35 Burst results for "Dave L."

President Biden, Galveston And Texas discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 5 hrs ago

President Biden, Galveston And Texas discussed on AP News Radio

"The nation has a new federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery June nineteenth eighteen sixty five the day known as Juneteenth when sleeves in Galveston Texas learned they were free president Biden has signed into law a bill making get the twelfth federal holiday this is Dave profound in my view profound weight and profound power a day the nation remembers when he calls the moral stain of slavery and its capacity to heal it's the first new federal holidays since Martin Luther king junior day was created nearly four decades ago Sager

President Biden Galveston Texas Dave Martin Luther King Sager
Clippers Beat Jazz 119-111 to Take Series Lead

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 20 hrs ago

Clippers Beat Jazz 119-111 to Take Series Lead

"The clippers have taken a three games to two lead in the Western Conference semifinals by earning their third straight win over the jazz one nineteen one eleven Paul George carried the load with thirty seven points and sixteen rebounds while Los Angeles played without forward Kawhi Leonard because of a knee injury suffered in game four Marcus Morris scored twenty five points and Reggie Jackson added twenty two for the clippers who shot fifty one percent from the field the jazz made a team record ten three pointers in the first quarter but led by just one at the end of the period boy am Bogdanovich had nine treys in thirty two points for Utah I'm Dave Ferrie

Clippers Kawhi Leonard Paul George Marcus Morris Reggie Jackson Los Angeles Bogdanovich Utah Dave Ferrie
Laureano HR, Nifty Catch in Return, Streaking A’s Top Angels

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 22 hrs ago

Laureano HR, Nifty Catch in Return, Streaking A’s Top Angels

"The athletics have a six game winning streak after Ramon Laureano homered and made a Homer robbing catch in his return from the injured list highlighting an eight four win over the angels Laureano had missed seventeen games with a strained right hip he timed his jump perfectly to reach over the fence and catch Justin Upton's fly ball in the fourth half inning before going deep manager Bob Melvin says Laureano didn't show any rust you've come back and you're off for a while and you know little uncertainty when you know you haven't had too many bad sin and then you go out there make a play like that you know Homer so I think he's he feels pretty comfortable that also singled twice in a six run sixth and finished three for four with an RBI Shohei Ohtani homered for the second straight day giving him nineteen on the season for the angels I'm Dave very

Laureano Ramon Laureano Homer Athletics Justin Upton Bob Melvin Angels Shohei Ohtani Dave Very
Molina's RBI Single in 9th Lifts Cardinals Past Marlins 1-0

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 23 hrs ago

Molina's RBI Single in 9th Lifts Cardinals Past Marlins 1-0

"The Adare Molina delivered his eighth career walk off hit with an RBI single in the bottom of the ninth completing the cardinals one nothing win and a three game sweep of the Marlins Paul Goldschmidt reached on an error by shortstop jazz Chisholm junior to start the ninth Matt carpenter followed with a one out walk before Molina sent the Marlins to their fourth straight loss St Louis starter Johan Oviedo worked a career high seven scoreless innings losing pitcher sandy Alcantara pitched a team season high eight and a third innings I'm Dave Ferrie

Adare Molina Paul Goldschmidt Jazz Chisholm Marlins Matt Carpenter Cardinals Johan Oviedo Molina St Louis Sandy Alcantara Dave Ferrie
Grandal's Single in 10th Gives White Sox 8-7 Win Over Rays

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 23 hrs ago

Grandal's Single in 10th Gives White Sox 8-7 Win Over Rays

"The white Sox have won a series matchup of AL division leaders but it took extra innings to accomplish it the white Sox pulled out an eight seven win over the rays behind yes money growing dollars game ending single in the tenth Jose Abreu hit his twelfth Homer of the season for the white Sox who squandered a seven to lead before winning for the tenth time in their last thirteen games Ranbir worked a scoreless tenth to get the win yeah they D. as in Mike Zunino homered for the rays Tampa Bay took the series opener before dropping the next two I'm Dave very

White Sox Al Division Jose Abreu Rays Mike Zunino Ranbir Rays Tampa Bay Dave
Mahle Fans 12, Reds Silence Brewers' Bats Again in 2-1 Win

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 d ago

Mahle Fans 12, Reds Silence Brewers' Bats Again in 2-1 Win

"The Reds won for the eleventh time in thirteen games as Tyler Molly tied his career high with twelve strikeouts in a two to one decision over the brewers Molly allowed three hits and a pair of walks over six innings Tucker Barnhart doubled home the tie breaking run to send Cincinnati to its sixth straight win and a three game sweep the walkie total just nine hits and four runs in the series the brewers scored their lone run in the third one Christian Yelich drove in Daniel Vogelbach with a single to right losing pitcher Freddy Peralta struck out six over six innings without walking a batter I'm Dave Ferrie

