a pilot project, and if this isn't here, one hundred years from now maybe. What you do will help somebody else. I think that the progress is being made it really is grassroots. It really is citizen led to challenges that as beautiful as this Mirabeau project stands to be, it can't fix everything it will have an effect on a certain area around it. But it begins to say that if you do these kinds of things in the right places, then you get the effects you need so that you don't flood in Gentilly. The Sisters of Saint Joseph, they really want this environmental change. And they saw a chance to. Stanford that here. So they become a inspiration, we all need models. We have within us the good and we have within a the dark and they cost light. I would like New Orleans to see waters and acid freshwater is the treasure and not threat. You might as well drink something. Beautiful. Might as well. Drained something you'd want to be part of. I'd rather be part of a garden than I would be another pump station. Floating City, the Mir boop water garden was produced by the kitchen sisters with Julia Married Raptor. Special thanks wagoner and ball architecture and Environment Mir itself. The drawings are done. The city's put it out to bid construction supposed to begin in winter for phase one, the pump station to take the water out now, and then bring it up into the site face to piece the community building an educational component we're just beginning. In this. Project about healing your. And the sisters coming to that gift should give you hope. Jewish faith or any other faith has this idea when you do that everything's temporary everything's changing. Just. Kimmy. Get it in a better direction. Just a wake up. Temperature. Wind. Sun. Special. Thanks to musician intron and his weather morlock a drone synth controlled by weather in New Orleans and a shoutout to IC-. Change Global Online project where you can post photos and descriptions of what you notice changing in your community to help investigate how weather and climate change are impacting our environment visit icy change. Dot. Org and get started. Special. Thanks to the National Endowment for the humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts Art Works. The kitchen sisters present is produced by the kitchen sisters, David, Nelson, and Nikki Silva with Nathan, Dalton, and Brandy Hal. We're part of radio TOPA FROM PR, x. a network of some of the best podcasts, an independent producers around. Thanks, to Ted, several reasons for our theme music and thank you for us. Lou Injure and blue dot sessions for more stories, photos, videos, and information about our online workshops. Visit Kitchen Sisters Dot Org. Thanks for listening. For the New Orleans metropolitan area. Today Cloudy A. Fifty percent chance of showers in the morning. is in the lower sixties. Northeast Winston twenty miles an hour. Night partly cloudy. Chief knees. Fifteen miles our. Pie another radio podcast you might like is home cooking. When the stay at home order came through when everyone learned, that would be cooking ourselves a lot more in seeing our friends a lot less. It was pretty clear. We were going to need some help. That's where the new radio Tokyo podcast home cooking comes in co hosted by Shop Semi Nostra author of the bestselling cookbook salt fat acid heat, and by our friend and fellow producer. Rishi case here way creator of the song splutter. PODCAST. The two of them are close friends and together they've been helping listeners figure out what to cook with what they've got on hand. Did, you panic and buy a whole bunch of beans, and now you need ideas about how to prepare them. Did you get a strange vegetable in your produce box? You can't quite figure out what to do with it. So mean ratio are here to help people from around the world send them. They're cooking questions and the answers are informative and a lot of fun and on September thirtieth they're coming back with more questions just in time to help cook your way through the fall and winter holidays, it was named one of the best podcasts twenty twenty by time Esquire Vulture Harper's bazaar, their website home cooking dot show has transcription recipe's to go along with each episode. Go subscribe to home cooking. It feels like you're hanging around with friends in the kitchen. Radio.

New Orleans David Wagoner Katrina Orleans Gentilly Convent of the Sisters of Sain Nikki Silva David Wagner Dot Ted Apple Dave Nelson Mir Sikora Mississippi River North Louisiana Woods Mississippi River pontchartrai Mirabeau Louisville Louisiana
143 - The McDonogh ThreeFirst Day of School

The Kitchen Sisters Present

21:20 min | 7 months ago

143 - The McDonogh ThreeFirst Day of School

"Radio. Welcome to the kitchen sisters present. Six where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson, N. Nikki Silva High. We WanNA. Tell you about another podcast might enjoy pin-drop from Ted on pin-drop hosts Salim, Rush Walla journeys across the globe to find surprising stories and ideas from each place with local journalists and creators as your guides, you weave through the streets of Bangkok with a motorcycle midwife time travel with dinosaurs behind a hardware store in New Jersey and meet a guy who dresses up as a door to protect citizens from traffic in Mexico City. Listen to pin-drop wherever you get your podcasts. The kitchen sisters present is sponsored by Celestial seasonings in nineteen, sixty, nine, one of celestial seasonings, founders, most seagal handpicked wild herbs from the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and used them to make their I t. in the following years. He sold his herb teas to health. Food stores enhance sewn bags. I have many memories attached to these teas and the beautiful little boxes that they come in my personal favorites. Favorites sleepytime and tension Tamer they source over a hundred tackles for more than thirty five countries purchase directly from the farmers and local community Charlie Haden. Their blend master for over forty years, tastes, and approved every batch of t before it leaves the factory in Boulder by your favourite blend of celestial seasonings on Amazon or anywhere tea is sold. We thank you. Celestial seasonings I, answering the sisters present. I can remember right before I started going mcdonagh nineteen. On and I took a bus ride. To Canal Street we took a bus ride. She was paying the fair, and I sat down right behind the driver. She's zero. No, you can't sit there. And I asked her why and she said well. You don't understand now within in a few weeks you will. So I knew something was about to him. That's Leona Tate. When she was six years old, she was chosen along with three other girls to integrate the public schools in new, Orleans in one, thousand, nine, hundred sixty. We produced the story a few years back and we WANNA put it out there again, because it seems critical particularly now to remember and pay tribute to the many keepers of the archives, the stories the truth about our past, and the long fight for what is fair and just. Remember. Get Dress. And a black car drove up parked in front of the door. The household got real quality. It was the US marshals coming. So my mother and I left, they drove us to the school building and she said sit to the back seat and do not put your face. When we turned the corner. All. I can see was crowds of people. Police on horseback. ACA related to was a parade company. It looked like a modern day. Why do we have to go to school oh Margaret. I didn't think it was a mighty the scared, but I could see these crowds of people, and if they get to me, I thought it was gonNA. Kill me! That morning when the Marshall came to pick my daddy and I. Mother was home. She was a nervous wreck. And she told the Marshall. I'm giving you my baby. This is my baby. And he told her he said. This is my job. and. I'M GONNA take care of baby. You don't have to worry about that. November fourteenth. Nineteen Sixty Leona, tate tessie preval's Guillotine and Ruby. Bridges integrated the public schools in New Orleans six years after Brown was decided. Keep Plessey for generation descendant of Homework Plessey president and CO founder of the and Ferguson Foundation. Brown versus board of Education was the land law school desegregation case there were many challenges in implementing that case I'm Brenda billips Square Co, pastor bt Memorial Congregational United Church of Christ. I'm an archivist preserving the history black education. When it costs implementing Brown versus board of Education New Orleans is chosen by the NAACP and a very courageous judge to schools were selected. William France, and McDonough nineteen. When. Did you first begin to think about Leon going to school at mcdonagh? After we got avocation and you pass the test well. That's what I'll do. She was gone. How did you happen to make the application in the first place? In the pavement and call Eglin Assembly one my mom fill out the application. They selected a hundred and forty five families. They chose five families, but only four could participate. NWPP was working with our parents. I did that I'm the tate. One of the six year old black girls at integrated the all white public schools here in New Orleans Louisiana. There was a lot of planning a great deal of faith and courage for this the happen. The girls had to take test to make sure that they were going to be able to do the work. I can remember. A lady in a man both white standing over me and we would test. It psychologically tested at the school, Board. was mostly. Questions and answers you know so. I must have talked my way. Right through that one, didn't it? Do. You think that she will get better schooling here. Will? Think, she will. We, all faced with either clothing. The schools are integrating. By far the greatest determination to preserve for the children on the Watkinson state Sira Gatien of the races. Because I honestly believe that only on the practice. Can Be properly. Educate the children of both races. The city at that time did not welcome to school integration. When the black girls enrolled in the schools, they each had their own washer protect them. Court order. That was a rookie Marshall Service. It's when I was sent down to new, Orleans and it was pretty scary when we get to MacDonald Nineteen to whole school campus was surrounded by New Orleans policemen, some of them were on horses things that. Went on there undescribable. I couldn't believe. Grew and people would act the way they did. About four girls go to school. One of the things that was in my mind is that I had two small children I'll be damned if anybody's GonNa. Tell them they can't go to school. And that's the way I felt about it. Nobody has the right to tell these ladies that they could not go to school. We as deputy marshals. If, we didn't get the job done. We're going to set the whole movement back. God knows how many years it just had to be done. Burn. The s going up the steps. They didn't know what to do with us. Once we got in there. We said there quite a few hours before we will place in the classroom. Class of white children. Mismile was teaching and all of a sudden. You see children disappearing. Passionate started pulling children out of school before you knew it off. They will go. For the year and a half there was no one else but us and Miss Myers. Mrs To me. What do you think might happen eventually in this? Well I know would happen that? Oh, I couldn't play on that. A Nation long because they. Long Legislature has urged quite parents to resist integration. The legislature took out paid advertisements in New Orleans papers, which urged the parents to boycott. They have not urged violence, but they have said resist integration, boycott the schools and demonstrate peacefully. People. Angry, that was so much hate. They have been taught. that. Black people would somehow hurt their children. And they were so devoted to separation that these little children were actually targets and their families targets. My Dad was a welder and a mechanic. He worked in Saint Bernard Parish, which was highly racist, so my dad's name stay out of the public for a long time. Nobody knew who he was one legislator work. Urge to Lynch Party for what he called integration as white parents. The two of his colleague pointed out. Everybody knows that this manage joking. He didn't really minute. He didn't mean what he said. Probably in the legislature, people did not think he meant that. People should be lynched in New Orleans we won't heavily guarded at night. All Day. Know at least. We were confined. We couldn't play in the yard. We bring our own lunch. We couldn't eat from the cafeteria. I guess for safety reason now with think. We left mcdonagh nineteen after the second grade, because mcdonagh nineteen became a black school. WAS, all, black! End Up people keep us in a white school, so they transferred us to Thomas J Sims? It was total chaos. They were sent over. Tj Sam's another school, but this time the white children didn't leave. We went to Sam's with a school. Full of students didn't want us to be there. They used to beat us ky-ko's. Did Spit on us. I got hit in the stomach with a baseball bat. We will deathly afraid to go in. The cafeteria was scared to use the bathroom alone. There were teachers that the children to call US names. Recess time we'd had a tree. That was our little protection. They endured a lot of violence hostility from teachers who did not welcome them. They were civil rights pioneers at age of six and seven and eight year old. The way that immigration system worked was it started with them six years old in elementary school junior, high and senior high were not integrated until they became age to attend. They were the first to integrate. Every level cool. And their age bracket integration progress as we progress agreed. We reached tenth grade then they opened it up all the way you can go to integrate. Wait will leave in junior high school in sixty nine. We were going to senior high school to Francis Nicholls. That was kind of rough, even was a lot of black students at that school then. We had a confederate flag. The mascot was rebel that caused a lot of friction. They expected the blacks to support the rebel mascot, and they don't WanNa do that I can remember going to school one day walking cafeteria and chas would be thrown and it was an uproar. The police were coming into building. Horseback and white, and the blacks are fighting. They didn't want the mascot to be changed. I asked Tessie. Why didn't you ever talk about this? She said I was finished with civil rights by the time I got to high school. I was done. They will complain to their parents at Tj, Samson. Gill said her dad said you know. He was with Martin Luther King. He said don't fight back. You can't fight. Just gotTa pray. that. We write letters for nothing would be done. I didn't talk about it for years and I'm thinking that I decided to break out. When Barack got elected president and I said. Wow, we really did something. Gail tests in our. We always talked about mcdonagh nineteen. Because it had closed down the before Katrina. Closed. When allowed us to come to the lower nine ward? I I say. Let's go by the school. Let me see what it looks like. You can see the water just hit the bottom level, but it looked fine. And I said well. Something's gotTa be done year. After the inauguration we got together and we put the foundation to him. When they were going to auction mcdonagh nineteen. Leona tate one of those young ladies, and I said let's go together to the school board. We have to let them know that. These are civil rights institutions. That cannot be just auction. Just as our ancestors had been. At the pressing Ferguson Foundation. We're documenting mocking historic sites because they're very few marcus of like history in New Orleans supervision is to do a civil. Rights Museum New Orleans does not have. A civil rights missy, so we're going to allow first civil rights missing. In this built. Each generation has to impart the stories for the future generations so that people will know they are. Ruby Bridges Gail, tested and Leona with a four girls who integrated public education in the deep south on November nineteenth nineteenth sixty. They were chosen as foot soldiers on a front line. The kitchen sisters present is produced by the kitchen sisters with Nathan Dalton and Brandy how? We. Thank our production interns MIRA clancy, Charlotte Landis Taylor. Simmons Katie mccutchen Mary Franklin, Marvin and Paulina Tano Lots of people to give thanks to today we thank Keith policy and phoebe Ferguson founders of the Plessey and Ferguson Foundation. Who Do St- to this story? We'll be doing a piece soon about their foundation and historic plessey versus Ferguson Supreme Court. Case in the meantime here's Keith Plessey talking about the power of one of his foundation's projects historic plaques. After US putting the marker mcdonagh nineteen, where it exists at the Saint Bernard Parish Line in two thousand ten to commemorate the school. The wrecking ball was waiting to knock it down. By placing the marker in front of it, we ceased the wrecking ball seven years later. The National Park Service finally recognized that site as a historic place. The gave the Leona Take Foundation for change a half a million dollars to start refurbishing that school and telling history as all part of our groundwork. Several of the voices you heard in the story were recorded in two thousand ten at Tulane University as part of a reunion and Panel Discussion on the Fiftieth Anniversary of the integration of public schools in New Orleans what an incredible and significant gathering. Voice as you heard, include the unattainable tessie provost Williams and Gail stripling who integrated McDonnell nineteen. You also heard retired deputy US marshals. Charlie Burke Herschel Karner and out Butler. This gathering was the first time the women had reunited with the marshals since November nineteen sixty. We think Tulane University armistead research center history. Department Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities Louisiana Center for Civil Rights and social justice. The US Marshals Museum and most Alan Wider. For the W. Espn Archival News footage in this story we thank Taylor Ci Coin, and Ruta Adelines Brown, media archives and peabody awards collection Uga special collections library. And thanks to Brenda, Flora Audiovisual archivist armistead research center Tulane University. Thank you prospect for New Orleans? A Lotus in spite of the swamp. The story is part of our Levy Stream project in collaboration. With Ben a Jones and associates made possible in part by Ruth. Eufor Tell Foundation and project and. As always we thank the National Endowment for the humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts Art Works. Thanks to Leona Tate. You can find out more about the Leona taped foundation for change and their civil. Rights Museum Project at www Lt, F C. I N C, Dot Org. As always we thank the National Endowment for the humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts Art. Works And One more thank you and last words from activist archivist Brenda Square, who spoke with us about the history of African American public education in New Orleans and about her archival calling. My name is Brenda billips Square Co, pastor Beechy Memorial Congregational United, Church of Christ. I'm an archivist documenting post Katrina New Orleans. On the day of the flood. Was My Saturday work that the Amish that research at Tulane University. The prediction was that it was going to be bad. The city's archives in the basement. WanNa came. We would have floods. Being archivists. I was thinking about the people, but I was also thinking about the records. This is what's in my mind. I said Lord helped me to stay. Focus this pray for the people, but these records. All in my mind is well. My archival Carleen was I. believe part of my spiritual polly. Let the redeemed of the Lord, say sober number the story of the nation of Israel. They had to tell this. Tell your children. You supposed to town. After Katrina, policy makers decided to take over the schools close off the school. I knew that with the takeover of the schools. The history of all these black educators with being destroy actually thrown away in these buildings. There was no effort to preserve it. Public Education was the central focus for blacks coming out of slavery. Alma leaders come out of these schools. So I've been collecting neural histories documenting the fight looking at where we have history recorded, and where the gaps are activists archival work, because in Iran's racial hatred will have you think that you're nobody? Bad History. Bad Theology has crippled our nation. I have a duty as an artist as a preacher and a culture keeper. To preserve this history where I can, because it's all a part of the rich community that we know is America. The kitchen sisters present as part of Radio topiary from P. R.. A curated network of extraordinary cutting edge podcasts created by independent producers. Thanks for listening our fellow Radio Tokens at radio. Diaries have a brand. New Series called the hunker down diaries, featuring stories of people in unexpected circumstances because of the pandemic, each episode is an intimate look at folks on the front lines, people living without a safety net, or those hunkered down with unexpected company. One of my favorite stories is about Joan Newman who's one hundred seven years old. He was five during the flu pandemic of nineteen eighteen. Today. He lives in a senior apartment complex in Sarasota Florida with his fiancee Anita. Simpson they interviewed each other on Anita's one hundredth birthday. Two weeks before we were told, we had to stay in our parliament's. I had done a cold and I was really scared. That just was happening to me. Fortunately, it was just a mild cold. But I was getting anxious because I I wanted to reach hundred. All of a sudden I didn't WANNA die. This is new to me. You always indicated to me. That you had no fear. In l., the reason why I don't want to die. It's because. I'd like big in this relationship and I. Really don't want it to stop. Take a listen to hunker down diaries at radio diaries dot org or wherever you get your podcasts. Radio.

New Orleans mcdonagh Leona Tate US Ferguson Foundation Ruta Adelines Brown tessie preval Tulane University Gail stripling Charlie Haden Brenda billips Square Co Public Education National Endowment New Orleans Louisiana Boulder Rights Museum New Orleans Dave Nelson New Jersey Amazon
152  Winona LaDukeFirst Born Daughter

The Kitchen Sisters Present

27:18 min | 2 months ago

152 Winona LaDukeFirst Born Daughter

"The Radio. Welcome to the kitchen sisters present. where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson. N. Nikki Silva. Voter turnout. This year is predicted to come in at around sixty five percent. What is that like a D plus? Come on America. I see as point down more like a B.. B. Minus easy. Get out there cast that ballot. No matter who you are no matter how you vote it's not government by sixty five percent of the people after all it's about all of us weighing in and being heard, make a plan, bring a friend and vote. Name didn't mugging attack me gangway get them Augustine. Gum DNA sequence iggo. McCoy Indo Damn. winona indigene. Thank you for the honor of introducing myself to my name is when on the Little Duke I'm from the bear clan Mississippi beyond I'm here on the whiter reservation in northern Minnesota I wanNA thank you for the honor of being considered as a vice presidential candidate accept this honor. As become from community that has been historically disenfranchised politically and economically from this United States. But we also come from a community that we believe in the future to make a society that is based on making decisions considering the impact on the seventh generation from now. I believe that together we can make that possible and I. Thank you for the opportunity of joining you in that process. That was when Luke in Nineteen ninety-six accepting the vice presidential nomination on the Green Party ticket with Ralph Nader. Winona do has been on our radar for a long time. We visited her in two thousand four on the white earth reservation in Minnesota for our hidden kitchen story harvest on big rice, Lake. Winona is a food activist, a writer and environmentalist. She's the founder of the White Earth Land Recovery Project and the Executive Director of honor. The Earth. Most. Recently, she was a leader at standing rock fighting the Dakota access pipeline. She's tireless. A visionary A fighter. And she's in it for the long haul. Today, the kitchen sisters present winona Duke first born daughter. Double Mike here. Is, David Nelson and Nikki, Silva of the kitchen sisters, we are in Minnesota to see winona La Duke. On September twenty first two, thousand four for the rising moon story for hidden kitchens me one non. Search you had for breakfast this? What did I? You know that was for the from with Kim, the skipping of the initial breakfast and then from there. But then I made yesterday we tried the wild rice and Maple Syrup cake, which I actually thought was quite good. So, this is like the new thing because I'm never was good at fluffy cakes. You know when you go wild rice and Maple Syrup, you're just like totally in the heavy cake department, and so you don't have to wear on it was great and so we had a big feast today. You probably have some of the email that cake but I had to make test run yesterday because you don't want to try the new recipe out for the feast and. Have it be like the failure. winona cabin is on the reservation thirty miles from the nearest town. It's wet green boggy and beautiful the headwaters of the Mississippi with forests of pine and Maple and not many people. A, small patch of wild rice grows in the lake in front of winona place. It hasn't always been there. Some of the neighbors say it followed her when she came back by neighbors are commenting on it. They said, how did that Rice all get here and you know they got here because of the ducks I didn't do it. The ducks front, the Rice Winona. The Duke is a force to be reckoned with. There's a poster on the wall of her study that shows around horseback. It was part of her campaign for the vice presidency on the Green Party ticket with Ralph Nader during his first bid for the presidency. I'm not someone who's necessarily inclined to run for office. You've got gotTa really feel compelled are really worried about the country to run for office and I'm kind of worried about it. Well, it was the best part about running for vice president. It was just all these people you know it's amazing thing but people really wanted democracy that works they wanna feel like they could vote for someone they believe in. They WanNa feel like they could believe in something but you hear these politicians talking you'll feel passionate about them. It's sad. I. Really Think this is the richest most powerful country in the world and we ought to get it together. There should be something that we would believe him. So you go to these rallies you go some place and people were just come crying that they finally felt like that there was something they believed in people bring you their daughters. you don't know how many times I go out and they still do people bring me their daughters and say we want them to grow up and be like you. You know that's like the best thing what are you seated to girls from their mothers bring them after telling listen to their MOMS study hard and eat their vegetables like things because I have a lot of kids. Then I say you know think hard about things don't take everything for granted. You know think critically and think with compassion to you know it's easy to be critical but not have compassion for that person whose opinion I might disagree with you have to think about why think? Born in. Los. Angeles and raised in Oregon known moved to wider, which is her father's reservation after she graduated from Harvard in Nineteen Eighty two. When she first arrived, she worked as the principal of the reservations high school seven years. Later, she started the nonprofit white earth, land recovery, project dedicated to restoring local economy and food systems and preserving wild rice longtime ago we started on the eastern seaboard those people there are related to us the WOMP annoyed Aba, Nacchio's and the Lenny Ave we call them our old people because we came from them we are instructed by some prophets to move west were told if we did not move West parish, which is pretty much true. Anybody who lived on the eastern seaboard almost gone. Now we followed a shell in the sky and our migration store we traveled by canoe. Through those water west get to where we are here we were told to go to the place where the food grows upon the water. And that was wild rice. And a lot of ways defines what it is to be initially ave. Our jubilee people because we're the ones who have that rice, we have forty seven lakes. This is a beautiful land here. You know we have a call this the medicine chest that will raise. It's all as prairie here, and there was great stands of pine the headwaters of the Mississippi is on this was efficient. So as the headwaters of the Red River goes to the north, this is like both ecosystems to the. South to the north, and then you have all these lakes you know. So you have a really beautiful land here and we have a really interesting ojibway community got three different bands that that we settled here came into this reservation. We have a lot of you know our culture here and our culture is not American. We're would you boys? You know now as the wild rice season and it is really defines being way. Tell us about that season. If you would each season, this moon here is called Mino- McKay Giza's Mino- mccague Jesus which means the wild rice making moon. You know we have different moves at talk about like the falling leaves moon and and when it's freezing up Gosh Cardinal Jesus when it's freezing up. We don't actually have four seasons I want you to know this. We have six seasons because he got freeze up and thaw. That's a whole other way of life that occurs during that time. You know it's significant when you're a water. Based culture or culture that lives by lakes, the freeze up in the thaws very significant and we have NEMI Bene-. Giza's Sucker Moon, which is why the suckers run. Damon Jesus, which is a strawberry moon. You know. We have our Maple Syrup in moon. A lot of people they make assumptions, and for instance, that idea that Julius Caesar Calendar. You know something that belongs to one culture and it doesn't even actually belong to everybody. You know always have this problem with naming large things after small white men. That's one of my little problems. Like. You know who was that guy why we have one whole system of time named after him you know because it has no relationship to the world. It houses relationship to appear colonialism. And to imperialism. And it is totally irrelevant to reality. So us, we have this way of life that is based on on. The. Land. and not wild rice is the centerpiece of of you know our food systems. This is like one of the biggest times in our community. Soon. As it starts coming up, there's bantering which lakes recording where they're gonNA go see. These guys we're excited. To race for their family and they're going to get to sell that rice this guys making a couple grand live when he got maybe sixty percent unemployment that's a Lotta money I ain't GonNa say easy money because it's not easy money. That's fast money. Put a lot of school closed on my kids because it's that part of the year. I am Ron Children waiters land project. Look to sue wholesome usually. On the night before. The canoe being tied on as a sign of honor. Our community if your canoe falls off the car on the way to racing, it's really a shame and you know if it falls off some. You. Drive out there. Cheer League. We when you're potent unload canoe when you drag it down there in, you know it's already a workout. Heavy and you know. A lot more sedentary these days. Now though you know what a lot of these guys are pretty buffet farther back the better. Going into the race you get out there on the lake and it's misty just as beautiful like fuck. On the lake. That's quite. There's nothing surfer them birds. One guy stands in the back. He has a poll tall right in front of him. Sits this person who's going to knock. These two long cedar sticks. Knockers. Economic. Put their called. But if we just call them knockers, allow you know let me give way humor. There any pull your rice across you laugh, and then you run the second knocker kind of diagonally class. And you hear the rice volunteer? Canoe. Stuff like that. You don't WanNa hit it too hard. You knock heads in. And if some fallen the lake, that's that's better. You Restating Lake. Go back and forth and back and forth you kind of try to keep some rhythm. which co cruel put Rice is some looks like close feed some looks like a bottle brush and they wrote different times they go and they start trying to domesticate varieties. It would ripen at the same time you're not diverse their monochrome. And they put him in diked Rice patties. A lot of times they're using fungicides and chemicals may go in and harvest it with a combat. That is different than to Indians. They're trying to call it while rice, but that's not wild rice. We call that team is and it doesn't taste. Is Tastes like a lake. Lake. We'll be right back. The kitchen sisters present is sponsored by ACORN TV a subscription streaming service that offers world class mysteries, dramas comedies, and documentaries all commercial free. There's a world of entertainment options out there and by that I mean there's a lot of compelling international shows you may be missing out on. It's time to burst the domestic TV BUBBLE AND CHECK OUT A. TV. You can stream all your favorite devices for just five, ninety, nine, a month I watch on Apple TV and they're documentaries, endless documentaries, the art detectives, the Churchill's the story of women and Power and mysteries I have to say Vera is. My personal binge at the moment i. now coming soon, the South Westerlies, which sounds pretty good to me about an undercover environmental consultant teaming up with x best friends and old flames. So escape to Britain and beyond without leaving your seat, try Acorn TV free for thirty days by going to ACORN DOT TV and use my Promo Code kitchen sisters. That's a C O R N dot, TV, Code Kitchen Sisters to get your first thirty days for free. When Winona I moved to white earth the price of wild rice was being driven down by the influx of cheaper paddy rice from California she and Margaret Smith a tribal elder set out to do something about it. Margaret and I start again mad about the fact that these guys were driving down the price of rice and trying to cheat those Indians instead of him abucha pomp in eighty cents a pound. So Margaret Night, we go out there with a little bit of money. You know five thousand bucks and we forced those race guys those white guys up the price we went there and we said we're paying a buck and followed until all the races come to us and those guys didn't know how much money we had kind of like playing cars like bluffing You know we had half a million dollars for all. They knew me Margaret Decorator. Bras. For the next four years were known A- and Margaret drove up the prices and WINONA started white Earth Land Recovery Project, not only to improve the economics of the crops for the tribe. But also to protect the survival of wild rice, their concern that genetically modified rice is being grown in diked rice patties in northern Minnesota, and when they drain the rice paddies, the modified rice seat goes into the public waterways and ends up in the lakes and native rice stands over time the genetically modified. Can Cross with native rice creating what they call non shattering varieties? So there's a guy with traditional parching equipment and he can't get the hall off or can't get the rice departure right and then they tell us that we should not be concerned or you don't got to worry about contamination. Five hundred feet, we'll keep our rice. A rice beds are testbeds for our new purple petrosky or macintoshes. I don't mean to repeat this, but I have a problem with the naming thing. Big Mountains after small men. This whole continent is badly named. So anyway, the grow this out this old you don't have to worry about it. The studies fine all you know there's a little wind drift with the seed. Oh Yeah but you guys don't really have to worry. It's really minimal risk. So then we ask what about the Ducks Body Z. Sheba ca I worked for ducks in Oj in our stories about where we got rice, we're taught about rice by the ducks. That's why got rice in front of my house. CanNot Delineate between a paddy rice analytic Chris, and they dropped that rice in there. and. This guy's got all these scientific models. What about the ducks? So it's not about money and it's not just about the food it's about reaffirming who you are. You know as a human being. Because you know really everything in America. You know to be honest you know towards the native people has been about kind of trying to deconstruct us. You know make us into like Brown skin white people. You know where we could go and have a little job over here and you know maybe sometimes we go dress up being a juke ways is not about that? You know it's about this relationship you have to the Creator you know you have to reaffirm that relationship by your singing and dancing and feasting. And you're harvesting. It is not something that you can go buy. At the store, your culture, you have to live it. They always are training and re-training are people for jobs that don't exist. You know there was a time on our reservation when there was more people employed in job training programs than were employed. And so like what does that Saito? Indian map you know you keep trading it for a job that doesn't exist you know, and then he goes trust to work at a border town. He cannot get hired. You make them feel like they're not going to be any good. He keeps retraining them for things and what we decided to do is say what we got us something that we're good at. Let's just build on that. Instead of trying to make up some economy. That makes no sense to us. That's our strategy is to is to rebuild and restore economy based on. Our cultural practices and our cultural values and and the fact that we're unique as people. How was your childhood power you raised and how did you learn these? It's of strange. It's not a strange story. It's my story. My mother comes from New York her parents were Jewish immigrants from the Ukraine. The story is that my great grandfather. Was a miller. So he milled wheat in the Ukraine he had a wind. No, and he was put out of business by someone who had a coal powered mill eighty years later. Putting up wind turbines. So my mother met my father he was Oj way. and. He comes from a really traditional family of the northern part of the reservation and in his family he was the one who spent all his time in the woods and he decided that he is going to go sell wild rice in New York. That's telling my mother selling wild rose in New York. Let's get. Let's zone in on that moment. Like, he drove his Indian car to New York, and so he meets my mother who is like this really stunning. She's an artist and he was betty La- duke living in a loft be paintings she was hanging out with all the hip radical artists, socialist people like my mother is like a contemporary of Diego Rivera and and so they eloped. The story is grandparents didn't understand what he was. You know the the quote is all he's not A. Sonata Ju. What is he? No conceptual. Work. For an initial ave no. So that's why they had run off. They ride off in the rambler. Go to La. Where the WESTERNS are starting to fill and so there's all these Indians that are in the Westerns and my dad must have got wind that my dad was handsome got. and. He could ride a horse. He looked like a real Indian at all. I remember we used to hunt in Santa Barbara and Pasadena on you know there was all these places that my dad used to go hunting, and so when I was little, we ate all this food plus that while rice when I was a little waste, come back to the reservation to whiter. Now always knew that I had family back here because my dad was only one that ever really left. Let's where I lived. You know when I was born here my parents separated and I was raised a small town in southern Oregon. I come back with seventy-nine. Twitter. and. What was that like? When you came back. I came for political conference. You know I was I went to Harvard is undergraduate and I got politically active was four years after wounded, knee. The American. Indian movement had become really active. And so I was raised largely politically by the American Indian movement. and. My father had run a lot of food to wounded knee and you know would stop by and tell me a lot of the for American de Movement, men and women are from the waiter reservation. So I would work with those guys. I was a researcher outside I didn't still do that. Always say when are you going to move home? When he's GonNa come home. Took about two years and then I moved home when I lived here since. So here I am I find that I'm working on the same things, my father and my great grandfather worked on. Because that's all it takes. Sometimes, it takes generations to fix those things so. So, your dad in Hollywood doing the movie thing what did that? To him spiritually having been in the woods forever and loving that what was that like for him? It transformed him in a lot of ways and he kept some things. You know his name is Vincent Duke. La in the. Sixties. was like bizarre Indians an ally in the sixties was like a really strange. Ethical allows people were looking for something and my dad, he had a gift. It was a spiritual gift he became. Known, as a man named Sun, bear. And he was like this new age spiritual leader like four books that he wrote. In on he had eighth grade education? But he had this huge following of a lot of new age people that came out of California are all across the country. Just believe that people should get back in touch with her in O and he had a set of teachings and his teachings were no gibb way based. But how that is translated but he had one saying that I use. I don't WanNa hear your philosophy if it doesn't grow corn. That's what he said. Because there's a Lotta, people spend their entire lives in their mind telling you how to run your life. That's what he said. I don't WanNa hear philosophy but doesn't grow corn. Grow food. The kitchen sisters present is produced by the kitchen sisters with Nathan Dalton and Brandy Howell. Special. Thanks to win on Duke and the wider. Land Recovery. Project today. winona operates a forty acre industrial hemp farm on the white earth land reservation growing him Friday's from different regions of the world. The fact is that we used to grow our own clothes. You know world smaby, we tend our heights, but we actually grew the him in the north country and until the nineteen forties, there were eleven hemp Nelson Minnesota and we grew the cloth for a lot of the uniforms that were used but also for a lot of close, it was in Minnesota and so I'd like to see the future that are tribes are part of an integrated hemp economy whether it is for bioremediation whether it is for fabric and clothing for him. Crete him based insulation you know I want to see the whole plant utilized and I wanNA see hemp as part of an integrated farming economy. The kitchen sisters present is part of Radio Topi from PR. A. Network of some of the most creative inspiring podcasts produced by independent producers. Owner WINONA. The martyr. Pretender. And here's Ronnie Chilton if he is the colleen. and New Solo manufacturing production facility PONSFORD MINNESOTA. You WanNa thank Ronni Chilton and all the rices we interviewed for our story harvest on big rice. Lake and we're thrilled to see WINONA and Ronnie and their crew are embarking on another project together the production of solar panels by company. Eighth Fire Solar Okay let me show you how. Much album. Only is so styrofoam nets were Dr Solana pounds consist of we realized that if you want a heat, the north you got. You gotta make like hundreds, thousands of solar panels honey really loud dangerous cutting fix. Nick graduated what two years ago the school year on the reservation, and this is his first big job loses thing this. Thing. Classroom. Enclosing, introduce yourself one more time. Money Must Winona La Duke my Indian name is Buenos Acquai- which means thunderbird woman. Is How we call ourselves and our language which means people. Where you named Winona, there are a lot of winona in Indian country. When Ono's kind of like our original woman in Japan miss a lot of different stories in different communities about her. First born. That's that means first born daughter. Before we go, we wanNA tell you about some exciting news from our friends at fellow Radio Topa podcast ninety nine percent invisible. They just published their first book, the ninety nine percents invisible city. It's beautifully designed and illustrated. It's a field guide to the hidden world of everyday design. If you're already a ninety nine percent of visible fan which I'm sure you are or if you've ever found yourself. Wondering. What do those bright squiggly graffiti marks on the sidewalk mean or why don't you see those iconic metal fire escapes on new buildings or how did car dealerships become home to those dancing inflatable figures than the ninety nine percent invisible city is for you. You can find links to purchase the physical book and the Book Bet by Roman Mars at ninety nine P I dot Org Slash Book Radio.

