5 Burst results for "Dave Moshe"

"dave moshe" Discussed on Household Name

Household Name

11:10 min | 1 year ago

"dave moshe" Discussed on Household Name

"A couple of days later. Paul got a letter in the mail from the Public Relations Director at Mars. The letter started dear. Paul good things do happen to those who wait. Although we have never met I have followed with interest the society for the restoration and preservation of red EMINEM's and employees to be able to share some news. I think you'll enjoy receiving he also sent along a little. Thank you of sorts. It was two boxes. Cardboard boxes probably being sixteen or eighteen inches on aside full of Eminem's and only read Paul and sprints through a party at the end of the night all the red m. and M.'s. Were Gone Charlie. I like to think we got the random back because of Paul like it wasn't because the food coloring scare had died down or because of a promotion it was because a kid in Tennessee. Set Out loud which all of us were thinking. We want read Eminem's in reality. It was probably a lot more complicated but for once in the saga of the random. I would love for it to just that simple. It's funny I've been thinking a lot. About what all this means and I wonder. Do you feel like there are any lake takeaways here. Like what is the legacy of this campaign Legacy yes there is. We were all taught lessons by that. Little Red Eminem the FDA the candy maker and us that's after the break a bi prime is like business insider but offers even more insights into the day's news goes behind the scenes of the companies. You know giving you indepth reports about the business world and the people who are making the key decisions this week. I caught up on B. I. Primes coverage of linked in and whites making a massive shift to Microsoft's cloud? There's also a story about Google and how some analysts are predicting. It could catch up with Amazon's web services with a strategic but expensive acquisition to read those stories and more join today at read dot com slash. Podcast that's read dot. Bi Slash podcast. We're back when Sarah and I are in the studio Jason Leib. The candyman and the inspiration for the story with a list of questions for him about Eminem's and the red scare but I also really wanted to ask him about this advertisement. Mems ran in two thousand eight which we saw on his website. I'm what the heck is this illusion. That was just from a they did. It's very Soviet. Nineteen thirty S era propaganda inspired poster incredibly designed it says resolution is now and it's got the surreally conspired lettering with backwards letters and it says vote read at the bottom but it's got the sort of proletariat the workers down below marching with flags and it's got the Red Eminem FM with his fist up in the air it's got a very shake bora sort of Beret with a star on a Red Star. Red Star yes. I mean it's very Soviet. Apparently this ad ran as part of an eminence campaign in Australia and New Zealand. Mars made a bunch of posters. Like this one one. Each color all of them had different themes and fans were encouraged to vote for their favorite character like Red Blue Green. Yeah I mean it. Most certainly is just a weird coincidence but still bold move Mars advertising the Red Eminem with the Soviet Union style propaganda poster for an election. Do you think Mars is laughing at the joke here? Do you think they're totally oblivious to that connection? I would like to think there's someone at Mars is like this is going to be too good. 'cause he's Red Red scare he was the REMM got pulled because of the Russian Red Scare Hours. Just to perfect yeah. I hope that someone did that if they weren't aware of it. It's just a great of accidental genius. Because this kind of ingenious represents all the solo even if there's no connection between this particular campaign and the red food coloring scare fears about red food. Coloring did have a huge impact on Mars as we saw. It pulled the red eminem when the public got vocal. And according to a company spokesperson. It brought the Red Eminem back years later because of consumer demand in other words after. People like Paul Hoffman and his society asked for it back. Jason pointed out that the whole experience taught Eminem's something important they realize maybe for the first time the real relationship that consumers had to their brand and I was so grateful when I started doing all this research going through all my stuff. I don't even think I realized it at first because I have so many of these things I realized I had one of the packages that welcomed read back into the packaging. They talk about right on there. They've read Eminem. They don't quite get into these. Things were banned for ten years. They just say look now even more colorful and I think for the first time eminem's realized this is an opportunity we brought back read. That was a specific thing that we stopped doing but we could maybe make marketing event around introducing other colors and for the next fifteen years you would see them do a new color promotion every year to on its surface. This is all funny and lighthearted real