Tyler Molly Tucker Barnhart Brewers Reds Molly Christian Yelich Cincinnati Daniel Vogelbach Freddy Peralta Dave Ferrie
Suns Say Paul in Protocols, Status for West Finals Unclear

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 1 d ago

Suns Say Paul in Protocols, Status for West Finals Unclear

"The sun say guard Chris Paul has entered the NBA's health and safety protocols and his availability for game one of the Western Conference finals is unclear a person with knowledge of the situation tells the Associated Press Apollo has been vaccinated against cove in nineteen that could mean the park could be cleared to return faster than those who tested positive before vaccines were available Paul had an outstanding series against the nuggets despite playing with a nagging shoulder injury he scored thirty seven points in game four to help the sun's complete a sweep of Denver I'm Dave very

Chris Paul NBA The Associated Press Nuggets Paul Denver Dave
Clippers' Kawhi Leonard Sprains Right Knee, Out for Game 5

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 d ago

Clippers' Kawhi Leonard Sprains Right Knee, Out for Game 5

"Clippers forward Kawhi Leonard has been ruled out for game five of their Western Conference semifinal series with the jazz a person with knowledge of the matter said Leonard will need more testing and evaluation on his sprained right knee raising questions about his availability going forward the person says the structural integrity of the knee has yet to be determined the clippers say there's no timetable for Leonard's return Leonard's injury appeared to occur with about five twenty left in game four of the series against the jazz on Monday when he was fouled on a drive by Utah's going on background of H. I'm Dave Ferrie

Kawhi Leonard Clippers Leonard Utah Dave Ferrie
Van Gundy, Brooks Both Out as Coaches for the Pelicans, Wizards

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 1 d ago

Van Gundy, Brooks Both Out as Coaches for the Pelicans, Wizards

"Two more NBA head coach is a party company with their teams Scott Brooks won't be returning to the wizards who made the playoffs three times in his five years at the helm Washington one is playing game this year and was promptly knocked out by the seventy Sixers in five games the wizards were one eighty three in two oh seven under Brooks Stan van Gundy was given just one season to coach the pelicans before the two sides mutually agreed to part New Orleans went thirty one and forty one to finish eleventh in the Western Conference two games out of a plane birth the pelicans had the eighth worst defense in the league this season following a truncated training camp I'm Dave Ferrie

Wizards Scott Brooks Brooks Stan Van Gundy NBA Sixers Washington New Orleans Dave Ferrie
Three Degrees of Separation From Neil Fallon With Rockie Brockway

The Social-Engineer Podcast

02:05 min | 1 d ago

Three Degrees of Separation From Neil Fallon With Rockie Brockway

"We are here with the most patient guests on the planet earth because we had some technical difficulties morning. Rockie brockway is currently the practice lead for the office of the cfo. Wow that sounds like really formal. And i'm gonna say trusted sec. Which just makes me think of dave and formal in dave. Don't go together but this learn more about that. Twenty eight years of experience and information security business risk rocky you specialize in business risk analysis in the inherent relationships between data assets adversaries and the organization's brand value you provide strategic and tactical advisory services for trusted set clients assisting them in maturing their organization security programs so first of all thank you so much for being here and being patient thank you. It's a pleasure to be on podcast. I'm excited actually to learn a little more about first of all this title even means the practice lead for the office of the cfo for trusted sec. Because that's not something i've heard before. So what is what. Does that even mean church. So so at trust the sec. My role and my team You know really is working close with organizations in kind of that virtual chief information security officer just from an activity perspective Helping organizations further mature their security programs really taking a look at how organizations can better align the the protection of important stuff Really with the business right. So there's so much that from a from an organic security program growth perspective that doesn't know inherently are naturally aligned with you know what the business is actually trying to accomplish. Security tends to be kind of a bubble over here for many organizations and so we we try to break down those barriers help. Organizations help really help organizations at our align all those activities around protecting the important things with the with business need in an requirements.