Rice Minnesota Winona WINONA Rice Winona New York Ralph Nader N. Nikki Silva winona Duke America Mississippi winona La Duke Dave Nelson Harvard Vincent Duke winona place United States Dakota La California
129 - Martin Scorsese  Try Anything

The Kitchen Sisters Present

28:23 min | 1 year ago

129 - Martin Scorsese Try Anything

"Welcome to the kitchen sisters present six where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson N.. Nikki Silva before we get started with today's episode. Some radio TOPI news. We've just launched our annual fundraiser. The one time of the year we ask our loyal listeners to support the kitchen sisters present and the network that helps make it possible. This year our goal is to reach thirty five thousand donors and we need your donation. Oh nation to get their donation of any amount will make a big difference. Radio topiary supports independent. podcasts like this one that bring the stories is that you just can't stop thinking about and talking about at the dinner table the stories that stick with you over time think Radio Topa forever and now we're asking you to make your mark on radio topiary. Your monthly donation will help us continue to support the important deep and profound content. You can rely on. I'm from US and for an extra little incentive if you make a recurring donation today in the amount of seven dollars a month you'll be entered to win a ticket to tope best next. It's January our annual meeting. Radio Tokens where you'll find yourself sitting at dinner table with all of your favorite Radio Topi producers head to radio TOPA DOT FM to learn more and to donate right now. That's Radio Topiary DOT FM donate today at Radio Tokyo that FM. Thanks so much for listening. This episode of the Kitchen Sisters present is brought to you by Sun soil since soil mix full oh spectrum whole plant. CBD that's organically grown naturally extracted an accessibly priced. They are ganic farm all their own hemp in Vermont. They naturally extract CBD from him using organic coconut oil and they test their products at three I s credited laps to ensure potency and purity garrity today listeners of the kitchen sisters can try son soil. CBD At twenty percent off head to send Soil Dot Com and save twenty percents off your order by entering code kitchen sisters at checkout that Sun Soil Dot Com Promo Code Kitchen Sisters for twenty percents off your order raging bull taxi driver Goodfellas. Alice doesn't live here anymore. The films of Martin Scorsese are astounding as are his efforts to preserve the history and heritage of American cinema through his groundbreaking film foundation. Martin Artan score says he is a keeper a steward of American and global cinema one of our heroes. The sound mix of raging bull was one of are great. Inspirations and had a big impact on the kind of mixes we thought were possible for a fledgling kitchen sister stories in the soundtracks. The way the man waves music into a stories or doesn't leave it just shocks you with Pierce's with it clubs with his scores is an soundtracks are like new orders and then there are his documentaries his nonfiction films starting with Italian American portrait of his own parents and family the last waltz rolling stones shine a light and his most recent documentary but not quite documentary. Three Bob Dylan's rolling Thunder Revue The San Francisco Film Society invited Mr Scorsese here to honor his nonfiction film. Work and premieres latest feature took the Irishman about the teamster union. Boss Jimmy Hoffa. We were so taken by his own state conversation that we begged the film society to give us a copy the recording. So we can make podcasts of it for you. Were kind enough to say yes today. The kitchen sisters present. Martin Scorsese testing. Hey thank you so much. Thank you that the Castro why you've talked about how formative film was for you and I'm wondering if you could talk a little bit about the nonfiction aspect act of that early documentary films that you saw either in the movie theater on your sixteen inch. RCA television at home. That's interesting because most of the early years that I was viewing films. They took me a movie theater. All the time where narrative films of supposedly supposedly narrative fiction films and the sense of non-fiction sort of slipped in slowly. I think by the late forties early fifties. I I think really something happened again. It's a whole thing about me. Having Asthma Nineteen forty-six I wasn't allowed to play sports or war. Run around or be near animals of any kind and trees and I was allergic to everything no laughing because kids would get into a spasmodic laughter laughter and then turn blue and it was very bad until always taken to the movie theaters. I think the closest thing I could think of that was overlapping a little bit into nonfiction with the film. Wars and this is slightly be misunderstood. Because as the whole thing that goes back to the forties and fifties and early sixties if it's black and white and grainy that means it's real and that comes from newsreels now with the younger people today of course. The perception is Cameron on a iphone. So it's a whole different perception of what reality could be. In any event event we had a television in nineteen forty eight and they were. These Italian film shown once a week on Friday night but Italian American community in New York and and we saw the neorealist films I five or six for me. Look at the film's Grainy Black and white. TV and subtitled ELT. I know who is still cinema but it had another immediacy to adding to that was the fact that the people in the film particularly pies. Aw Cellini found. That begins insisted that my grandparents came to the apartment and watching it when my family and how they were speaking in the film was the way they were speaking speaking. Thank you and I guess that state line that way but ultimately I couldn't really see a difference difference between the two and then of course we became very very aware of the nonfiction film in the fifties particularly films from the WPA. A Leo Hurwitz Parallel Ryan's and all of that so that became something we could see them. A theater in New York called the value in the theater was very small and the screen was tiny and it was a no nonsense every day in the summer. They got double bill every day. They changed it and so many documentaries their first episode Eisenstein film just walked in the middle and so this led to the awareness of this kind of film making when I started taking film courses at Nyu in one thousand nine hundred sixty by that time. There's Penny Baker. There's Lecoq there's the maizels surely Clark and John Kesse these shadows and shadows. And Shirley Clark's a cool world. There was no difference between what what I saw on television. And what I saw and we'll be zoll one and it could be done is. He's so in a sense they're interrelated so much that once I saw shadow's even window it's another world for me culturally. I was very very much Coming from a little Kinda Sicilian village in a way But when I saw shadows I told my friends at night. I said there's no more excuses we can do. It depends on what you have to say. You know so we started doing everything we could even if we didn't have anything to say just but we knew that the pictures could be made and the documentary. Element was there all all the time. Our Teacher The Hague Manooghian. It wasn't school the arts that was a couple of classes it was not like Nyu now but he was only intent. Untung showing US or inspiring us to make documentaries anybody who made narrative films one thousand nine hundred eighty nine sixty. That was out here in the West Coast. There was very little to New York Independent. Were you resistant to that idea. Or because I think you also said that you were more interested in making more stylized narrative films at the time. We're absolutely. Yeah but the thing was that it seemed that how should I put. It should be a film. It shouldn't be a documentary or fiction. Film should be a film. There should be no difference. I mean that is happening now to not really shouldn't be pigeonholed into saying well. The documentary should be this way. And that's nonfiction. And what if it's altogether. What if you could pull from everything and experiment with it? And that was the idea that ultimately became mean streets. Really how do you choose your documentary subjects subjects. How do you decide what is worthy of spending the time and effort? I think the key one was Italian American when I made eighty my mother and father that was nineteen seventy six was the bicentennial maybe doing the PBS series. The storm of strangers was called and they had for each ethnic group a half hour film and they asked me to the Italian when I suggested that instead of doing be traditional or colonel logical obvious. Way of going about explaining the immigration battalions. So why don't we just go to my mother and father's apartment on Elizabeth Street. We'll have dinner okay but like really. You're sitting down there okay. Why why are you down there? What he wants from me? We got in there her myself from the kitchen memoir you and Martic and I started shooting my doing so far. It's about to ask a question but I saw that. My mother took over the scene. You what should I say you know. You want me to tell you how how how learn how to make. Why don't ask me the question? Don't you hear that. Then I mean if you would ask me a question I would answer GonNa. I'm GONNA save now. I WANNA know how you learn how to make sauce. We'll talk to you. How long I mean how many two years I'm going to use it and doing it and I want to see you do it? Well you know. My father was greg resistant. And she started arguing with him can mean Charlie Book. The way you're talking to we know that's what I mean. I'm an actress. I'm not putting on any as you want to fight or something. Talk Talk to me when you talk to your son. My mother and father by that point it was that they were never went to school. There were working in the garment district but kit started make these movies. They thought I was completely crazy but they participated data because their son is doing and I know I wanted to start you. You're going to tell us about the sauce. You'RE GONNA show us how to do the source. By the time I finished. which was the next day three hours three hours? The next eating with them at the table by that time I realized that they had a whole life before me. Wow I didn't realize what really like in the tenements in nineteen twenty two. You know I remember as a little boy we used to have Wallis. I mean people loved us. We see the kitchen. He used to be a bedroom. These to pay. Oh yeah mom cook for them wash. Their clothes needs to pay how many people on the rooms. It was two bores me my father this rosy Mo- Mikey Joey Faye seven and two was night forearms over more on. You got no furniture at bed. Time you pick them up when you had the room and time before them down and then you want to sleep all the questions we had didn't really matter anymore. They just took off and went and went and went onto Kellyanne. Yeah I was right. What were you about? My father's smashed a great thing but no they can't your mesh once. Oh my God. Yeah father didn't have. The machine by father had jokes. You know hit body. We'll come work exactly beside scaffolding apple. Being what kind of things happen was it was a lot of things you know. Another time. He came home. He hurt his then. He was out of work so long. And you know in the master of the House within market. It was hard on us. My mother used to paint to keep the family going. My mother was a very fine Hanso. The older people will remember when I mentioned his name. My mother made pants for Daddy Browning a millionaire. He married young girl. Her name was peaches right. This is I'm serious and my mother was such a fine so whatever and he used to go here on our ninth street to have his clothes made and they used to give the pants to my mother because her celine was beautiful. My mother used to take the call. Listen to me. My mother used to finish the pan. Hold up night. Then I began to realize as much fascinated by for leniency hopefuls. Kubrick Eisenstein all of the editing when a person person is in the frame directly talking to you or directly to the camera. That's the movie that then affected everything I did in the fiction films too including the film. The Irishman I know that if the actor hold it and if it's interesting enough you stay on them. We'll be right back. The kitchen sisters present is sponsored by better help better help offers. Licensed professional counselors who are specialized in issues such as depression stress anxiety anger family conflicts. LGBT matters and more connect with your professional counselor in a safe safe and private online environment. Anything you share is confidential and it's convenient you can now get help at your own time and at your own pace you can schedule secure cure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist kitchen sisters present listeners. Get Ten percent off your first month with Discount Code Kitchen in sisters so why not get started today go to better help dot com slash kitchen sisters simply fill out a questionnaire to help them. Assess your needs and get matched with a counselor slur. He'll love better help dot com slash kitchen. Sisters I then. I started making documentaries for every film I made like a companion thing than taxi. Driver was a film made. Call American boy on a friend of mine. Steve Prince New York New York. The work was Last Waltz by that point the music of course music was something that again. The family wasn't in the habit of reading and everything was visual but there was music all the time all kinds of music opera but primarily jazz and swing and popular music but probably the most important music I remember was Jangle Reinhardt. And the hot club of France and I had Antonio was five years old. I don't know what that sound was but I played those seventy eight thousand Stephan Berg Pelley. The I didn't know what it was. But that impulse music always creates for me the impulse to shoot. Oh to compose and design a scene. Always music was just a major part of my life. It's always influenced Irish minutes minutes five seconds in the still of the night at the movie soon as I read the book as that's it it's the saw it's like it can mean streets be my baby. It's the Rhonette it's Phil Spector's wall sound. Music has always been the great inspiration. Something was turned. Eventually I did something for nothing but the blues with the Eric Clapton upped. And there's about twenty years ago I was cutting to some of the Great Blues Musicians Muddy waters and Sonny Boy Williamson. That's what I thank and Eric Clapton felt that was really a problem. Because he says I can't be equal to them but at that point I I understand what he means that people say. Oh your master master is I've seen all the pictures so I understood them what he meant so we decided to go ahead and do something on the blues and make a the whole series on the blues. That's the whole thing. Started with making be documentaries or films on music the next then we're doing gangs in New York and my a friend Jaycox Bro Jeff Rosen. Who is the archivist? I think. Producer for Bob Dylan. Jeff said to me I have this footage edge some of the interviews. I've done we wonder if you look at it. If you think you could do something with it so I looked about an hour of footage including a lot of beautiful interviews of Allen Ginsberg Bergen and so all these wonderful characters and the whole idea that any had this you see jeff had done an interview with Dylan for about four or five days. I saw that interview. I was intrigued by where it could go particularly by the look in his eyes and that took about four four years or three or four years that bolt together no direction home no direction. I wish point than a Libya Harrison came into the picture and she loved that film a lot and then she proposed me doing something with George Harrison. I really love George. Harrison's music and and I was fascinated by how Harrison having everything seemingly to me aside and went for the spiritual matters. I thought that was really fascinating especially at the time when someone who's being ridiculed as well. Yeah the hell would do it you know. Where's IT GONNA take us and at became Living in the material world right around the same time Jefferson came back and showed me some footage from the rolling thunder tour. And you said You'd think you'd do something with this. I sent her. I sorta Kinda beaten up everything but I saw this performance that was really fantastic and they had hundreds of hours of film but I WANNA do. I couldn't care about a conventional documentary on a tour. So what the hell is it about that. I mean it's one thousand nine hundred seventy six the bicentennial the sixties rover Tailwind. Maybe this is the last of its kind. The Committee Adele are going through the going through America. You're helping America's saying there's a and an idea. I think what we're talking about interviewing people as we can into as a people but then Jeff said he was talking to Dylan Dylan. So what if you weren't there. I said Yeah Okay now. That was a challenge. All right Oh yeah like what. If we get like the two manager Jour- and he represents goal to represents all the businessmen Jim Jim Jim nobelists ahead of paramount pictures and he was great. What what did you say to those people about what you were asking them? You Know I. I don't know I don't really know I said in a way as Jim come on. You're like whenever you speak your very Mediterranean of different things. You can talk in a certain way money embarrassment. I didn't make money. What's the matter with them? It didn't make money right exactly and so we went. We took that attack but the best was the best. Was that Dylan suggested Sharon stall sharing right. I work with Sean on on Casino. Sharon I said. Check Dan this so we made up the story now. The point is it says conjuring the rolling thunder to. What do you want to watch something? That's great so why don't we get a spirit of a circus atmosphere. It was a feeling of being alive. We didn't they have enough masks on tour betsy. How bad if you come on the road with us? He hasn't done an interview in twenty years. Joan Baez and necas together in a sleep. Take a lot of people talk about combining things that are true in untrue to reach a sort of breeder truth with that at all part of the idea of this or was it just about being could be clear actually but I a I don't think so I don't think so I gotta say for me always because of listening to music and then seen people perform the truth is for me in the music it is in the music and you could say or do anything you want even describe it you could say this means this that doesn't it it's I think something could be written one way but it can mean something else entirely to you at the age of twenty one at the age of forty means something different and so what's that elusive major art you know he's like that's why it's the joker with the mask asking a sense the waving the idea of a masks and parole Liz hundred parodied a d John. We'll be there but that white face. A real feeling of a traveling committed alert which was very joyce I do remember in Laurie. Site in one thousand nine hundred fifty. I remember hearing a guy playing guitar. Somebody singing we look out the window and they were still traveling strolling musicians and my grandmother throw money down and that's New York it's just wonderful all to Experience with that and so for me. I don't know about a great truth. I just went to the heart of the music and so I'm just wondering wondering if this country at hassle approach help you get at something with him because he's hard to pin down. I mean wiping them down. First of all as the A why. Why do you want to know we listen to music go with it? You know something. He did forty years. AGO is still here. Still hearing your heart too so go with that. Want to know just experience. Abbas the idea and I have masks expand the masks for something. He did those masks and then he says in the interview. They weren't enough masks. We have written some stuff into say just to get him started. And Jeff is very good at these interviews and you see what happens there because one point. He's talking he's talking about the rolling thunder things started and he goes this all and it got so let's use them also opens it up to a kind of improper Tori intuitive intuitive way of moving with with this structure of the piece Mike a piece of music rather than a narrative structure does say something interesting towards the end. We said what's left of it. Nothing ashes and really you know. And I mean he's basically all those factors that create seventies at that point will never happen again and that is ashes thanked honest but from the ashes. It's like the Phoenix of rises again. And we found footage of that beautiful speech Ginsburg. It's wonderful full addiction. The end go out and make it for your with knock on his door really as younger people see this. I hope that's just what he says. They are flashes. Bits and pieces. You saw it all or saw flashes and fragments take from US some example trying to get yourselves together. Clean up your Iraq find your community pick up on some kind of redemption of your own consciousness. Become more mindful of your own friends. Your own work your own proper meditation your own proper art your own beauty go out and make it for your own terminal. You haven't great tress stress in your audience that you're GonNa get what's going on risk. I didn't know if they were going to know what's going on and honestly people will get mad at some time but you gotta let people know something I mean. Come on what did we do the country and then David came up again putting the as the beginning the disappearing woman. Hey something's off it's the truth wrapped in. ooh That's the idea Martin Scorsese try. Anything thanks to the San Francisco Film Home Society to Rachel Rosen director of programming and most of all to Martin Scorsese Film Master Film Keeper. You've you've been listening to the kitchen sisters present produced by the kitchen sisters with Nathan Dalton and Brandy how the kitchen sisters present is part of radio. Tovia appear from P. R. X. A curated network of extraordinary cutting edge podcast created by independent producers. You can find kitchen kitchen sisters on twitter facebook instagram and you can check out all of our stories and workshops. Public events are t-shirt and more at kitchen sisters dot org thanks for listening before we go one. More reminder that we've just launched our annual Radio Radio Topi a fundraiser. And we really hope you'll show your support for the kitchen sisters present and the network that makes this show possible Radio Topa you can and donate at any level to help us reach our goal of thirty five thousand donors just go to radio topiary dot. FM to learn more and donate right now to make your mark that's Radio Topa Dot f. m.. Thanks for listening talk radio.

New York Martin Scorsese Jeff Rosen Bob Dylan US Kubrick Eisenstein San Francisco Film Society Dylan Dylan Radio Topi Jim Jim Jim nobelists Nikki Silva Jimmy Hoffa Radio Tokyo Vermont TOPI US Martin Artan CBD Eric Clapton Dave Nelson N
Stop Trying To Balance Your Day

The Playbook

13:45 min | 1 year ago

Stop Trying To Balance Your Day

"Only balance in my life is that I set minimum amount of time per day. What my priorities are this? Is entrepreneurs the playbook any any any of you guys are the question I loved to start. We'll just roll. How do you? How do you say so balanced so the chew two completely different things right? So humility is a practice Understanding humility comes from the self actually site actualization of I need help is not coming from. I gotta give everything I have. That's not healthy is not you know it comes from I. I need help. I'm connected everything you know to everyone. And so if you truly can get to humble space where I feel you know having children helps you any of you guys have until rate you would much rather see a child achieve something or give them something. Then give it to yourself but we're all in that same relationship but it's so hard to extract fear from like I don't know you. Why would I help you the same way? I'd help my son and so I think humility for me has been a practice of asking for help and it is not just straight out tate. Hey can you help me. I call them series of questions. Now got really good. Having a series of questions to figure out how can provide value to you but also learning to have practicing these series of questions explore. Hey do you know anyone that can help me. How can extract the assets and resources in powers and skills and knowledge and desire that you have have in order to do effects? Wait what I want. That's humility because I'm allowing. You all would feel really good if you're able to help me the same way. I feel super good being able to help other people so humility is one thing. Let's talk about balance because that's probably the more common question that people want in their life balances indicated not by I twenty five percent twenty five percent twenty five percent. Twenty five percents balance is not indicative of I have this unbelievable every single day family family life every single day a making shit loads of money every single day working out five hours every single day. I'm eating right. That's just not even close close to realistic so for me. I do daily assessment of my my own personal values my own experiential values for the day just the day no no more than the day then my giving values and receiving values and then I set by priority in my values so that you know I have standards standards that me to have an adaptable routine minimum of an hour a day with my family minimum of twenty or thirty minutes with my wife thirty minutes of my nine year old two minutes of my three teenage daughters. One Minute with my mom and now I do one minute to push ups and call one member of my family every day. That was just something happened. In New Year's what are you GonNa do for your. That's something I could use and then from there being a student my calendar minimum of ten minutes a day that study my calendar under the Lens of accessibility productivity and gratitude. When I look at my day I tell myself some days? You know what this is my day. Ninety percent descended WanNa do is going to be for me my personal values. There's no great experiences involved. It might be. I'm going to meditate workout. Study the course in miracles. Write my own book. I'll still do the our our health. and the T thirty minutes with my wife and all of that. The consistency of what's most important important me makes me feel as if I'm balanced but it's not balanced out days a lot about Dave Nelson. There's other days in some of you. Seen them in and like ninety percents about everybody else but I set the objective in an management of the expectations before the day and I use being student into my calendar in order to activate meaning raise my awareness or attention and then put my intention through activity to create the coincidences. I want. It's so much fun coming here for me because a lot of people are now like they're living with me here and so they can see how all attention plus intention eagles coincidences. You know very fast when you get rid of interference and corrosion between what you're connected to already. Things happen fast so just little examples. I told Mike Allen my seal make I gotta be Doug Flutie. He's at the party here. He's staying here. You know not many people I consider roic like for me like a kid that I get that juice for anymore. And he's just one of those guys right. He's five foot. He says he's five for Tanis. Five hundred seven and the greatest quarterback I've ever seen and I'm five seven so I appreciate and he was saying charger and like all these things. It was amazing. I go to work out this morning. I was done at seven fifteen drenched. WHO's sitting only person in the lobby here? There's Doug flutie whole whole my God. You're out of the gym is seven fifteen. I can't believe that. Where are you from? California goes yeah me too I go I know I I've manifested you being here brother I go I I always wanted to fix him. The sound of you remember me. I go year one of the guys. I don't get to talk to you. We met several times. And I'm sure you're like who the hell is. This looks familiar and I told older who I was podcast scheduled. Then he's when I'm coming after. I'm showered and dressed to go to the philanthropy awards. He's out front. We hold team talking again. And then he's the philanthropy awards right same thing holds true we had in manifested Justin said. WHO's the second in person you like? How how did that happen from Gary? V's Boy Tyler. We were just talking. Hey how's that happen angle attention. Plus it's a practice. Every day I only balance in my life is that I set minimum amount of time per day in what my priorities are health. Family work are actively pay for productivity accessibility and gratitude. Those lenses and I'm tone you that student of your calendar is if you believe in the formula of what you pay attention to and you give intend to do believe in the unconscious competencies that you have if you believe that formula crates coincidences the coinciding in the universe of what you want no better way to evacuate it then studying your calendar but get out out of the realm of this utopic balance world you know because I lived in that world so long that I tried my best. I'm so hyper competitive. I drove myself crazy going. I got to be. He's the best dad I got to be the best. I got to be the best business person I got to be the best son I got I gotta have balancing my life. How can I do that when my whole map matt? A goal of being being a multimillionaire was sixteen hours twice as efficient twice as typically successful. Sixteen hours if you're spending sixteen hour on TV that you get paid for. You're not going to be balanced. Not If you sleep but what I learned was bending time Oh my teenage daughters. Don't WanNa talk to. Maybe most people use that as an excuse but then they don't feel balanced because they don't spend time with their teenage daughters. I'm GONNA give them two minutes a day. I asked for five. They're like you're actually gonNA call us Texas email every day. I'm like yeah. Can you just do two minutes. This is literally the conversation. I had two minutes a day's worth more within two hours on a Saturday but the continual connection and reminder and attention intention creates this beautiful feeling of what you really want to be somehow aware of what you're doing for your personal experience giving you feel so much better when you consciously say today's not about giving right up today's about me. Today's about experiences I'm GonNa go to you. Know Skydive almost been eight hours to learn how to skydive go. Oh skydiving. That's not a balanced life either but in the end if you take your personal values experience you're going to be super happy and you're gonNA die whenever that. Is this journey which I want to bring one things deep conversation with Jake. I don't know where he went. But he was asking me like my philosophies and how they all occur. He's more religious Dogmatic religion and I'm not into dogmatic religion support all religions. That's why I'm not into dogmatically. 'cause I support the mall. I don't WanNa be separate it. Within one religion they can separate you into different religions within a religion but he said well what do you believe about living. I said well. Here's the interesting thing that I've learned is that I know one thing. My Heart's GonNa stop sooner or later unless something happens technologically most likely. My Heart's is gonNA stop. I would pay taxes and my heart was top. That's what I was born in learned. So if my heart's GonNa stop in this period or journey is going to stop on my heart stops. My brain can stop. I'll still be here is when your heart stops or no electricity. There's no current through you so if that's going to happen happen I have one choice. Do I get a do over or not. I don't know what that looks like right the do over and so she asked me. What do I believe I said? Yeah I do over. I believe that get multiple lifetimes maybe not in this embodiment but I get multiple chances at this and then he said why they may know why I believe it matters. Yeah so the reason. Why is I said to myself? What are my choices number one? It doesn't number two. It does to me. It's simple choice. If I'M GONNA live my entire journey thinking I would prefer to think that I get a do over. It seems it's like a more positive thing for me my personal so I literally nothing other than the fact that it seems like a more positive decision to believe I get a do over. So then Ed I base my entire existence on the fact that I get a do over which allows me now to learn lessons because why learn lessons this is it why learn less. It makes to me choices so easy now I can use. This is journey to learn as much as I want and then I ask myself. What does that those lessons carry on to the next journey once again I have a choice? No or yes. What's the more positive answer? Yeah yeah so I believe yeah. I don't need Moses to tell me I don't need Jesus to tell me it's not that I don't believe in Jesus what they represent or how they can inspire you or i. I don't care for me. It's math. This seems like a better choice. So if I'm going to learn these lessons now I have to play with time. And this is the whole bland of we live at this vibration. Money is the currency of this vibration in my value system in my perception. I believe you've money doesn't buy love doesn't buy happiness but it allows you to shop it. If you shop for the right things you'll be happy shop for the wrong things you won't be you can learn your lessons whichever one but for me money. Is this vibration. So I initiate most of my bigger decisions by an economic decision. Then I take time out of it I I said to myself all right. Would you buy that Volt if you knew the time infinity is that the purchase. You would make a Chevy volt if you knew time was infinity. Would you make it once. You extract time. You're out of an economic analysis. You're in a faith based analysis. I when I make decisions on faith every time. Come up with a better decision than when I make it off of money but I don't always make my decisions on faith because I'm too scared a lot of times. I'm like Gosh. There's no time you know I wouldn't go to that party. Yeah but then you wouldn't be able to finish in close that deal and yeah but you know my son's having a rehearsal in San Diego and you know Friday I should be back at home. You know but then I make that decision and said okay. We'll there's no time what would you do. I'm too afraid to lose the money I do. It's so funny funny. Because every time I make a faith basis turns out better and I still make money based decisions with the key. Is I blend as much as I can. There's somewhere in the blend. Faith and money and mitigate risk and do that what does that mean mitigate risk so take for example. I mean the biggest first faith-based decision I make it beyond I was going to be able to play football and college of a pure faith in you know money decision literally faith. The next one was to sell legal research online so the full faith decision was how many it'd be real lawyer. I know that the Internet's going to be amazing. I know I'm going to be great at this. I know I'm GonNa make millions of dollars. But what did I do. I took the bar. There's a blend there. Why did you take if you knew? Why would you take the bar? Yeah yeah because if it didn't work out now I'm ready. I could go practice oil and gas law and make another decision. That's the blend and it's okay to make. I just believe that the attention plus intention eagles coincidences. The more aware. Conscious of. What we're doing? The less will have the interference corrosion and insecurity that creates a slowdown in this systematic way or flow that we live in where everything is connected helping everything.

Doug Flutie tate WanNa Dave Nelson California Moses football Mike Allen Volt Justin Gary matt Jake Texas San Diego two minutes twenty five percent
113 - Filmmaker Agns Varda  A Conversation

The Kitchen Sisters Present

24:49 min | 1 year ago

113 - Filmmaker Agns Varda A Conversation

"Radio. Welcome to the kitchen sisters present. We're the kitchen sisters, Dave Nelson, and Nikki Silva, some things are hard to control like the volume at a music festival. Other things are easy to control like you're in home wifi with xfinity X Y. You get fast speeds and the ultimate control over your home wifi network with the x fi app, you can do things like see which devices are online, and how long they've been connected or set a wifi curfew for that someone who check social media at three in the morning. So go ahead and take control of your wifi with xfinity X fi. It's simple easy. Awesome. Go to xfinity dot com. Call one eight hundred xfinity or visit a store to learn more xfinity internet required. Other restrictions apply. The kitchen. Sisters percent is supported by sun basket, healthy cooking, made easy organic produce cleaning, greedy, aunts and delicious recipes delivered weekly straight to your door. Sun basket works with the best farms and suppliers to bring you fresh organic produce and responsibly sourced meats and seafoods. Everything is pre-measured and easy to prep. You can get a healthy and delicious meal on the table in as little as fifteen minutes. Sun basket has wonderful dishes shrimp pad Thai with rice noodles and sugar snap peas or fresh fettuccini Primavera with creamy Fateh sauce. If you're watching your carbs and finding it difficult to cook delicious nutritious meals. This is the meal plan for you full of fiber, rich, vegetables and quality proteins. There are paleo gluten-free lean and clean vegan Mediterranean. Diabetes. Friendly and more go to sun, basket dot com slash kitchen. Sisters to get up to eighty dollars off. That's basic. Getting dinner on the table for less than nine dollars a serving for your first four weeks. Visit sun basket dot com slash kitchen. Sisters to get up to eighty dollars off today. Was he Tom toys? All it twists it up you to track clarity rental. Go to them. Today, we honor pioneering filmmaker unnecessary part of the French new wave of the nineteen sixties who died recently at her home at the age of ninety Varda broke ground in many mediums. She made feature films documentaries. She did photography and art installations, her work, often focused on feminist issues and social commentary, and she had a very distinctive experimental style. She has hip poorest because you sweat loose the visas crucial home if he can the thumb foes the. Through the. One of her most recent films faces places a collaboration with the activist. French photographer JR was nominated for an Academy Award for best documentary. On. Yes. Or self received an honorary Oscar for her. Life's work in two thousand seventeen we interviewed on. Yes. For our story about Anri lung and the Sematech Francaise part of the keeper series stories of activists archivists in Roque librarians today, the kitchen sisters present a short commemoration, we produced a von yes for NPR and the full interview debut did with her in twenty seventeen in her home in Paris. My name is Agnes Valda, and my French film director, and this I am doing the series of stories for NPR called the keepers keepers about keeping. I keep looking I'm that they would piss on for your subject because I lose it loud. My fist film. I was twenty six. About his Hoover from my best to twenty five at seen less than ten films. I'd never go. Oh. I SU Snow White than the symbols when it came on. Didn't make it too much. Don't you a stupid? I was looked with films. And when a the did the thing on my first film, you said you should go to the city Matic. No, we had one in Paris. And was was said that he had seen the of pieces of film that isolated. Maybe I would not have started. I dare to make it from without knowing about film. I met down is an inventor is invented the French cinematic. He invented the idea that we should keep including the future, we dont like not only the so called masterpieces. He also said whatever films that we dont like, maybe they make sense may be they tell something about the society in the states. Skull says it wasn't incredible champion about saying we have to keep films. We have fishing rules about to die. But I kept saying this because I received that care roses further Busca that I got in the states two three weeks ago. In the little time. I have to throw them away at forget about those. If I could keep over my memories because I'm losing them. I remember who's been well say that one forget about commemoration Vive blueberry health forgetting, so we should says at sometimes. Model keenum Marsh amid Paladini. Mid flow only told us keep a wet. Should we keep a dunno? I keep a neat. What I like a lot and the rest I forget. Not keeping what is important with keeping the side of the life. You know, it's just dealing with the if image of life and the beauty of it. I don't know what I'm keeping try to keep my buddy wall put some war on my back and I keep face in. Can you identify the Smith around? Very good in the kitchen, and I don't know what it's red peppers in the oven. I was wasn't her. So they will be vague euros. That's interested in details in life. You know, so meeting you in a place, which has the smell that smell crosses to rooms and comes to us, and it's villages. Don't you think it is so beautiful like perfume better than perfume for me? Cooking is. So why should we just on joy? What's happening right now. What are you making? What is the dish? It's just roasted red peppers served with good cheese. Let's and we know we are facing roses about to die. But I kept like this because I received them further Oscar that I got in the states two three weeks ago and I receive that care of roses, and I keep Texas schools. Maybe it's still with Oscar. In the little time. I have to throw them away. At forget about your Oscar speech was incredible. Did you hear? Yeah. No you to they have the adalina Joe Lee. And Jessica, and then I think the men the key of that speech was that. I never made money, but I received many many awards and prizes and start to it. That's interesting to know the proportion is not fair. I would like to have less world and more money. That's the point. And you so you please introduce yourself say your name where you live up to. Now. This thing this big reform ghost. They will I will put your name before. Very American by the way, because people come and say my name is this and I do that. So my name is Agnes Vada and French film director and artist. Thank you. So the story that brought us here is we call archive fever. It's about on reload wall and the cinematheque Francaise sees. I met down. Now he and there is an inventor is inventive French Matic invented idea that we should keep out. That's why you could keep we should keep including the we don't like that was his point not only to so called masterpieces the film made by famous Besson. He also said what about say bay be what about films that? We don't like when we see them. Maybe they make sense may be tell something about the society about the way people behave. So it's interesting. That's not my point. I keep Anita. What I like a lot and the rest, I forget it. Do you just let it go? Give it away throw. Where does it? Go don't care, but I have one of the antennas here with twenty one year old. Yes. This was a meal we're going to place, and we spoke, and then we and she said the film's she loved. She's twenty one years. I should say my favorite is assu. Wonderful Japanese filmmaker, but I wouldn't expect that from that young person. And she said, you know, because. The time gives me the feeling of the time. I was so impressed, and she goes bristle. And she goes to all the movies coming out nowhere this. So as you see it's not it's not what you expect from people. That's interesting. What they keeping their memory an in-depth. All I would say industry is not always what looks that makes them feel so excited and happy. I think I feel the same everybody speak about my energy, you know, this wonderful initiative. It gets on my nerves because I'm miracle league. And I like very strange silent. You know? Soul food of soul. I love this films of speak about something recently so him from a French director woman could Julie Petrocelli. She made a film called us from the customers. What was it? She spent time within autists is other word artistic autists sick young woman. Cannot speak cannot act. And she when you give her letters. She composes worth is like poetry. So what means that she has in hone? Close mind she has worked she has sought. So again, if I can learn something here, but some have thought of and learn about what I would say the cosmos of the minds because of the souls and not not so much the machine going in the moon. You know, I'm not so much excited about it. So so many intelligent seven is our engineers in the do things and credible impressed that the goal. Try to see if there is life in March, and they do something. But then just the next person if she got learn something about his minor her mind, she can learn something about the misery of just being a person. I was so excited about that. So I'm not the keeper of classics things, you know, keeper of the soul. I don't know. Maybe I don't know. What is so because I like Samson. So I keep sems- not a collector a keep them because I loved ID that have been sent from 'nother place, and so I've American stemmed at that received in fifty eight and I keep them the letter. Sometimes we stand little little dot too. Big collector. I don't care. I don't collect. And I keep postcards, but une- from the places we have been living. So postcards of the city of puzzle postcard of the island of normalcy. And of Barry, Barry, fourteen near my neighborhood, my block so has nothing to to be keeping collector just. Being surrounded by images. Proofs, you know, but images. Silent films of little a matter fills images of my family, my family Khanfar. I don't know the names of the people which was an album, but he had this is misery Odongo these people where was he from Matt grand fat was a. Come on campus. Partic-? What is Cal? Terrier Lutheran pastor my grandfather was in rebellion passer. He had twelve children somewhere in the jihad near Neil in France, Switzerland, but have Nonni because a where raise in Belgium, far from them. So when he has an album, I don't know the people, but I think maybe these people were maybe brides of funny who knows? I don't keep serious things. There is a museum in the city of set that I love I go. There have made a film. They'll appoint cool. In nineteen fifty four. And I remember fistful to that city. There is a museum could news of the modest. The man win. Vented museum dependent. And he started to stupid things like, you know, in the soap boxes there was a little bonus in the fifties. Sometimes for the kids to make them by some sweet little stupid, objects little plastic toys little this guy's of at the time. You know, what was it? Nikkei mousa. Keeps things that would not give half a cent for it. And if you put them together, you have society, the society of the forties and fifties revealed through the prices of so that's the point about not keeping what is important with keeping the side of the life. You know, it's interesting. I wonder what was the impact of the cinematheque for you. How much was it part of your life? But I'm a case because I in my film was twenty six and from my birth to twenty five seen less than ten films. I was is we films and when alive. The. Famous, but he was editor did the thing on my first film. You said you should go to the cinema. Take I didn't even know we had one in Paris. And he said is you have to see them come on come start to field. And was was said that if I had seen the mass of pieces of film that I later maybe I would not have started. You know? So I was in a certain stupid gave me the energy and the idea to make it from without knowing about him and never went to films school never was a sister. So I knew nothing. I'm so impressed by all these young people around me who good films and try to end the it's about and I'm impressed. I love that. But I that's was not my life. That's it. So when I met long were here, and there the man was very impressive fattened speaking, very well at forgetting everything tally out of real life. And very smart about we should keep finishes start to keep what have been in. And as you know in the states to start very late skull says it was an incredible champion about saying we have to keep films even trying to collect them half of the team made before forty. Abolished lose, you know, about this out very late to to resemble to collect. What I know is when he started to collect close about the and start to file boxes of films in the bathroom to the Siri this. I know because I knew marry my son who was a very important collaborator of him. And a wonderful woman fat the of the news. It was like a big bet sued. Nice so intelligent, and so sweet one of looming. But I was not really going to the cinema tag. It's just Metis peoples. Good people, and yes mask, you are you working on film? Now, you know, I made him that is called faces places I interviewed J R and Rosalie telluride, though, I love that film that film is being. So deeply received think where it's will receive people understand that sometimes here's this just for a while not adding layer of been happiness drama Taiji. The world is such a cows. You know, we didn't want to add to that. Just just get out for a while and feel that people are warmed which was. But it's a way of his gaping the drama of the world is a need. We had that knee. Then we share it with the people see the film. For me. I didn't feel I mean, yes, it was not the being in the horror and drama of the world or Donald Trump or that kind of thing. I but at the same time, the the humanity, the souls of people they're changing way of life. What is being lost? All that is what has Lewis it was knowing what's happening day relate to what's happening. No. But the relate with energy not with a Nissan memories. Digging. Simple. I remember the harvest the were meeting of people at night, they would eat together and sing and drink. The thing about how now demand which the older machine has computers. E- cutest alone. Eight hundred x I don't know what is in huge Datta land. And he's on his machine with the computer. And he does it. Well, but alone so that what what modality has given to him. Is it good on that good? I dunno. That's the way life is. And he space about that. So we try to understand how the world is changing. And how the people try to keep together as much as they can which is not so easy than before. When you and then the pudding of his photograph onto the side of the barn. That's what I did with jail. We were both thinking that there is a way to put light on people. Not only by. Make them speak about but the but by being putting big images of them on the wall with their agreement to say. There are the stars on the wolf maybe eight days to weeks because Jay does something very beautiful NFL mural. We deal with the fact that it doesn't us. It's interesting. You know, the underworld say that nobody should be able to have fifty minutes of glory in his life. It's part of the why not give light snow, and we know we know that they have their lives the problem. It's just just take advantage of some moments. It's we can share something for a while. It's just dealing with the ephemera of life and the beauty of being old. I don't try to keep too much of memory because I'm losing memory. When I feel that I'm losing memories. Which is true. I remember who's been well who said forget about commemoration Vive Louis hell forgetting, I'm not they would piss on for your subject keeping because I lose a lot. I think you're perfect. The the story of keeping is not keeping us. Well, there's both faces of it when you live in the same house for more than fifty years, which is my case it's very difficult to keep. So I have a lot of things that I keep at should not be all things. Books that I will never really gain. And I tried to send them away. I try to. Escape from keeping. So it's. Thank you so much for speaking. With may appreciate it. Is you have your? He's you know. Juju piano, then. The kitchen sisters present is produced by the kitchen sisters with Nathan Dalton and brandy how the remembrance of Anya Varda was produced by us with selene Ross and mixed by Jim Mckee special. Thanks to rob Maas. You can hear a story about Anri Lunghua Anderson with tech from says and all of the keeper series on itunes forever. You get your podcasts or by visiting kitchen. Sisters dot org. As you. Three. The kitchen sisters present is part of radio Tokyo from P R X. A curated network of extraordinary cutting edge podcasts created by independent producers. Thanks for listening. Radio too. Ex-?