happy ending to the story. But let's not forget that EMINEM's branding renaissance may have come about because the American public's but a decade being suspicious of that used Red Dye. And if you ask me that feels pretty messed up. Like the fact that Mars felt it had to discontinue eminem's just because they were read when they weren't even using the food coloring that was being investigated not feels like a really clear sign that like we the public the press companies like Mars. We were not clear on the problem. We didn't understand what potential danger was even being discussed during the red scare and when we're making decisions about public health and Tamsir and product safety. I feel like we all at least be clear on what conversation we're having when Pines former FDA spokesperson. He told me he still sees this as a huge concern. I don't blame the public for being confused about science because we are inundated with scientific studies and it's hard to distinguish the good from the bad right like trying to keep track of. I don't know whether or not caffeine is supposed to be good for you these days. It's impossible and it feels like every day there's a new story with a new study with different results and I am going to keep drinking coffee no matter what look. I'm a journalist and I get it. Sometimes we have to simplify complicated stories. In order to get the most important points across or to fit into five hundred words or five minutes or a reader's attention span. Like I had to do that for this story. I have more than two hours worth of tape of me talking to John. Swan Wayne Pines about the DA and read number two. But all of that background just couldn't fit into this episode stuff did get left out so as a consumer. Here's the question. How do we know when we should be seriously worried? That say read Amenemhat or if yours later it was SACCHARIN. When should we be worried that those things might be giving us cancer? And when should we just trust the scientists and journalists to do their jobs? I'm at schools. Need to teach this better. The media needs to do a better job of education. The government needs to do a better job of outreach but I can tell you having tried all that. It's hard because people have their own educational backgrounds. They have their own perspective. They have their own emotional reactions to the food that they're eating the drugs that they're taking and so it's hard to persuade people. Did we ever figure out for sure whether or not red dye number two actually does cause cancer knelt? As of this moment no one has successfully demonstrated that it is safe by the FDA standards so we still can't say that it causes cancer and we also can't say that it does not cause cancer. But I feel like we've mostly recovered from the red scare. I mean the Red Emma's back. People aren't giving Colored Foods. A WIDE BERTH. In the grocery store and at least in my family the red food coloring bottle is back in the game. Okay but I've been hearing this other thing about Red Dye actually. I don't know if you knew this that it's actually made from mushed up bug parts drew. It's true we have a little gift for you. I'll nice of you have to look closely at my goodness. Charlie got his new best friend. Jason a bag of custom. Red Eminem's an on the EMINEM's Charlie didn't already eat. It says in tiny white letters brought to you by brought to you by the Red Eminence Look at this. That's fantastic. That's Brandy Ladies and gentlemen that's branding. Wow that's Jason Lee Big Candy Collector and historian you can read more about his work at collecting Candy Dot Com. He's speaking of our favorite foods from the eighties. Do you remember the California raisins commercials? You know the one with the dancing claymation raisins we need your help court of Voice memo telling about your memories of that ad and what it meant to you and then send it to us at bt Y BE AT INSIDER DOT com or you can leave a voicemail at six four six seven six eight four seven seven seven go ahead and hit the fifteen seconds go back and get all that Info Gin. And while you're at it let us know what you think about the show on twitter at bt Y pot and on facebook just search brought to you by podcast also. I know podcast hosts say this all the time but it really does make a difference. If you leave us a rating and review on Apple podcasts stitcher or wherever you listen. We appreciate the feedback and it helps us keep making the show. This episode was reported and produced by Sarah. Wyman Julia pressing need our editors were Michaela bly and Caroline do bowl. Sound Design by Bill Moss. Casey Holford and John delory composed theme. Music is from Audio Network and Sarah. Wyman is our show runner special thanks to the FDA history office and Lindsey Meyer for their help with the story the headline you heard skills a bit like an Oscar. Speech read by Clare. Ben Deras Margaret. Bhawani Livy Brandt Clayton dire rich. Baloney Graham Flanagan Neg techn- men Fuller D- Juliana Caplan Dave Moshe Shirt Christine. Un Lauren Thomson and our very own. Julia. Press brought to you by his a production of insider audio..