Rockie Brockway SEC Dave
Durant's Sensational Performance Sends Nets to 3-2 Lead

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 1 d ago

Durant's Sensational Performance Sends Nets to 3-2 Lead

"James harden was back in the next line up but it was Kevin Durant's triple double that led them to a one fourteen one await went over the box Duran carried the nets on his back delivering forty nine points seventeen rebounds and ten assists Jeff green also had a big night off the bench scoring twenty seven is Brooklyn took a three games to two lead in the Eastern Conference semifinals harden played all but two minutes providing five points eight rebounds and six assists in his first game since coming out of the series opener in the first minute yeah this intent to Kubo had thirty four points and twelve boards for the box to lead by sixteen at halftime before allowing seventy one points over the last two quarters I'm Dave Ferrie

James Harden Kevin Durant Duran Jeff Green Nets Harden Brooklyn Kubo Dave Ferrie
Jokic, Antetokounmpo Among All-NBA First Team

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 2 d ago

Jokic, Antetokounmpo Among All-NBA First Team

"Reigning MVP the Cali okay just among the list of players named to the all NBA first team the nuggets center averaged twenty six point four points ten point eight rebounds in eight point three assists in seventy two games during the regular season he also averaged twenty nine point eight points as Denver advance to the Western Conference finals before getting swept by Phoenix Bucks for Janice intend to Cooper was unanimous first team selection he in your culture joined on the first team by warriors guard Steph curry Mavericks guard Luka Doncic your clippers forward Kawhi Leonard I'm Dave Ferrie

Nuggets Phoenix Bucks NBA Denver Janice Steph Curry Cooper Luka Doncic Warriors Mavericks Kawhi Leonard Clippers Dave Ferrie
Look In The Mirror - The Importance of Measuring and Tracking Everything

Elliman Daily Podcast

02:41 min | 2 d ago

Look In The Mirror - The Importance of Measuring and Tracking Everything

"Little bit today about holding the mirror up to yourself a little bit and and creating something predictable for yourself and what we mean by. That is the conversation between peer. Nice started on the idea tracking and measuring. We're both big tracking and measuring people. And so when i say tracking. Let's put some definition on that. Peter so like when i say tracking measure. What does that mean to. You means image picking out some key metrics or versus say keeping different key metrics in your lifetime. That you'd wanna move. You wanna move the needle forward you want proven you want to become better at and and making sure that those metrics are the are the right metrics significant metrics that metrics that. If you move them forward you're going to see huge results in your life. So you know putting this mirror in front of ourselves on a regular basis is a great way to see where we're at and then measure it to where we wanna go. I'm really curious. Who has a really tough time kind of tracking and measuring goals or things that you feel are important to you but just who has a tough time with that. Yeah like a lot of people. Yeah me too. I have those issues to uae portland. Peter why is it important to track and measure. And i think i wanna throw context on this. Because we're going to dive into track and measure doesn't i'm not just talking about like your data For or your commissioning. I'm talking like track and measure. And and i know that sounds a little robotic for some people. They hear that near like a like you know. I'm not one of those people. But but why is it court. What makes it important. What makes it important for you. Peter where you don't track you don't track and measure things. What happens well. I mean i've i've done both ways. Dave in you know the ultimate not tracking and measuring is taking your bills and throwing them in the drawer not paying attention to your health. You know saying that you know. I just work hard. And whatever comes my way comes my way not measuring your business metrics and just basically taking a putting your head in the sand kind of a philosophy not balancing your checkbook not looking at your taxes not thinking about you know these things that that trillion gonna come by by bite you in the but if you don't pay attention and they will show up

Peter Portland Dave
Wolfgang Van Halen on his Debut Album and Influences

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:33 min | 2 d ago

Wolfgang Van Halen on his Debut Album and Influences

"Hearing the whole thing. It does emphasize to me that it's dead on to say two of the touchstones here are foo fighters jimmy world. You and i have been talking about it for a while. And i mean obviously there's a ton of influences and their stuff that only you can do a lot of that but when you think of what lineage. That's what it is. Tell me about like discovering those bands. It's not like you had to dig deep in the crates to find them. They're pretty popular bands. But you know discovering this bans personally really specifically what you kinda took from them as far as inspiration. Yeah when it when it comes to. I always had this dream of doing an album with me playing everything. Just like dave grohl. Did the first firefighters album. It was just a thing. I always wanted to try. It was always on my list of like this'll be really fun. And when i got back from the two thousand twelve Van halen tour. I was kinda just like okay. Well what do i do now. And i started writing like taking it seriously. And that's when i wrote the song mammoth and it was like okay. I think I think i'm onto something here and that's kind of where it all started. And just from from the band's. I would listen to all the time. Everything from foo fighters to jimmy world to nine inch nails to tool to alice in chains queens of the stone age. You know it just kind of those influences really seemed to inspire me and Yeah i mean th but with the main thing just the dave grohl doing that first fires album and just he. I always had an affinity to two bands like blink. One eighty two and and jimmy world. I really love harmonies. And i think that's where my love for like harmonies melody. Came from with bands like jimmy world. 'cause they're just so strong with that type of stuff so i really laid the foundation for me in terms of that. Mammoth which is a aptly titled. Song is one of my favorite tracks on the album. Tell me about especially since it was the beginning. Tell me about that one coming together. Yeah it seemed to kind of it. Gave me the confidence to kind of be like. Hey okay i think i'm on the right track here. I kind of hit the the tone and the pace of what i was going for for something you know. It felt knew it felt different. It felt something that was like original in my own. It didn't sound like van halen. It didn't sound like anything. It just sounded like this might be what my music sounds