director Oscar Paris xfinity Diabetes NPR Dave Nelson Tom Nikki Silva Joe Lee Barry rob Maas French Matic Anri lung Texas Academy Award Skull Agnes Valda
Identifying the right time to PIVOT to a new business model.

OC Talk Radio

23:26 min | 1 year ago

Identifying the right time to PIVOT to a new business model.

"It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting in between you in the life. If you want to live CD medic target your pain at its source. It's fast acting relief with active. OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC FREE HEMP oil get back to your life with CBD medic available online and at CBS these statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease intercom wants more than Nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took that little chat bubble in the corner website and packed it with automatic meeting booking in data capture on leads conversational bots and more intercom user elegant themes added Intercom to their site and now converts twenty five percent of leads through live chat go to intercom dot com slash deals to jump on customer intent in the moment then see everything else intercom can do that's intercom dot com slash deals welcome back. You're riding along the surf with all of us here. Is We grab grab a board that that Sea of ideas here. Thank you everyone for joining us for for those of you grinding it out hitting your number trying to hit your number and thanks for joining us live in the middle of your work day on the funnel media radio network. Thank you everyone for joining us and every episode of the Sales Pipeline Radio past present future always available at sales pipeline radio DOT COM. We are featuring some of the the best and brightest minds in sales marketing. Today is no different we are continuing e aumont apparently we had the an Eeo entrepreneur organization member and the founder of one eight hundred got junk last week today we have the CO founder. CEO of guidance Angel Dave Nelson joining us today. Dave thanks so much for joining us on sales by radio. Yeah thanks for having me excited to have you on the show have wanted to get you want for a while to talk about a number of topics in the last week. We talked an awful lot about entrepreneurs and talk about just sort of the tenacity. It takes to just be a professional but also be an entrepreneur. You have been doing this for a very long time. You know you were your own book making the jump into small obviously ownership which would encourage people to check out but really want to spend tonight run just get into a conversation here with Dave Nelson from financial. They've been around for almost sixteen years helping small businesses. I grow with the financing options and they wanNA talk a little bit about so that your entrepreneurial journey you know before we get into sort of how you build a sales and marketing engine you know what was it about about this topic. That was a passion for you. Just give a quick story of sort of where you started and how you've gotten to this point today sure we'll mind like many entrepreneurs was the accidental so I was developing real estate here in Washington State and had an opportunity to raise some additional funds and as I was talking to an attorney one day she suggested that I look at self off directed. IRA or retirement plans as a way to help people invest in real estate and through a process of expiration discovery realized that not only can people invest retirement assets in in real estate but they can invest in things like small businesses and private mortgages and tax liens and so we actually initially launch guide into help people do that invest in alternative assets over time though what happened was my profound and I realized that we weren't really as passionate about those alternative investments we were the businesses themselves and so in the course of sort of figuring out what our model was going to be in connecting with our customers we realized that the real gap in the marketplace wasn't helping individuals who are looking to buy or start a business and needed between about one hundred K and a million dollars to do that. There's a real gap in terms of them being able to access capital and so in addition to help them use retirement assets we've built an SBA capability and unsecured secured credit and so we sort of evolved as we went from more traditional or alternative financial services to really a small business financing organization but it was it was accidental until I actually have in my office here a piece of paper and they say people start businesses on the back of the NAPKIN. I've got a drawing and that was really our initial business plan from the get-go. That's I want one thing that stood out to me in that conversation something I know a lot of people face either in their businesses are in their career and that's the idea of a ride the idea that you see an opportunity and sometimes as you you know you move from what you were doing something different. I think in hindsight those successful pivots always look like a slam dunk in the moment they're not it is clear cut choice. Could you talk a little bit about that. Moment of vaping that pitted what you had to go through to sort of mentally to do that and I think I'm thinking about that not just for those that might be entrepreneurs are thinking about stepping out on their own but people that are you know looking at their own even sales and marketing careers and phasing opportunity. That isn't certain sometimes scary Gary Yeah. I always love how we talk about it. As a moment of time like there's this moment where you pivoted and everything changed. Reality is when I talk about the fact that our business shifted. That was a five five year process so it's something that you know like you start to see. Hey this doesn't really connect for me and I'm wondering if this is the right path Russ and then over time what we saw is that we were investing more and more time and energy in the small business component of our operation and less and less than the alternative you start to see these resource conflicts that came within the business those that were working on the real estate side. Were you know concerned that maybe they weren't getting the time and attention and so eventually we divested we sold that portion of the business to accompany who wanted to continue continue to grow and expand that area and that would ultimately best for our customers best for our team members on that side it would give the existing organization the remaining organization a chance to focus in on who who they really wanted to serve in who we wanted to be long term. I'd like to say that it was a moment in time but the reality is it was a long painful decision because you're talking about people you know your clients your employees and and you know as entrepreneurs you have this sort of emotional attachment to this thing that you're building not easy no not easy at all. I think we'll probably stay in the whole show talking on the concept of pivot. Give it as a process which I think is something that a lot of people that have been through that successfully and unsuccessfully can talk about but I want to cover today. We talked before you know as we sorta talk about what the all the different topics cover in this conversation. I WanNa talk about the sales and marketing engine. You have built a lot of people you start the business you start to figure out what are people looking for. What is our sales process. Look like as you've grown the business successfully over the last sixteen years you really have developed an engine for growth that not only supporting your growth but growth goals but also you're doing it without making cold calls. You're doing it without having to do a lot of complicated. Sometimes there's just frustrating outbound selling effort so wanted to talk a little bit about how you came to that process how you've been able to sort of systematize and scale yeah well. Let me start by just talking philosophically ah no offence to those that are listening to this podcast but in general I hate being so there's a stigma in general with and I'm using air quotes you can't see it but with sales people because I personally don't like going through the process of trying to be sold and so when we designed our system initially you know I was chief. Cook and bottle Washer because when we started this thing was just two of us and I was the one one that was focused on sort of developing in generating revenue engine and so I had to build a system that allows me to play to my strengths but also felt like it was the right thing for our client. We were fortunate in that. We started this business at a time that our industry was a little bit immature. Just there wasn't a ton of competition and so we had the benefit of having a lot of tension interest breath and not a lot of competition for those individuals and so the things that I tried to do was make sure that we were providing good information to the marketplace we were meeting people where they wanted to consume that information so we're providing lots of different ways and then making it easy for them to engage with us and so that system sort of built under the premise of of making it simple for people to engage and not having them feel sold so we are a financial firm so we are helping people look at ways that they can capitalize the business but we try to take more of a care and empathy approach the clinical one. I've heard a lot of people characterize that approach in different ways and one of the ways I've heard that is you know you're not selling your helping on curious how you think about about that moment when you do in some cases even if you are providing value to someone even if you're sort of sort of coming to a mutually beneficial agreement when even when you're sort of enabling outcome they care about their there's still as part of that is the moment of getting quotes right. I assume you're not just waiting for them to on their own volition say yes even as we sit here on the last day of January. I'm sure you are staring get a dashboard and coping they hit a certain number not just hoping and praying it happens but also putting things in place to compel people to make a decision now versus next month or now versus later how you bring those together. How do you provide a very customer centric benefit outcome oriented process but still managed to close It's a good question Russian and it's one that I think we struggled with for a long period of time. I can tell you what works for us and that is taking a little bit longer perspective so for example a moment ago you made the comment about me staring at a dashboard well we actually work off quarterly targets in quarterly plans versus monthly ones because I personally wasn't a big fan of every single month us having these real big ebbs and flows in terms of our energy and effort and sales and it just put extra stress on the team and so we built our sales engine to have a little bit longer perspective active in addition to that we wanted to make sure that while we provide lots of potential services that are compensation strategy doesn't cater towards one of those products any more than the others and so we wanted to make sure that people could be objective about what they are suggesting a client consider the other thing that I would say is that the way that we generate our business is with a lot of sort of inbound inbound marketing tactics and a big part of that is our channel right now about fifty percent of our businesses either coming from customer referrals channel referrals the big number and so we have to take really good care of those customers because we're travels fast until for us you know we've tried to take the long view. Make sure that our internal practices and plans certainly certainly support that and then make sure that we understand that we are serving a base where our reputation is going to either enable or disable our ability to grow as Nelson. He's the CO founder. CEO Guided Financial and row quick before we have to take a quick commercial break here you know we talked about the machine guys bill from sales and marketing standpoint a and you know one of the metrics you guys look at is appointment set so not just sort of those inbound lever inbound requests for the number of appointments. Get sort of move things along talk a little bit about how oh you think about. How do you characterize point to make sure that those aren't just sort of a you know. It's not just a number that is something that the prospect themselves isn't doozy the active yeah so I'll take I'll try to just really quickly. We can dig in after the break if we need to but you know we generate a tremendous amount of leads on a monthly basis and so we have to be very careful who we are spending our time with and so we have a team of individuals who spend their time calling down on these people that have inquired about out the stuff that we do and try and extract a little bit of information to understand whether or not we are potentially a good fit about half the time we realize we're actually not a great fit and so it's both in our interest and this this perspective small business owners interest to give them resources to help them continue their search and maybe get where they want to go but recognize that we're probably not the right company to do that for them. Those that do though qualify in meaning that we think we could potentially be a good fit then we set these appointments and so the appointments that are more of a deep dive. We're really giving our golden educating the client on the ways that they could capitalize their business because this is a very high stakes transaction for individuals arguing the largest investment that they will make in their lifetime so it is not a sales process. It really is an educational educational one so they're excited that there's something that's awesome. I think that's the only way you can do it and do it. Successfully when you know if you set an appointment with someone and that nate comes and they've got you know other fire drills and things that they're supposed to be doing and if they don't know why there's got to that point or what they're going to get out of it. It's a lot easier just to blow it off but if they know they're going to learn and they're gonNA get some insights. They're going to get some value. They remained committed to the process fan the appointment we got a lot more coming up here with. Nielsen the CO founder and CEO Guided Financial. We're going to talk about the content strategy they've put together and how that's been so successful helping drive their inbound leads. We're GONNA be talking about internal culture and why that's important to building a successful sales and marketing engine again why it's been so important to guide us. We'll be right back after paying a couple of bills here. This is the sales pipeline radio. What's his insight driven messaging. Look like for sales like a whole lot more deals fast jump on high insent leads in the moment with intercom the the Business Messenger that extends the reach of your team twenty four seven entercom creates more opportunities for you by booking meetings and collecting data from leads leads automatically take intercom user elegant themes they now convert twenty five percent of leads through Intercom S- messenger deals. Don't wait get them with Intercom Goto ENTERCOM DOT com slash deals. That's entercom dot com slash deals conversations. Dave Nelson the CO founder and CEO Guided Financial and I want to get to some of your content because if anybody that's listening it is an entrepreneur or working in a small business. You know whether or not you're looking for funding has an awful lot to learn from the content you create will point some of that out in a minute but I wanNA talk about culture because I think that topic we're going to cover our next week with Alex around. You know hitting the number but doing it. The right way I know is a big focus of yours with your your co founder and partner. You know winning best places to work. Okay no with a huge source of pride or you talk a little bit about the importance of culture and what you've done to build a culture that will silicate the sales success growth in Houston yeah well. I mean I say this to nearly every single new team member that we bring on my personal belief. Is you spend more time at work than you do with your family so you better better enjoy what you do believe in what you're providing market enjoy the people that you work with. We work really hard to foster a culture here that is passionate about the entrepreneurs that we serve serve wants to invest in the community that we all sort of live and work in every single day and ultimately make a difference in the lives of these people that are starting businesses and creating jobs taking ownership ownership over their own life so it's very important because I would take personally someone that's a great cultural fit over agreed skills fit any if you check out you know the guided financial pages. Stephen on limped in a lot of great examples of sort of the investment you made in your people the growth you put into not just growth of the company but also in new markets so you know just recently earlier this month you guys launching a new new office in Boise Idaho Idaho and really contributing to a number of different markets in providing jobs and great cultures for a lot of people what you also see on that Lincoln Pager is a lot of the great concert you have you can just scroll down and you see on the top five startups of last year and what you can learn from them. You see the you know the value of hiring with emotional intelligence and there's a wide variety of content and I set this up somewhat not it is not about funding. It doesn't go right for the throat and say. Would you like to expand your business. Can we provide you funding new clearly have put a focus on your content strategy on providing a wide variety of guy who had a content for your target. You talk a little bit about the strategy behind that how you've been able to successfully convert that into pipeline and new business well let me start with our content strategy and sort of some of the core tenants behind that I mean if you look at the vision that we have our vision is to increase the number of people that succeed in small business. It has nothing to do with helping them access capital giving them money. That's a catalyst I the reason they come to us. They come to us because they wanNA open a business. They want to take control over their lives and their their financial futures and invest in themselves. That's why they come to us and so do you know for us the way that we serve them in the way that we generate value per se in that is by helping them access capital but where we can best serve them as by educating educating them and helping them understand as that they could be more successful as a business owner. It's also a way that we reach more of these perspective. Entrepreneurs answer to nurture them over time is by providing them great content so just like you pointed out there we WanNa make sure that we're covering the gamut of issues that affect small business owners not just the thing that is self serving and intentional strategy right to be able to build some value in his part of that knowing that some of your prospects that are highly qualified as prospects just aren't ready to buy today. Talk a little little bit about sort of that top of funnel strategy and how it relates to the timing of when people may or may not be ready to engage in an actual purchase decision or at least purchase riches process well. It's funny so we survey our customers. Every singer sorry are prospect every single year and we asked them the question where you on your process but we'll blow we do the same anything with our customers and what we find from our customers is the number one reason they bought a businesses because an opportunity presented itself now. That's pretty that's pretty interesting because we generate thousands thousands at least per month. A significant number of them won't move forward right away and so what that means that they're thinking about this. They're open to the idea but they haven't found the right opportunity for us. We sort of play the mortgage professional role a real estate transaction so somebody could be looking online at red finish zillow that can be working with an agent. They don't actually need to really get a mortgage until they found a transaction made a deal to do and so for us as people are starting to think about this and dream about it they start searching the web looking for information and so this is part of acquisition strategies to provide good relevant relevant credible content of the market that helps move them towards a transaction over time and of course once we've had an opportunity to capture a little bit of information than we certainly make sure that we continue can you to keep our information in front of them so that when the time is right our hope is that we've established a level of trust and credibility with them that they'll want to engage just have a couple more minutes annotate. Nelson Co founder and CEO Guided Financial. We've been talking about the key components building a a scalable sales engine and part of that is the people themselves not just the the culture you provide for the organization overall but the very people you hire to begin with. Can you talk a little bit about what are some of the attributes that you look for in a successful sales rapid. You continue to scale your inside sales team. You know you may be looking for experience but what are the components are. After of new sales rep that you've seen that most lead to success in your organization yeah so when I'm doing interviews with ourselves professionals there's really I don't know four to five attributes that I'm on personally looking to assess. Certainly I wanNA understand understand like do they. Have some experience have seen success in the past doing this because the things that I really care about is are they a learner you know what are they doing to stay sharp on sort of modern auden practices. How are they continued to stretch and grow themselves. the second is actually try to find a way inside of that to role play so that we can actually do some live coaching coach ability in my opinion is one of the greatest keys of success for someone who's going to take on a sales career and then you know knowing that. Guidon is a dynamic and evolving organization. One of our core values values adaptability. We need people who are willing to sort of roll with the changes and adapt as we try and fail and succeed in various ways and then the the the fourth is a level of humility understanding you know who they are and where they're strong and where they need support or where they can get better and the final one is just a passion and for entrepreneurship. No matter where you work is good as the culture can be as fun as it is. Sometimes it actually does feel like a job and so you've still got to be passionate about the role that you play in the customers from that you serve so those are the things that I look for when I'm talking to potentially hiring someone in a sales path that's a great list and I think oftentimes especially when people look for Sales Reps. We look at their your past experience. We want to see that they've been successful telling somewhere else for those that have built and run sales organization. You learn the hard way that just past experience does not mean they're necessarily going to be successful continuer industry in your culture in a different environment so I think those attributes oftentimes are better indicators or whether someone's going to be successful and scale and grow your business. Well just just almost out of time here but I want to ask you one question. I think you mentioned one of the attributes you look for in new hires as you look for people that are hungry people that are lifelong learners yourself as a learner and I know oh just just knowing you left through e. Oh no you continue to be racist. Learner you read and you always learn new things who are some of the people that stand out in your learning experience in your history alerting the people that are either authors or mentors pass managers. They can be alive or dead. People that you might recommend others listening to the show look for and keep an eye out for or to get some guidance and learning as well sure well a couple people come to mind right out of the gate so one is a gentleman named. Alexa SASME LEX was the founder of Commission junction. He wrote a book called Organizational Physics the science behind growing a business so he takes rules of science and applies them to growing business. I love his concepts in terms of how he thinks about product development designing the sort of organizational structure and some of the processes that you can implement in order to run a business more efficiently viciously so for your listeners out there lexus knee is probably the single greatest mentor that I've had in my professional life I would say is one of the books that I subscribe to the concepts concepts and just personally feel like a lot of our businesses designed around is the Toyota way so the purpose of using lean methodology to learn fast not launch fast is something that we try to live every single day so there's to one person and one resource. I think anyone who wants to learn about what it takes to own and operate a small business would find really really interesting interesting. I think there's a lot of concepts that apply to those that want to remain a revenue generating real love it love it. Well thank you so much for that. We will put links to those resources in are shown announcing in the blog post. Put on this as well so if you liked what you heard today from Danielson on this episode of Sales Pipeline Radio we will have this entire episode of course up available on demand ended sales pipeline radio DOT COM in a couple of days. We'll also have a summary of this conversation on our blog. At Heinz Marketing Dot Com along with links guided financial web page. You can see more of their content strategy you firsthand as well as some of the resources as recommended that have been influential to him so thanks so much for joining us. Today we will be back next week with more from deep in the heart of the Upper Midwest in the hopefully not quite as called polar vortex but very excited for our conversation with workfront. CEO Alec shoots route of time for today. Thanks so much joining us for another episode road of Sales Pipeline Radio for my great producer Paul Hynes. We'll see you next week. You've been listening to another episode. The sales pipeline radio right here in the funnel Radio Network for at work listeners like Mike you brought to you by the good folks at Matt Hines Hines Marketing. It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking in your peace of mind it's pain and it's getting in between you and a life you want to live. CD medic targets your pain at its source it's fast acting relief with active tasty ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp oil get back to your life with CBD medic available online at CBS. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease. It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting in between you and the life you want to live. CB medic target your pain at its source. It's fast acting relief with active. 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Dave Nelson CEO Guided Financial CO founder founder cure CBS CEO FDA Upper Midwest Eeo entrepreneur organization SBA Gary Yeah Business Messenger Idaho Houston business owner Cook Russ
Batman/Superman #1 Review: Before the Bat Podcast