Red Eminem EMINEM Red Dye Paul Hoffman red food FDA cancer Sarah Jason Wyman Julia Public Relations Director John delory Mars Google Microsoft Bill Moss Soviet Union Coloring Bhawani Livy Brandt Clayton
"dave moshe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:01 min | 2 years ago

"dave moshe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Narendra Modi says his country is now a space superpower alongside the United States Russia and China of attest to destroy a subtle light, the BBC's Yogi Telhami joins us from Mumbai. What exactly to the prime minister say? Well, he made it quite an unexpected announcement it was televised address. And in that he said that India has in his words become a space power because it's now acquired the capability to shoot down a Lou orbit satellite. So what he said was today on on Wednesday here. The Indian space agency launched an anti satellite missile, and successfully was able to destroy a low orbit satellite and that this whole mission lasted for three minutes. What he also said interestingly is that he wants to assure the international community that. India does not intend to use this power against anyone. But all of this was part of an effort to strengthen security, and it's been sort of an objective for a long time. And today he wanted to make the announcement that it's an objective that has finally been achieved its use bit far-reaching, though, this ability to shoot down a low orbit satellite, and then India reg registered itself as a space power is that seen as unusual in India or how how is it being received? Well, it does have, you know, pretty prolific sort of space program, and it's also very well known space program for not spending too much money. Unlike sort of other other countries that are heavily in the space race like the USO Russia China. In fact, those are the other three countries that already have this capability so in that sense. The Indian space mission has, you know, set out objectives. And also chief them in the past, you know, they they've launched missions to the moon as well as to Mars they. Only recently announced that they want to sort of launch their first manned mission in the next two years as well. But it's really the timing of prime minister Moody's announcement. I mean, there are a lot of critics out there in the opposition saying that, you know, barely two weeks to go for a national election. Why is the prime minister making this announcement wise, he trying to take credit for the achievement off? The India of the space agency that the the head of the space agency could have made this announcement here. Also, you know, sort of hearing those kind of voices, and and, but but many people, of course, in India will feel a sense of pride, you know, in the prime minister's announcement that India's not only the fourth country in the world to have this capability. Thank you very much. You my last question was about the timing. But you summed that up very nicely. I telhami. Thank you very much for that. Of course, the US won the last space race to get a man on the moon. Now, they're gearing up for another one not we Russia, but with China the US has announced it's going to redouble efforts to get Americans back on the surface of the moon. The previous state they were aiming for was twenty twenty eight now Mike Pence, the vice president has said Americans will land by twenty twenty four and the next man on the moon could be a woman if I can find space to fitter why now though for this decision. It's hugely expensive. They've been done it before. And Canada actually be done in such a short timescale a question for Dave Moshe, who is senior correspondent for space science and tech business insider, this is the hundred billion dollar question. Can't can we move it up for years. And I would also ask is this even possible at all given the agency's current trajectory because right now the biggest thing. Thing they have going for them literally is a rocket called the space launch system in MRs sort of a recycled version of a recycled version of a big rocket. They've spent tens of billions of dollars trying to get to this point. And they just kind of walked off or deferred the future development of this rocket. So it remains to be seen if they can even use the government system to do this. That was gonna be my next question. We've had so much pacesetting done in in space recently with private companies. Why is the government particularly a Trump administration not using the private sector and putting the burden of hundreds of millions of dollars on the tax payer. This is a sort of very entrenched political kind of situation, we're dealing with. There are more than ten thousand people working on this space launch system rocket. And there are a lot of people in congress who have a lot of jobs in their districts and. Are on very important committees that call the purse-strings on on some of these programs. They are clinging to this space launch system when there are definitely other systems, for example, falcon, heavy made by SpaceX that can do at least some of the capabilities that they're looking for, you know, launch a pretty big space capsule in the space, and you know, with meeting another rocket or to get enough stuff out there to get it around the moon and possibly even land something there. Nasa. And and Mike Pence and President Donald Trump are looking at what SpaceX and others are doing and saying, hey, well, we could probably do this cheaper. But they have this friction to deal with with congress. Everyone knows that it was a space race back in the sixties. It was basically to show what America could do as against a against Russia against communism. Obviously the target is now China how