Jimmy World Dave Grohl Van Halen Jimmy
Peterson, Smith Lead Mets to 5-2 Home Win Over Cubs

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 d ago

Peterson, Smith Lead Mets to 5-2 Home Win Over Cubs

"David Peterson earned his first win in exactly two months by allowing just one hit over six shutout innings in the Mets five to win over the cubs Peterson was R. one four with a six point three two ERA in his last nine starts but he allowed just a third inning single to Eric Sogard who me picked up second for the final out of the frame I think it came down to just being able to execute executing pitches throughout the night and I think that led to led to what happened Dominic Smith hit a solo Homer and Kevin pillar added a two run double off loser Jake Arianna as New York beat Chicago at home for the first time in eight games Anthony Rizzo and Patrick wisdom hit back to back homers off Trevor may in the seventh I'm Dave Ferrie

David Peterson Eric Sogard Mets Dominic Smith Cubs Peterson Kevin Pillar Jake Arianna Homer Anthony Rizzo Patrick Wisdom Chicago New York Trevor Dave Ferrie
Vlad Jr Homers to Tie It, Red Sox Top Blue Jays in 9th, 2-1

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 d ago

Vlad Jr Homers to Tie It, Red Sox Top Blue Jays in 9th, 2-1

"Rafael Devers land a line drive off the green monster in the bottom of the ninth giving the red Sox a two one win over the blue jays Devers went deep happening after Vladimir Guerrero homered to tie it it was Guerrero's major league leading twenty second home run of the season and his fourth in as many games he continues to amaze manager Charlie mon Toyo you don't teach that you know A. S. A. you closer and uses of all five hundred miles you know on a breaking point she it's been fun to watch the walk off win came after the Bluejays belted thirteen home runs in back to back wins over the red Sox Boston starter Nathan Eovaldi took a one hitter into the seventh Matt Barnes got the win despite blowing the save Rockfield always took the loss I'm Dave Ferrie

Rafael Devers Devers Charlie Mon Toyo Vladimir Guerrero A. S. A. Red Sox Guerrero Bluejays Nathan Eovaldi Matt Barnes Boston Rockfield Dave Ferrie
Semyon Varlamov, Islanders Beat Lightning 2-1 in Game 1

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 4 d ago

Semyon Varlamov, Islanders Beat Lightning 2-1 in Game 1

"So any of our alarm off made thirty saves in the islanders got goals from Matt bars Alan Ryan Pulock to beat the lightning to one in Tampa fire alarm off blank Tampa Bay until Brayden point netted a power play goal in the final minute we were focusing on our game today and then at that that's why had a success Marcel scored for the fourth time in five games making it one nothing on a breakaway in the second period following a bad pass by lightning captain Steven Stamkos not for the most part one we had a chance to make the right play we did and can didn't give in give too much pull out double the York's lead with the shot from the point that alluded Andre that's left in the third period the islanders will carry a four game winning streak into game two on Tuesday in Tampa I'm Dave very

Matt Bars Alan Ryan Pulock Islanders Brayden Tampa Bay Tampa Marcel Steven Stamkos Andre York Dave
Islanders Beat Bruins 6-2 in Game 6, Reach Stanley Cup Semi-Finals

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last week

Islanders Beat Bruins 6-2 in Game 6, Reach Stanley Cup Semi-Finals

"The islanders are heading to the semi finals for the second straight year following a six two win over the Bruins the islanders took control with a three goal second period entered the semifinal rematch against the lightning the game was tied one one in the second until Brock Nelson scored two straight goals in a seven nineteen span place is rocking tonight the fans are feed us energy team played great Kyle Palmieri made it for one with a stuff shot against two Carrasco who stopped twenty three of twenty seven shots Brad Marchand second power play goal of the night through the Bruins within four to early in the third but the islanders I stood on empty netters by cal Clutterbuck and Ryan Pulock I'm Dave Ferrie