Capes and Lunatics

41:43 min | 1 year ago

Batman/Superman #1 Review: Before the Bat Podcast

"This episode of capes and lunatics brought to you by tweaked audience awesome headphones tweaked audio dot com and use the coupon code southgate hurry percent off reshipping in lifetime warranty where he can get their link on our website southgate media group dot com hello and welcome to opposite before the fact that we're like. We're off the bat to apart. We'll do spaniel report. We played this allow ago but this is good because it's like you know anywhere this week so yeah. It works out great. I'll stay in my dates have been off because they went off missions last night. We have set schedules at work now. We don't so i get randy's off now and it's it's thrown me. I'm off tomorrow stuff going on on saturday but anyway. I am filled. That workaholic is tyler. The crypto figured the perfect team for us with the you know. I'm a big fat man. He's superman fan so figured we'd discuss. Batman superman number one came off this week. I would hold lineup but i actually got this when digitally because <hes> with the whole crazy were scheduled my shop has like banker's hours and they literally are opened the tight my network <hes> so i have to leave for work before they open by the time i get off work. They're closed so i mean i understand like the business model for comic book shops but it's like yeah. They're not open that that long win wednesday's will be nice if they would stay open later being new comic book day they would open earlier and stay open later a but i just i just get there fast enough. Some product will pick them up tomorrow r._o. The house i grab this digitally i like to read so it spins out of <hes> the batman who laughs mini series <hes> <hes> for you sarah here i think it's interesting how they do the batman superman books now like if i'm not mistaken kaethe the there was the batman superman run that that birth public enemies yes and then of course later the one that introduced him brought back kara you know in like the apocalypse story and everything and then with the new fifty two when they brought in batman superman it was a pairing but it was like earth two batman superman some of it some of it was some of it was yeah yeah you're right. I think later on they did get they get earth. One eventually only because what we find out i is like in the new fifty two earth two's bat we start with if you're reading the earth to book batman batman superman already dead <hes> they were they were killed part of dark sides invasion just like what he did on for jerk asli origins <hes> so the super books are member picking it up and i got a poster of it and being kind of confused because that's what the daily star and stuff like that and it was all the earth the two and then here we are again with this new run of batman superman and it's birth out of another human eight kind of avenging that's that's. Let's bring these two into their own story so we haven't talked comics awhile. What what do you think of batman who laughs <hes> you know. It's one of those it's i. I kind of proven myself. I i lo- scott snyder's writing. I think sometimes is kinda crazy and when it first was announced i was like the dark multi-diverse elsa okay the imf metal like ninth metal and all that that they did <hes> with metal like read metal it was done and then i read it is okay. It is kind of interesting <hes> how the batman who came from that and i didn't quite get all his story. I didn't remember and then reading this kind of helped hoped <hes> just bring that to how he was came to be so that was interesting and i mean it's just an interesting take. It's like it's a way of doing like the joker and batman has one character yeah yakuza that batman joker in there was like choker gas and jokers chris hearts or an kills them. It turns him into yet. The batman who lives in the you know the whole dark multi-diverse thank was pretty <hes> interesting and so i mean it's a care to i it serves its purpose. <hes> we've been that batman laps mini series like he was working with another batman the grim night who that reality minute like bruce wayne's parents die joe chill drops the gun bruce wayne picks it up and blows away and thinks hey. This is a great way to fight crime. Just it's kinda crazy his in that dark multi-diverse even jokers still a villain. You know oh and not so even the heroes. There's like it's flip that our earth three where you have the syndicate it gets corrupted that everything is dark and almost everything even like in some like david getting the story like it was a universe similar to ours. They all signed him. Batman just gets turned. Yeah i mean i will say that when i started reading this did hook me 'cause i was i was you know looking at stuff and one thing should have given it away to me but <hes> what was going on but yeah it was a don't spoil it too much about to start so yeah so but yet say feedback from radio read but <hes> yeah that he's oils the endings we'll save that for the first of all i want to put out a love the all the artwork i think this is the best batman superman of looked in a while where i don't it's over style ideas or not trying to make them look. They look more normal to to for lack of better yeah. Nobody nobody looks heavily armored. Already got like yeah like classic looks you know batman and got the utility belt. Superman shut the trucks and everything and so so it definitely takes place we know in the modern continuity where you know batman has his trunks bag and so two super in which i find hilarious just because it's like all the changes team does all the stuff that goes on in comics but somehow we have to always come back to that class but yeah but you wanna start from the beginning incoming go through a here. The i mean we kinda gets the opens up with daily planet <hes> she also got a shot a batman about in the the daily planet jimmy olsen by clark kent and they're talking about a guy a tip. You know assessed like it's very interesting that if you just started reading this you wouldn't realize <hes> what's going on here. We get batman whispering to clark that he needs him. Ebbing shot of superman flying off that is amazing shot in the watchtower yet yet the artist date david marquez yeah. It's really great job even the colors and stuff <hes> and i like the way that we get the quick back story of batman you just my pants were murdered in an alley everyday crime in a dark alley and we see the pearls come in perth like blood. Oh oh yeah and superman shows up at the watchtower. You and i kinda tell what's going on on here. He comes in the league's like dead. Yeah and what should it tip me off it. I was the costume <hes>. Oh yeah i see now. If you look like i didn't think about it just because that's my favorite superman costume they <hes> recently done but it is a little bit differently because they really didn't give you a straight on shot until he walks into the watch tower two right and if you look at it it's got the belt more the new fifty two bell trump but it's got the wrist cuffs and everything more like the <hes> like the was a new dawn or whatever it was so so i mean it is subtle changes. I mean just like they took the two different costumes and mix them and basically find out were on the dark multi-diverse earth. This was kind of a quick background rounded to the batman who laughs origin. He got me for second. I was like holy crap off the bed. Superman's down like there's back in with wait what and then we see earth zero now so that's a couldn't remember that's what they call other earth the zero nest the mainur is not prime crime not one yet right now. It's earth zero which sidetrack here. I wonder when we get the crisis on t._v. If they'll be revealed to be an earth zero or an earth kreil they afford everything in is just going to be earth zero or earth prime right because i mean they've always used that terminology but in the t._v. series that they've always references were earth one <hes> you know so so. I'm wondering if they'll be like oh wait. There is an earth zero but that's a tangent so we get gotham. City batmans talking to gordon is he well scored and thinks as he's like i know all this batman works easily as the explaining to him the batman elapsed. He's like i know i was there in the miniseries is they're not talking to you. Commissioner superman swoop in without killer it it it's interesting like the way they draw batman holding his keeton so much <hes> and then. I didn't realize this issue like the title is who are the secret six and i guess part of why i'm excited for this. I'm not familiar with this writer. Oh joshua williamson. I believe that's the guy who's writing flash right now. Yeah i feel he's one of the new up and comers has really i've read. I started reading what flashier one at nuts him on issue three when i stopped because it i dunno it just kind of it was okay but in grabbed me who i was hoping he traveled through the back. He's talking to himself. I don't i don't want to deal with like we'll see flashed. Learn that i thought moved a little slow but i thought the last part was really good like he really nailed it in the last part of it so i'll pick it back up as his time dave nelson pick up. Seventy five was the last part of that but i i like this superman stuff where and that's a good thing. Hold on let me drop drop crock often arkham you see whoosh and then okay how can i help gentleman and commissioners just kind of like in shock and i had to think like with our continuity. This kind of feels like the first time superman meets the commissioner but unlike with all of our merging of new fifty to reverse and everything have they met before yano. I mean they th- <hes> that's <hes> either the first meeting or it's like you know. Superman doesn't show up that often recorded boarded superman tells him to quit smoking because he's the man who flights is still an uncomfortable sites just wonder if they few times four but man. I love this color just superman batman gordon sitting on the by the bat symbol <hes> <hes> soon transformed. That's right renault gordon. Hello by ah d mills thirteen years old was kidnapped from his bedroom but what else is what i really like. Is i like in this. One shot shows like the gold tones the world of batman the darkness and there's that brightness of superman just popping <hes> like it fits the same color style but those colors don't fit there. That's what makes it so interesting. <hes> and we find out that he was is kidnapped by superman will he had to look at a super after a little brother was a witness said it was his laughing superman yeah so batmans a room. You'll find danny. We'll sue permits were commissioner will find them and <hes> you know we we get a quick recap that gordon was held by the batman who laughs and i love this jordan's in the forefront forefront says and usually i'm alone by now. That's batmans move not know and like i am. I read this okay so submit says commissioner will finding commissioner says i know you will and like it goes dark and just his glasses says he says hair and my first thought was is he infected like like he's gonna start laughing because he says hair and i thought i am. I said that the now i've read them. Maybe like a sigh of relief like okay. I don't know i but i don't know i think it's could be it's just an interesting way. They shadow it compared to how drawn the other stuff and just the h. e. h. Canada's makes me think like something more but we have this great superman fly in batman running <hes> i think kinda funny and batman keeps asking superman superman. If i was ever out of control like this guy what would you do to stop me superman through donald think like that he says so. You're saying you don't think let me no one thinks like you and i love this art of them. Standing <hes> and we're basically back where bruce's parents were murdered and the concoct crime alley. My parents died just those phantom figures of bruce neilan over his parents and he says we don't have to to do this and bruce's just do it and soon dislike boom straight down because that man who loves cave is under park park crime alley and they're they're about to jump down ceelo same like the way batman grips his cape so much in this <hes> and i from this interest in like the batman who laughs has robots <hes> because read like it's interesting how much elaborate he has his cave like you already came you for like how much time to the light life was here to do all this. You know i just wonder i mean they don't they never say i wonder if this woman breezes old caves because i mean in at least during no man's land like he had a bunch of different came built after being broke my back you know i decided -tingency plans exactly luckily that's why my kiss me for him to sit up this one cave. I have been here for a oiseaux in with extensive. It is and all the creepy creepy nece that's there but yes superman barley figures out. He's like the batmans like you're interrogating me. He's like maan -ffected and yeah how they're going back and forth and he says i mean you're not you are nothing like this. Batman who laughs and batman says i wish that were true and a the battery molds are interesting traces of that serum serum with info metal but just the cave the cambridge just like it dark twisted version of the cave and i love this <hes> you know they're talking. Superman says like him and his father used to play chess and that's what the batman who laugh says doing and it's interesting because so often. I think we forget that. Superman is a smart guy. He's not you know super. He is smart smarties a scientist and a lot of ways <hes> was kind of a little bit of a detective in his own right tube season vanessa investigator reporter exactly but he always gets undercut underplayed by so many other characters that we forget this <hes> because i like what he says what happens when we stopped playing batman who laughs games and he puts the chest piece down and then we see an image of the justice league the titans teen titans titans and as states everyone with their face with red x.'s and lips <hes> and then the like the the robin are standing around that it was like statues are shuman creepy. Oh yeah because yeah the batman who laughs ahead <hes> were his his robbins. They were real before which one of them is now. He says we have no idea who can entrust so. It really seems like this storyline is just batman and superman vs everybody because they don't really can trust or what's going on on and then we get the evil robin that just pops out yet and attacking he says one of his robbins but where did he and the boy says he took me from my amway hit me with a battering so tournament too innocent for his mission us me and you know they don't think that the kidnap danny kid says you can trust us. We're here to take you home. Denny's as you understand what susan i'm glad he took me. Steve freed me. You don't recognize me <hes> find out that that evil robin is actually billy batson and we we get an epic shot of <hes> the zam who laughs i know it's like a big splash cats and if you look at the battering during he's holding has the superman crest and <hes> and he's got superman down nasacort always wondered who was better and he's gonna a multi ten present tense like i wonder who the that's why like okay that's why i kind of wondered if like the gordon suspicion just because they don't find danny no yeah it yeah gordon of made that whole thing up so and and they also just stated you know we don't the who we can trust <hes> so i don't know but i liked it. I think it's a kind of a cool little whore esque story of i think so many of these we're talking a bit online. You know today like with all of us and our thread samedi story start out great uh-huh last at the last part like they become these huge epic towards just. It's it's a fight. The store gets lost it. Just becomes uh-huh a slight and that's how i felt about at the end of metal like there was so much grinding noah's going on anymore. It was just like i had no idea is becomes too big for its own good but yeah this is a strikingly powerful image the art again this artists good and yeah it like thorpe. Mates metal was a little too complicated. I thought yet so far. This is like i like i like the <hes> pacing and everything on this and it's not like everything has to be giant universal. <hes> yeah i i miss <hes>. Actually that's what i i kinda liking over at action comics when <hes> it started off with <hes> where was his investigating the fires and stuff when it first started a small story <hes> supermarket and i went huge again. It's kind of neat won't get these smaller different kinds of personal stories with our characters instead of always these or ending kinda things <hes> but yeah these huge epic arcs so leyla instead bray ray rota from last son's crypt on into the night the podcast <hes> he wrote. Hey up a couple of times. I've been on the internet a few times <hes> says hey a._f._l. And tyler just dropping in some thought the recently read batman superman number one issue which dropped this week not being too familiar with batman and comex yeah i know i know i should really yeah but having a phantom for superman. I thought it gives us comic ago. I was pleasantly surprised at the solid start to this series. Much of it is with marquez's gorgeous art. Williamson's writing itself is also quite fluent and keep in keep. The beats going without getting too way down with dialogue. I never heard of this batman man who laughs ontario. I've seen pictures of him and he sounds like a pre deadly villain for me. I find the concept of the batman who laughs a bit silly but the batman who laughed the vehicle to create a scenario which places the batman and superman in a predicament. It's quite effective. The premise of the batman who who laughs trying to spread his illness is scary scary and i love the allusion to superman who laughs the ultimate reveal at the end with shas a._m. Having enjoyed the movie i like seeing his a._m. Now alan comics and at least this highly entertaining issue in a pretty good cliffhanger gives it seven seven and a half out of ten cheers all right <hes> <hes> i agree with everything he said <hes> i think the batman alaska's a really big concept but at the same time it's kind of a neat little it can be pulled back story. You said it it's something interesting that put them two together with just them to <hes> mm-hmm but are sitting here. I'm looking at the cover and it's called you know who the hunt begins for the infected and then as you know <hes> we we went through on the page. Where super shows up it says who are the secret six so i just kinda like <hes>. What all does that play. What did ray <hes> 'cause. They're sham that one. <hes> you know what what does that mean so it's a this. This is a great start for a batman superman but it's like is this supposed to be a limited run unless they do like previous runs of batman superman and agency different arcs 'cause 'cause it's not saint like batman superman vs batman who laughs. It's just got in superman then. It says this is called the hunt begins and then who are the secret six part once it gets you know setting up for an ongoing series with this being the launching story <hes> sometime curious yeah me too like i said again if unless they just do different arts and this is the first art but i mean all right here's a question. Do you think there i mean i like the batman who laugh so far especially in this story but i don't know where they watering down the the the whole premise of batman with the batman who laughs than the flashpoint point batmans over and tom king's batman yeah i like like several things where i feel that they have an idea and they do too much or they try to stretch character too much of i don't know what kind of have to wait and see because i just they felt when they did batman and robin colonel and batman colonel like they start with a quote here but then they just like shrek the way too long character in in that it it just fell out of place and of course we have these these comic book stories like this where regular okay well this is going on but you'll have to rent solo adventures like where does that take place at. I like batman superman together. I think it's a lot of cool story and things that you can right around the two of them together and they're from personalities is for how they're very same yet different though this issue buddy let so so you got show you you go to italy. Did you get like a superman cover. There was like two different cares as superman batman oh poker but in print he turn phrase when he laughs everybody. He's bad yet at that. May who you laugh as bad look joker us into <hes> so you see. That's the cool yet the double character so i i agree a lot with what ray was saying. I think it's a cool make him be a good jumping. Invoke to man. I love his artwork. I i love love the image of superman on the assuming cover if i could just take the batman who laughs out yeah it would be to this. It is stunning stunning shot so yeah. That's the other thing too like on the batman on the superman side yet. He's like all in the sunlight but then you go over to the batman side and he's all in the dark all right anything. We pretty much summed it up. Oh one last thing i do wanna comment with you man. How like just a quick feeling so. When i hear forever this whole light geoff johns shas ammo yeah that what is it. I is issues. Is it nine and ten th there's like two issues and they're basically with pushed back indefinitely yeah we we basically the run is done and i'm like. I don't even remember what issue we are on. Because it was like they came out they came out and they got delayed. Wanna say four. Maybe maybe that's where we were like swearing <hes> five. I don't know i just it. It's it's killing me because i love john's writing. I love were this is andrew's picks up enough or do we should zan. Saint zeynep is too much now. Choon zam sakes was in june. It's like man. We're almost two years now and still haven't completed tissue eleven comes out on wednesday. Yes coming up so september tim be. I mean great awesome but i'm just like. I don't know it's like i don't know what jeff jones is doing. Since he seems a he's took time off from your stuff. They're having big issues over there. Little said the like yeah they're they're. They're seriously having giant issues over there on on the comic book side and on d._c. I'm like what's going on. You know the sky bent the but i i don't know just like man i really. I hate because like as soon as he he gets announced for a book. I'm really interested and then yano like. I said i don't know if he's too busy but <hes> the other having some kind of issues over there on the come look side like little sailing big time like she like for awhile thought they were gonna. Stop making comics. That's bad it was. I think i don't know read more yeah. I'll be mean i think my thing is. I wish they they they do so many story at this same i felt belt report not too much and they you know the president knows on business to well. It's this is exactly the way that i felt when <hes> what do you call it. The same thing i said about superman <hes> i thought do a sweet story like soon doomed but then they threw it and they split it up between tweets like six bucks so they got the story done quick you know when it could have been a long story in superman or the same thing with <hes> superman unchained that they did like you didn't need to do this side story that could have been part of the superman comic. It's like you have all these ideas instead of like pacing it. You just like okay. We'll have six batman titles right now. Okay well. That's done where we do. Now you know and <hes> instead of doing like i said earlier you batman eternal. We look look at that story that the kind of batman story that scott. I don't wanna do do after he got done with year. One because it really is like the tap to his is what he started with him the corvallis <hes> <hes> they spread that out for fifty two bucks yeah you know and and then they did batman and robin eternal and they were side stories when they have been in in the main line. They just do so much so quickly that you're just like. I bet dark knight metal like you know sighed store. You're just like there's just so much going on. They're trying to right. It's like it'd be nice if they peel back some it then maybe i would get more invested in these other titles to of characters i like but i'm to he's trying to keep up batman superman to enjoy his other. You know what i'm talking about right here. Zam thous book. I was really excited for because we got the 'schisms origins and the new fifty two and then he appeared what in trinity war couple other things here and there and then he'd never got his own title. This latest series seems like they're almost like oh. There's a movie out. We gotta get something out what it does but it also. It's the sequel to marriage in bulk lake because he was completely forgotten for most of the new fifty two he appeared here here and there and then he was gone through all rebirth and he didn't reappear tone now if they wanted to get it out and it's like in what i wouldn't mind waiting a little little bit. You know get some issues in the cans. There's delays and that's what always baffles me like if geoff johns is stepping from john. I don't know maybe to finish writing. I don't know three jokers. I think what the book that would never come out that was announced in one two thousand. What's lead. You know we had yeah wasn't that when we held the fifty two it was the dark side war because i was supposed to be part of because that was supposed to be in continuity and they said there don't do it in the d._c. Black side which is out of confidently justice league fifty or something like the new fifty. I mean it's we've been waiting all through loop rebirth birth everything i mean rebirth as overweight as onto the regular dc universe books get we wait for the joker movie okay. I don't i've just accomplished. Don't always have ow to the movies and stuff yeah. I know they want like you know branding up bright and i mean that's the beauty is that they don't that. It's a character that their tone this story over here and they're telling this story over here. I i mean perfect think about. Do you remember when am i think the flash tv series was maybe in season one or two in the comics they were at that weird where was the dc hugh and changed his costume to where the flash commas had read by oh yeah g._b. Be serious and then all of a sudden like in the t._v.'s regular am and try to do with oklahoma and they try to give him more jason momoa look before <hes> p._v._a. Or right after it did and it just it just like you don't have to make the characters reflect the other side like because by the time you guys catch up the change the other union that you're chasing 'cause they think all these movies and t._v. Shows drive people to the comic shops. That's not working. I mean i think it might help it but it's the same thing i've said about <hes> like with marvel is i really enjoy all the marvel marvel films when they go to macau shop alred spiderman daredevil but i'm not interested in picking up a captain america book or a hulk book or i'm just not interested in picking up those comments but like those near anders a you know the movies more dr arch <hes> <hes> and the readers like gather we continue to read and everything but <hes> we gotta find wastes honestly honestly what i wish would happen is when the dc would launch <hes> a line that is more team reader the team to kids kind of but kind of the way they do when they when marvel released the alternate universe where every character got its own reboot for a younger generation and it was like they they were just completely separate the other line so the 'cause it was a great point for me at the time to jump back into reading thing because my brother he got he got hooked on fantastic four and <hes> remember the event but i got hooked on spiderman then i got back into just weekly buying because i can find it quaint and it was a whole new verse where everything connected and i didn't have to know anything anything. You know i didn't have to worry about. I still have my other stories over here with all the history and continuity may be something like that where younger readers could come reintroduced to their characters and create their own new comics universe frat house thinking these he never once they completely reboot anymore but it's like i don't know they tried to tweak at after new fifty two in the rebirth and i think it kind of just they're two different flavors as they wanted to go back to the old style but they are just like they're still new fifty two mixed in their offices psych. Yeah i mean the mu fifty to a half a good idea. It's like when you go from new fifty to the rebirth muddying the waters even more clear what's in continuity and what's not but and a nine that's that's kind of the biggest problem right is who is it like for a while new fifty two great for me because i kept certain stories. I read more graphic novels because i had lost track of books because i had nowhere to find them. <hes> and now you know i've had my shop and everything but <hes> i had more fun tracking older stories i think for the longest time the only current series i was reading was <hes> dreamliner because my my roommate was such a big green lantern fan that we are reading all the stuff to blackest night and we stayed like up to date with that yeah. That's the problems distribution. I mean backman days to be able to get a comic book at the more the convenience store they add like you know magazine shops and stuff yet now. It's like mushy go to comic shop their or define and that's why the whole walmart thing. I thought was a cool idea. <hes> priscilla's putting books. I don't think they need a better section where they have in some walmart's but they but it's kinda putting folks where people could actually get the the actual book and it was like it's weird like a new story then like what like two three reprint send like. What was it like four or five bucks. They would've made them cheaper. It's like do like one story story making like a boxer too. I think they sold more yet if they would have just it's like a five dollar book and it's thick which is great for us but make make like a two dollar picking them up mostly because it was like yeah. There's one story in there but everything also the reprints mike. I have already yeah. I only okay bye to wish like now. I'm buying the batman universe 'cause the reprinting the original batman story about ben this road so it's not any of the reprints i was like okay okay but that's in the con- jobs yeah these -actly so. I don't know like i like years ago. Kyle higgins was writing the sequel to batman beyond digital form and then after three or four digital chapters come out they would collect which marvel and dc boats not that you know and i'm like okay so i don't wanna buy and digital then because wait and go get in the shop so i i. I don't know my my thing. Is i just feel like there's a saturation of the same characters and somebody you know titles that it's it's. It's just hard to work through it so that's that's my appeal so yes we get out of here. I want. I wouldn't even ask you about the legion of superheroes. I haven't got the superman. I finally got superman fourteen eighteen this week after the harbor snow i just i'll be up front with you john but i'm not alesia i. They've never liked the legion. I just it seems like i don't know i don't really care but it's moving pieces. They're not that lead their series regularly but i'm just like too much going on there. I guess when they tried to do hold university. I repeat drain one all right. Let's get out yeah. Let's let's get. I hear i got a four year old taste. Yeah my six year old will begin the bed soon. Everyone <hes> send a thought. We'll be back next week with pennyworth. <hes> so email us keeps a lunatic set g._o. Dot com <hes> follow keeps lunatics before the battle facebook on twitter at capes lunatics at before the bat pod follow keeps them. You takes on instagram <hes> work in progress. He thinks dot org followed youtube in watch it here and get vocal v. a. l. dot com which is the oldest live on our facebook twitter and on a vocal and the youtube tyler patrick work people talk you about d._c. Finally krypton report podcast where we talk all things superman super girl related and you'll can hear chris talk about that and can find me at krypton report pod and on twitter facebook instagram just search for kripa krypton report yeah. You said you could always catch bray on philosophy crypt on podcasting into the late night podcast. Yeah that's given plus. I'm actually excited that his new nights not. I know much about awesome awesome so yes news. I just don't wanna every issue to be like the batman laughs. She laughs one woman last metal issues. I don't know might have six so the outpouring of that's weird alfred says the got killed in staten. That's the problem oversaturation and you gotta. You gotta prints i already. I already said i will be making amy more work either continental.

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114 - ChameleconBelow the Border in Honduras with Scott Carrier

The Kitchen Sisters Present

24:23 min | 1 year ago

114 - ChameleconBelow the Border in Honduras with Scott Carrier

"Radio. Welcome to the kitchen sisters present. We're the kitchen sisters, Dave Nelson, and Nikki Silva, the kitchen sisters present is supported by sun basket, healthy cooking, made easy organic produce cleaning greediest and delicious recipes delivered weekly straight to your door. Sun basket works with the best farms and suppliers to bring you fresh organic produce and responsibly sourced meats and seafoods. Everything is pre-measured and easy to proud. You can get a healthy and delicious meal on the table in as little as fifteen minutes. Sun basket has wonderful dishes shrimp pad Thai with rice noodles and sugar snap peas or fresh fettuccini Primavera with creamy Fateh sauce. If you're watching your carbs and finding it difficult to cook delicious nutritious meals. This is the meal plan for you full of fiber, rich, vegetables and quality proteins. There are paleo gluten-free lean and clean vegan Mediterranean, diabetes friendly and more go to sun bass. Skit dot com slash kitchen. Sisters to get up to eighty dollars off. That's basically getting dinner on the table for less than nine dollars a serving for your first four weeks. Visit sun basket dot com slash kitchen. Sisters to get up to eighty dollars off today. One of our longtime favorite producers is Scott carrier. He's also a good friend. He lives in Utah. If probably hurt his stories on this American life, and all things considered he has a voice and storytelling style that. You'd remember. He also has a podcast called home of the brave. That's where we heard this story about a trip Scott recently made to Honduras and his take on what life is like and one of the most dangerous regions in the world, we ask God, if we could share it with you on her show. He said yes today, the kitchen sisters present to Melico produced by Scott carrier. Welcome to home of the brave. I'm Scott carrier. Last fall when I was talking to people who come north with the caravan, many of them said that fled their homes because they've been threatened by street gangs that controlled their neighborhoods. Mothers and fathers said they had to pay a tax to the gangs. Their children would be killed young men boys really said they were given a choice either joined the gang or die. I found these stories hard to believe not that. I thought they were lies just they were hard to comprehend what it would be like to live in a place like that be afraid to go out of my house. So when I was in Honduras, I wanted to visit one of these neighborhoods, but it turns out you can't simply walk in and start asking questions, the gangs have the streets under constant surveillance. Luckily with some help found a guy who could take me in openly without creating havoc. His name was wrong. Carlos Marado twenty four years old lives in town culture, mellow calm on the outskirts of San Pedro Soula the city in northern hunters. Where the caravan began last fall the city known in two thousand fourteen as the murder capital of the world due to two rival gangs fighting and killing each other over territory. We're working from the Windsor, right? Here's. Right. And we are working work into the team says the embryo gives us a gym does like the front of the from Thatta that for the gun. The borderline. The street nearly empty of human beings ran straight through a housing project for low income factory workers small cinderblock homes with small yards fences sidewalks our side of the street was controlled by the Bario eighteen game. The other side was MS thirteen territory. One Carlos lived a few blocks away on the eighteenth side. All this. Eighteen the guns. The name the eighteen. Both games grew up dealing drugs on the streets of Los Angeles and came to Honduras to members being deported. So the US imports illegal drugs and exports. The system of violence that distributes them also hard to comprehend. On Carlos took me to a park with a health clinic and some swings for kids a basketball court. That was also a soccer field all underneath a massive tree shaped like a nuclear mushroom cloud. Like god. What kind of tree is that this district is very important. Did these three may be about three hundred or jeers? Yeah. Yeah. He's very old. He's very old for the community is very important because the people come here and play less or talk with played cutlets card night bicker. Liam must play cards, adding and tables over there. Yeah. That is the way to the other guns other give them. Yeah. Come here. And. Shop spun despite on shoot their guns should the guy from the air at other people. All people move on the people even here in the park GI. Yeah. Hang from this way, turn the life. These will is destroyed display because they have Granada's aids. Yeah, grenades. Yeah. Just heavy armament. Yeah. That's crazy. It's mayor in this neighborhood. It's arm for the military the gays. The reason I could walk around. She Milken safely with one Carlos was because he's from there. And also because he's an artist and artists are immune for they have an exemption from the gangs. They don't have to join our pay extortion tax the held apart like priests so on Carlos was safe on the street, and I was safe as long as I was with him. Is this house? Has no windows room to to live here. They had to leave. Did you know the family that lived there? And I don't know. I don't know who they are. But. It's very it's much too. People have to go out go out because the live is is dangerous is so they had to leave because someone was threatening them. Get going pretty good their guns. And then, but why did they destroy the house because Steve teeths get down the doors windows, and by for other other person they stole all the parts of the windows doors. All right. So this house was dismantled. They took it. Apart piece by piece to us by a house somewhere else to sell for another house, even the roof leaving Peru. The type of art Juan-Carlos practices is hip hop following the model of the Zulu nation that came out of the South Bronx in the nineteen seventies Zulu nation is now international organization that teaches hip hop culture. Wrapping break, dancing, graffiti, art, the kids warzone type ghettos around the world one Carlos teaches all the subjects and he's the number one break dancer in the hood known to all as JC rock. I talked to people on the Mexico border who came with a caravan young people, and they said. We didn't want to join the game. If we stayed. We there had to join the gang or they kill us. Is that true true? Is that you're not very true? Yeah. Because supposedly they say, we are not him you. But it is. It is not true. Because if you don't want they brush. Yeah. Imagine imagine if my jumpy full Joan young kids, young kids, stay of the of the street, and they don't story. They don't have a job. But the think what you're what are they gonna do? Yeah. The people say the gun is good because Dame they have a very employers out of jobs. Yeah. Choice either game Indians. Indians up member in science government inside the congress inside the military. Yeah. You say that system of the the Giusti's really people who are paid by gang. That Emmons gun day base for that for Jones members to study at university space study. Oh, really? Yeah. The guns they have the money, but the food for study for the Saloum his convert health together for for temple the school here. The minister the guns give the computer the Ganz. Yeah. Like the guns looks good for the community. We help the security. We're the only help you have. If we didn't help you there'd be no help. Do they say that? I'm sounding like I'm a PR person. I could do that job. I don't know for sure. But I think the reason hip hop artists are respected protected by the gangs is because they represent the community. They define the identity of the community gangs are all about defending territory, physical territory, but conceptual territories may be just as important how we say who we are. And what we're about how we create and defend metaphysical borders. Hip hop is all about using nothing. Very little to create something big like if you spray paint a message on a subway car. Everybody in New York City will see it. Or if you put the same record on two turntables, you can create a whole new style of music or you can dance upside down and sideways. So what are you trying to do to make things better? Did ching of the Junes of the child's the the gears to home whole day kin happy leaving in this reality. How is poss- each days for your life? How to spend each day of your life? So what do you tell them? What you how do you spend each day of your life? What do you what do you say? But no just ditching start teaching breakdowns, for example, defeated hippo right drop in and them. We are give them a deeps. Okay. If you seen maybe you can represent losing the country. But if you join them grants, you are a percent of those in two MBA, the senators you're there, and it's it's no liar. It's true. It's true. When the words urination started. We have maybe twenty five members. But let's two years. We are only four people live in all of them. They're all going to the Carolina go into that. You say immigrant only four only four, but of the stark, we are forty forty five forty five percents only four left. You had gone. Yeah. Is a Buddhist tragedy to to g to thinking chains. Your form of thinking about the life in the selects that good way to be happy to and the life. Yeah. But these precarious because we don't have money to get to get to the boys, but the guns they have money, and it's complicated. Because the the mother says cave is good. If you answer, but Hoke him by the food can pay that extra the. And then we give you what what is the morning. Okay. Yeah. I've heard that. His company. In the afternoon. I was lucky again because there was going to be a warrior Zulu nation free style. Rap battle in a park on the other side of town mile away, an MS territory ten rappers from both sides of town would compete spontaneous Ryan to find an ultimate winner. And according to John Carlos, no one would get hurt. The other park. Also had a tree that looked like a nuclear explosion hanging over basketball court slash soccer field. The sun was bright the tree lost its lead. So the limbs cash shadows like blood vessels covering court from gold gold. Boombox was on the ground near the trunk of the tree just off the sideline at half court. It was a small speaker a nine inch too. But it seemed like a magical tap pulling rhythm from the grant from the roots of the tree. There was a good crowd. Maybe fifty or sixty boys and girls and teens and twenties with a loose and clean stat. Girl, had black high top sneakers that sipped up the side and a guy with a t shirt that said acid. Have you tried it? Another guy I had a warrior zoomzoomnation Honduras t shirt with the head of a Mayan. God, very cool. The rap battle started at the same time soccer game six on six with a half size ball the rappers on the sideline had four guys going after each other in elimination rounds they were given a theme and had the rap on that theme making it up on the spot off the top of their head. Overwhelming to. No. How do you? How do how do you vote? The first thing is guy. Him and his friends with work. Two two. Our power each work power. So all the food. Yeah. Yeah. That's good. These guy. Those for the with finishing work. That is nice. That is not the ocean. Throaty thing. Amigo after. For example. Our it's Mike. In this guy about that Carolina that immigration. Yeah. Because, you know, dynamic grant have your back and go. So this guy talking about. I just have my my Nimri is my family and my principles and because countries like I have to go. Parka just from legal. Yes. Van gone SMI Consolo medical Martino admiralty yet. He. Yama? This kind of Evans is. Government who who is friends, but it is just to spring is like. Political message. Eagle eagle. Look JAL via each. A local me. Doc, no salvage less. Nothing me meant that. I looked around the crowd and saw girl. Maybe fifteen years old who is very obviously in love with one of the rappers. She stood transfixed with big doughy is almost weeping from heartache rapper was tall and strong wearing sunglasses and gold chain aka Yosi from Mario world twenty four years old. He told me in order to prepare for battle. He studies and reads all the time history. And the great writers for me is that. The power of them all free in this moment. You can you can say whatever you think nobody can say nothing. Because is is is like a game. If you played this game, you can take the mind from the people which are mouth. Yes. Feel hold. Because in this moment, we are free. We are. Feet. Ain't nobody can say nobody in say, nothing only you and your imagination fighting for position this moment. Thanks. Thanks. I don't know who won. It didn't seem that important. What mattered was these young people from opposite sides of town came together and fought it out through spontaneous inspiration for three hours. They were artists commune from fear and desperation, and it was a lot of fun. No doubt. They went home to desperation mothers asking, where's the money in poetry? But maybe they were thinking about doing it. Again, having fun at home rather than walking two thousand miles to the United States. The hip hop scene into mill Millicom is flip side, the Donald Trump declaring a national emergency the build the wall and more detention centers along the border. The Trump side is all about harboring fear and hiding from reality. And the hip hop side is about creating something out of nothing. The human spirit yearning to be free choice seems obvious here at home of the brave. We want one of those nuclear explosion trees and a boombox that pulls rhythm out of the ground and some high top sneakers that zip up the side in return. We offer this podcast, which is also about making something out of nothing. Check out our website Humber dot com for photos of the rap battle buttons to push donate. Subscribe or by t shirts and patches. I'd like to thank everybody who's posted up and supported this show very much. Appreciate your help. Melinda. And Ubon shipyard made a very generous contribution from the ball Toro trust and Becky Liebman. Also made a large donation, but did a lot to relieve my credit card debt for the trip at also like to thank all the people at met in Honduras. It's a dangerous place, but it's easy to make friends. They're just kinda showed up and a lot of people helped me at some risk to their own. Well, and it was humbling every time thanks for listening and being part of home of the brave. Jamila Cohn was produced by Scott carrier. You can hear more of his work on his podcast home of the brave. The kitchen sisters present is produced by the kitchen sisters with Nathan Dalton and brandy hell, we're part of PR X radio. Topa a collective of some of the best independent audio storytellers out there. We can find out more about our stories upcoming events. Classes internship, opportunities t shirts and more at kitchen, sisters dot org. Please visit us on Facebook. And instagram. We have a whole social media project going on called keeper of the day with stories and links to activist archivists rogue, librarians, collectors historians keepers of the culture. Guardians of the free flow of information. Take a look, thanks for listening. Before we go. We want to tell you what's happening on another radio took show. Our friends at six just kicked off a new season, Jen and Manucher still share their own struggles as newbie entrepreneurs. But they're also investigating how other founders and creators are resisting the winners, take all mindset and redefining success for themselves and society, there's a winner. There's a loser. If the business owner wins the client losers. If one person gets promoted everyone else lost because that took away from the bonus, it perpetuates this mindset that like there's never enough. We now look at our own personal worthiness through the lens of extraction. We look to feel worthy through the money that we have the power that we have or the beauty that we have or the sexiness that we have we are so starved for meaning for narrative for human connection that we've perverted the system beyond all recognition and art God is money. What's your individual responsibility is? Just as important as the overall big picture. Good news is if we can convince everyone that we all want the same thing, which is more sustainable ways of living. The market will follow it venture, capital steroids. So as a founder, if you go to raise you raise with venture, you're basically saying I would like steroids, and I would like soil aunt, and I would like to not sleep, and I would like to eat this culture. If people can only speak up when they have a solution. You is a leader are never going to hear about the biggest problems that are just too complicated for anyone person to figure out how there's a very large market opportunity in very small groups that was my fortune. I got the Chinese restaurant. Small opportunities represent big enterprises. Six Texan, honest, look at the culture of business and what needs to change find out more at zigzag pod dot com. Radio.

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140 -The Climate Underground with Al Gore and Alice Waters