important is that. In this decision. We are absolutely looking at national pride and space. And I think that is the overarching impetus here is not so much strategic. That is definitely part of it. But based on the tenor of the vice president's speech on Tuesday, you know, we we got many shades of patriotism in. There said we're in a space race today. Just was we were in the nineteen sixties and mistakes are even higher and also this mention of gender equality. The fact that a woman will very likely be one of the astronauts, why not fantastic. But you wouldn't expect that necessarily from the Trump administration would you to be fair? I think it's I think it's refreshing to hear the vice president's say something like that. And I don't think it's a coincidence that this was said on Tuesday because this week we were supposed to see the first all female spacewalk, which was something of a scheduling accident. And I think this actually ties back to an earlier point, which is can they do this by two thousand twenty four in my severe skepticism to that happening. Astronaut Ian MacLean in astronaut Kristina cook, we're supposed to walk outside, the international space station together on Friday, but McLean decided that her space. It was a little bit too. Big on the first spacewalk. She did this past Friday. She needed a medium sized spacesuit, and they only have one of those in noperation up there and cook was planning to use that then can we really trust really trust the government to to execute a crewed moon landing in less than basically. Than five years. And I think that's just desserts are skepticism ask that Dave Moshe senior correspondent from business insider on matters Spacey. Science and technology you listen to Newsday from the BBC with Lawrence, Paul Allen county shopping staying with the space story just weeks before he faces reelection. The Indian prime minister has declared his country a space superpower after shooting down a satellite in a series of tweets. He's tweeted they shouldn't shock. The was a highly complex one conducted at extremely high speed with remarkable precision. It shows the remarkable dexterity of India's outstanding scientists and the success of our space program. He also went onto tweet it will make India stronger. He says even more secure and will further peace, and harmony that's one of our main headlines this half hour and also standing by is Matthew with the school. Hello lawrence. Lots and lots of football on Tuesday. Italy's scoring six unanswered goals against listen. Stein. Red lead today for Fabio choir quality era, who became the country's oldest ever goalscorer got to the age of thirty six not by going day for Nigeria's poll on watcher yesterday as well who scored the country's fastest ever international goal. We're told inside ten seconds. It certainly was on his full debut for the Super Eagles as they beat Egypt. One nil. Ineffectively if you were late into the game by even half a minute. You look missed the key moment. Elsewhere weightlifting is going to be given the green light for inclusion in the Paris Olympic Games. Twenty twenty four by the International Olympic Committee wants an anti-doping agreement is in place, and that deal ends eighteen months of uncertainty about the sports future in the game. CIO executive for meet later today with the future of amateur boxing on the line as well. After multiple scandals surrounding that sports. And we've talked a lot about the case of the court of arbitration for sport brought by South Africa's double Olympic eight hundred meter champion caster Semenya against international athletics governing body, and it's. Rules in particular on gender, classification and testosterone. And remember that decision by cast has been delayed until the end of April. So many of those issued arrest statement in the last hour or two emphasizing that she is no threat to women's sport. And saying that recent comments from AWS. President Sebastian Coe have reopened old wounds. And it's it's a reminded her statement in in detail is a reminder of the very personal nature of this case. Even though it has huge implications. Many thanks indeed Matthew Kenyon with the spotlight. Twenty one minutes past let's go to business now. One of the largest airlines in Asia Cathay Pacific has got to buy a low cost carrier Hong Kong express Phillips on the business desk how much money, and what are they get for six hundred and twenty eight million US dollars against some planes, which is nice takeoff. Landing slots at Hong Kong, which is great. If you're into that kind of thing essentially, Hong Kong express flights destinations, right? The way across Asia. And it's going to become a wholly owned subsidiary of Kathy. Pacific. This has been mooted for quite some time. Now, both companies that have been denying it up until today. Kathy is looking to overhaul its cost structure. It's looking to expand the company's only recently returned to profit back in twenty eighteen however on Hong Kong express decide it gets a little bit interesting zone company. Could h they're in financial trouble at the moment there cash-strapped they took something like forty billion US dollars out of Asia and went on a buying spree. Right. The way around the world, boots steaks and things like to Shabangu in Germany, which isn't doing quite so well all of which is a little bit short and tight on money. And so they needed to sell. There are motivated sellers. Peter Morris chief economist over descend by Serbian. I asked him therefore if this was a good price for an airline. It's an excellent price. I mean, I think it's too to the circumstances that there's a willing buyer willing seller and it suits both to be. Be making that kind..