Islanders Brock Nelson Bruins Kyle Palmieri Brad Marchand Carrasco Cal Clutterbuck Ryan Pulock Dave Ferrie
"dave l." Discussed on The Sue Plex Podcast

The Sue Plex Podcast

03:50 min | Last month

"dave l." Discussed on The Sue Plex Podcast

"Responsibility to be. Because i have something of that families who've in british wrestling saying i have a huge audience. But i have some people who hear my stuff that i about my mental health stuff in about the importance of normalising talking about it today with my sexuality. I talked about that for the first time publicly. this year. Tried to normalize by that stuff as well as To try him to set an example. That way i think is something the who've us you have the any kind of platform. If we feel comfortable doing it should should try to make the effort today. So that's why. I've tried to push towards during a bit more this year. Definitely great new. You mentioned your sexuality and does list now and oversee dive came out To one who didn't know in january twenty twenty one did a wonderful pace in wrestletalk magazine as a few Paul costs as well with wrestletalk and with abc regarding coming out as gay. Now i'll be frank. I did now until i sold a self and wicked good on you dive. that's fantastic. I dive you know. You'll just die is fantastic. How how did it feel often ryan that and token about that. How did you like after the Snot sigh of relief at donald that phrase but like did you know what it was interesting because i i china's to come out in in the article. I write mainly because i was writing an article about the history of lgbtq representation in wrestling and sorry. some ways was through the through. The decades has been negative so an has an effect on people and i saw assault does full nice. If i'm going to write about that is it will be more. It will be clear. I'm being authentic. If i explain why. It's actually affects me personally. Because of this united's are like a. This is a good time to the mentioned An annoyed is kind of it was sort of long overdue. Anyway for the reasons. I said about the mental health stuff about just trying to be an example of someone who has had whatever amount of success. Had you know. I've been able to to be caught of this community wrestling emily and it's not. It's not a barrier. It's not an obstacle and but that aside. I didn't really think it was that important. Because i've been out to most noble. Most friends close friends outside the industry and family in the lep since about two thousand nine for a decade. And so i was just i. I always kind of like the stomach. Ninety percent of the job of coming out and this other soda ten percent of like i tell you kind of wider group of friends on facebook and in in the industry where you were Public life be nice to do that. One day that's fine too finishing the task but whatever the liable to me and we'll i learned from that the data that news came out like an and and is the. Oh my god. This is important. Because like i got many all this amazing messages from people who i respect in the industry in random strangers. Like saying thank you for doing it in a nuclear talking about it and that kind of thing so something. The.

ten percent Paul Ninety percent wrestletalk donald this year united today january twenty twenty frank facebook china first time ryan about two thousand nine lgbtq british one a decade
"dave l." Discussed on The Sue Plex Podcast

The Sue Plex Podcast

05:40 min | Last month

"dave l." Discussed on The Sue Plex Podcast

"A full highs in for the so many laws and unfocused some of all colleagues over the years have not made it for To to their battles with mental health and unnoted you are a big africa. Soul support in mental health in for people have seen overseas you fundraising efforts is down for. Calm me about your your own personal if you don't mind a bit of mental health and how'd you feel what you feel needs to change in the industry in terms of mental health about in the wrestling industry Of of the nasal of changes going on in the british. Seen the for the best. Because of what happened last year with the speaking out as you know clearly a lot of the things were happening prior to that not just damaging in ways but very much damaging to people's mental health. The improvements we king in the industry there safeguarding and let stuff just sort of a less of a bullying coacher again. Wrestling had necessarily more of a problem with that than there is other positive society but but the fact that our industry is kind of starting to have that conversation with itself. I think is is very helpful. But for me at least progressively being volpi british pressing never was never the source of any mental health. Problems is always been from the side for me. It's always been a positive. I understand that that's not the experience of everyone but myron experiences all had anxiety problems since my teen is which i now would classify as more of a ocd type anxiety but is you know about mental health is like generalized anxiety disorder. Which is where you worry about. Fifteen twenty different subjects in an hour. But you worry. Worry worry about everything i tend to be. One of those fake is subject to the ugandan obsess about and then worry about that for a month or two weeks and you call them thinking about it and it can be the most wacky. It could be a the the stereotype about. Ocd type stuff is all people checking with lifetime. Tapsell for where they've looked the door and it can be something as mundane zap. It can also be yoga's got exist. I going to hell like. I don't know even religious but you can pick one of these. You'll brain can pick one of these subjects and for some reason even though most of the time you sort of feel like well at i ninety also to that question Anyway what my doing with my day. Today i find condemn one of these rabbit holes. Where just kind of sort of have this endless unanswerable debate.