The Kitchen Sisters Present

30:34 min | 9 months ago

140 -The Climate Underground with Al Gore and Alice Waters

"The radio welcome to the kitchen. Sisters present six. We're the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva role. I always start with this image of earth rise made on Christmas Eve. December twenty four th nineteen sixty eight on the first mission to go all the way out to the moon. One of the astronauts saw out of the corner of his eye. This amazing image. They didn't expect it. Sounds like a family on vacation in a station. Wagon off quick. Where's my camera? Give me some Golden Film Journal of near the right setting that come out. This one's called the blue marble and it was from POL seventeen. The last image taken by human being far enough out in space to see the planet hold the most published photograph in all of history. I do so many slide shows and presentations. I just never get nervous anymore. But I'm nervous before this one the very first climate underground conference here on Gore Farm. Al Gore's back and he's got a new slide. Show better take heed last October. The former Vice President Nobel Prize winner and Academy Award Winner for an inconvenient truth and activist restaurant tour. Founder of the Edible Schoolyard Alice. Waterson gathered farmers ranchers scientists shafts researchers and policymakers on his family farm in Carthage Tennessee for a riveting set of conversations about the world of food and regenerative agriculture in solving the climate crisis. They called the two day event the climate underground along with the conversations. Some of Nashville's hottest chefs joined Alice in creating a sustainable organic school. Lunch to highlight. The power of local school supported agriculture in nurturing the health of children and the land. This event happened long before the moment we will find ourselves in right now as the corona virus pandemic sweeps across the planet but it holds seeds and hope for a different approach to our future and the fate of the planet. Meal share in honor of birthday. The kitchen sisters present the climate underground as a child from first year my life all the way through until I was in college. I spent every summer here on this farm at Christmas and every spring vacation. My father told me how to recognize the best and most fertile soil with my hands in it and it was black and moist always believe agriculture in the food system are absolutely key to solving and mitigating the climate crisis. We have converted this farm to a whole variety of genitive practices a combination of plants and livestock with highly diverse cover crops and maximum use of no till the voiding synthetic insecticide. We harvested our first crop. According to these new practices in two thousand sixteen only three years ago. Some very excited that we have not only regenerative farmers but also scientists and entrepreneurs and chefs. We've got some really great. Where else course? Far and Carthage Tennessee. We are cooking to school lunches this for three hundred fifty people who are attending climate underground a about connecting food and farming to climate. I'm Alice waters the owner of shape pennies restaurant and Berkeley California and Co founder of the edible schoolyard project which has grown from one school in Berkeley to a network of seven thousand sent schools around the world. We're here today to acknowledge the land. Not just here in this area Paul over Turtle Island and the Americas. My name is Mary. Crow I'm a member of the eastern Ben is Cherokee. You are here today. Because you have a concern. You have a major concern about this oil about the air about the watcher. I'm really happy to introduce my partner in putting together this event. Alice waters who is providing all of the delicious and nutritious food in addition to her groundbreaking work as a chef and a pioneer in the Movement for organic and local food. Alice's also a committed advocate or the role that food and agriculture can play in protecting our environment. And you get started with the edible school projects really began. Then I had a child. I was a monetary teacher. The IDEAS HAVE MONTESSORI HAVE INFORMED. All of my work she believed in the education of the census ship believed in touching and tasting and smelling. When I started the edible. Schoolyard project is said. Food is subway to really open up the senses because it touches every one of them if we put in a garden and we put in the kitchen classroom. We could wake up. The young people who were have been sent sorely deprived many of them because of hunger and because poverty because of an indoctrination of fast food culture throughout most of human history the daily ritual and practice of collecting gathering preparing eating food together has been a key part of the connection between individuals and nature and in order to reestablish that connection for children you look for other opportunities than you found one in the school system. I mean that's the place where we can reach children when they're young and open idea of this is to have them fall in love with nature. Food is more than just food. Food is really about culture. We have been indoctrinated by fast food culture when we eat that we digest the values that come with the ideas uniformity. The ideas that we should have whatever we want whenever we want. It doesn't matter where it comes from cooking rusher farming stretcher we think advertising confers factor you the centerpiece of this project is a civilized sustainable school lunch. And before you focused on the school system and the edible schoolyard project your career as a chef was really transformative. What got you involved with that? It was all about taste for me. Taste and beauty. I had gone to France when I was eaten and it was a slow food nation. France kids came home for two hours to eat with their and every day people would go to the markets and their neighbor beautiful outdoor markets. And you bought only what was since. He's we go and eat in these family restaurants that are happening again. People see that making restaurant can be aware of lights. Fit Real connection with the people that come in and I love that about the restaurants I visited your and astral and I feel such kinship with that group of people are ready because we have the same values. That's what's important about this and what we need to communicate to the next generation. It's something that we've been doing since the beginning of ballistic gathering together eating only. What's in season? Only what's locally available even fast food culture with sake? It's impossible to feed kids in schools too many. They don't like you can't find the food but guess what we can Chapter one a fable for tomorrow there was once a town in the heart of America. Where all life seem to live in harmony with its surroundings? The town lay in the midst of checkerboard of prosperous far with fields of grain and hillsides have orchards. Where in the spring white clouds and blown drifted above the green fields in autumn. Oh can nate. Birch setup a blaze of color that flamed and flickered across a backdrop of by then Fox's bark hills deer silently. It was on this farm. Mother insisted that my sister and I listened to her. Read Aloud from Rachel Carson's silent spring. My Dad's Generation was really focused on soil conservation. Franklin Roosevelt made that a key part of the new deal. My parents generation understood that in their bones. They live through it. I will never forget. The fields of wheat. So blasted by heat cannot be harvested. I shall never forget. Field out the field of Con- stunted airless stripped of leave for what the sun left the grasshoppers took? I saw Braun. Pasqua would not keep a cow on fifty acres yet. I would not have you think for a single minute that there is prominent disaster. Released drought regions. No cracked no blistering Sun. No burning wind. No grasshoppers are permanent. Met for the indomitable American farmers and stockmen and the waves and children in the last two hundred years. We've taken this leap. In destroying the grasslands of the world all of the agricultural systems of the last hundred years have seen this massive decimation of soil and biological life in this microbiology has disappeared under the pressure of the antibiotics put into our animals and crops. Zach Bush. I'm a medical doctor. From VIRGINIA SPECIALTIES INTERNAL MEDICINE AND ENTER. Haji metabolism leader in hospice and palliative. Care and my background is in the microbiome and its intersection with soil and human health. We're really talking about a new paradigm for the topic of climate change where we can start to focus less on the symptoms of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and start to look towards the solutions which are in the soil about twenty eight percent of all the global warming pollution comes from Land Use Agriculture and Forestry. But here's good news with the practice of no till versus conventional till after ten years you can see the build up of soil organic carbon. We have forty years worth of data that showcases that the way we farm has a huge impact on how much carbon we can sequester when native ecosystems forests and native prairies are converted to intensive agricultural practices within about thirty or so years. You can lose up to fifty percent of the carbon topsoil so that says to me is at the very least we have a potential to restore that much restoring. This carbon is obviously very foreign from a climate perspective but it comes with multiple other co benefits that are essential for human and other beings soils as part of the folio of strategies that we could deploy to address. Climate Change but soils aren't going to solve the problem alone. It's frustrating even the scientists in the scientific community when you talk about carbon sequestration. Our climate change mitigation with agricultural practices to have colleagues get angry at me and say it's all about fossil fuels and it is all about fossil fuels we have to reduce emissions. Just no aware we're GONNA fix our energy systems we've got to change our lifestyles. And in addition we need to develop ways in which we can remove co two out of the atmosphere and swells are great place to do that can solve all the problems maybe not but is it a good place to start with absolutely conman. Sequestration soil is a natural process. It's a low hanging fruit. It's cost effective. It has many benefits and start with that rory to feed the world. We'll be right back. The kitchen sisters present is sponsored by Sikora a nutrition company. That believes wellness begins with what you eat? You can stay home. Stay healthy and strengthen your immunity with fresh delicious meals delivered straight to your door from Sikora. They've got hardy salads and nutrient dense granola savory flat breads and seasonal fruit par phase all one hundred percent plant based gluten free dairy free and non GMO in addition to their delicious meals. Sukar also offers daily essentials like supplements and tease to complete your wellness routine and support overall health and vitality to boost immunity. Try their best selling daily probiotic blend or detox water drops with pure chlorophyll and right now. Sikora is offering our listeners. Twenty percents off their order when they go to Sikora dot com slash kitchen sisters or enter code kitchen sisters at checkout. That's the Kara S. A. K. A. R. A. dot com slash kitchen sisters to get twenty. Percents off your order. Sikora dot com slash kitchen sisters? I'm looking at the tables that we have set in long lines under a tent all the food that we have for. This latch has been gathered from regenerative farms across the state of Tennessee. We have a place spat with the state of Tennessee. Pinpointing all of these farms when people come to ease. I'm going to say I'd like to feed you an idea you. We're serving U S school. We're serving of school Real Tennessee Neal. He look on your case. You'll see all farms here in Tennessee. Seeing where we purchase food all of the from really activists here in Tennessee. I never knew you see Happened See e Wagner Alice's on the road team the corn meal flour. The vinegar this particular menu vote days are sourced with seventy miles of here in. We really dug into what Tennessee could provide. We're about to feed three hundred and fifty people of fair amount of food that we got from around here are farmers pitched in. Arabic is simple triangle at the ingredient shine. I'm David from Nashville. Mt Wilson From City. House of Nashville. I'm Sam jet from Audrey and redbird in in all honesty. The farmers did all the work. So all we're doing is just finishing her up and put it on a plane hoping people in Yulia really products. That's like that's my job. Most the time. Don't screw up what they've already put all their organs really at the handle it a little bit. They have to grow their farm. Takes them a lot longer to do? The work does us the full cartoon. Like if I were excited like I'm throwing the spirits thing like do you want to look at one? You're excited. I wouldn't be excited about it. To say don't know on our and that unique ingredient gets us going because I'm having a little bit of an edge in the market. Yes we have this delicious thing that nobody else has. You've never heard of this. And that's because only what Barbara has it. We know them. Yeah I GOTTA. I enjoy the school lunch. What's your thought on? Why all this effort to Damola score lunch the ideas we gotta start early because if you show them young Chick Fillet Burger King and all these things and say well this is. What food is. They're gonNA come here. They're looking at lettuce and go. Why would I want that? That's just what goes on top of a hamburger. I mean we had kids out here the other day and they were all I wanna you know powder I don't want this and then I brought food. We put in front of them and the girl who was complaining. Start Eating Salad. She smiled gasoline. Pump out was she loved it. I think we started that later on in life. She's going to be looking like that. As opposed to subject combined quickly from a fast food restaurant. My name is Matthew Raeford. I am a chef and farmer or shofar at Gillyard farms in Brunswick Georgia. What made you decide to come here? I called Alice Alice's matthew she goes. I'm so glad you called me today. She said I'm getting ready to go. Do this conference and I need you to help me with these brings in beans. And then she goes. You know what I'm trying to find some good bonzo beans except for what she said. Well I really WanNa make helmets and I was like. Why don't you use field? Peas field peas coming out right now and she was like. Oh my God. That's what we're talking about. Philby's that's right. I'm in your neck of the woods. And then she goes. Wait a second. You need to be at this conference because you have one hundred euro farm. You've been doing this kind of stuff. Your family's been doing it and I want you to communicate and talk to people about what it's like to be in the south as a chef and the farmer african-american talking about region of Agriculture Sustainability. Yeah these are old ways. These are the things that's going on. I have believed for many years. That farmers are the first environmentalists the group. I'm about to bring up here on. Stage embodies the belief that farmers can lead the way toward caring for our environment of being good stewards of the land and the water and the air and they are at the forefront of the emerging changes. I farm about six hundred seventy five acres. And I'm best known for running a flirt. The cattle and sheep together and then added hall were converted some land to civil pasture. We need to build the quality of the food. And you need to understand those feedbacks between routes and shoes that We really spent a lot of time. Investing I have a small organic farm in south western Virginia Tobacco Farm. When we bought it had one point. Nine percent organic matters. It's a brick when it's dry. It's mud when it's wet first year. We had an organic inspector out. She literally could not find an earthworm on the farm literally. So that's Kinda fairly job is not to produce tons and tons of stuff. It is not to try to kill weeds with pesticides. Our job as farmers is to healthy people and we need to begin looking at the soil is the foundation for that building block in health. The important question to me is how do we get back to those practices that we know can restore carbon in soil like restoring native vegetation whenever possible conservation tillage practices or practices that that are able to introduce more carbon to soil including recycling. All of these variables help us to accomplish that goal and the added benefit of dressing. This degration issue then we also have these benefits that are essential for human and other beings living on land one of the most profound things I've found in recent years. The definition of nature is animals plants minerals and anything non human on earth. What did we do when we defined nature as everything outside of human? How did we exclude ourselves from nature in its definition? What a mistake. We made my mission. Now I think is to put humanity back into the definition of nature or perhaps put nature back into the definition of human as a hospice dragged seeing eighty patients a week what. I was seeing the last few minutes and sometime days and months of people's lives was a complete transformation event. People were acting differently than they ever had. People who were graphing non nurturing their children's suddenly became these bundles of just nurture and love as soon as you get that terminal diagnosis. There's an opportunity. There's an opportunity for you to drop the fluff reorganize your perceived priorities. And Ask yourself what really matters? So the Paris Agreement. Lot of hope here set a goal to get the net zero by mid century and some countries are doing well. Our President announced that he wants to pull out the Paris Agreement but under the law the first day the US could withdraw is the day after the next presidential election so this agreement was carefully drafted so the American people still have that decision. Meanwhile we're seeing the majority of people living in states that are accelerating faster than required by the Paris Agreement. And I don't know whether you've noticed or not but the marchers demonstrators are getting younger and we're seeing with gratitude. The Voice of a generation that is so pure and so powerful and now there are a whole variety of New People Power options that are opening up so this is our home. We've got to say it. I'll just close by referencing. No one of my favorite poets Wallace Stephen d wrote these lines after the final. No there comes a yes on that yes. The future world depends every great. Morally base revolution in human history has met with an endless series of knows until at long last the central choice is revealed as a choice. Between what's right and what's wrong. That is the Moma. The climate movement is at now and the farmer led regenerative. Agriculture movement is part and parcel of this morally based revolution. If you ever doubt that we as human beings and the ability to solve this just remember that political will is itself a renewable resource. Thank you very much. Climate underground was produced by the kitchen. Sisters debut Nelson N. Nikki Silva with math clash in collaboration with Nathan Dalton and Brandy and mixed by Jim McKee thanks to the teams of Al Gore and Alice waters together brought this summit to life. Thanks also to the many scientists farmers and visionary thinkers who put their heads together to share their collective wisdom. Thanks also to that remarkable scrum of Nashville chefs and to chef farmer. Matthew Bickford from Georgia. I've always been on top of the stove. I am the youngest male in my extended. Family what do you do a little boy? You sit them in there. And the king his grandma and cleaning field peas and snap a snap beans and granddaddy brought in some fish. Let scale these Fisher. I'm on family. Land in a generation to be on farming. I was raised by father that was a Baker by trade from the fifties and sixties during his lifetime. He never saw anyone that was African. American. Make it to become an executive chef. So he didn't want me to cook at all he was like. There's a lot of things you can do. Cooking one of them is that you can go to school. Do anything you want now. I just want to cook. I WanNa go to culinary school. My Dad was. I know you can't do it in the military and when I got out I was going to Howard University and I was cooking all the time people like you know how to cook. I remember when Anna finally showed me how to make her sweet potato pie. Small video clip on my phone like in the kitchen and her going on. You need to add a little bit more than that don't taste written Whip it some more maybe baby no rush. Just go ahead and just whipping some more. You know and I'm standing there like I whipped it and she's like they don't feel right. It don't feel right. I don't feel right in my mouth. Don't open up the oven. Yeah as you told me the base it every five minutes. She said See that's an approximation. You trying to like look at you. Look at you look at you. Got Your phone out you know. I had the little time five minutes. Let me run over here in base right. She says no baby. That's an approximation. Like I had to give you something to go on. Thanks also to Clare Sullivan and Angela. Mckee Brown from the edible schoolyard foundation and two CALICO Jonty Edge. Nick and Jason Baid. Here's a few more. Thank yous the panelists you heard in this story. Jeff Moyer excecutive director Rodale Institute as Mott asked bear. Hey professor of Soil Biogeochemical University of California. Mer said Wendy silver professor of ecosystem ecology and Bio Return Lau soil scientists Ohio State University and recipient of the Japan prize for the sustainable soil management for Global Food Security and mitigation of climate. Change Greg Farmer. Grazing Land Management Consultant. Anthony fell convento author an organic farmer. David Work Work Farms Ltd. then the get into farming. We were sitting around in Manila. Was like bathing. What are we going to do with autism land and I said Nanna we should go back to formative and she says just saying we baby and I said yes man. Her Mom and my aunt sisters got together. They underneath the table in gifted in my sister tuna acres and was like. Y'All need to get back to form in at the time. I was executive chef at the House of Representatives in Washington. Dc and. I'm like I can't just leave my job. Two thousand eleven. I moved back to the farm full time. I had the conversation with Manana about going back to school and learning about organic form. She heard me use the word organic and what she actually thought was chemistry manacles. Babe sit down with me for a little while I would learn. I WanNa know what you earned school. I'm telling her what I learned. He was like no no no. Tell me about the organic stuff I said. That is the organic stuff. She was like No they'd be talking about farming baby. You mean to tell me Yo ass when all the way to California to learn what you already know how to do so. I'm telling her about compass and she goes. But you're talking about the honey wagon to do the honey wagon day. We've been making minority. Says I don't know I mean your your great granddaddy used to make minority and I was like. Oh my God I could actually just given my Nanna the money in her feet. I think we need to take the time to sit at the feet of our elders. And actually listen regardless of whether they're using of big scientific word or something as simple as the old ways I mean what I see here al. Gore's ranch the reclamation of land and How to do carbon sequestering making sure that you rotate various animals through the pasture spreading that manure out and letting that grass grow putting things paddock's old ways the kitchen sisters present is part of PR XS RADIO TOPA. A network of some of the most distinct independent and beautifully crafted podcasts. Please take care of yourself your family and your community and the people who grow and Cook our food deepest. Thanks to those of you. Who are out working taking risks to help take care of the needs of all of us. Thanks for listening. Boom boom boom radio.

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132 - The Pancake Years

The Kitchen Sisters Present

24:54 min | 1 year ago

132 - The Pancake Years

"Radio welcome to the kitchen sisters present six where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva all of the stories stories. You hear on Radio Topa are brought to you in part by support from listeners. Like you we tell stories and take chances every day at Radio Tokyo. Make the case that podcast just like this. One are essential to you by becoming a recurring donor at radio TOPIARY DOT FM today recurring donors give a small amount monthly that forms the Financial Foundation Foundation on which this network has built every donation regardless of amount from now until December. Thirty first will enter you to win a trip to Tope Fest in Boston. Dan where you can hang out with all the radio TOPI producers. We'd love to see you. Please go to Radio Topa Dot. FM Today and donate what you can. Thanks for listening doing this. Episode of the kitchen. Sisters present is brought to you by Sun soil since soil mix full spectrum whole plant CD. That's organically grown. Naturally naturally extracted and accessibly priced they organically farmed all their own Hampshire Vermont. They naturally extract cbd from hemp using organic coconut oil and they test their products at three I s accredited laps to ensure potency and purity. Today listeners of the kitchen sisters can try son on soil. CBD At twenty percent off head to send Soil Dot Com and save twenty percents off your order by entering code kitchen sisters at checkout that son Soil Dot Com Promo Code Kitchen Sisters for twenty percent off your order today on Christmas Eve. The kitchen sisters present sent the pancake years. Davy here with Nikki sending you and your family are best. As the year turns for years ago. Today my father other Lenny Nelson passed. It was a sunny afternoon in Los Angeles. Bright Windy big billowing clouds in the sky. The Sun Shimmered on on the Pacific. Lenny was ninety two and the last thing he wanted to do was die on his ninetieth birthday. He announced he was going to live to be one hundred. I called this time in his life. The pancake years. If you're looking for lenny you would either find him watching Rachel Motto or contributing to Planned Parenthood the ACLU. Oh you in the nation magazine or eating a stack of hotcakes. He was in his groove but things took a hard turn and there we were on December twenty forth all gathered an apartment for two days lenny in a hospital bed Rachel maddow blaring. He so clearly didn't WanNa go. He wanted to see Hillary Clinton's presidency. He wanted to read the New Yorker. He wanted to eggs over easy and Blueberry Syrup on those flap Jax today in Lenny's honor and in honor of your family and ours. We were pre story about him that we shared a few years back and a few years back. I fell in love with a man who lives in London Endon every few weeks or months he would come to see me in San Francisco or I would fly there to stay with him when my Father Lenny. A World War were to veteran realized. I was commuting back and forth to London. He started filling with stories of his wartime experiences. Their German bombing rates that forced the city underground into the tube stations till the buzz bombs passed pretty British girls. He dated with names like Daphne bubbles but mostly he talked about rattles Ston. Every time I got on the plane he would remind me that his airbase was rattlesn-. And if I went there into the town hub hub. I would find his photograph along with this. Eighth Air Force Squadron there on the wall it was still there. He said over fifty years later. Lenny Linney loved England and for his terrifying as it had been for an eighteen year old. Who had never been out of the lower east side New York and was now a navigator in the Army Air Arcor flying bombing missions over Germany? He loved his time in the army. Fighting Hitler and Fascism and antisemitism meeting guys from places places like Kansas and Utah hearing the swing bands that came and entertain the troops receiving Salami from cats as Delhi sent to rattlesn- and his mother back on Orchard Street for five years. He asked me to go to Ralston to see the photograph and find his base. I kept saying saying I would go. Finally on find Sunday. Joe Agreed and we headed north northeast of London in search of a pub and a piece of my father's passed. The peace he was proudest of Lenny died on Christmas Eve last year in his honor. We share here at this journey with you Samuel Shelton Robinson helped us produce the story. He's from London. It seemed only right This is David and Joe on Saturday may twelfth a two thousand twelve on our pilgrimage for the four forty seven and the eighth air force so we just passing Barry Saint Edmunds. And we're on our way towards stow marketer with for the turnoff to rattles them. I have to look for the town of Wool. PET OF WALL We'll we'll put we'll put green. And then we get to rattle stone and then the actual airfield is a little bit south of Robinson. Place called High Town Green and there's a gliding club which is the only part of the airfield which is still in use. These are the birds of Ralston. Allston member those berths dad. Did they say it. We are now at the brewers arms which perhaps is the pub you've been referring to homemade food garden cask Ales classic wines. Jacob prearrange aches for Sale L. at Seco- do you think your photos in in a process. How are you hi? I'm David from San Francisco. My father was In the US Air Force and was based here during the warriors. My Name's Rebecca on the landlady of the burs arms matchless did how did you come to be the landlady sir. I grew up. Not Too far from here. Do you hear many stories about that. Time in the forties. When the American airmen more here you get quite a few people coming three of year on year she during the summer as a few people in the village of older members of the community that have a few stories to tell stories about the lady who it was a land ninety then stories about her policies kind of parties dancing on tables and maybe that was a nine thousand on the table with Mabel? That's what the guy said to me. I talk in store this fun things that went on in this building. I think the photographs Tavassoli said there's a pub in rattles that I've had a lot of growth. See by the time we go here. There wasn't really that much here. I'm I gave a few things. The local historical society that we found a few photos and there was an plaque that have been presented to the pub at some point as a mark of sort of support and hostile wagering the more. So it's kind of within the village I think. Some of the fighters belonged to families in the village and they hit kind of a waste bin here so some people took take things back and things like that and what about the local men who fought in the war. The other pub would Ni- better anyone that was around and because then more econo drink pub so any of the old guys do sort of WanNa sit around and have a point and so they tend to go in there even though this is the the history the drinking and the stories tend to happen in the other. This is the boroughs arms. And that's the five bells. How old an establishment is it's been a hub for the best part the hundred fifty years? I think so if my dad was in here in nineteen forty four. Let's say what would he have been drinking. It would have being bitter but it was slightly different to the aging these days it was flatter and it was a healthier because it wasn't ever left for as long as it would have been served straight from the Bible. I think Edward Pumps yeah. It wouldn't have been that different. What would have been the music? He would've been hearing in here then. I guess it would have been like big band music communities. He's that kind of music. I was obviously something. Don't stay because maybe dance tables uh-huh Mark Robinson in Suffolk Bruce. What kind of presence? Essence of World War Two stories from Greenwich who I never know what will he was wondering ones that will confront the tanks search for people in the cross way. I walk in front of tank. Could he's quite proud. Navy talk about the wore badges. These uniform mentioned a few things here and there some people talk about you Dave Eddie so I think some people do say thank you so much for talking tonight. Woken by Diakite Hugh it breath the five bells free house nice view. Hi How you doing. I'm Dave from San Francisco. My Dad was. He's here during world. War Two stationed in Rattlesn- with the air force and he says that there's a pub in town that he thinks thinks still has a picture of the eighth Air Force. His that was done Abreu was homes and New People Gopher server year ago. I know the guy who wouldn't skip so nobody's call any of them. The bill is moved into wherever they done and just everything not realizing and they were actually the pope on wwl Lavar founds. Why have go sure you been the war? If you're lucky to get back we didn't obviously you've got sick which is called lucky policies clump of lucky to get back in the sixth day of June. One thousand nine hundred forty four the fickle finder of fight funds expedient to try on the role of lucky bars. Describe the name of Edward Lately. Eh Waste GonNA on Boeing Fortress Fetterman agent. We'll having this day. It changed remarkable record rallying returning no less than thirty times. Bryant has his on flack for bringing to Hitler and his cronies tons of bombs for bending the offers back also the curtsy the author from one I F who sponsors these programs in the interest of liberty loving people everywhere four four seven bomb group. Did that come with. That was given to me when all this stuff nickel throw night somebody in four weeks the only thing that they'd had instead taper here because I know probably stay. I bet you're going to become the informal historical society. There is one in Ralston. Hadn't road more. You're GONNA try and find out when you come back for good name for the phone number. Give a gun. Elites thinking rattles tune airfield sweat. We're seeing the goats. rattlesnake endowed quite fat and happy creamy white daffodils and tulips in bloom strouss chimneys. Ron Really narrow roads. tree-lined overgrown and what piles said of back and roofs kept farmhouses and trying to keep my eye open for the Glider Society. Well down the airfield. Our field has been replaced by a grass fed beef farm. We have just made the right turn up to the gates and we are at the gate of the airfield fueled clothesline a locked gate and working to explore. Let's see how far we can get right on. Our left is a quonset hut that is being swallowed by nature. Yeah it is sort of an anger. What kind of feeling constant hut after Consett Hut? These are much bigger huts quonset hut type right buildings but much much bigger. I guess that's a new addition those skylights inside the Smoke Saxon smoked. Okay chimneys that look like they might have been from the time and also green whether that's with mold or paint or not sure it's paint three one. Oh three nine three three six nine six. Hi Dad it's Davey. I'm so sorry to wake you up. But I'm standing at rattles Dan Airfield and I just had to hear your voice while staring at the quonset huts concert had sir still there. There's like little quonset huts in between all the big quonset huts. Do you remember the number of your quonset huts out. I was very lucky. That airfield was originally a British airfield and my barracks urge. Was the women's barracks who in the Aria like my girlfriend was gaffney and my bags plus a concrete brick with its own toilet and everything else so if that should be still standing because it was like Komo Dad I'm going to introduce you a gentlemen's just walking up. What's your name Sir Mr Watts? This is my father Leonard Nelson. This is Mr Watts Dad who just approached us. Hello to have you been before I guess I came about two years ago accounting. They all probably think they handled it about a dozen troops and one concert. It didn't these ones live here. He is the Father Damien as dad. Was the memorial. There when you came. We'll call you from there when we're driving back down okay. Aright over and out smart thank you. Yeah that all grandfather's in the area. What are you farming? Only just from our will this kwait. Bali's OC right control now. Where's the control control tower? You go back then here. Left the straight up. You'll say that should be. That is into all right. Thank you bye-bye Hello Hello Ma'am morning. My name is Dave Nelson. And I'm from San Francisco. Oh Duty You d northeast. What's your dog's name skies a name? Now take provoke breach con. So yes you certainly trophy. Isn't she. Beautiful my father was here during World War Two. He was an American yes. Has he been out of a sense of Vay Fair. Reunions hasn't what winter the reunions. I think they're probably finish now. The head some every couple of years I come over the and we'd have sometimes have a meal you know I think it was both sides of the load here. Ah mainly done at the crossroads down there that side. That's where they used to take off and do the bombing approach. That was before my time. This memorial is dedicated to the men of the four four seventh bomb group and they're supporting units in remembrance and gratitude of their fight in the cause of freedom from rattlesn- airfield field station. One two six nine hundred forty three to nine hundred forty five. This memorial was dedicated waited on the third of June nineteen eighty four. What's the music remember from that? Time so I'll see you over the white cliffs of Dover Tomorrow Just you wait and see the blue and over to Mara they just do. And what's traditional rattle. Steve and cooking I think most of it is from the Super Log. Probably now I don't know whether the people still have roast dinners on Sundays. which they used to do? I don't anymore because I'm on my own but families to probably not. I eat steak pies and rice pudding following that because it went up together and roast meat on Sundays. Cold meat on Mondays. Sometimes made into Shepherd's PAT on Tuesday. Very nice to meet you. Yeah you take good care by sky. Hi Dad can you hear us. There's another little memorial in fun. Memory of Shirley Lee from the four hundred and forty seventh bomb group. Do you know who that that would've been. was trip the archives by the weight as you make the turn into the towards the off road it still. They're always there okay. We went over to see where you live dead but it's been cleared. What was there now was to pheasants in a mating dance? We just sat transfixed transfixed in front of the open field watching these two grouses or pheasants. Do the dance around each other. The Tower it's over there but they're gliding from it today so we just yeah but there they were. We saw two of them. Okay well there goes all right you can go back to sleep now. No I won't be able to. I'm uh-huh dad. Okay Daddy love up to you. It is a journey. It's a good one okay. Five Live rattlesnakes was produced by Sam Robinson and the kitchen sisters in collaboration with Nathan Dalton and Brandy how special thanks to the National Endowment for the humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts Art works the kitchen. Sisters present is part of Radio Topi from P. R. X. A curated network of extraordinary cutting edge podcast US created by independent producers. You can support the kitchen sisters present by reviewing us on itunes. It really helps with sponsorships and helps new listeners. I find are stories. You can find kitchen sisters on twitter facebook instagram. And you can check out all of our stories and workshops. Public events are t-shirt and more four at kitchen. Sisters Dot Org. Thanks for listening. All of the stories you hear on Radio Topa are brought to you in part by support from listeners. Like Accu we tell stories and take chances every day at Radio Tokyo. Make the case that podcast like this one are essential to you by becoming a recurring donor at radio TOPA DOT FM today. Recurring donors give a small amount monthly that forms the Financial Foundation on which this network is built every donation regardless of amount out from now until December. Thirty first will enter you to win a trip to Tope Fest in Boston. Where you can hang out with all the radio toby producers? We'd love to see you. Please go to radio topiary dot F._M.. Today and donate what you can. Thanks for listening.

San Francisco Lenny London Radio Topa Radio Tokyo Ralston Boston Radio Topa Dot Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva Air Force Lenny Nelson Los Angeles David US Air Force Financial Foundation Foundatio Samuel Shelton Robinson Rachel maddow Lenny Linney
128 - First Day of School1960, New Orleans

The Kitchen Sisters Present

20:27 min | 1 year ago

128 - First Day of School1960, New Orleans

"Radio welcome to the kitchen sisters present six where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva. Hey everyone one lovey Ajayi here. Host of the podcast ransom randomness. and Jesus Angelov. If you're listening to my voice right now the you know podcast our wares at so. Why haven't you started yours? podcast in one one is a new series from Google podcast NPR. Rex teach you everything you need to know. It's a plan record record in launch your podcast. Oh I mentioned their free. No Promo code needed. Check out the entire series at PR wrecks dot org slash podcasting being one. Oh one this episode of the kitchen sisters present is brought to you. By CENSO- censorial mix full spectrum whole plant. CBD that's organically grown own naturally extracted and accessibly priced. They organically farm all their own hemp in Vermont. They naturally extract CBD from him using organic coconut oil and they test their products at three. I S O credited laps to ensure potency and period today listeners of the kitchen sisters can try back some soil. CBD At twenty percent off head to send Soil Dot Com and save twenty percents off your order by entering code kitchen sisters at checkout gap that Sun Soil Dot Com Promo Code Kitchen Sisters for twenty percent off your order. I remember uh right before I started going down. Nineteen on and I took a bus ride took announced you took a bus ride. She was paying the fare and I sat down right behind the driver of the No. You can't sit there and I asked her why inches here. Well you don't understand now will in a few weeks you will so I knew something was about. That's Leona Tate. When she was six years old she was chosen along with three other girls to integrate the public schools in New Orleans in nineteen sixty? We've produced the story a few years back and we want to put it out there again. Because it seems critical particularly now to remember and pay tribute to the many keepers of the archives. The stories the truth about our past and the long fight for what is fair and just ACA remember getting dressed in a black car jove out parked in front of the door household. Got Real it was the US marshals coming so my mother and I left may drove us to the school building and she said sit in the back of that seat and do not put your face. We turned the corner them. All I can see crowds of people. Police don't horseback ACA related to was a parade with stomach. It looked like a Mardi gras day. Why did we have to go to school or Mardi Gras I didn't think it was a mighty girl. I was scared. All I could see these crowds of people and if they could get to me. I thought it was gonNA kill me that morning when win. The Marshall came to pick my daddy and I my mother was home. She was a nervous wreck and she told the Marshall. I'm giving you my baby. This is my baby and he told her he said this is my job. And I'm going to take care babe you don't have to worry about them. November fourteen meet one thousand nine hundred sixty Leona tate. Tessie Preval's gale and Ruby bridges integrated the public schools in ruins. Six years after Brown was decided. Keep Plessey for generation descendant of home replacing President and Co founder of the pleasant and Ferguson Foundation. Brown versus board of Education was the landmark school desegregation case. There were many challenges in implementing that case. I'm Brenda billips. Square Co Pastor leaching Memorial Congregational United Church of Christ. I'm an archivist. Preserving the history of black education when it comes to implementing Brown versus board of Education New Orleans is chosen by the NAACP and very courageous judge to schools were selected. Liked it William France and McDonald. Nineteen when did you first begin to think about Leona going to school at mcdonagh after. CBS got avocation and pass the test. Well that's what give me I do. She was gone How did you happen to make the application application in the first place variables in the pavements? And just call up an agonising. They want my mom filled out the application. They selected a hundred in forty five families. They chose five families but only four could participate. NWPP was working without parents at that time. I'm doing Yona Tate. One of the six year old black girls at integrated the all white public schools here in New Orleans Louisiana. There was a lot of planning a great deal of faith and courage for this to happen. The girls had to take a test to make sure that they were going to be able to do the work. I can remember a lady in a man. Dan both white standing over me and we would test it. Psychologically tested at school board was mostly questions and answers. You know so I must have talked my way right through that. When do you think that she will get better schooling here? You will think she. Will we walk face with either clothing schools or integrating the schools. I fought with the greatest determination to preside for the children on the wagons and state surrogate of the races. Because I honestly believe that only on the system can we properly educate the children of both races. The city city at that time did not welcome school. Integration when the black girls enrolled in the schools the each own Washer to protect them court audit. That was a rookie Marshall Service. It's when I was sent down to New Orleans and it was pretty scary when we get to mcdonagh nineteenth hole school campus surrounded by New Orleans. Policemen some were on horses. The things that went on there where undescribable. I couldn't believe grueling when people would act the way they did about four girls go to school. One of the things that was in my mind is that I had two small children. I'll be damned in. Defending by is going to tell them they can't go to school and that's the way I felt about it. Nobody had right to tell these ladies that they could not go to school. We the as deputy marshals if we didn't get the job done but we were going to set the whole movement back. God knows how many years it just just head to be done marshalls escort enough steps. They didn't know what to do with us. Once we got in in there we said there are quite a few hours before we were placed in the classroom was class. White Children Mismile was was teaching and all of a sudden you see children disappearing. The parishes started pulling children out of school before you knew it. They were all they were going for the year and a half there was no one else but us and miss minds mrs to me. What do you think might happen eventually in this well? I know I couldn't stay on that long. Aw because they legislature has urged quite Paris. Here's to resist integration. The legislature took out paid advertisements in New Orleans papers which urged the parents to boycott. They have not urged violence silence but they have said resist integration boycott the schools and demonstrate peacefully people. Were angry that list so much hate. They have been taught that black people would somehow hurt their children. They were so whole devoted to separation that these slow children were actually targets and their families. Were targets my dad was a welder and and a mechanic he worked in Saint Bernard parish which was highly races so my dad's name stayed out of the public a long time. Nobody knew who he us. One legislator urged Lynch Party for what he called integration as white parents. The two of his colleague pointed out. Everybody knows that this manage manage joking. He didn't really minute he didn't mean what he said. Probably in the legislature. People did not think he meant that people should be lynched in New Orleans. We doc heavily guarded at night all day. You know at least outside confined. We couldn't play in the yard we had to bring our own lunch. Couldn't eat from in the cafeteria. I guess it's safe to reason with bank. We'll be right back. The kitchen sisters present is sponsored by a way thoughtful luggage for modern travel. They've thought of just about everything. It's lightweight easy to go up and down stairs. The wheels don't stick. It fits in the overhead Ed and a built in compression pat that helps you pack in more even boots winter clothes. I'm amazed at how much I can get inside this bag it. It has a built in lock that the TSA won't question. I also really like the removable laundry bag. There's a limited lifetime warranty which means they'll fix or replace your bag if if it ever gets damaged. There's free shipping on any away order within the contiguous. US Europe and Australia for twenty dollars off a suitcase visit away travel dot com slash kitchen sisters and use Promo Code Kitchen sisters during checkout. That's away travel dot com slash kitchen sisters Promo code kitchen sisters during checkout out. We left MacDonald one thousand nine after the second grade because mcdonagh nineteen became a black school. It was all black. Dead End up. Lacy will keep us in a white school so they transferred US terminology sims it was total chaos. They were sent over not J.. Sounds another school but this time. The white children didn't leave. We went to Sam's with a school full of students at didn't wants to be there. They used to beat us. KY-KO's the spit on us. I got hit in the stomach with a baseball bat. We would deathly afraid to go in the cafeteria whiskey. Whiskey is the bathroom alone. There were teachers cursed the children to call US names. resets time you'd hide tree. That was our little protection. They Dan do it a lot of violence hostility from teachers who did not welcome them. They were civil rights. Pioneers at age of six and seven and eight year old the way that immigration system worked was it started with them at six years old and elementary school. Junior high and senior high were not integrated waited until they became age ten. They were the first to integrate. Every level is cool and their age brackets integration progress as we progress agree once we reach tenth grade then they opened it up on the way you can go to integrate. Wait will leave even junior high school in sixty nine. We were going to senior high school to Francis Nicholls. That was kind of rough even though it was a lot of black students at that school then we had a confederate flag. The mascot was rebel that caused a lot of friction. They expected the blacks to support the rebel mascot. And they don't WanNa do that. I can remember going to school. One day I walk in the cafeteria and chairs being thrown and it was an uproar. Police were coming into building a horseback and white and the blacks of fighting in. They didn't want the mascot to be changed. I asked Tessie. Why didn't you ever talk about this? She said I was finished with civil rights. By the time time I got to high school I was done. They will complain to their parents at. TJ Sam's and Guilloux said. Her Dad said you know he was with Martin Luther King. He he said don't fight back you can't fight just got to pray and Dad. We write letters for nothing would be done. I didn't talk abided for years then. I'm thinking that I decided to break out when Barack got elected president and I said wow we really master did something guilt tests and now we always talked about McDonnell nineteen because it had closed down the FBI. Four Katrina was already closed when allowed us to come into the lower ninth ward. Not I say let's go back to school. Let me see what it looks like. You can see the water just hit the bottom level but looked fine and I said well. Something's gotTa be done. Yeah after the inauguration organization we got together and we put the foundation when they were going to auction mcdonagh nineteen. I contacted Leona Tate. One of those young ladies and I said let's go together. Gather to the school board. We have to let them know that these are civil rights institutions that cannot be just auctioned just as our ancestors had been at the plus in Ferguson Foundation. We're documenting mocking historic sites because there are very few markers of like history in New Orleans. The vision is to do a Civil Rights Museum New Orleans does not have a civil rights missy. So we're GONNA have first civil rights missing in this bill. Each generation has to impart the stories for the future generations so that people will know who they are. Ruby Bridges Gail Tessa and Leona with the four girls who integrated public education in the deep South on November. Remember nineteen thousand nine hundred sixty. They were chosen as put soldiers on a front line. The kitchen sisters present is produced by the kitchen sisters with Nathan Dalton and Brandy Hal. We thank our production interns earns Miracle Ansi Charlotte Landis Taylor Simmons Katie mccutchen. Mary Franklin Marvin and Paulina. Tano lots of people to give thanks to today day. We thank Keith. Plessey and phoebe Ferguson. Founders of the Plessey Ferguson Foundation. Who introduced us to this story? We'll be doing a piece soon about about the foundation and the historic plessey versus Ferguson Supreme Court. Case in the meantime here's Keith. plessey talking about the power of one of his foundation's projects historic plaques after US putting the Marker mcdonagh nineteen where it exists at the Saint Bernard Parish Line in two thousand ten to commemorate the school. The wrecking ball was waiting to knock down by placing the marker in front of it. We ceased wrecking ball. Seven years later the National Park Service finally recognized that site as a historic place. They gave the Leona Tate Foundation. Should I change a half a million dollars to start refurbishing that school and telling at history as all part of groundwork several of the voices you heard in the story were recorded in two thousand ten at Tulane University as part of a reunion and Panel Discussion on the Fiftieth Eighth Anniversary of the integration of public schools in New Orleans. What an incredible and significant gathering voice as you heard include the unattainable tessie provost tvos Williams and Gail at Tan stripling who integrated McDonnell nineteen? You also heard retired deputy. US Marshals Charlie Burke Herschel Garner honor and out Butler this gathering was the first time the women had reunited with the marshals since November nineteen sixty. We think Tulane University versity Armistead Research Center History Department Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities Louisiana Center for Civil Rights and social justice the US marshals museum him and moderator Alan Wider for the WSB an archival news footage in this story. We think Taylor. Ci Coin and Ruta Adelines Brown Media Archives Types and peabody awards collection. UGA special collections. Library and thanks to Brenda Flora Audiovisual archivist armistead research center two Lane University. Thanks to Leona Tate you can find out more about the Leona Tate Foundation for change and their Civil Rights Museum project at www. W W L T F C I N C Dot Org. Thank you prospect for New Orleans the Lotus in spite of the swamp. The story is part of our Levy stream project in collaboration with Oda Big Jones and associates made possible in part by Ruth. Eufor Tell Foundation and Project Act and as always we thank the National Endowment for the Amenities and the National Endowment for the arts. Art Works the kitchen. Sisters is present as part of Radio Tokyo from P. R. X.. A curated network of extraordinary. Cutting edge podcasts created by independent producers. Thanks for listening when you were growing up. Did you have her attempt to write song lyrics. Wchs was it rock rap goth country in their newest episode. Our friends at mortified podcast are leaning on their expertise in all things teen angst. I to celebrate all those earnest and melodramatic songs he wrote in high school. Think of it as Song Explorer for your childhood lyrics when I I was in first and second grade and my brother and I can't with the song using the name of our family dermatologist. When I was eleven years old I wrote the song told happy be times a here again? Girl crush on her name is laurel and I- versa. Lorelei sounded more poetic and I was about seven years old my a little sister and I wrote an Ode to my dad's bald spot to the tune of willing bully and we call this song only bald spot and this is what it sounds like. I slouch down in my blow. So you know the lyrics you saved in a drawer for decades or ridiculous. Got Candles Sandos burning in my mind. My win what if you just needed someone to help you. Discover their hidden potential. I'm not the child Lord. I used to be mortified. PODCAST is changing things up and taking a break from the usual format of the show as we present I used to rock a music music competition. Unlike any other where we challenge professional musicians to re imagine the ridiculous. Owns you visit kid but any song be transformed into infectious pop anthem. Steak fork fork in me. Because I am dead in episode one seventy six the mortified podcast. I am dead dead. Ed that the data that check out the mortified podcast at get mortified dot com. Or wherever. You get your podcasts radio.