India prime minister US vice president Russia China Hong Kong Mike Pence BBC Asia Dave Moshe congress Narendra Modi Matthew Kenyon USO Lou orbit SpaceX Lawrence Mumbai
"dave moshe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:54 min | 2 years ago

"dave moshe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Narendra Modi says his country is now a space superpower alongside the United States Russia and China of attest to destroy a subtle light, the BBC's Yogi Telhami joins us from Mumbai. What exactly do the prime minister say? Well, he made quite an unexpected announcement it was televised address. And in that he said that India has in his words become a space power because it's now acquired the capability to shoot down a low orbit satellite. So what he said was today on on Wednesday here. The Indian space agency launched an anti satellite missile, and successfully was able to destroy a low orbit satellite and that this whole mission lasted for three minutes. What he also said interestingly is that he wants to assure the international community that. India does not intend to use this power against anyone. But all of this was part of an effort to strengthen security, and it's been sort of an objective for a long time. And today he wanted to make the announcement that it's an objective that has finally been achieved its far-reaching, though, this ability to shoot down a low orbit satellite, and then India reg registered itself as a space power is that seen as unusual indu- or how how is it being received? Well, it does have, you know, pretty prolific sort of space program, and it's also very well known space program for not spending too much money. Unlike sort of other other countries that are heavily in the space race like the US Russia China. In fact, those are the other three countries that already have this capability, so in that sense the Indian space mission has set out objectives. And also chief them in the past, you know, the they've launched missions to the moon as well as to Mars. They only recently announced that they want to sort of launch their first manned mission in the next two years as well. But it's really the timing of prime minister Moody's announcement. I mean, there are a lot of critics out there in the opposition saying that, you know, barely two weeks to go for a national election. Why is the prime minister making this announcement is he trying to take credit for the achievement off? The India of the space agency that did the head of the space agency could have made this announcement here also sort of hearing those kind of voices and. But but many people, of course, in India will feel a sense of pride in the prime minister's announcement that India's now only the fourth country in the world to have this capability. And thank you very much. You my last question was about the timing. But you summed that up very nicely. I you Telhami. Thank you very much for that. Of course, the US won the last space race to get a man on the moon. Now, they're gearing up for another one not with Russia, but with China the US has announced it's going to redouble efforts to get Americans back on the surface of the moon. The previous state they were aiming for was twenty twenty eight now Mike Pence vice president has said Americans will land by twenty twenty four and the next man on the moon could be a woman if I can find spacesuits to fitter why? Now those for this decision. It's hugely expensive. They've been done it before. And Canada actually be done in such a short timescale a question for Dave Moshe, who is senior correspondent for space science and tech business insider, this is the one hundred billion dollar question. Can you know, can we move it up for years? And I would also ask is this even possible at all given the agency's current trajectory because right now the biggest thing. They have going for them literally as a rocket called the space launch system in Mississippi. A recycled version of a recycled version of a big rocket. They've spent tens of billions of dollars trying to get to this point. And they are just kind of walked off or deferred the future development of this rocket. So it remains to be seen if they can even use the government system to do this. That was going to be my next question. We've had so much pacesetting done in in space recently with private companies. Why is the government particularly a Trump administration not using the private sector and putting the burden of hundreds of millions of dollars on the tax payer. This is a sort of very entrenched political kind of situation revealing with there are more than ten thousand people working on this space launch system rocket in. There are a lot of people in congress who have a lot of jobs in their districts and. Are on very important committee is that call the purse strings on on some of these programs. They are clinging to this space launch system when there are definitely other systems, for example, falcon, heavy main by SpaceX that can do at least some of the capabilities that they're looking for, you know, launch a pretty big space capsule on the status, and you know, with maybe another rocket or to get enough stuff out there to get it around the moon and possibly even land something there. Nasa. And and Mike Pence and President Donald Trump are looking at what SpaceX and others are doing and saying, hey, well, we could probably do this cheaper that. But they have this friction to the with with congress. Everyone knows that it was a space race back in the sixties. It was basically to show what America could do as against against Russia is against communism. Obviously the target is now China how important is that. In this decision. We are absolutely looking at national pride and space. And I think that is the overarching impetus here is not so much strategic. That is definitely a part of it. But based on the tenor of the vice president's speech on Tuesday. You know, we we we got many shades of patriotism in there. He said we're in a space race today. Just was we were in the nineteen sixties and mistakes are even higher and also this mention of gender equality. The fact of the woman will very likely be one of the astronauts, why not fantastic. But you wouldn't expect that necessarily from the Trump administration would you to be fair? I think it's I think it's refreshing to hear the vice president's say something like that. And I don't think it's a coincidence that this was said on Tuesday because this week we were supposed to see the first all female spacewalk, which was something of a scheduling accident. And I think this actually ties back to an earlier point, which is can they do this by twenty twenty four in my severe skepticism to that happening astronaut in McLean and astronaut Kristina cook, we're supposed to walk outside, the international space station together on Friday, but McLean decided that her space. It was a little bit too. Big on the first spacewalk. She did this past Friday. She needed a medium sized stay suit, and they only have one of those in operation up there and cook was planning to use that then can we really trust purely trust the government to to execute a crewed moon landing in less than basically. For five years. And I think that's just deserves our skepticism an ask Dave Moshe senior correspondent from business insider on matters Spacey. Science and technology listens. Newsday from the BBC with Lawrence, Paul Allen county shopping staying with the space story just weeks before he faces reelection. The Indian prime minister has declared his country a space superpower after shooting down a satellite in a series of tweets. He's tweeted missions shock. The was a highly complex one conducted at extremely high speed with remarkable precision. It shows the remarkable dexterity of India's outstanding scientists and the success of our space program. He also went on to tweet it will make India stronger. He says even more secure and will further peace, and harmony, that's one of the main headlines.