last year Today Fifteen twenty a month two weeks ninety One one an hour british africa
"dave l." Discussed on The Sue Plex Podcast

The Sue Plex Podcast

03:24 min | Last month

"dave l." Discussed on The Sue Plex Podcast

"Because it's real way to practice like you. Can you can obviously watch some wrestling on your laptop in your house and scream at two but it just feels so up. Go used to it now. Because i've done quite stuffing production production. Where you all essentially doing that but somebody who hasn't done that before it. It just feels so weird. Doesn't it by having it. You a commentating at you. Tv screen at and you probably haven't we've you Contact with so really. There's only way to rehearse in a proper meaningful way. Until so i went to mild issue for it just like well i'll just from out. He see what would come out in seattle. I interact with this team guy sitting next to and how it works and it was word well enough for me to get the job. I have no doubt that i would be utterly embarrassed by headed back you go. I'll save type somewhere probably days. I might have to be frank if you get to. This is that. I get to listen to yours. After they find mine they will sorts. That's f. so moving from i w didn't You're doing what regularly for after by wnw and you doing mentioning you during the post. Production siham l. common train new scientists. Now that was reason that christmas student transcription for that. Ready bay weiwei back. It's not so averred of some of the country from that house chris. How does how was that was mentioning. It was quite difficult to win. That transitions you've got the balance off of its like and he a move and here's another move up the how how was it. What should be comparisons between a live audience and or live show and this post production stock because i think people underestimate differences. Yeah the first thing is. If i wasn't doing it with like a headset with the volume from the type up like a pie. Then even though. I feel i was being loud when i listened back to it. It's very obvious studio. And i'm so. I feel like i'm talking if i'm in the library. One of the things one of the techniques. I learned very quickly. The if you're doing something in post production is i make sure i have my headset. I have the crowd noise on a pretty much not me not as damaging my is but you know pretty much really loud so it sounds so i feel like i'm in a Environment and that naturally makes you voice loud lies. You can sound slightly detached. Sometimes you know like sometimes when you get wrestling comment commentary on a wrestling videogame obviously it was just. It's just someone in a booth spouting off a lighter lions could remove from the action the there cooling we talk atkins video game like it can real life. Country is done. Invites production can feel at as well. So you do everything you can. Even though you're just sitting in a room watching it to make it feel like light and sound like to you. You're in that space that you die as a few live but not having with the stuff is the it's it's.

christmas first seattle One two one of the techniques atkins chris
"dave l." Discussed on The Sue Plex Podcast

The Sue Plex Podcast

03:37 min | Last month

"dave l." Discussed on The Sue Plex Podcast

"We could do not the wwf wrestling challenge just about. Yeah oh yeah that's why don't we just watch your house instead. And then i found like someone what my dad had skies they would recall the pay per views for us and yeah it was. It was quite quite sophisticated operation for a nine year old. Actually manage to seek while the younger generation. Who don't understand the technicalities of coding sky back. They'd right the have to remember that there are. Some people are the age of thirty. Listen to this podcast. Look hey. I know right the ihs types which you could only puts a limited a male and you had to put in super long play to get like a couple of pay per views on tape. I have a book so tape still somewhere in my house at some point which owning ridiculous alone pry to get to get used to be a. This is my trick. Anyone show chris at a slightly shifted system but it was like it the rule before the pipe of on the pay per view than the roar of the pie before smackdown. It was like she had a book. Did as well as the whole story i ours. I think he's back so we've got a bit long. The rules a little bit role is is going to get with the type like this whole sort of you know difficult scenario having to get people to do it also about six years me the ninety seven just as yet kicking off at we got sky at my house is by mum. Mouthful of the five channels was far too many. He was old fashioned people but me and my dad grew wanted sky sports for football and wrestling. Whatever so we basically overruled go to and then and then from then on it was like an goes incident was starting to be old but yet the internet was the thing then unite ninety seven. Ninety eight as well as then you. Could i remember. Wwf had their own area on. Aol led dial up internet. And you can see video clips and stuff so you could kind of even if you didn't have sky because the internet was coming in you could start to see what was what were missing as well as i said bye. Yeah bye bye. The attitude era it becomes the from white ninety one when i go into it. Free the fruit of the new generation era in ninety four ninety five ninety six was a relied on my ingenuity against who wrestling action in my life. That's good network. I'll have to give you that. That beginning Schmoozing with the right. What's the wrestling more screen. As a good life skill to have died as a brilliant nice to have as also so would you say them with other than oversea. The first ever match watch. What would be your favorite matches. So we're growing up what would be your If you could someone. I could sit you in front of the table. Insight that is made Love recipe of the the initial mattress. I this is my showcase match. What would it be. I think from memory but it was like april. May when i go into wrestling so it was really a full year until i experienced wrestlemainia which but i think by then i'd got light of the silver vision. Vhs isn't all the kids in the playground. Interesting by the in ho cardigan the ultimate warrior match your man with the biggest trend.