New Orleans US Marker mcdonagh Leona tate Leona Tate Brown Leona Tessie Preval Ferguson Foundation Dan Leona Tate Foundation TJ Sam Charlotte Landis Taylor Simmon Keith. plessey Vermont CBD Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva Google New Orleans Louisiana
How to Set Hundreds of Appointments with No Cold Calling (Heres How Guidant Financial Does It)

OC Talk Radio

27:56 min | 2 years ago

How to Set Hundreds of Appointments with No Cold Calling (Heres How Guidant Financial Does It)

"The Satellite Lounge presents an evening with the progressive box. That's you go tickling the Ivories. He just saved by bundling home and Auto Progressive GonNa finally ring for that Gal of Yours Hugo. I send my condolences this next one. There's in my Progressive Casualty Insurance Company and affiliates discounts not available in all states or situations welcome back. You're riding along the surf with all of us series. Dr Aboard Clue matted that Vast Sea of ideas here. That looks like it's filling up most of the southern California because it's raining again here. Oh my goodness we need some Happy News Matt Pines you poor people down there and so it's raining this like the second time this year come on this is Armageddon. This is Armageddon this this unspoken negative forty four hundred degrees in <hes> in your homeland of Minneapolis. I've seen pictures of some friends from most of the Upper Midwest Chicago Minnesota. I can't even fathom what negative negative forty would feel. How does it go down to zero to nothing and keep going? It goes below nothing when I was when I was a kid it would go down to minus twenty alive. I've been a minus twenty and that's miserable. I can't imagine really minus forty thirty five. I think it was minus thirty five in Detroit the other day ridiculous. It's I'm. I'm actually going to be in Chicago myself next week. <hes> you know for for radio show and it's supposed to be I think it's it's not going to be quite that cold but I think the low next Thursday. He's going to be like negative eighteen. It hurts to be that cold it. I mean it's dangerous at that level because even if there's a wind you you can freeze your lungs can freeze its crazy but even at round minus ten minus twenty. Your face just absolutely stinks when you go out into the weather. Why would anybody anybody live back there yeah? I'm just putting your needs drizzle in contact well. It's pretty bad I mean I know what they're suffering because you know it went down. It's probably fifty nine here right now. I've got the heat up and I'm getting ready to put my jacket on over here before we lose all of our Midwest listeners on started with thank you everyone for joining us on the polar vortex edition of sales pipeline radio if you're joining us live. I hope you are inside. I hope you were saying more as we record this in the last day of January. I can't believe tomorrow's February already but for those of you grinding it out hitting your number trying to hit your number and <hes> you know start the year off strong for January. Thanks for joining US alive in the middle of Your Work Day on the Funnel Media Radio Network but those listened to the podcast hope you had a great January and excited to have you join us we are I think we have just now as of this month we have passed fifty thousand subscriber milestone for sales pipeline radio with his phenomenal phenomenal humbling and very very cool so thank you everyone for joining us and every episode sales pipeline radio past present future always available at sales pipeline radio dot com we are featuring some of the best and brightest minds he in sales and marketing and today is no different. We are continuing e o month. Apparently we had the we had an E._E._o.. Ed Entrepreneur Organization member and the founder of one eight hundred got junk last week and today we have the Co Founder C._E._o.. Of Guidance Angel Dave Nelson joining us today. Dave thanks so much for joining us on sales five radio man. Thanks for having me so <hes> excited to have you on the show have wanted to get you for a while to talk about a number of topics and you know last week. We talked an awful lot about entrepreneurs and talk about just sort of be the tenacity it takes to just be a professional but also be an entrepreneur. You have been doing this for a very long time you your own book <hes> making the jump into small business ownership which would encourage people to check out but really want to spend ten. I guess get into a conversation here with Dave Nelson from guided financial. They've been around for almost sixteen years helping small businesses grow with financing options and they WanNa talk a little bit about so that your entrepreneurial journey before we get into sort of how you build a sales and marketing engine you know what was it about this topic that was a passion for you and just give a quick story orients sort of where you started and how you've gotten to this point today sure <hes> we'll mind like many entrepreneurs was <hes> accidental so I was developing real estate here in Washington state and <hes> had an opportunity to raise some additional. uh-huh funded as I was talking to an attorney one day she suggested that I look at self directed I._R._A.. Or retirement plans as a way to help people invest in real estate and through a process of expiration discovery realized that not only can people invest retirement assets in real estate but they can invest in things like <hes> small businesses and private mortgages and tax liens and so we actually initially launch guidance to help people do that invest in alternative assets over time though what happened was my co founder underneath realized that we weren't really as passionate about those <hes> alternative investments as we were the businesses themselves and so in the course of sort of figuring out what our motto was going to be in connecting with customers. We realize that the real gap in the marketplace wasn't helping individuals who are looking to buy or start a business and needed between about one hundred K and a million dollars to do that <hes> there was a real gap in terms of being able to access capital and so in addition to helping them use retirement assets we've built an S._B._A.. Capability in unsecured secured credit and so we we've sort of evolved as we went from you know more traditional or alternative financial services to really a small business financing organization but it was it was accidental. I actually have in my office here a piece of paper they see people start businesses on the back of the NAPKIN. I've got a drawing <hes> and that was really our initial business plan from the get-go that's fantastic and one one thing that stood out to me in that conversation. It's something I know a lot of people face either in their businesses or in their career and it's the idea of a pivot Friday bride the idea that you see an opportunity sometimes you you know you move from what you were doing something different. I think in hindsight those successful pivots always look like a slam dunk in the moment. They're not always a clear cut choice. Could you talk back a little bit about that moment of vaping that dividend so to what you had to go through to sort of mentally to do that and I think I'm thinking about that not just for those you know that might be entrepreneurs are thinking about stepping out on their own but people that are looking at their own even sales and marketing careers and facing an opportunity that isn't certain that sometimes it's scary yeah. I always love how we talk about it. As a moment of time like there's this moment where you pivoted and everything changed. Reality is when I talk about the fact that our business shifted that was a five year process us so it's something that you know like you start to see. Hey this doesn't really connect for me and I'm wondering if this is the right path for us and then over time what we saw is that we were investing more and more time and energy in the small business component of our <hes> operation ration- and less and less than the alternative assets you start to see these resource conflicts that came up within the business those that were working on the real estate side. Were you know concerned that maybe they weren't getting the time and attention and so eventually we divested we we sold that portion of the business to accompany who wanted need to continue to grow and expand in that area and that would ultimately best for our customers best for our <hes> our team members on that side <hes> and it would give the existing organization the remaining organization a chance to focus in on who they really wanted to serve and who we wanted to be long term so it wasn't you know I'd like to say that it was a moment in time but the reality is it was a long painful decision because you're talking about people you know your clients your employees and you know as entrepreneurs you have this sort of emotional attachment to this thing that you're building so not easy no no not easy at all and I think he would probably send the whole show talking on the concept of pivot as a process <hes> which I think is something that a lot of people that have been through that both successfully and unsuccessfully can talk about but I I want to cover today we talked before you know as we sort of talked the all the different topics we can cover in this conversation. I WanNa talk about the sales and marketing engine. You have built <hes> you know as as a lot of people you start the business you start to figure out what are people looking for. What is our sales process look like and as you've grown the business business successfully over the last sixteen years you really have developed an engine for growth of not only supporting your growth but your growth goals but also you're doing it without making cold calls? You're doing it without having to do a lot of complicated headed and sometimes <hes> frustrating outbound selling effort so wanted to talk a little bit about sort of how you came to that process and so the how you've been able to sort of systematising scale that yeah well let me start by just talking philosophically philosophically <hes> and no offense to those that are listening to this podcast but in general I hate being sold so there's a stigma in general with and I'm using air quotes you can't see it but with sales people because I personally don't like going through the process of trying to be sold. And so when we designed our system initially you know I was chief Cook and bottle Washer because when we started this thing was just two of us and I was the one that was focused on sort of developing generating revenue engine and so I had to build a system that allowed me to play to my strengths but also felt like it was the right thing for our clients. Now we were fortunate in that we started this business. <hes> at a time that our industry was a little bit immature it just there wasn't a ton of competition so we had the benefit of having a lot of potential interest <hes> and not a lot of competition for that you know for those individuals and so the things that I tried to do was make sure that we were providing <hes> good information to the marketplace <hes> that we were meeting people where they wanted to consume that information so we're providing in lots of different ways and then making it easy for them to engage with us <hes> and so that system sort of built <hes> under the premise of of making simple for people to engage in and not having them feel sold so you know we are a financial firm so we are helping people look at ways that they can capitalize business but we try to take more of a care and empathy approach the clinical one. I think there's I I've heard a lot of people characterize that approaching different ways and one of the ways I've heard that is you know you're not selling your helping <hes>. I'm curious how you think about that moment when you do in some cases even if you are providing value to someone even if you're sort of sort of coming to a mutually beneficial agreement when even when you're sort of enabling ailing some outcome they care about their still as part of that is the moment of getting a quote right. I mean like you. I assume you're not just waiting for them to on their own volition say yes that even as we sit here on the last day January I'm sure you are staring at a dashboard and hoping to hit a certain number and not just hoping and praying it happens but also putting things in place to you know to to compel people to make a decision now versus next month now versus later. How do you bring those together how do you how do you provide a very customer centric? Oh you know benefit outcome oriented process but still managed to close <hes>. It's a good question and it's one that I think we struggled with for a long period of time. I can tell you what works for us and that is taking a little bit longer perspective so for example a moment ago you made the comment about me staring at a dashboard well we actually work off quarterly targets. <hes> quarterly plans versus monthly ones because I I personally wasn't a big fan of every single month having these real big ebbs and flows in terms of our energy and effort sales and it just put extra stress on the team and so we built our <hes> sales engine to have a little bit longer perspective <hes> in addition to that we wanted to make sure that while we provide lots of potential services that are compensation strategy doesn't doesn't <hes> cater towards one of those products any more than the others and so we wanted to make sure that people could be objective about <hes> what they <hes> are suggesting a client consider the other. The thing that I would say is that you know the way that we generate our our business is with a lot of <hes> sort of inbound marketing taxes and a big part of that is our channel <hes> right now about fifty percent of our businesses either coming from customer referrals for channel referrals. There's a big number and so we have to take really good care of those customers because we're travels fast <hes> so for us. We've you know we've tried to take that long. View make sure that our internal practices and plans <hes> certainly support that and then make sure that you know we understand that we are serving a base where our reputation is going to either enable or disable our ability to grow gave Nilsson. He's the Co Founder C._E._O.. Of Guided Financial Hansel and real quick before we have to take a quick commercial break here <hes> you know we talked about the machine you guys bill from a sales and marketing standpoint and you know one of the metrics you guys look at is <hes> appointment set so not just so those inbound leads and inbound requests but the number of appointments you get set to sort of move things along talk a little bit about how you think about a how do you characterize appointments to make sure that those aren't just sort of a you know. It's not just a number that team is something that the prospect themselves is enthusiastically the active as well yeah so I'll take <hes> I'll trying to this really quickly. We can dig it after the break if we need to but you know we generate a tremendous amount of leads on a monthly basis and so we have to be very careful <hes> who we are spending spending our time with and so we have a team of individuals who spend their time <hes> calling down on these people that have inquired about the stuff that we do and try and extract a little bit of information to understand whether or not we are potentially a good fit about half the time. We realize we're actually not. What a great fit and so it's both in our interest and this perspective small business owners interest to give them resources to help them continue their search and maybe get where they wanna go but recognize that we're probably not the right company to do that for them? Those that do though qualify in meaning that we think we could potentially be a good fit then we set these appointments and so the appointments then are more of a deep dive. We're really giving our golden educating the client on the ways that they capitalized their business because this is a very high stakes transaction for individuals arguably the largest investment that they will make in their lifetime <hes> and so it is not a sales process. It really is an educational so they're excited here and that there's something from it. That's awesome. I think that's the only way you can do it. Do it successfully as when you know if you set in the point with someone and that that day comes and they've got you know other fire drills and things that they're supposed to be doing <hes> if they don't know why they're up to that point or what they're going to get out of it. It's a lot easier just to blow it off but if they know they're going to learn they're going to get some insights. They're going to get some value. They remained committed to the process and the appointment but we got a lot more coming up here with him Nielsen the CO founder and C._E._o.. Guided financial we're GONNA talk about the content strategy they've put together and how that's been successful helping drive their inbound leads. We're going to be talking about internal culture and why that's important <hes> and to to not to building a successful sales and marketing engine and why it's been so important to guide. We'll be right back after paying a couple of bills here. This is sales pipeline radio. The way we do business is advancing faster than ever before yet amongst disruptions. There's one pillar that stay standing through it. All the power of a relationship relationships are at the core of everything so how are today's organizations developing nurturing and leveraging them to drive Dr Success Download the new research report on the State of relationship marketing and learn how your team can bridge the gaps between relationships and revenue download your free report and hines marketing dot com. That's H.. Not I n.. Z. Marketing Dot Com all right a little slow on the take today the poor after burke my way through the pouring rain here in the freezing cold and all that so I'm just GonNa keep calling it beats drizzle for no other reason just <hes> in with an empathy with our friends in the Midwest today speak in the Mid West next week on sales by radio. I will be joining you live from the heart of the Vortex Tax in Chicago Illinois be out there with the clients marketing kickoff for the year but sales primary roles on. We are GONNA featuring next week Alex shoots he is the C._E._o.. Of workfront and has recently written in published a new book <hes> on not just hitting your number doing it the right way and I've known Alex for a very long time from back in his time at Alachua and <hes> he is he is one of my favorites in this topic of integrity and doing business and doing sales integrity and doing business the right way so very excited next week to have Alex treatment join us on sales pipeline radio continue our conversation today Dave Nelson the CO founder and C._E._O.. Of Guided Financial and I want to get to some of your content because if anybody that's listening it is an entrepreneur or working in a small business. You know whether or not you're looking for funding has an awful lot to learn from content you create and will point some of that out in a minute but I wanNA talk about culture because I think you know that topic. We're going to cover next week with Alex around you know hitting the number but doing it. The right way I know is a big focus of yours. <hes> with your part with with your co founder and partner partner winning best places to work I know with a huge source of pride or you talk a little bit about the importance of culture and what you've done to build a culture that facilitate the sales success the growth of new soon yeah well I mean I I say this to nearly every single new team member that we bring on I my personal belief. Is you spend more time at work than you do with your family. So you better enjoy what you do believe in what you're providing market enjoy the people that you work with so we you work really hard to foster culture here that is passionate about the entrepreneurs that we serve <hes> wants to invest in the community that we all sort of live and work in every single day <hes> and ultimately make a difference in the lives of these people that are starting businesses. This is in creating jobs than taking ownership over their own life so it's very important because you know I would take personally <hes> someone that's a great cultural fit over a great skills fit any I love if you if you check out you know the the guy financial. Angel pay just even online too and you see a lot of great examples of sort of the investment you've made in your people. The growth you put into not just the growth of the company but also in new markets I just recently he goes just earlier this month. You guys launching a new new office in Boise Idaho Michael Idaho and really contributing to a number of different markets in providing jobs and great cultures for a lot of people what you also see on that Lincoln page is a lot of the great concert you have you can just scroll down and you see you know topics on the top five startups of last year and what you can learn from and then you see the value of hiring with emotional intelligence and there's a wide variety of content and I set this up somewhat not facetiously it is not about funding. It doesn't go right for the throat and say. Would you like to expand your business. Can we provide the funding. You clearly have put a focus on your content strategy on providing a wide variety of value out of content for your target you talk a little bit about the strategy behind that or why and how that's been how you've been able to successfully convert that into <hes> uh-huh pipeline and new business yeah so <hes> we'll let me start with our content strategy and sort of some of the core tenants behind that I mean if you look at the vision that we have our vision is to increase the number of people that succeed in small business. It has nothing to do with helping them access this capital giving them money. That's a catalyst to the reason they come to us. They come to us because they want to open a business. They want to take you know control over their lives and their their financial futures and invest in themselves. That's why they come to us and so you know for us us the way that we serve them in the way that we generate value per se in that is by helping them access capital but where we can best serve them as by educating them and helping them understand ways that they could be more successful as a business owner. It's also also a way that we reach more of these perspective entrepreneurs <hes> answer to nurture them over time is by providing them great content so just like you pointed out there. We want to make sure that we're covering the gamut of issues that affect small business owners not just the thing that self serving and that's an intentional strategy right to be able to sort of build some value in his part of that knowing that you know your some of your prospects that are highly qualified as prospects just aren't ready to buy today. Talk a little bit about sort of that Taco funnel strategy edgy and how it relates to the timing of when people may or may not you know be ready to engage in sort of an actual purchase decision or at least purchase process well. It's funny so we survey our customers. Every singer sorry our prospects every single <music> <hes> year and we asked him the question. You know where you on your process but we'll blow we do the same thing with our customers and what we find from our customers is the number one reason they bought a businesses because an opportunity presented itself now. That's pretty that's that's pretty interesting. Because we generate thousands per month. A significant number of them won't move forward right away and so what that means that they're thinking about this. They're open to the idea but they haven't found the right opportunity for us. We sort of played the mortgage professional enroll in a real estate transaction so somebody could be looking online at Red Fin zillow that can be working with an agent but they don't actually need to really get a mortgage until they found a transaction rate a deal to do and so for us as people are starting to think about this dream about it <hes> they start searching the Web ed looking for information <hes> and so this is part of our acquisition strategies to provide good relevant credible content to the market that helps move them towards the transaction over time and of course once we've had an opportunity to capture a little bit information yeah we certainly do make sure that we continue to keep our information in front of them so that when the time is right our hope is that we've established a level of trust and credibility with them that they'll want to engage just have a couple more minutes here with Nelson Co founder in C._E._o.. Of guided financial we've been talking about you know the key components of building a scalable enough sales engine and part of that is the people themselves not just the culture you provide for the organization overall but the very people you hire to begin with. Can you talk a little bit about about what are some of the attributes that you look for in a successful sales rep as you continue to scale your inside sales team. You know you may be looking for experience but what what are the components are. Attributes of of of new sales reps that you've seen that most lead to success organization yeah so when I'm doing interviews with ourselves professionals there's really I don't know four to five attributes that I'm on personally looking to assess. Certainly I wanNA understand like do. They have some experience. Have they seen. Gene success in the past doing this but the things that I really care about is <hes>. Are they a learner you know what are they doing to stay sharp on sort of modern practices. How are they continue to stretch and grow themselves? <hes> the second is actually try to find a way inside inside of that to role play so that we can actually do some live coaching coach ability in my opinion is one of the greatest keys of success for someone who's going to take on a sales career and then you know knowing that Guidon is a dynamic and evolving organization -Ation one of our core values is adaptability. We need people who are willing to sort of roll with the changes and <hes> adapt as we try and fail and succeed in various ways and then the <hes> the fourth is the level level of <hes> humility understanding you know who they are and where they're strong and where they need support or where they can get better and the final one is just a passion for entrepreneurship. I mean no matter where you work is as good as the culture can be as fun as it. It is sometimes it actually does feel like job and so you've still got to be passionate about the role that you play in the customer that you serve so those are the things that I look for when I'm talking to potentially hiring someone in a sales capacity that's great list and I think <hes> you know I think oftentimes especially when people look for sales reps we look at their past experience. We want to see that they've been successful selling somewhere else and you know as as for those that have built and run organization you learn you learn the hard way that just past experience does not mean they're necessarily going to be successful in your industry in your culture in a different environment so I think those attributes oftentimes are better indicators whether someone's going to be successful and and scale and growing your business well <hes> just almost out of time here but I want to ask you one final question. I think you mentioned attributes. You look for in new hires you look for people that are hungry and people that are lifelong learners yourself as a learner. I know just just knowing you left for years through through E. Oh no you continue to be gracious. Learner you read and you always want to learn new things who are some of the people so you stand out in your learning experience in your history learning people that are either authors or mentors you know pass managers. They can be alive or dead. You know people that you might recommend others listening to the show look for and and keep an eye out for or seat to get some guidance and learning as well sure well <hes> a couple of people come to mind right out of the off the out of the gate so one is <hes> gentleman named <hes> Lex SASME LEX was the founder of <hes> Commission junction. He wrote a book called Organizational Physics Science Behind growing a business so he takes you know rules of science and applies them to growing a business <hes> I love his concepts and in terms of how he thinks about product development designing the sort of organizational structure and some of the processes that it that you can implement in order to run a business more efficiently so <hes> for your listeners out there <hes> lexus knee is probably the single greatest mentor that I've had <hes> in my professional you know life <hes> you know then the other one that I would say is one of the books that I subscribe to the concepts and <hes> just personally <hes> feel like a lot of our businesses designed around is <hes> the Toyota way so the purpose purpose of using lean methodology to to learn fast not launch fast. <hes> is something that we try to live every single day so there's to one person and <hes> one resource that I think anyone who wants to learn about what it takes to own and operate a small business would find really any really interesting. I think there's a lot of concepts that apply to <hes> those that want to remain in a revenue generating real love it love it. Well thank you so much for that. We will put links to those resources in our show notes and in the blog post we put up on this as well so so <hes> if you liked what you heard today Dave Nielsen on this episode of Sales Practice Radio we will have this entire episode of course available on demand. It's sales pipeline DOT COM in a couple of days. We'll also have a summary of this conversation up on our blog at Heinz marketing dot com Tom along with links to the guided financial web page. You can see more of their content strategy firsthand as well as some of the resources recommended that have been influential to him so thanks so much for joining us. Today we will be back next week <hes> with more from deep in the heart the upper midwest in the hopefully not quite as called voter <hes> sort of the polar vortex <hes> a very excited for conversation with Workfront C._E._o.. Alex shoots ragtime for today. Thanks so much for joining us for another episode of Sales Pipeline Radio for my great producer. The ball is we'll see you next week. Will your child be ready for kindergarten at Chester Brooke Academy.

CO founder founder Alex Dave Nelson Chicago Dave Nielsen California Minneapolis Minnesota Detroit C._E._o US Progressive Casualty Insurance Matt Pines Dr Aboard Clue Vast Sea Mid West Dave
110 - Filmmaker Wim Wenders - The Entire Caboodle

The Kitchen Sisters Present

21:28 min | 2 years ago

110 - Filmmaker Wim Wenders - The Entire Caboodle

"Radio. Welcome to the kitchen sisters present. We're the kitchen sisters, Dave, Nelson, and Nikki Silva. Hi, we wanna tell you about one of our favorite podcasts. It's called Christopher Kimble's milk street radio, and it goes anywhere and everywhere to discover how food and cooking are changing the lives and cultures of people around the world. He'll hear stories about thirteen thousand dollar melons in Japan. Agip fast food in Berlin. How computers are designing chocolate. Chip cookies and the secret history of peanut butter. You'll even here the kitchen sisters in an episode about bask-, she purrs in America. Next radio is hosted by Christopher Kimball with a rotating cast of contributors, including Sara Moulton, Adam gopnik from the New Yorker, Dan, posh men from the sport full and Alex of French guy cooking from YouTube. Take a listen at one seven seven milk street dot com slash radio or just search your podcast app for milk street radio. This podcast is supported by Lincoln learning with more than thirteen thousand courses Lincoln learning can help you clinch any career moment. Like finding a new job. Earning a promotion or nailing your next big presentation. And today, we're giving you a chance to check out Lincoln learning for free at the end of the episode hang around for a free lesson on asking for a raise for more. Visit Lincoln learning dot com slash free course to get one month free and keep learning and all the moments that matter to you. The kitchen sisters present is sponsored by simple context. The most convenient way to renew your contact lens prescription and reorder your brand from anywhere in minutes. This is Dave Nelson of the kitchen sisters. I'm the blind as a bat kitchen sister. I think I got into radio because I have hearing an not really good is so simple contacts makes a lot of sense for someone like me if you need to renew your prescription at there's a five minutes simple context vision test online, it's reviewed by licensed, doctor and for LA you agreed order your contacts. This isn't a replacement for your periodic full I health exam, but it is the most convenient way to renew a prescription. If your vision hasn't changed prices are unbeatable and best of all they're offering a promotion to our listeners you get twenty dollars off your contacts at simple, context dot com slash kitchen. Sisters twenty or enter kitchen sisters. Twenty at checkout, again, get twenty dollars off by going to simple, context dot com slash kitchen. Sisters twenty. The kitchen sisters present them vendors the entire caboodle. Harris Texas wings of desire, the American friend, Alison the city's kings of the road, but vista social club. Pope francis. A man of his word kina until the end of the world just a few of the films directed by Ernst Billtown VIN benders film like play right author photographer a major figure in new German cinema in global cinema. We're gathering interviews for the keeper story archive fever on reload. Wa and the cinematheque Francaise about one of the earliest and most important film archives in the world started in Paris in the thirties when we dug into what filmmakers had been shaped by this eccentric archive, and it's eccentric archivists along with the entire French new wave drew folk Dard cetera surface, the name of a filmmaker we have law. Long admired whose movies opened the door of the lonely. The mystical the musical landscape with performances at tear, your heart in vendors. We met up with him when he was at Harvard. Delivering one of their infamous Norton, lectures, Leonard Bernstein, Robert frost, Doni Morrison Frank Stella eager Stravinsky now him dim told us about the impact on reload wa on the cinematheque had on his own filmmaking. But then the stories began to move in new directions. Them's voice may be one of the favorites. We recorded. I don't know if everyone who group and Dusseldorf sounds like him something tells me not but here on the eve of the Academy Awards an award vim vendors has been nominated for three times, we share his story produced by Viva Aronson and the kitchen sisters make st- by Jim Mckee or your into the cinema. Montek foces by shit. Coincidence. I was forced having odd student and Paris home was chambermaids room under the roof heated, very cold. It was in the middle of the winter. Somebody gave me a good tip to try the cinematheque at the show. It costs on new one Frank nice woman one could see movies. And this was the Masta off Siamese presided Ali. Sunday, mala, then boss on Michelin is tech with no sneak off for me shed. Then vendors gemin- filmmaker gift in America for fifteen years and make quite a lot of movies. For me. Oh was synonymous with this shelf cinema. I was always sitting in the first row I knew everybody in the first couple of rows renew. Each other. We will always death. Fritz Lang jumped Ford and all these people's, but you see a real criss cross section of him history. Copies through school men will take it one day, you might soon that Jerry and phone with French subtitled, the Chinese film with Turkish subtitles and ship pleasure. Was if long while was set to actually introduce them, he didn't speak long. But he always said the essential things. And he said it in terms that created context die saw the beginning two or three movies. And finally ended up seeing bound two thousand films in the realm of maybe these thousand firms I saw with his eyes and through his words and actually through his institution. I remember retrospective of answering man he showed about twenty films. So appreciate the offer. But I can't accept the condition. Why not? You're not gonna find the answer your dream around here, Mr. wagon, you better look someplace else. Understood the work of director when I saw these Anthony men foams understood what it meant white shots and traveling shots and closeups it was with a certain regret that eventually parted from parenting ought to try to get to film school in Germany. Only five years later, I came back because long was that very first one to show my very first picture the goalie's anxiety at the penalty kick. I came with the film. Don't actually into my them. I was sitting again on my seat in the first low, and and listen to him as introduced my film. And then he took my hands at hyung-man. Let's go have dinner. I was ready to stay and what's men movie with him. And I asked with really great disappointment. You're not going to stay. No. He said he put me up you end out. He said young man, I'm not watching movies. I'm showing movies that was a sort of a disappointment at first. And then I understood, of course, the distinction. And actually, then having dinner with a wheeling and Mary was there as well. Was of course, a feast it was a hot thing to realize he kept my print of decoding things. I tried hard to to get it out of his hands again. But he said, no, no, I rather keep it. It's good that we have it. And I realized that's how you had more or less symbolism mazing collection of thousands and thousands of films. He just kept them. At the time. Nobody gave him right nickel to buy. It imprint so he had to just steal them. He was sitting near the first together with Marian is not to realize that films parishable, and that needed to be preserved think he realized that before anybody even lost thought about it. I started to see the entire memory machine that the cinema takeaways from the other side, I got to know lot is a little better 'cause she stayed and what's the damn lot? He is ner conservatories on chef that is curator at the Paris attack, a minor Lottie may. Please tell us what the cinematheque in Paris's. It's that's devolve film archive and in the same time thin museum, north, of course, had been an important in in Germany, the night twenties thirties at known all the major filmmakers in in the twenty s in Germany at person on Fritz Lang and had written extraordinary books, and then as choice right ahead to leave the country, and it up in Paris that to know on re and had actually started the idea at the cinema take together with them cinematheque is an international institution in that. Am I right to think it's the the largest depository of films in the world? I sing re and. Only you're willing to show them to the rest of the world rations. Oh longest principle is that films of to be seen. He's sings the needed this. He says just like people have to go for walk fims heft to run if you just keeps them involved, and they died not was hit to see off Elms Norfolk and get to know us and connect us to the past that the most had missed I got to see Joan films of the twenties for the first time in the sooner or take when I make films myself. I saw how invaluable she was as a link between the memory of the great time of Jemison Emma on the twenty thirties. And and that she really was very eager to connect with us and connect to the decent history of germs. Get to know her when she was old. Jimmy was a little had a French accent? Then. But she always insisted that speaking German, and she was so curious and went to know everything about everybody else anew and about all the filmmakers, she hadn't personally met. Undergone in America, which is interesting, but mostly I prefer what's the call? Now's a classic shit been really an important person. In my young ages of Mike Heinen my development. Many of us for even more. One of my two, great mentors, not Eisner. She was eighty s when she was critically ill. And I did not want to allow her to die. Actually, walk to parents from the socio journey across the apps to Paris. She will not died. She must go tie because I'm coming on foot. When I two out of hospital. Amazed that he didn't walk bath foot. An appendix kept his Sousa maybe eating late somebody else. Somebody else. She summoned me to Perry's a took a train in Seoul hedge. She said, I'm almost lined great joy of my knife to read into cease cinema cannot do anymore. And she said something which very simply because she said he'd been leaping Sut like Noah dying at eight hundred twenty years saturated of life. And she said, however, still spell upon me by you. That I must not die. And I sit to very casually Lottie taking away now. And she tied eight days later. Dedicated Paris, Texas to her because she. Guide where we made that movie. And I heard it from a distance. I she was almost Saint which in the end to. Which of these? I knew these people. Two people. They were in love with each other. The girl was very young about seventeen or eighteen. I guess. And the guy was quite a bit older. It was kind of raggedy and wild. She was very beautiful. You know? And then when we were shooting. American friend in seventy six. In paris. Alway died, and we gave him a place in the movie somebody reads the newspaper and as a close up of picture of ugly. With the headline announcing the death of on. You speak about your own archive. Do you have an offer have my only films that in the best to dishes of cinema to produce most of my films? Put one exception. Only Amit Cisco the others before NAFTA was produced myself. So I owned a coal then lost them on in two thousand one. Lung story says threes, so I lost him and they were on. Other from people at the merchants, libraries and stuff. That was a painful time. And I realized it was just the beginning of the twenty th century movies needed to be transferred to digital in order to survive and not be screened anymore. And of course, the commercial entity that owned my friends was so much interested in preservation. They want to make as much money with them as possible. So they were exploited and used at the had an audience, but definitely suffering realize, but I realized that was another ownership for movies that was ideal which was for formal nonprofit to fundation. So I phoned such foundation and with the help up my home city in the home state of nothing Fania and private investors, including myself we bought the whole caboodle back. A lot of them were western distribution date on money. But now they didn't money for anybody else. And also not for me. But. For their own safe. They financed basically their own restoration now restored eighteen of them, which loaded continue with twenty or thirty two missing. Or the important ones done redo two more every year and hopefully get to the end of the two. Duty. Influence was that he adjudicated generation of congress. He made sure that other people understanding the city of saving the memory of mankind that is incorporated nays. Then vendors the entire caboodle was produced by Viva Aaronson and the kitchen sisters, Dave Nelson. Nikki Silva mixed by Jim Mckee special. Thanks to Tom letty. Rob Maas, homey, baba Haden guest Sophia huffing, injure brandy howl and Nathan Dobson and most of all to VIN vendors who has inspired us across the years. Thank you for going out on the long. The kitchen sisters present is part of PR Xs radio Tokyo, curated network of extrordinary cutting edge podcasts created by independent producers. You can find links to all of these great shows at radio, Tokyo dot FM. You can find kitchen sisters on Twitter, Facebook Instagram, and you can check out all of our stories and workshops public events are t-shirt and more at kitchen, sisters dot org. Thanks for this Ning. This podcast is supported by Lincoln learning with more than thirteen thousand courses linked in learning can help you in the career moments. That matter today, let's learn about asking for a raise for more. Visit Lincoln learning dot com slash free. Course, I'm Jane Barrett. The founder of gold being a small business in the financial services space, you work hard feel money. Most people do and at the very least it's great to see your income expand. And the best way to do that is to get a race. So how do you get a raise? Don't just not into your manages office and say, I need a rice look at it as a project. I you'll research than build your reasoning as to why you should be awarded raise unlikely find the right people to make the case to research means to find out everything you can about the industry norms for your position work what people above and below you a being paid. And especially what your peers with similar scope of being paid have all the data points. Especially if you believe you're being on the paid next Bill Joe case, keep track of your contributions in your existing role and think about how you contribute more in the future. What you're really doing is giving you lost the ability to go and make the case on your behalf lost find the right person, which may not be your direct boss or h contact see if you can enlist the help of a mentor sponsor, someone within the organization that can help you navigate the treacherous waters of securing a pay raise make sure you know, who the ultimate yes, no decision makers and work backwards from there timing can be everything based TJ about when you also and set expectations that it could be months between the time you make your case and actually getting more money one more minor detail, and it may seem simple that you actually have to Oskar in order to get a raise Doisneau assume your employer will reward your hard work on their own remind the move the great work that you're doing and then off in full money. Good luck. Radio too. Ex.