India prime minister Russia China US vice president Mike Pence Dave Moshe BBC Narendra Modi SpaceX Mumbai twenty twenty Yogi Telhami Mississippi President Donald Trump congress Canada Nasa
"dave moshe" Discussed on Household Name

Household Name

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"dave moshe" Discussed on Household Name

"All right team. After all these years after sixty years of NASA. Why are we still so captivated by space? I think because we still know so little about space. There's something about it that still feels incredibly novel and exciting even in this moment, there's a moment and Apollo eight when Jim level and the other astronauts were looking back on earth, you know, the blue marble in. They were just like they just got the willies, and they were just totally blown away. And they had this sort of out of body experience looking through the window because they knew that everybody who lived on earth was like the cover them up with a thumbprint. I mean, that's the thing is I can only imagine what that would be like like, I've never had an experience in my life that compares to that even remotely and yet at the same time, even if you've never been into space, you can still feel the wonder of it, even if you're just looking up at the stars at night or going to a planetarium on a field trip or something like that you feel the wonder and excitement of what it must be like to be up there, and the the great unknown of it and seeing the stuff that's been up in space like the stuff that Robert Pearlman collects that feels really exciting to there's only been about five hundred people that have loaned to space in the history of humanity. And we can't be then we can maybe get to hold something. They took pictures objects package of Eminem's or flashlight or a pen and the rest of us can kind of get a little bit closer to experiencing. What that must be like. Being able to hold her or be within the presence of something that actually went. There speaks more to our inner psyche than simply seeing it on TV and bring space closer to everybody. And to me that is what Nassim bodies. All right. Dave Moshe insider science and technology correspondent and our producer Sarah Wyman Animas Iraqis. Thank you. This has been out of this world. Our prime crew for this episode was Animas America since Sarah Wyman Dave motion, Amy Padilla, and I were on backup back at mission control. Our support crew included our editor John Palmer, original music and Spacey sound design by John galore and Casey Holford. These executive producers of household name. Art, Chris Ben in Laura mayor, Jenny rattling and me special. Thanks to Dan lockney and the NASA technology transfer program. Household name is a production of insider audio. Stitcher. This is jaboomer on conversion therapy is an attempt to change people from gay to straight to either shock, the gateway or pray. The gay way over seven hundred thousand people in America have been put through this. That's the equivalent of the city of Boston. Jack, the mental illness. So we've just signed in. And then we were handed this giant and book told on stuff you need to memorize everything in it purpose of this patient, demonstrate therapeutic use with humble sexual wish to change his six nine versus those who practice homosexuality will not inherit the kingdom of God every single page roles. The kind of clues we wore no hugging or physical touch between clients the way we sat brief handshakes crossed our legs. How we looked at our nails. It was like seeing the word of God I was battling with God. At that point. The first episode of unrest is outright. Now. Find unraced in your podcast app. And subscribe, so you don't miss an episode.