May five channels first ninety seven nine year old about six years april ninety chris Ninety eight ninety one couple of pay per views age of thirty four ninety five ninety six seven
"dave l." Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

04:43 min | 6 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"Let's let's chew on that fat okay. Bottom could be a dream life who you listen to. The life is shorts on your host justin long night good. Do shampoo also vaguely resemble with a filipino. Man i would say of all the asian countries you may resemble. I've you know who i get. A lot is Yeah which you don't get around the time that you're mostly your body. Yeah my skill fighting scales now around the time. I grew Every once in a while. I'll attempt to grow facial hair and When i grow a goatee go for something you do have. Yeah thank you for sure. Yeah 'cause he has. I mean he's obviously very impressive in many ways but the ability to grow facial hair is not one of those things that one of the things. That's impressive about him. It's quite unimpressed. Right but just looking at you. I would assume you might like filipino food. Only because i mean. Of course. I didn't know you. I would assume you might be part filipino. Yeah maybe that's it. Maybe they'll subconscious but in a discussed defense great too i like talking to the crew and it was a small. It was one of the small shoot so like you spent a lot of time with each other. It's not like you going back to your trailer and stuff. So i like talking to him about and i like food and he was a good like talking about filipino people so you never have filipino food. I don't think so. I may have to remember like it's like the barrier variance something. It's very meat. Based i mean like they eat a lot of meat but how does it. Compare to say Like vietnamese food. You know what. It's kinda like i remember when you had that special losing it like entrails and everything every like every part of I try animal. I couldn't get past that stuff because it's just it's a psychological barrier with that stuff once you get past it and the texture sometimes the flavor is welcome. I hope they're Squeamish vegans vegans lie. No maybe because the truth is i mean this. I really do wanna eat less eventually. No from my point of view. You've been eating less meat. Yeah yeah the past. No i know. I'm not like sincere. So are we talking about. We are talking about the philippines because our guest today while he's half filipino. Yesterday's dave battista. He's a lot more than a half filipino person. Much more he is also half greek. No that's pretty much it. yeah well. There's the episode. you've been listening to. he is. He's a renaissance man. She was a huge wrestler. I n krishna are not You bumped up to not be interesting but we're not that into wrestling so i didn't. This is how big he wasn't the wrestling world. That despite our lack of knowledge ryan. I still new investor. They're very few. There's a handful of wrestlers that are so famous in the wrestling world. Who else would you say about Would say chris jericho. I knew who he was. Hulk hogan of course people like that will yeah magnet. Yeah but like those about well now. I seen a modern era. I don't know if like. Oh the ms but see. They've all transitional i know ric flair into an actress. Yeah rick flair. Yes anyway point is he's a very famous okay and now he's a very famous actor mostly known for guardians of the galaxy and the mcu and The man crush universe. Yes but now. He's also doing he's branching out as an actor We'll get into it. We'll get into a lot. Because i just find him so fascinating i got to meet him briefly Through mutual friend. John down in tampa and Teachers could not have been sweeter person and really interesting Surprisingly interesting and Defied a lot of stereotypes that i had about somebody like dave. Well i can't wait to hear all right you're about to hear it is my My ketchup with my friend my largest friend. You don't have to brag that he's large or he's my friend. I do because i still have that little. You know that movie my bodyguard. I'm still a little. Chris makepeace in me where i need an avenue. No he was a great child actor But i i liked it. I have a friend. I got it okay so anyway catch up with my big friend. Big-hearted front to what a kind person and very funny and very very.

dave battista wrestling justin rick flair chris jericho philippines Hulk hogan ric ryan tampa Chris makepeace John dave
"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