Paris Lincoln America Dave Nelson Fritz Lang Nikki Silva Germany Texas Jim Mckee Lottie Frank Stella cinematheque Francaise Agip Christopher Kimball Christopher Kimble Japan YouTube Michelin Harvard Academy Awards
154  Hunting & Gathering with Angelo Garro

The Kitchen Sisters Present

18:33 min | Last month

154 Hunting & Gathering with Angelo Garro

"Radio welcome to the kitchen sisters present six where the kitchen sisters dave nelson n. Nikki silva the kitchen. Sisters present is sponsored by artifact artifacts sets you up with professional interviewer to capture stories about the important people or things in your life. Think about it like your favorite podcast but about whatever you want. We just used artifact talk about how the kitchen sisters met our style of producing and some of our favorite stories. Here's what we did. We went to. Hey artifact dot com and told them a few basic things about what we wanted artifact to be about step two. We then answered a few pre interview questions scheduled an interview step three. Our interview was about thirty minutes long and it was pretty easy and fun. From their artifacts professional editors and sound engineers. Take care of the edit and the final product you can visit hey artifact dot com to browse examples and learn more about how to start your own. Listen to our episode at hey artifact dot com slash sisters. Get forty dollars off on your first by using the code sisters. That's hey artifact. Dot com h. e. y. Eight rt. I f act dot com. We wanna tell you about a brand new podcast. From w k m s npr x. Called middle of everywhere middle of everywhere shares big stories from the small places. We call home rich. With examples of tribalism and kinship skepticism and idealism defeat and triumph hosts aerial. Lavery and carter tell stories of life in rural america. They provide a connection for those who have left but still identify with small towns and explore the growing appeal of rural life middle of everywhere season one features stories from across kentucky from a magic healing stone to a ninth generation farmer battling and insurance company for his beliefs area in austin explore some history of the bluegrass state busts. Some stereotypes and share what motivates people in these communities. Listen and subscribe to middle of everywhere wherever you get your podcasts. There's fennel here today. We are here qaluza to hunt ducks morning of the season after that. We put everything to rest south. That's coots that's the pintail see. That's a mild screen ahead calling female famous small birds to know. What are you live today with. All of us thinking of home and family and of all the things we love and miss this year the kitchen sisters present hunting and gathering with angelo gara and a few words from verner heard sock about angelo and his omnivore salt. We met angelo garowe. Gosh maybe two decades ago we were working on waiting for joe dimaggio. One of our radio stories about the return of gelatin. Joe at age eighty three to his parents village in sicily story. I'll get you the episode number in a second so we needed help with some sicilian translation and a friend told us about a blacksmith. From sicily hidden down an alleyway in san francisco and who made artisan wrought iron and cured his own olives. He sounded promising. David called angelo the blue and asked him to listen to our tapes over the phone. He stopped everything he was doing to translate the recordings and then invited her to forge that evening. For rapid and polenta. We were in the midst of the mix for joe dimaggio so she didn't make it out that night but a few months later the phone rang. Are you coming for lunch or are you coming for dinner. It was angelo. The next day davis spent a rainy afternoon at the forge eating. Lunch by candlelight. Everything was handmade by angelo. The salami prosciutto pasta sauce. The wine even the candlesticks. The next week after returning from hunting he called to invite us to a wild boar dinner then a few months after that we went. Foraging for fennel. That's when we began following. Angela s he follows the seasons harvesting the wild recreating in wrought iron and in cooking the life you left behind in sicily. Go make noise bob dole mic noise device will be look the wet area. The trees dead stamps. Just hiding pine needle carpets here to be focused. We are looking for cini mushroom and what is a bobble. There's a mushroom could be pechiney. Could be poison one so you have to be careful pilot. My name is sensual guiral. I'm was born in sicily and now live san francisco sicily. Why could tell by the smell. What time of the year was all ranch. Season oranges persimmons. Olives and olive oil convoked. Look bob bob come in. That's fourteen route beautiful smell. If we find ten like this night we can cook it and make christie. My my. My place is not. Can i describe my place. This used to be blacksmith shop in the eighteen. Ninety were hauled a gold digger. Cowboy used to bring the horses. I do architectural rod higher forging elements for about opening. Listen to this. It's like a soprano you. My friends just went down vining and tonight i'm cooking. While polenta ngelo goes with the season fee has hunted a boar would be sausage making and would be prosciutto making in the middle of november turkey. Hunting as you come in a day like today. You don't know what you're going to see what you're going to smell what you're gonna eat these either working medal or cooking. Something a put a smaller the kitchen adjacent to the forge while the metal is warming up there before i beat it up just common and started recipe. I can make you a cecilia porch. Date the forges like the old country is like a piece of easily old europe which is frozen in time in the middle of san francisco. Just very mysterious place. It's nine smith forge. There's just about everything from crab nets to bow and arrows picture of friends old machinery tools. And there's a victory in the middle with the passionate foraging passion of hunting opera. My work i've the fashion of cooking pickling curing. Salami sausage making wine in the fall. This is my life. I do this with my friends. It's to my heart. I've seen the most eclectic group of people coming through the forge for dinners and lunches engine. Always the center of gravity for people from just about every classic. We jobs is a pleasure. I don't think i would drive within five miles of here without stopping by. That's a beautiful whole here right here. If you would live there. If landed at steep rabin the pacific coast narco. Stinson beats thou tied. Today is a beautiful day. You almost can't have christmas without ill. It's almost like turkey for america's thanksgiving in know. You can't have the seven fish dinner a christmas eve without ill angela. How has this theory that when people do these things communally and get together and peel the skin. Softer the ails. You get sit around as you do when you pick olives and go through the olives you can figure out all your psychological problems and incessantly. Hit tells is now nate together. Psychologists often sisley men if they go in the kitchen they say that they are normal. Flushing men with skirt. The women they just gusty away. That's not your place. Get an emmy on all son off your saw own you calm. When i moved away. I would call for recipes for memory. It smells tastes and now. I'm trying to replicate what i left behind. I'm trying to find this operates more cheerful coming to fennel patch. Now we're going to stop big some federal so that they can flavor my olives than are queuing in the forge. Plus the car will smell good all the way the san francisco. There's federal here today. We are here in collusion to hunt ducks morning of the season. After that we could everything to rest the south gupta. That's that's the pin. Tail z screen. Ahead calling the female nice smell mellberg's to know. What are you live ends. you also the decoys. I am at that country but also nature. Over and i don't think to the to love nature life ducks and some of them make this. Why france anju. Why do we do what we do. I think because we are pre-start people we haven't shake out the east think of hunting like almost you know we won't be able to shake her out of us because we're kind of living these three scott. I cannot resist winding the tape back a little bit and taking you deeper into the duck blind behind the scenes with debut. Angelo and sabi. Birds are gone. We don't they already left. This is the last holdouts. Id's the ol- duck. Like how come. These didn't already leave. Which one those. Those are decoys. These are all the kinds. I think those are the one you keep here. S to trick the live ones. Every one of them has a name. We got about six hundred of them. I was wondering why they were responding to the duck calls. Had your major to major accident one. This morning chris. I guess washed a bike and left the holes in the back of the trailer so art. Of course. I hope that the trailer come those out all the way up here. You know i'd be happy to be this new hundred foot long two hundred foot long you drag on an equal seven miles. Oh man Look a different experience at six o'clock in the morning and feel like it's a sitcom. How come anyone made it yet. We could make a million dollars off of this sitcom that could talk to. You know thinking three guys were shot nine rounds in this guy at Recently angelo began his own small company. Omnivore salt beautifully packaged bags of his special blend of natural sea salt harvested from the salt beds off the coast of northern california and organic spices. When he came up with the idea to sell his salt he launched a kickstarter campaign and his friend. Filmmaker verner hertzog offer to produce his kickstarter pitch angelo guy who is a central cisco blacksmith. Artisan his renascent forage has become a center of cooking. Many of the great shifts of america gravitate his philosophy of kochi. Brings us back to the timeless essentials of organic food. I'm jay lewis like medieval man. Who makes his own wine. And krupa cures his own olives and meet and make salami in forages each season. He roasts wild boar or for his friends in his smoothie. He's constantly gathering all the fresh wild things. Nature has to offer and a long time ago. Here's created his own spice salt. He calls it. Only four in many great chefs use it. Oh since so many friends steal the delicious stuff from his kitchen. Angelo has decided to put it out of the market off on angeles food is organic. He knows we eat too much and in particular too much sugar too much salt. Too much fat. Unjaded assault has spices inorganic. wild family. That because of the spices us much less his grandmother in sicily generations before her new. This already taught him the secret ingredients. You can see verner herzog's video which we love at kitchen sisters dot org hunting and gathering with angela. Kara was produced by the kitchen. Sisters mixed by. Jim mckee in collaboration with jay. Allison laura culture capable. C'mon and the suburbans and vicky merrick angelo's fellow forager's were bob karoo stobbe carbonate and taking knickerbocker special. Thanks to the national endowment for the arts art works. The kitchen sisters present is produced by the kitchen sisters with nathan dalton and brandy how he can follow us on twitter at kitchen sisters or share your photo on instagram. You can see photos of angelo in his metal forge and recipes for wild fennel cakes or chini pasta aunt. Cecilia poached eggs at kitchen. Sisters dot org. Ray you can also see debut and full deaf blind. The gallia ask the kitchen. Sisters present is part of radio. Tokyo from p. r. x. a collective of the best story driven creative cutting edge radio shows on her. Oh and the story of waiting for jeb dementia. That i told you about at the beginning episode thirty one. Don't miss it radio x.

sicily Nikki silva joe dimaggio angelo gara angelo garowe san francisco two decades dave nelson Angela s pechiney forty dollars Lavery verner thirty minutes bob bob america bob dole turkey vining mellberg
Identifying the right time to PIVOT to a new business model.

OC Talk Radio

23:26 min | 1 year ago

Identifying the right time to PIVOT to a new business model.

"It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting in between you and the life few onto live CD medic. Target your pain at its source. It's fast acting relief with active. OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp oil get get back to your life with CBD medic available online and at CBS these statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease intercom wants more than Nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took that little chat bubble in the corner website and packed it with automatic meeting booking and data capture on leads conversational bots and more intercom user elegant themes added Intercom to their site and now converts twenty five percent of leads through live chat go to intercom dot com slash deals to jump on customer intent in the moment then see everything else intercom can do that's intercom dot com slash deals Welcome back. You're riding along. The surf with all of us. Here is Dr Gordon came out of the Bath Sea of ideas here. Thank you everyone for joining us for those of you. Grinding it out hitting your number trying to hit your number and thanks for joining us live in in the middle of your work day on the funnel media radio network. Thank you everyone for joining us and every episode of the Sales Pipeline Radio past present future always available at sales pipeline radio DOT COM. We are featuring some of the arrested. Brightest minds in sales and marketing. Today is no different we are continuing e. Oman apparently we had the an Eeo an entrepreneur organization member and and the founder of one eight hundred got junk last week today we have the CO founder. CEO of guidance Angel Dave Nelson joining us today. Dave thanks so much for joining us on sales five radio. Yeah thanks for having me excited to have you on the show have wanted to get you want for a while to talk about a number of topics in the last week. We talked an awful lot about entrepreneurs and talk about just sort of the tenacity. It takes to just be a professional but also be an entrepreneur. You have been doing this for a very long time. You know you were your own book making the jump into small obese ownership which would encourage people to check out but really want to spend tonight run just get into the conversation here with Dave Nelson from financial. They've been around for almost sixteen years helping small businesses just grow with the financing options and they WanNa talk a little bit about so that your entrepreneurial journey you know before we get into sort of how you build a sales and marketing engine you know what was it about about this topic. That was a passion for you. Just give a quick story of sort of where you started and how you've gotten to this point today sure we'll mind like many entrepreneurs was accidental so I was developing real estate here in Washington State and had an opportunity to raise some additional funds and as I was talking to an attorney one day she suggested that I look at self directed. IRA or retirement plans as a way to help people invest in real estate and through a process of expiration discovery realized that not only can people invest retirement assets in in real estate but they can invest in things like small businesses and private mortgages and tax liens and so we actually initially launch guide into help people do that invest in alternative of assets over time though what happened was my profound and I realized that we weren't really as passionate about those alternative investments we were the businesses themselves and so in of course of sort of figuring out what our model was going to be in connecting with our customers we realized that the real gap in the marketplace wasn't helping individuals who are looking to buy or start a business and needed needed between about one hundred K and a million dollars to do that. There's a real gap in terms of being able to access capital and so in addition to helping them use retirement assets we've built an SBA capability in unsecured secured credit and so we sort of evolved as we went from more traditional or alternative financial services to really a small business financing organization but it was it was accidental until I actually have in my office here a piece of paper and they say people start businesses on the back of the NAPKIN. I've got a drawing and that was really our initial business plan from the get-go that's and one thing that stood out to me in that conversation something. I know a lot of people face either in their businesses are in their career and that's the idea of a Friday the idea that you see an opportunity and sometimes as you you know you move from what you were doing something different. I think in hindsight those successful pivots always look like a slam dunk in the moment they're not it is clear cut choice. Could you talk a little bit about that. Moment of being that pitted what you had to go through to sort of mentally to do that and I think I'm thinking about that not just for those that might be entrepreneurs are thinking about stepping on their own but people that are you know looking at their own even sales and marketing careers and phasing opportunity that isn't certain sometimes it's scary Gary. I always love how we talk about it. As a moment of time like there's this moment where you pivoted and everything changed. The reality is when I talk about the fact that our business shifted. That was a five five year process so it's something that you know like you start to see. Hey this doesn't really connect for me and I'm wondering if this is the right path for us and then over time what we saw is that we were investing more and more time and energy in the small business component of our operation and less and less than the alternative you start to see these resource conflicts that came up within the business those that were working on the real estate side. Were you know concerned that maybe they weren't getting the time and attention and so eventually we divested we sold that portion of the business to accompany who wanted to continue continue to grow and expand in that area and that would ultimately best for our customers best for our team members on that side it would give the existing organization the remaining organization a chance to focus in on who cudi really wanted to serve and who we wanted to long-term. I'd like to say that it was a moment in time but the reality is it was a long painful decision because you're talking about people you know your clients your employees and and you know as entrepreneurs you have this sort of emotional attachment to this thing that you're building not easy no not easy at all and I think we've probably in the whole show talking on the concept of pivot. Give it as a process which I think is something that a lot of people that have been through that will successfully and unsuccessfully can talk about but I want to cover today and we talked before you know as we sort talk about what the all the different topics could cover in this conversation. I WanNa talk about the sales and marketing engine. You have built a lot of people you start the business you start to figure out what are people looking for. What is our sales process. Look like as you've grown the business successfully over the last sixteen years you really have developed an engine for growth that not only supporting your growth but the growth goals but also you're doing it without making cold calls. You're doing it without having to do a lot of complicated. Sometimes it's just frustrating outbound selling efforts. I wanted to talk a little bit about sort of how you came to that. Process how you've been able to sort of systematize and scale that yeah well let me start by just talking philosophically ah no offence to those that are listening to this podcast but in general I hate being so there's a stigma in general with and I'm using air quotes you can't see it but with sales people because I personally don't like going through the process of trying to hold and so when we designed our system initially you know I was chief. Cook and bottle Washer because when we started this thing was just two of us and I was the one one that was focused on sort of developing in generating revenue engine and so I had to build a system that allowed me to play to my strengths but also felt like it was the right thing for our client. We were fortunate in that. We started this business at a time that our industry was a little bit immature. Just there wasn't a ton of competition and so we had the benefit of having a lot of tension interest and not a lot of competition for those individuals and so the things that I tried to do was make sure that we were providing good information to the marketplace. We're meeting people where they wanted to consume that information so we're providing lots of different ways and then making it easy for them to engage with us and so that system sort of built under the premise of of making it simple for people to engage. I and not having them feel sold. So you know we are a financial firm so we are helping people look at ways that they can capitalize the business but we try to take more of a care and empathy approach the clinical one. I've heard a lot of people characterized that approaching different ways and one of the ways I've heard that is you know you're not selling your helping. I'm curious how you think about about that moment when you do in some cases even if you're providing value to someone even if you're sort of sort of coming to a mutually beneficial agreement when even when you're sort of enabling some outcome they care about their they're still as part of that is the moment of getting close. I assume you're not just waiting for them to on their own volition say yes even as we sit here on the last day January. I'm sure you are staring at the dashboard and coping the hit a certain number not just hoping and praying it happens but also putting things in place to compel people to make a decision now versus next month now versus later how you you bring those together. How do you provide a very customer centric benefit outcome oriented process but still managed to close It's a good question Russian and it's one that I think we struggled with for a long period of time. I can tell you what works for us and that is taking a little bit longer perspective so for example a moment ago. You made the comment about me. He's staring at a dashboard. Well we actually work off quarterly targets in quarterly plans versus monthly ones because I personally wasn't a big fan of every single month us having these real big ebbs and flows in terms of our energy and effort and sales and just put extra stress on the team and so we built our sales engine to have a little bit longer perspective active in addition to that we wanted to make sure that while we provide lots of potential services that are compensation strategy doesn't cater towards one of those products any more than the others and so we wanted to make sure that people could be objective about what they are suggesting a client consider the other thing that I would say is that the way that we generate our business is with a lot of sort of inbound inbound marketing tactics and a big part of that is our channel Ray now about fifty percent of our businesses either coming from customer referrals channel referrals the big number and so we have to take oh really good care of those customers because we're travels fast. It'll for us. We've tried to take that long view. Make sure that our internal practices and plans certainly certainly support that and then make sure that we understand that we are serving a base where our reputation is going to either enable or disable our ability to grow gave Nelson. He's the CO founder. CEO of guided financial and row quick before we have to take a quick commercial break here you know we talked about the machine guys bill from a marketing standpoint in and you know one of the metrics you guys look at is appointment set so not just sort of those inbound leads an inbound requests but the number of appointments get sort of move things along talk a little bit about how. Oh you think about. How do you characterize appointments to make sure that those aren't just sort of a you know. It's not just a number that is something that the prospect themselves isn't doozy. He asked me well yeah so I'll take I'll try and do this really quickly. We can dig in after the break if we need to but you know we generate a tremendous amount of leads on on a monthly basis and so we have to be very careful who we are spending our time with and so we have a team of individuals who spend their time calling down on these people that have inquired about all the stuff that we do and try and extract a little bit of information to understand whether or not we are potentially a good fit about half the time we realized we're actually not a great fit and so it's both in our interest and this is perspective small business owners interest to give them resources to help them continue their search and maybe get where they want to go but recognize that we're probably not the right company to do that for them. Those that do though qualify in meaning that we think we could potentially be a good fit then we set these appointments and so the appointments that are more of a deep dive. We're really giving our golden educating the client on the ways that they could capitalize their business because this is a very high stakes transaction for individuals arguing the largest investment that they will make in their lifetime so it is not a sales process. It really is an educational educational one so they're excited that there's something from it. That's awesome. I think that's the only way you can do it and do it successfully when you know if you set in the point with someone and that day comes and they've got you know other fire drills and things that they're supposed to be doing if they don't know why they're setting up to that point or what they're going to get out of it. It's a lot easier just to blow it off but if they know they're going to learn and they're gonNA get some insights they're going to get some value remained committed to the process and the appointment we got a lot more coming up here with Nielsen the CO founder and CEO Guided Financial. We're GONNA talk about the content strategy they've put together and how that's been successful helping drive their inbound leads. We're GONNA be talking about internal culture and why that's important to building a successful sales and marketing engine and why it's been so important to guide us. We'll be right back after paying a couple of bills here. This is sales pipeline radio What's his insight driven messaging. Look like for sales like a whole lot more deals fast jump on high insent leads in the moment with intercom the the Business Messenger that extends the reach of your team twenty four seven entercom creates more opportunities for you by booking meetings and collecting data from leads leads automatically take intercom user elegant themes they now convert twenty five percent of leads through Intercom S- messenger deals. Don't wait get them with Intercom Goto ENTERCOM DOT COM slash deals. That's entercom dot com slash deals conversations. Dave Nelson the CO founder and CEO Guided Financial and I want to get to some of your content because if anybody that's listening it is an entrepreneur working in a small business. You know whether or not you're looking for funding has an awful lot to learn from the content you create will want some of that out in a minute but I wanNA talk about culture because I think that topic we're going to cover over next week with Alex around. You know hitting the number but doing it. The right way I know is a big focus of yours with your your co founder and partner. You know winning best places to work. I know with a huge source of pride or you talk a little bit about the importance of culture and what you've done to build a culture that will silicate the sales success growth and yes. I say this to nearly every single new team member that we bring on my personal belief. Is you spend more time at work than you do with your family. So you better enjoy what you do. Believe in what you're providing market enjoy the people that you work with. We work really hard to foster a culture here that is passionate about the entrepreneurs that we serve or wants to invest in the community that we all sort of live and work in every single day and ultimately make a difference in the lives of these people that are starting businesses and creating jobs taking ownership tip over their own life so it's very important because I would take personally someone that great cultural fit over agreed skills fit any if you check out you know the guided financial pages and even on lengthy and you see a lot of great examples of sort of the investment you've made in your people the growth you put into not just growth of the company but also in new markets so you know just recently earlier this month you guys launching a new new office in Boise Idaho Idaho and really contributing to a number of different markets in providing jobs in great cultures for a lot of people what you also see on that Lincoln page. There is a lot of the great you have just scroll down and you see topics on the top five startups of last year and what you can learn from them. You see the you know the value of hiring with emotional intelligence and there's a wide variety of content and I set this up somewhat not it is not about funding. It doesn't go right for the approach say. Would you like to expand your business. Can we provide funding. You clearly have put a focus on your content strategy on providing a wide variety of guy who had a content for your target. You talk a little bit about the strategy behind that how you've been able to successfully convert that into pipeline and new business well let me start with our content strategy and sort of some of the core tenants behind that I mean if you look at the vision that we have our vision is to increase the number of people that succeed in small business. It has nothing to do with helping them access capital giving them money. That's a catalyst I the reason they come to us. They come to us because they wanNA open a business. They want to take control over their lives and their their financial futures and invest in themselves. That's why they come to us and so so you know for us the way that we serve them in the way that we generate value per se in that is by helping them access capital but where we can best serve them as by educating indicating them and helping them understand as that they could be more successful as a business owner. It's also a way that we reach more of these perspective. Entrepreneurs answer to nurture them over time is by providing them great content. Just like you pointed out there. We WanNa make sure that we're covering the gamut of issues that affect small business owners not just the thing that is self serving and intentional strategy right to be able to build some value in his part of that knowing that some of your prospects that are highly qualified as prospects just aren't ready to buy today talk a little a bit about sort of that. TACO funnel strategy and how it relates to the timing of when people may or may not be ready to engage in sort of a an actual purchase decision or at least purchase which is process well. It's funny so we survey our customers. Every singer sorry are prospect every single year and we asked them the question. Where are you on your process but we'll blow. We do the same anything with our customers and what we find from our customers. Is the number one reason they bought a businesses because an opportunity presented itself now. That's pretty that's pretty interesting because we generate thousands. Sali's per month a significant number of them won't move forward right away and so what that means that they're thinking about this. They're open to the idea but they haven't found the right opportunity for us. We sort of play the mortgage professional role a real estate transaction so somebody could be looking online at red vendors zillow that can be working with an agent. They don't actually need to really get a mortgage until they found a transaction the deal to do and so for us as people are starting to think about this and dream about it they start searching the web looking for information and so this is part of acquisition strategies to provide good relevant relevant credible content to the market that helps move them towards the transaction over time and of course once we've had an opportunity to capture a little bit of information than we certainly make sure that we continue we need to keep our information in front of them so that when the time is right our hope is that we've established a level of trust and credibility with them that they'll want to engage a couple more minutes detail what they have. Nelson Co founder and CEO Guided Financial. We've been talking about you know the key components of building a a scalable sales engine in part of that is the people themselves not just the culture you provide for the organization overall but the very people you hired a begin with. Can you talk a little bit about what are some of the attributes that you look for in a successful sales the rapid you continue to scale your inside sales team. You know you may be looking for experience but what are the components are. After beats of new sales rep that you've seen that most lead to success in your organization yeah so when I'm doing interviews with ourselves professionals there's really I don't know four to five attributes that I'm on personally looking to assess. Certainly I wanNA understand understand like do they. Have some experience have seen success in the past doing this but the things that I really care about is are they a learner you know what are they doing to stay sharp on sort of modern auburn practices. How are they continued to stretch and grow themselves. the second is actually try to find a way inside of that to role play so that we can actually do some live coaching coach ability in my opinion is one of the greatest keys of success for someone who's going to take on a sales career and then you know knowing that. Guidon is a dynamic and evolving organization one of our core values. I uses adaptability. We need people who are willing to sort of roll with the changes and adapt as we try and fail and succeed in various ways and then the the the fourth is a level of humility understanding of coup they are and where they're strong and where they need support or where they can get better and the final one is just a passion entrepreneurship. No matter where you work is good as the culture can be as fun as it is. Sometimes it actually does feel like a job and so you've still got to be passionate about the role that you play in the customers. I you serve so those are the things that I look when I'm talking to potentially hiring someone in a sales to pass a great list and I think you know I think oftentimes especially when people look for Sales Reps. We look at their past experience. We want to see that they've been successful telling somewhere else in is for those that have built and run sales organization. You learn the hard way that just past experience does not mean they're necessarily going to be successful full industry in your culture in different environments. I think those attributes oftentimes are better indicators or whether someone's going to be successful and scale and growing your business. Well just just a almost out of time here but I want to ask you one final question. I think you mentioned one of the attributes you look for in new hires that you look for people that are hungry and people that are lifelong learners yourself as a learner and I know oh just just knowing you know you continue to be learner. You read and you always WanNa learn new things who are some of the people that stand out in your learning experience in your history learning the people that are either authors or mentors pass managers. They can be alive or dead. People you might recommend others listening to the show look for and keep an eye out for or or seek to get some guidance and learning as well sure well a couple of people come to mind right out of the gate so one is a gentleman named. Alexa SASME LEX was the founder a commission junction. He wrote a book called Organizational Physics the science behind growing a business so he takes rules of science and applies them to growing business. I love his concepts in terms of how he thinks about product development designing the sort of organizational structure and some of the processes that you can implement in order to run a business more efficiently patiently sow for your listeners out there. Lexus knee is probably the single greatest mentor that I've had in my professional life that I would say is one of the books that I subscribe to the concepts concepts and just personally feel like a lot of our businesses designed around is the Toyota way so the purpose of using lean methodology to learn fast not launch. It's fast. It's something that we try to live every single day so there's to one person and one resource that I think anyone who wants to learn about what it takes to own and operate a small business would find really really interesting. I think there's a lot of concepts that apply to those that want to remain in a revenue generating real love it love it. Well thank you so much for that. We will put links to those resources in our show pronounce it in the blog post. We put on this as well so if you liked what you heard today from Danielson on this episode of Sales Pipeline Radio we will have this entire episode of course up available on demand ended sales pipeline radio DOT COM in a couple of days. We'll also have a summary of this conversation on our blog. At Heinz Marketing Dot Com along with links guided financial web page you can see more of their content strategy firsthand as well as some of the resources names recommended that have been influential to him so thanks so much for joining us today we will be back next week with more from deep in the heart of the Upper Midwest in the hopefully not quite as called polar vortex but very excited for conversation with workfront. CEO Alex shoots route of time for today. Thanks so much joining us for another episode Food Sales Pipeline Radio for my great producer policy highs. We'll see you next week. You've been listening to another episode. The sales pipeline radio right here in the funnel Radio Network for listeners like thank you brought to you by the good folks at Matt Hines Hines Marketing. It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking in your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting in between you in the life you want to live. CD medic targets your pain at its source it's fast acting relief with active tasty ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp oil get back to your life with CBD medic available online at CBS. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease. It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting in between you in the life you want to live. CB medic target your pain at its source. It's fast acting relief with active. OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp boiled get back to your life with CBD medic available online and at CBS these statements eight minutes have not been evaluated by the F._D._A. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease.

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135 - Deep Fried Fuel - A Biodiesel Kitchen Vision - Celebrating Over the Road