Amy Padilla NASA Sarah Wyman Robert Pearlman Eminem Dave Moshe Dan lockney Boston Jim executive John Palmer Jack Chris Ben technology correspondent editor Casey Holford John galore Laura mayor Jenny producer
"dave moshe" Discussed on Household Name

Household Name

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"dave moshe" Discussed on Household Name

"About NASA Debrecen, plus we'll check in with Robert again and hear more stories from the promo in house of space wonders stay with us. With us today on our journey of space. Exploration is Dave Moshe. Who is insiders what space space correspondent, I think you can just call me the resident nerd at insider. That'd be good title. Dave Moshe resident nerd at insider. And today, I'll be talking about Tang and its association with NASA. Alright. And then we also have with us our producers and America's Hello. And today, I'm going to be talking about KFC and NASA mysterious and Sarah Wyman. Hi, I'm here to tell you a story about a worm and a Meatball. Actually, it's about Nastase logo. And to help me tell the story I called up a guy named Hamish Smyth Hamish is a graphic designer. He's worked on a ton of really cool projects in New York City. And also he really likes NASA. It's nasa. Like, it's so cool. It's you these doing space stuff. It's awesome. Right. So Hamish explained to me but back when NASA was. Founded in nineteen fifty eight people had bigger things to worry about than logos and graphics like Russia had just launched the satellite Sputnik. We'll be spice Douglass Edwards report. Until days ago that zone, but never been heard on this earth, which really took the American populace by surprise to Newell. What about the vital question that everybody is thinking about why? And how did the Russians beat us to the drill? It also freaked out the executive branch like the president was losing his gourd. So they founded a new agency NASA, and they had one of their employees just draw up a logo. So this is the Meatball. You can see it's the same logo. Nasa has today. And it's like a big blue circle. There's there's like an orbiting thing in the middle. There looks very space-age there. Lots of stars in the background a lot going on this logo. We have stars. You have lines. You have circles you have. Yeah. It's it's a messy logo. It's very razzle dazzle if I can put it that way. It looks like something maybe an engineer would have designed or third grader. Great engineer, and it's it's kind of fun and whimsical, which I think was exciting for a lot of the people who worked there because they as kids had grown up kind of in love with the idea of space exploration and excited about the idea of exploring the universe and going up to space and rocket ships and this logo looks like all of that excitement like all of that childish glee, but as you pointed out like in terms of graphic design, it's not an awesome logo, the owed one consists of numerous very odd to printed accurately, especially using government printing technology at the time logos have to do all kinds of stuff. You have to put them on. Stationary. You put them on pens that you can hand out to people at conferences in Nasr's case, you have to stencil it onto rocket ships and this logo is just not good for any of those things. You don't really see that very well at. Mile out on an aircraft or something in part of this. Logos job is to be on rocket ships and satellites in space, and like it isn't super often that you're getting a nice close up. You know, those are things that are meant to be seen from faraway. Ideally, you know, by Russian people, I guess like also trying to fly into space. We're very far behind you. You're Soviet space. Like, you gotta know what spacecraft you're dealing with. And it just looks like kind of blobby blobby is not the message that the American government was trying to send out about their space. A graphic designer like Hamish Smyth would never have come up with anything that looked remotely like this. But I would not try and design a rocket and they shouldn't try and design a logo. So by the nineteen seventies were like coming out of the space race, we've been to the moon, and then on the fiscal side of things the US economy is taking its first big downturn since World War Two. And so people are starting to question masses. Funding shuttle program was wildly the budget, and they weren't launching nearly as many as they were planning on launching people are saying like what's the point of funding?.

NASA Hamish Smyth Dave Moshe Russia Tang Debrecen American government KFC New York City engineer US Douglass Edwards America Robert Nastase Newell Sarah Wyman Nasr