The Kitchen Sisters Present

20:52 min | 1 year ago

135 - Deep Fried Fuel - A Biodiesel Kitchen Vision - Celebrating Over the Road

"Radio welcome to the kitchen. Sisters present six where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva fans of masterpiece on PBS. To Catch Sandton a bold and lavish adaptation of Jane Final and unfinished novel Airing Sundays nine. Eight central from January twelfth through February twenty third. Be sure to check out the masterpiece studio podcast which will feature exclusive interviews with with the Sandton cast. That's PS dot org slash masterpiece studio or wherever you get your podcasts. This episode of the kitchen and sisters present is part of a special Radio Topa wide project welcoming the next radio topiary show into the family. It's called over the road and it tells the story of American long haul truckers a changing industry and the culture of daily life on the road in celebration of over the road. The kitchen sisters are hitting the road revisiting. Some of our favorite hidden kitchens Texas pitstops first step a truck stop at Carl's Corner Texas on I thirty five five between Dallas and Austin where Willie Nelson introduced bio Willie in two thousand four willies friend. Carl Cornelius founded Carl's corner in in Nineteen eighty-four in order to sell liquor in a mostly dry county. He opened up a truck. Stop at truckers haven and tourist attraction with hot tubs and dancing girls and in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven. Willie held his legendary fourth of July. Picnic Carl's corner but a few years later following a fire in some major setbacks. Ed Baxter the place fell on hard times. That's where our story begins. The kitchen sisters present deep fried fuel a biodiesel kitchen envision Carl Carl's corner truckstop. Carl Texas that's just a little truck. Stop doing out of Dallas received out of a green and this used to have a swimming pool right in the middle of it hot bone stage head. Girls stand on a hidden. Google peanut butter. There was a good time here. Rick would you put on number two there for me. This is a record. They wrote about with a dreamer number. took a Ako Willie Nelson call me one time. Said what are you doing and I said Willie shutting down what. I'm all set the truckstop. Now he's a will. Carleton shut it down. Shut the DADGUM thing. The next morning mingay comes it. Don't shut it down. And he said Carl you WANNA put one of your lanes in out. There is bound as I said. What do you believe in the damn stuff Willie Nelson also? Let's do the whole thing. I'll be made of Casper Bain or peanut Alvin cholesterol. Anything like that. Sunflower seeds mustard seed when he said that California right. Now Yeah also it can be made out of the grease traffic restaurant. Willie's wife Anne. Put The bug in his head a few years ago when she saw bio-diesel. The articles on Maui Willie's touring bus runs on vegetable oil and bio Willie now. My name is Joe Nick Petoskey. I've been writing about about Texans for about thirty five years. biodiesel is You'll that made out of stuff you can grow and vegetable oil kitchen race. Everybody uses a lot of grace. The whole concept would read off diesel back in the early days was the one that perfected to diesel engine and it ran off of peanut battle and then the big boys come along and all that but they like it so it took over where Rudolph left. I'll just touching union finger. Naxi tasted mazy. Run an eighteen wheeler on it. Do we take soybean oil that comes out of mailing the Midwest and then we refine it. I'm Peter Bell with distribution of founder of the Bio Willie Brand in Dallas. Texas calls is really the place where it started and we were the first place anywhere in the country selling be twenty two truck which is twenty percent bodies eighty percent. These feel we might no longer be known. As Tech Stephen Texas Blah Olga bill diesel smoke incurs. No Job de eh money Larry Fowler. I'm out to Saint Louis Missouri. And we're in college going to truckstop. How Chemicals on the TATUM? Salt Hashers Material Alta doc diesel berms cleaner emissions. Not as much coming out the exhaust air. Chance I get I get it. Thank our politicians sodas out get away from the foreign oil more not at the foreign oil company runners bio diesel ripple mouth that Jews would I this is our land of freedom. It should be obvious to everyone. We're running out of dinosaur wine this Kinky Friedman. I'm compassionate Redneck. I'm sixty one years old. Which is too young for Medicare and too old for women to care by the band? The Texas Jew boys and I'm I'm Running for governor here in Texas Willie would be my chief of the new Texas Energy Commission of all the ten or twelve particles that they've isolated it make Houston. The number one polluted city in America. Diesel is the worst. My Name's Chris Powers. I'm the founder of Houston biodiesel. I teach a class on and how to make bow diesel safely in your own home. You know the kitchen way because you can make it in a blender in your kitchen to now wouldn't use that blender nder again for a Margarita or anything but you have a sacrificial blender want the recipe one liter of vegetable. Does Elise folks out there. Doing what's called homebrew eight grams of potassium hydroxide. People go collect this oil from restaurants Donald's dumpsters donut places as they take it home. Filter Israel with coffee builders reacted with an alcohol. Just like we do in a big refinery. Also the Dr Pepper method that you take to leader Dr Pepper boxes. whole-home leader his help is will basically stop at the United States? Cottage Industry. How you doing riding around very North Carolina into Virginia right now? I was on Bill Mex- trucking show and XM radio not too long ago and it was Willie Wednesday Willie calls in and takes calls from listeners largely truckers for you today. Were you aware that there is a glut of Dana. I thought the parking. There's nothing don't be done with them either stored away that. Don't sound right right. If you make filed all all anybody was talking about was biodiesel how this is such a good thing for the family farmer for rural communities in general just to hear the truckers talk about. It gave me hope Carlson. Texas won't all that fuel city. We want to be totally independent of everything. We wind power solar power bio-diesel power soy beans in the farmers and the truckers get bored in a big way to soccer. MOMS will will not be far behind. It's a way of having clean energy. I mean these are reachable stars. Thanks there was an incident in Colorado. Where a bear attacked biodiesel truck because it smelled like French fries and this is the downside biodiesel and we'll be right back with the Stop but fuel city from hidden kitchens Texas hosted by Willie Nelson the kitchen? Sisters present is sponsored by Sikora a nutrition company that focuses on overall wellness. Starting with what you eat their organic ready to eat meals. are made with plant based ingredients the menu of creative chef crafted breakfasts lunches and dinners changes weekly and it's delivered fresh anywhere in the US along with delicious meals. Cigar also has daily wellness essentials like supplements and herbal teas to support your nutrition to boost results. Try the best-selling metabolism Elizabeth super powder and all natural remedy for bloating weight gain and fatigue. Right now Sikora is offering our listeners. Twenty percent off their first order when they go to Macara dot com slash kitchen sisters. That's Kara S. A. K. A. R. A. dot com slash kitchen sisters to get twenty percent off your first order. You're welcome to hidden kitchens Texas stories about the world of Secret Rick unexpected below the radar community cooking across the lone star state produced by the kitchen sisters with ut in Austin and NPR. I'm your host Willie Nelson you stories come from Texas where I grew up in St live there about ice houses and truck stops Chili Queens and the oil barrel barbecues about biodiesel made from restaurant threesome foreign corrupt. About the birth of the Frito the birth of the slurpee the birth the frozen Margarita Texas stories of land family in place seven was received at two ten. Am Saturday this. Is Brian getting a gas station. In Dallas Texas called you'll city okay down on the Levee just outside of downtown Dallas these ten buffalo there and they have cows grazing right there on the levee within sight of them down. There's a little video window in the side side of the service station and they have a career in there they cook them all night. Texas tacos. Thank you I'm Robin Right Pan and I was born in Dallas the home of fuel city. If you have owned a gas station it might look a little like this. I'm John Benda. You'll city downtown. Dallas I'm in the business of selling gas and beer so I thought it would be neat to have an attraction and have a station to this one show. We know what Dallas looked like a hundred years ago. We've got Ten acres I put in. A longhorns went around the country and got the biggest longhorns in the world she can walk right up to him. The older they are the bigger the horns and this went over here. Looks like he's dead. He's a snapping part of Texas. They might put a all will there. And then I put in swimming pool over here. And I've got waterfalls shooting up. have girls sitting out by the pool as you can see. They're Fu bombers that this lay the pool away with the customers and from the interstate you can see people drive by and they can see the girls in the pool. It's probably more of attraction that happen to animals out in back. The in twenty eight cars and trucks can feel up at one time truckers come by a twenty four seven and they can eat they can go part of drug and stay for the night women. We're we're we're back on Theresa. They guaranteed she's got this little bitty ice chests. She's selling hot tamales to these people coming by them mm-hmm when the first cost approaching things. I get pretty busy all day. The gas the beer we have people who south born put sour cream chili and maintenance. My Name is Norma domingus right is around talk a lot of business the nights I have a DJ outside and he's jamming and play music Got A place to be seen you ever see from these e Eh well out there. I'm Robin Wright. Penn was born in Dallas Fort Worth Airport Hospital Hospital. My mother took US everywhere with her. She worked for Mary Kay cosmetics. My grandfather raised charlie cows so he was way out. in Venus honest Texas everybody would come back to the farm the big summer reunion you would do hot water cornbread. Hush Puppies Fried Okra. You do chicken fried steak with that. My Grandmother was the cook. Your whole day was prepping for lunch and then dinner and most of that meal was starch and all the aunts and uncles would come to have lunch on a Saturday and I remember my grandmother saying okay. Let's just go down the list. We have everything they Most CDESR give themselves a name or handle to be used to identify themselves to other. CB News on the air the cowboy. Here I'll get the handle. Should be one of the kind based on something special in your life. One nine hundred a man in addition to handles garrison. CB terms in common use was meanings. You'll find useful. Take mental notes. These keywords will be used again later in the recording advertising police car using lights and siren coming up fast in Dalian Guy and he's advertising foreshore your brown bottle of beer. Hey got time for battle with the next short shirt camera radar Dr used by police. Michael One tree won the campaign. He taking pictures for sure coupon speeding traffic traffic ticket. Double Nickel fifty five miles per hour. We made it into double nickels comeback. Back go go juice or motion lotion gasoline or if you've got to get the motionless for this year four wheel but my name is Paula. Era was chef went cafe what Taga Texas we are between route Snow Denton highway in the CONACO gas station. We are the CONACO gas station. There was the only way we could get a bank loan. We really early a tried to get along to buy restaurant and banks to give loans for restaurant. Thanks for giving out loans left and right for convenience stores so we decided okay. We'll open up a gas station station and we'll put a kitchen in the back pretty soon which is kind of pushed the convenience store smaller and smaller and got a few more tables and now the place on our special board. We have duck lamb chops stuff New York strip. ESCARGOT come meet. The missus ran saw France as is a from Nigeria. I'm cooking lamb. I'm cooking shepherd's Pie. Chicken Fried Steak for the local and I love to see the excitement people's faces when they leave the idea of somebody come in to gas station to make food has changed to where people look at eating out. I decides chef point. Just want to prove a point. It's not about location. If the food is wonderful people will travel the distance to come and here we are sending clinical guys got take in the name's David close barbecue. PIT manufacturer here in Houston Texas called bling bling. It's a standard mobile pip. Feeds needs about probably six hundred people twenty foot trailer seven Foot Wide Scott Twenty four karat. Gold mags handles. Had A friend of mine dip electroplating goal bill has a two by four foot sliding state grill on the nose and fish fry burner for doing you know deep fried Turkey subpoenaed all bull and cord fried catfish. It's got gas injection hundred sixty thousand. BTU for ladies man cooking on top of the fire boxes of one inch solid Granite Lazy Susan whole pots of coffee. It's perfect temperature. Temperature for keeping them warm. Go Round back. We've got an infrared grill. That cooks two thousand degrees for new cowboy steak behind that you have gold sinks twenty twenty four x three satellite dish has got a DVR record holder hunter motion-picture DVD players. Satellite Radio Satellite TV. This is solar overpowered as well as electric cars run the lice. TV radio and all that off of solar power. The lighting on the trailer will flash to music and we can even check his Co. comes out of the faucets. You don't have to do anything you don't have to play in anything. You don't even have to have food all I have to do pull that Pity on a cul de sac and get out lighted and people will start showing up with Fu Hay Bales People party at the drop of a hat the the paint job on the trailers Ferrari metal flake burgundy should last. About one hundred years I coulda had a Maserati or this barbecue pit now. What texted would've picked them as a Rottie? None of this is forever. This is always going to be here. Maybe they'll find it hundreds of years from now and wondering what the hell this was. Uh we'll stop until I mean everything in the world into a barbecue one on the moon. I've talked to the administrator of NASA ceramic fiber finish finish with platinum coils inside with solar panels probably oxygen picks environment inside when people in I want them to see the world's first close interplanetary real that seems I'll give them the rest of the money I make sure rest of my life with to put one on the moon for me that I mean. That's a scratch on the a plan that you were here the rest of Luke. The kitchen sisters present is produced by the kitchen. Sisters David Nelson and Nikki Silva With Nathan Dalton and Brandy the kitchen sisters present is part of Radio Tokyo from P. R. X.. A curated network of extraordinary cutting edge. PODCASTS created by independent producers. This episode is part of Special Radio Topa wide project welcoming the next radio. Tokyo show into the family in partnership with overdrive magazine over. The road gives voice to the trials and triumphs of America's truckers. I've driven a truck for almost forty years now. There was some help from the good folks at radio. Tokyo and overdrive magazine. I'm going to take you along for a ride. I going deep into the world of trucking. We're a family. Love Marie that lead to hear stories of the past ask you need to step away for strings on the ceremony changing today. It's the freedom of it and that's kind of being taken away. I'm long-haul Paul and this is over the road. First Episode Rose Out February twentieth forever. Ever you find your podcasts to find out more and subscribe head to over the Road Dot F._M.. THANKS FOR LISTENING RADIO TO X.

Texas Willie Nelson Willie Dallas Carl Carl United States Carl Texas Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva America Carl's Corner Texas Sandton Houston Austin Texas Google David Nelson founder Carl Cornelius Midwest Ed Baxter
157  Chido GoveraThe Mushroom Queen of Zimbabwe

The Kitchen Sisters Present

26:35 min | 6 d ago

157 Chido GoveraThe Mushroom Queen of Zimbabwe

"Radio welcome to the kitchen sisters present x. Where the kitchen sisters. Dave nelson n. nikki silva the kitchen. Sisters present is brought to you by honey. The free browser extension scours the internet for promo codes and applies the best one that finds to your cart. So let's say you're shopping than when you check out the honey button drops down and all you have to do is click apply coupons. If they find a working coupon you'll watch the price drop then. It applies it automatically. I found a pair of running shoes. Honey found thirty dollars off coupons. Honey supports over thirty thousand stores online. If you don't already have honey you could be straight up missing out on free savings it's free and installs and a few seconds and by getting it. You'll be doing yourself a solid and supporting this podcast. Get hunt for free at join honey dot com slash kitchen sisters. That's join honey dot com slash kitchen sisters a year or so back. We were in sao paulo for fructose. To- raincoat something just showing extraordinary brazilian cherry alex atala famous from net flicks chef table summoned the international gathering to go deep into the issues of food zero waste agriculture and climate the rights and foods of indigenous people of the amazon. The conference was a global of so. I'm on the. Da's good is has especially more work I live in laguna come from china. Maybe i'm a former speaker. After speaker from around the world. Shafts activists fishermen amazonian travel women organizers. Botanists spoke of issues and solutions. The speaker who struck us most was a mushroom farmer from zimbabwe. So i have a lot of hope. And i trust but the future would be better than where we are today and it is veto was orphaned at seven. When her mother died of aids and met the life cheadle made the life that followed is one of the more brave and determined. We've witnessed some people look at a mushroom and see a mushroom. Some people look at a mushroom and see a weapon for social change a path out of hunger and poverty to empowerment an income for herself and other orphan girls a mushroom farmer. A food activist business entrepreneur of foster mother to more than a dozen girls. Cheeto vera is a kitchen visionary a pioneer in the cultivation of mushrooms throughout africa and the world today. The kitchen sisters present cheeto the mushroom wing of zimbabwe. My name is cheetah guevarra. And i am the pound off the future hope. I am also anti cheater to michael's at the future of foundation. I grew up in rural zimbabwe in morandi not very far away from the diamond fields so i always make jokes with people and say i am the diamond call from but unfortunately regardless of the diamonds and all that is It was really poor village. It's still is so. I found myself as a young orphan in that village doing anything that the goal could do to get a ball of maize now at the age of nine. I realized that. I could not balance between digging other people's fields tending to my own filled. Fishing watch out for me fishing firewood for my family and for the people so i decided to leave school and concentrate full-time on taking care of my grandmother. My little brother and myself making sure that we had something to eat. My uncle would not let me leave the village just like that because the had to be some kind of transaction that took place for him to let go of me and not transaction meant that i had a good marriage because if i get married he gets a few kettle. Get some money for him. It was more beneficial than when. I just leave to go and find a job. So i received an offer to marry to marry a man who was that he is older than me. I was ten years old. I was opposed to meet this guy. He would have a blue car and long story. This is a a time in my culture way. If a man marries you and they pay paula that's a bride price. It doesn't matter what you think of feel about him. In the future the feminazi. Your own family had this obligation to force you to stay with you like it or not. When i sitting there considering this off i was thinking well i could go and then yes i could have food and maybe i can find a job but is it really what i want to do by loved my grandmother very much. I wanted to be with my grandmother because it was owned closest thing. I had to a mother and i had a little brother who has two years younger than me. Who depended on me. I tend to offer down. I grew up fast. I've always known that my grandmother would never leave me anything. She had nothing but she would never walk away from me. Just like that wasn't incident. Once one of my uncles was behaving a little bit strangely towards me instead of touching me with a piece of wood with fire was carrying up thirty litterbug on my hat. I realize okay. I had run to makes my grandmother woke up early morning and she packed every little thing but belong to her. She told her son my uncle. I am leaving mama. Where are you going. And she said if she cannot leave. Here i cannot live here myself. That's suppressant my head. And i knew i had customize my place of my childhood was read the place with my grandmother all the songs we sing together or the dreams we had and just always saying all you have to get married before i died and you need to marry a doctor so i can leave a little bit longer. So she was. She was this woman who really had a love for life and when she laughed it was really genuine. It was coming from the deepest point of her. She taught me to appreciate the small things in life. She had no teeth left anymore. But i never saw her sobbing. That the last of the seventies she had gone when their head turn gray. She was just beautiful confident woman and she had all this beautiful songs. She's saying was this song that she sang the story to it was that she and my grandfather. We're really a very special couple. And they married during the war and a lot of things happened in between there never really had a proper marriage when the war was over they decided to have a proper wedding. john was a stationmaster. He would come home on weekends and go back. And what did you sing. Grammar is saying to him. Stage massive data getty cheryl getty me. And he responded. Oh never bestowed in my daddy. I will see peak again. Don't ask me what that means but something about a station must not forgetting her and him promising that he will not we spoke should most of the time but when she sang her songs she was one hundred percent sure that that was english so we also spoke. Her english. mushrooms had been part of my life right from the beginning from shrooms. Insurance is whole. My grandmother was a hundred years old and they have depended on the forest to feed themselves since forever. We would go into the forest train citizen. I would run around like headless chicken collecting every mushroom my fine and putting it in front of her as she would pick the one by one she would cut them and smell them and tell me. This is an edible mushroom so you put that in that pile with dry it and we eat it later. This one is not poisonous. But it's not edible. You throw it away. He used to tell me stories about the gods of the forest. When you go into the forest and you have this mushrooms you find very old ones. That don't look attractive enough. Leave them there and cuts mushrooms. Leave part of the stem in the ground. If you're cooking inside keep the up and keep the door open mic. Why so that. The goals of the forest can give you more shrooms next year. ten away the marriage offer and eleven years old. I learned to from mushrooms. It wasn't an organization by belgian guy. Called guenter poli. The organization was called xerri zero emissions. Research is an initiatives amongst them was margaret aguirre with the africa university. This was a un funded project and margaret together with some of the african scientists. They agreed that the knowledge that we have. It's not for academic the knowledge that we have has to be shared with people who need it. The most they sent an invitation through the united methodist church. An amazing lady called loveness was A member of the church but she was also had a group of women who were helping young oftens and she's always passed by my house and she said Look business opportunity. Do you want talk to you ankle. So you can go. And i say he. S when she approached him he said no. How do i know that if she goes she will come back. She told my uncle look. I bring her bake myself and and she had to promise and he says okay. Fine if you say. It was a trading over one week and remember but clearly i went was bare food. I had my small shopping bag. And i arrived oversaw keen to me going back to school and going to attend this calls. What we lend is you take begs with corn stalks or cotton waste makes mushroom spun and you put them in a mushroom house. You water them and you'll give mushrooms and you can bring them to market lending to fund mushrooms for me. It was a way of connecting with my grandmother. She were still alive. And i started to make sense of all the things that she was saying about the spores escaping from portland spreading the stem in the ground. As it's rotting it becomes new my celia all these stories and like wow. After one week. I went back to the village was able to do. This can still see her face tasting the mushrooms for the first time. Thank you okay. This mushrooms in did. It's nothing fake. We were little scientists in the village. It was magic because nobody had heard about mushroom cultivation. Before i'd gone as part of a group of fifteen goals and it happened so fast. Thirteen of the fifteen goals got married in period. Less than six months and of course in. I'd had an of a guy with a car but it was just he said to think you want something a little bit more was eleven going twelve. I realized that. The organic waste which i had which i could not eat in my field i could convert that's into money the ankles that used to threaten me to say if you report what i did. You cannot live here anymore. The threat sort of disappeared. Because they knew as long as i am here. Whatever i get whether i like it or not. They would have a part of it. I was able to pay school fees for my brother to go to school. I was also able to pay school fees for the young orphans to go to school and that took me back to. When i was eight years old where i went into my cornfields and i was praying. I said god. I really don't like what i'm going through. And if i ever buy some way get a chance to get out of here. I would like to help other young goes. I decided to focus on learning about mushrooms and to try and simplify the arts of cultivating mushrooms. So i could really share this with people who made it when i get married if anybody asked me what i wished for. I always wanted to have a father. It was very clear to me that. When i can have a father than i have a little bit of security in terms of. Nobody can tell me that they will chase me away anymore. And then margaret was talking to guenter poly. She said look one of them has got green fingers mushroom fingers and she doesn't want to get married. What does she want tossed. And she said well she wants a father and he says okay oncoming down then. He was based in japan so he came to zimbabwe imagine. He became my adopted father and he tells me stories about how i would never say a word and he always had to read everything through my eyes when i left the village when i was twelve. My my uncle had Again the same questions some if she goes what. If it doesn't come back. It was amazing because he came up with a way. When i left a twelve face as she has to pay me she has to pay me. Two thousand five hundred dollars for taking care of her grandmother and her brother transaction that he really he always wanted to have happened. This was really mean marrying myself. So from the age of twelve. I was working in laboratory at university. I started to learn everything from tissue culture the whole process of making and substrate for growing mushrooms. And then just travelling and teaching people about it. One of my very first troops to colombia. Because they were finding mushrooms on coffee waste from the farm. After i went to some people in india i spent some time in serbia. But you know. I had always wanted to get some kind of justice because forgiveness in cases like mine isn't something that just arrives and one of the things that was clear for me was that when i can. I want to put all my uncles in jail but thanks to having a father. I was able to go to a hospital in switzerland with they diagnosed me with post traumatic stress and the doctor came to mrs look bigger problem. Is you stuck in what happened to you as a kid and you have to help yourself get out of there. When people are part of a broken society. The things that are happening in that society that also make them brooklyn people and i think we have responsibilities as a society towards this kind of people punishing them only. It's not enough. Because you know when i go to the village now. He's the same person who runs to me to give me a hug. I've never really angry at him. I feel sorry for him. I feel sorry for him. Because i realized something must have happened to him. That got him so broken. But he doesn't even have the capacity to feel any remorse. After that i. I wrote the stories of how i grew up. And that's ten into a book. And of course only person i trusted with that was my father so i send that to him and he happened to be. Visiting aleve is all who was a of ashford's and together. They had had a conference in japan in hiroshima and the title of the conference was the future of hope and measure idea behind. It was calling upon the young people to feel in the leadership gap of that time. He asked me. Do you have a title for it. And i'm like no. I says what about the future of hop immediately. I was like yes. The future of hope and i thought to myself. I want this to be something more. Because now i had the experiences from all my travels to draw from so i thought i want to show myself. What is the future of. I want to practical demonstration of that. So i created the future foundation empowering women and girls through food my name's lars williams co founder of empirical spirits in copenhagen denmark went to culinary school in cooking in new york made my way to europe is at the fat duck and then there was a small little restaurant in a corner of the world that no one really thought about for a very long. It seemed like a really exciting place to be. So i should have been a door of no money for a job. We're trying to rethink the way that we interacted with the landscape and how we would try and put time in a place on upstate. Someone you have the story of this amazing woman from zimbabwe. She's the most incredible things. She has a lovely small plot of land with a couple of houses in the front and and she doesn't fifteen when it went down on this red dirt driveway and the color of earth is something between ruby and ogre and you can just see the intensity of the earth i live on a very small plot of one hectare and a half and that piece of land happened to be run an orphanage and had at the time nine children the people supported the orphanage needed to leave the country but they were stuck with what to do with the children and so i went there and it was clear i can grow some food so i can take care of. The children took me five minutes and they all stopped. It was husband and wife and the look like this. You want to go home and ask. You'll husband worry. I don't have a husband to what about your father. Hey i will do this. So i became a mother of nine children in november twenty fourteen. I treat them. Like i would treat my children. I would never want my children to never know how to grow food. It's amazing to see them. They talk to their friends. We mushrooms at home mothers and enterpreneur. This is beautiful. Big tree in the center of her land and the girls were climbing up the tree and one of them rotunda gorging on these fruits and i said oh but underwood son jeff handed me one like one of those moments where you eat something and goosebumps and all the hair on your arm stands up and tasted like slightly. Caramelized pairs mixed with fresh sugarcane. This is the most amazing thing. I've ever had like what you guys do with it. And we tend to looks at me like you're like we eat when the things like the masan they just needed when it's in season and then a lot of these amazing traditional foods that people eat and part of their heritage and part of the culture. But it's not something that's part of the commerce and in a lot of ways. A lot of these foods are thought of as something that zimba always trying to get away from because a lot of the food that they aspire to are highly processed western food white rice or yellow maize informing. Our distillery became clear to us. That most useful thing i could do was to work with the women from eighteen other communities that you works with an i thought to myself. Well if we could just get a ton of that. I could make a really beautiful room so we sort of appealed it and strained it and cooked it down a little bit and it became this incredible pastry cream like this dosage alexei intensely flavored. And we're doing with these eighteen women. And i immediately said if you guys can do this by one ton of it right now that would be a way for us to inject some money into the process of women being able to start their own company and be able to sell that beautiful. Dotage election sanjay in. Its own right as well which we're doing in. Zimbabwe is not just a work of charity. It's not just a wacko for people who are hungry. This is a work of for people who want to contribute to something big in the world and from us when they introduce themselves. It's just like on just a pharma like it doesn't mean anything. I think for me finding producing food so important that we cannot continue to under estimate. A my personal goal is really to get enough young people excited about where they can still wear their long nails and the hills and do what they have to do in that kind of look and come back home to work the earth and make that something that they can say with pride. When we do the expression workshops we gather around together and they are free to think of any story want to share the can draw it. They can write it in a poem. They can make a song out of it. We sit together and we take turns. You find goes who's dreamed that they would like to build a house when everybody can leave. You also have stories of children who were sexually abused coming up dreaming to be a gynecologist and then we'll try them to position ourselves in a way that we can support. It's from these little experiences. The way i knew that i met you often more than just the mushrooms. We're trying to provide like an avenue for them to take pride in what they're doing take pride in their culture take pride in their lives and take their own to stay in their hands when they go to make self. It's always like pull a cart out of the ground. Unnamed holds with the car so they have really a healthy relationship was growing on food and of course when they met laws a lot of them want to be shifts and so they said. I want to be a chef. But i also want to have my own front. I want to be an artist. But i want to have a restaurant. They have really developed this love. And i'm pretty sure that they would never be those kind of goes who think because of my long. I can never bro what we do. She took over the mushroom. Queen of zimbabwe was produced by the kitchen sisters. Jvm nelson n. nikki. Silva and evan jacoby in collaboration with nathan dalton brandy howl and kate wary and mixed by jim mckee special thanks to the creators of fruteau one of the most inspirational conferences. We've had the privilege to attend chef. An activist alex atala and philippi. We've been home. And thanks especially to cheat a goal vera and lars williams and the. No mclean in denmark. You can find out more about cheeto and the future of hope on our website. Kitchen sisters dot org funding comes from the national endowment for the humanities and listener contributions to the kitchen sisters productions. We thank you deeply for making these global stories possible. The kitchen sisters present. His part of the radio topi podcast network from paper ex. A collection of independent story driven. Podcasts that open your heart and your world. Somebody used to sing to myself. If as a teenage girl. I hope in mother myself to s just like a way i was system. Just saying to myself who we when We had now not me jay leno my guy and buckeye and Komunikasi grenades radio x.

zimbabwe alex atala nikki silva Cheeto vera cheetah guevarra future of foundation morandi cheryl getty Dave nelson guenter poli margaret aguirre africa university loveness sao paulo guenter poly margaret laguna
122 - Burning Man  Archiving the Ephemeral

The Kitchen Sisters Present

21:24 min | 1 year ago

122 - Burning Man Archiving the Ephemeral

"<music> radio welcome to the kitchen sisters present where the kitchen sisters dave nelson n. nikki silva in high. If you are fans of the kitchen sisters stories i think you really might like ephemeral part of podcast part. Sound collage ephemeral features interviews with historians collectors authors and more during our stint on the planet. Humans have made a lot of stuff. Some of it is treasured. Some of it is junked chunked. Some of it is just forgotten. About how do we place value in the things we create what deserves just one more look before it vanishes into the past host alex williams guides us through a wasteland of things that were just barely saved and in some cases not saved it all episodes piece together stories lost in time a missing chapter of american music history a decade's worth of original television broadcast only once a mystery caught on tape that seemed unsolvable how women's suffrage and the invention of the telephone are linked then more the entire season is now available for your binging pleasure listened to federal on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts and learn more at ephemeral doc show the kitchen sisters present is sponsored by better help better help offers licensed professional counselors who are specialized issues such as depression stress anxiety anger family conflicts l._g._b._t. Matters and more connect connect with your professional counselor in a safe and private online environment anything you share is confidential and it's convenient you can now get help at your own time and at your own pace you can schedule secure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist kitchen sisters present listeners get ten percent off your first first month with discount code kitchen sisters so why not get started today go to better help dot com slash kitchen sisters simply fill out a questionnaire to help them assess is your needs and get matched with a counselor field of better help dot com slash kitchen sisters arm larry harvey. I started just ten years ago <hes> as a lark on a beach in san francisco and i've been directing it ever since we came out to the desert six years ago searching for serie. I know you're gonna ask me why i did it. <hes> people ask that question because they think they'll find in my initial motive the germ of the meaning of the whole thing. I've come to understand it. That's really rather irrelevant. The the real story is in the act itself in the immediate experience and of course that's what this is all holdout kitchen sisters. My name is lady. Be i'm arocca. This convinced for burning men. Please come diverting man headquarters. I can show you the collection cheers today. The kitchen and sisters present burning man archiving the ephemeral on the night of summer solstice nineteen eighty six larry harvey and jerry james built and burned an eight foot wooden figure on san francisco's baker beach surrounded by a handful of friends. Burning man was born each august. The annual burning man gathering begins to assemble on a vast a dry lake bed in nevada's black rock desert the nomadic rituals home since nineteen ninety an estimated eighty thousand people will come. How do you archive an event when one of the driving principles of the ritual is leave no trace race where the burning man is in fact burned and the temple is to what is being kept and who is keeping it the kitchen sisters tikka the journey into the archives of this legendary gathering at burning man world headquarters orders in the mission district of san francisco. I'm lady also known as christine kristen or this and the art collection manager classic renegade archivists. It was not trained in any of this. I have a master's degree in sculpture from the art institute of cargo and it became curator through my early work at burning man this small this the history while the very early photos of the man all the way back to the golden gate bridge background people carrying the man's man's head the first man that's totally jianqing need from one by twos and fraud scams. Larry harvey used to work as a gardener sir and he was always trying to trellis effective. Now we are entering the archive rooms huge heavy file cabinets packed with two years and decades of articles zillions of boxes are material culture items jewelry patches stickers bandannas beautiful gift things every tv t._v. And radio spots and youtube videos the words burning and man in the title preserve all that stuff every week larry harvey super nineteen. Tim was the summer solstice late june nineteen eighty five longest day of the year a friend and i went down to the beach at sundown cobbled together stick man made from scrap lumber was very tall about ten feet but then we archive in trying to preserve all the documentation the actual things many of them not longer exists burn. The temple is burned learned the man. Every year is burn. He simply experience is very ephemeral <music>. An important part of archival work is maintaining the content of the website. It's like a beautiful storm or you can get lost our my name is stuart mangum the education director for printing that when i came in and took this his position i was a little shocked to find that we had really no collection video other than individual videos in people's desk drawers. This is one of the earliest videos that we know summer solstice from nineteen eighty eight. Someone's a video camera baker beach. This would have been the the third burn and actually the first of what we now think of as the ambassad burning man shape was going up golden gate bridge in the background and going back down so we haven't figured out yet how to <hes> put it on a fulcrum and raise him in the road china fall it up. It's rising. We're still in the process of finding that stuff and digitizing it. We got a new volunteer on our documentation team. In the intake interview it was like so have you been bringing in before and he said no wait a minute. I went to this thing on baker beach in san francisco in nineteen ninety and we're like <hes> sit down. I shot video in my house somewhere. So we found these two vintage beta tapes turned out that they were damaged from mold had to be taken to a specialty lab and cleaned up basically just walked around shooting everyone and everything from the guy who is selling t shirts to <hes> the confrontation with the police that was the year that we were actually not allowed allowed to burn the man but that non burn is actually what led to our first sojourn into the desert black rock city in nineteen ninety. Mary harvey b._b._c. witness history two thousand sixteen when they first told me about it we were on the ocean there baker beach and that had cast dispel coastlines do that and what they described to me sounded just like the pacific ocean except you could walk on it and drive on. We're standing on a lake bed. Black desert is huge. There's nothing they're not even insects. Tony perez bonday coyote out in the desert in the city superintendent safety meet a black rock city pretty much the first one out there putting the flags to build black rock city the grid. It's a two mile wide right clock. It holds the event itself. I find south. I orient the city. I find where the temple is going to be. It is the largest clock in the world video streets every fifteen minutes to fifteen to thirty to forty five three. It's an open circle. The man is in the center. The city is around it from ten o'clock to to open into the desert and the mountains beyond principles that drive the city or generosity and gifting. We don't allow anything to be sold there. We sell coffee and ice larry. Larry one's told me the reason we have the cafes because everybody knows how to stand in line and wait for coffee and talk to their neighbor so the introverts can be happy to and they don't have sane fourth largest city. I don't know it is fourth largest city. What vegas reno sparks carson city and then black rat city heading burning david twenty twelve. I'm on interstate. Eighty just loved reno. We're going to go up north. How in the middle of the black rock desert <music> anyone bikes on top of it. You know they're heading to park. You park your car. You can't drive in there unless you're a <hes> what's called a mutant vehicle. It looks like we're going to be turning on a dirt road now and this radio station you here. I think is set up over at the burning man camp. The timeline on the website has the city's population paid or the man from desert floor to the top of his pointy little head in historical archives. We have black rock city history the burning and journal gazette documentation on all the art installations and the thing that distinguishes burning man art is it's monumentally. We have canvas that is nine square miles. You can build as big <unk> as you can. As long as you can make it stand up and be safe. I'm jennifer riser author of burning man art on fire. Uh keeping burning man art is what motivated me to do the book because it's so ephemeral art that has to withstand very high temperature's matures seventy mile an hour winds tense rain lightning for two weeks a year and then it's gone dismantled or oftentimes. It's burned. There's no other record of burning man art except the photographs that people take their not gallery tags or names or labels on the art. Only the people who had the privilege of being able to see charlie rose interview with larry harping two thousand fourteen the church trap and other large-scale interactive arcade station piece from two thousand thirteen by rebecca <hes> wait. I loved this piece. The churches supported by this giant stick and and the pews are inside his precariously perch like mouse trap primly about four hundred art installations a year from all over the planet russia england france siberia villa all the new york artist. Who did the bay lights here in san francisco who's currently working on five bridges over the thames in london. He has been going to bernie man since nineteen ninety four and has never missed a year cornell university two thousand twelve. My first experience out there at burning man was getting profoundly lost at least at that point. It was only the burning man sculpture. There are no streets orientation became a major concern so by my third year out there i created strobe matrix and i- mounted on top of my mobile home so that i would be able to get back at night but this is a very unique set of circumstances that led me to create this utilitarian object it but i had no idea that this would turn out to be a really major epiphany for me. It is an experiment in communist living and new audience's. Everything is a gift given without expectation of return and people spend all year thinking of ways to delight one another other through the art. The first three principles of burning men are radical self reliance radical self expression and radical inclusion inclusion. They were published civic participation about twelve years ago. Homina effort leave no trace their guidelines that help the community community de commodification understand one another and have a shared set of values justification being fully present a._b._c.'s nightline nineteen ninety-seven this is a._b._c. news. All the officials note that this this community in largely rural nevada has become overnight the tenth or twelfth largest town in the state that they say demands twenty four hour public public service and that costs money. You can't expect the taxpayers washer county to pay for the funding for these spokeswoman laura blaylock and i'm a resident of girl doc nevada and i spend more time on the playa than anyone i know. I think that the be elements be remiss in allowing any further increase. I would actually say go back to fifty thousand. We know what water water green water straightening overspill folks are getting just a little bit here. Locals <music> <hes> most everybody's on board with us but there's some people that really just tolerate it <hes>. They're out there the ranchers they got cattle out there. Install the last thing on their mind is festival or an event that the one thing that they'll look at it go well they do. They do clean up after themselves. Really everyone thinks of burning man is the one week the city in the desert but it's way beyond that we have burners without borders ready to go disaster relief. This porn out of katrina happened during bernie man suspect up in took their tools and went down to the gulf decided decided to turn it into a year round thing they're out there doing beach cleanups working on new appropriate technology solutions for refugee camps trying to apply some of the lessons that we've learned in our intentional attentional survival community harvey from his documentary burning man nineteen ninety-one. My father was a self taught carpenter. Masonic lodge was j- masonic lodge was devoted to god as architect. This is all things so the idea that god is trying to park ranger extremely appealing to him so i sort i've soaked all of that. Passionate passion for him is twelve against him ended up designing a giant god-like man made by carpenters k._a._b._c. w t._v. San francisco april twenty eighth two thousand eighteen and new tonight a gathering at san francisco's baker beach to remember the founder of burning man larry harvey and he died this morning party. We bring our man on saturday night. The whole city gathered in a circle around the man. Seventy thousand is in people from groups of fire performers from all over the world. All the art cars people are caracas while in the temple burn on sunday nights. Complete opposite is dead silent. The temple is an example of what we didn't know we needed now. When we first decided to make the crazy decision caller a city eddie wait a very short list of things that it took to be a city half-jokingly we said really august plumbing <hes> coffee and a newspaper city and so we had all those three things so we put up a welcome to black rock city sign and call ourselves city. We didn't really know we needed a place for spiritual reflection until the first temple was built in two two thousand. We actually have an archive of ashes. After the man burns the next morning crimson rose. I one of our co-founders sifts through the burned wreckage. Finding pieces of melted glass has collected a large jar of this and we have a display of them by year in our library. Honestly i've always had mixed feelings about documenting such an ephemeral event type for the longest time. I really felt that it was best just experienced you know. The best camera was one's memory. It's sometimes hard to reconcile the notion of participation association with the notion of documentation. Larry's death was definitely a reminder to us to go out and get the historic documentation the preservation jazz band and burner band jazz funeral for larry harvey burning man two thousand eighteen gene the experience is very ephemeral and only lasts for ten days and then the whole city goes away so you just have your memories we've very interested in preserving all of the history and culture because we are creating culture here and we want that to be documented long after we're gone well if any of you old timey burners out there any of you salty old dogs have a v._h._s. tape or hi eight or mini <music> d._v._d. Up there with with all burning video on it now is the time to get that digitize all help. Send it to me. The email address is archives at burning man dot org. We've got a museum of jurassic technology here. We've got volunteers lined up around the block to help but if that stuff doesn't get transferred soon a lot of seriously at risk of being lost forever. I am pretty passionate about getting everybody stories down while they're still around getting getting all that <hes> that old analog media scanned in digitize before it crumbles to dust. I just wanna make sure that <hes> the origin stories or preserved served along with the ongoing story. I think it's important to remember how we got to this but <music> burning man archiving the ephemeral was produced by the kitchen sisters david nelson n. nikki silva with nathan dalton and brandy handle special. Thanks at burning man headquarters delaney be christine kristen coyote tony perez begnaud jennifer razor valerie velocity they took in solids leo veal around eric mcdougal and our project intern kate very and thanks to all the burners who've been archiving and uploading across the years the kitchen sisters present is part of radio tokyo from a p._r. Ex a curated network of extraordinary cutting edge podcasts created by independent producers. You can find kitchen sisters on twitter tesa book instagram and you can check out all of our stories and workshops public events are t-shirt and more at kitchen sisters dot o._r._g. Thanks for listening talk radio.

larry harvey san francisco baker beach Larry one golden gate bridge david nelson n. nikki silva nevada dave nelson Mary harvey nikki silva alex williams journal gazette Tony perez youtube reno christine kristen apple russia cornell university