15:45 min | 8 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

"Was a lot of fun antiques that were part of the core. Start pulling the stuff off the walls he started getting rid of. Our honey buttered cornbread he thought it would be easier to take the honey butter off the top of the Corn Brin. Just put it in the corn bread. This'll. One of the most interesting stories of famous Dave's was in the beginning I didn't have money enough to have a smoker I used a garbage Camden and so are all American. Barbecue feast served on a garbage candlelit while at. Got Rid of the garbage can let's try to put it on some type of stainless steel platter and I can remember people just coming up to me and Saint Eighth. My. Family just absolutely loves the garbage can lead with all your barbecue on it where garbage can lid go? A lot of things that just was being the heart and saw famous Dave's was being ripped out. I guess you were So angry that you I read that you like severed ties with the company in two thousand fourteen is what happened. Well, I wasn't going to listen to some guy who ran McDonald's tell me how to be a barbecue pit master I had barbecue sauce running through my veins. I wasn't going to stand for it and I just said look. If. The board at the time wanted to have. Somebody like Ed Rienzie. This is what you're going to do. I'm not going to be part of it and so I basically emotionally. Legally financially was separated out famous Dave's wow financially to. Everything you divested. It's all gone. Sold all your socks well, I didn't have much stock left. You know what? A lot of people don't realize. They may think I had a lot of stock well over the years in the beginning you know like any business you have your eyes and you have your lows. Well, there are times when famous Dave's had it slows. I put up my stock as. Collateral and there were margin calls and. By time things were were they were there wasn't much left. I mean. Your name was still on all these storefronts all over the country Well, you know one of the things I didn't realize that when the company went public is you don't own your name anymore. Yeah. So consequently, I lost something that I had worked all my life for and you know I wish I had attorneys that had given me better council in the early days because you know I'm a native American I. I don't have a community of people around me that could give me good counsel and if the attorneys really cared for me, what they should have said was Dave, you shouldn't go public you really have something special you should really keep this in your family. So. You step away and the brand is is doing well at this point, they're number of management shakeups and again in two thousand sixteen. You get a call they some they want you back. They want you to come help them rebrand and Return to their roots what was the story? So I'm kind of out of famous Dave's and one day I get a call from Mike Right who was running the famous products retail line and really mike was a good friend and he called me up Dave. He said, I'm in the area. Do you mind if I stop over some mic shows up my house. He said Dave. He said there's some things we got talked about. He said the company misses you off the franchise owners. Miss you your customers. They Miss. You people who love famous dates are missing. You got to come back. And I said well I don't think the leadership wants me. He said, that's not true. He said people want you. They want you involved and I said, well, I am out of famous Dave's I'm not going back. and. He really laid a guilt trip on me. He said Dave. Time and they're in never be another time those every time you come back you gotta come back now because Ed runs is not going to be around. The company really needs you. There's new leadership we need you back how Felt. Pretty. Validating. I was in tears. I thought I would never hear that again. I. After Mike Left my wife and I talked and. It was really. A tough conversation of what do we do? Famous Dave's has really been such a love hate relationship where I. Love the Food I created I love being with our guests and the reason why came back was My wife and I came to an understanding that it was really the people that we cared about. It was the franchise owners. It was the people who came to famous states who've loved the food. And I think it was for that. Is I. Knew I had to come back. So you you start to against essentially consult with. With a company to to help them like do a rebrand and things I. Guess you kind of suggested was to to. Bring back the classics, Right. The the Cajun Chicken Sandwich and the brisket burgers and other things but also I guess at that time this twenty sixteen at even to this day, a famous Dave's started to buy back some of its franchises in order to kind of retake control I guess of the business. One of things I think the company realized is that there was some franchise owners who probably had enough there was a number of management changes over the years and and they kind of got disenfranchised with the you know not having a passion they once had. So one of the things company realizes that the only way they could write the ship was they probably had to buy back some the franchise reinvest in them, get back the training programs that we used to have an just kinda reinvent ourselves and bring back the basics. Getting back to what made us famous in the beginning, we needed to be devoted to making people. Happy. and. You see you came in in two thousand, eighteen, Jeff Criollo and I guess I mean did he starts ask kind of bring back some of those things like the the trash can and the the history I mean you go on the website now and the your story is is right there's front and center. Well I think one of the things that makes Jeff. So special is that he grew up eating famous Dave's in Chicago. He loved famous Dave's he was the first CEO. Who actually called me up on a regular basis I mean Jeff and I talk all hours of the night. He'll. He'll call me up at eleven o'clock and talk to one in the morning. This is how passionate this guy is. Jeff reaches out to the franchise partners. You'll see jeff and a restaurant actually pushing a broom when we're doing a remodel on one of the restaurants Jeff was there with a paintbrush I had never seen any prior CEO's actually get in a restaurant and WANNA work. And and your role in the company in a sense, and this is not I. Hope this is sounds complimentary I mean you really are you're like Colonel Sanders I mean you really are kind of the ambassador, the brand ambassador of the company. Do you feel like you are listening to more now than you than you were in the past? Today, there's without a doubt. Jeff listens to me. Jeff is a first CEO that actually brought me back to the board and. Said you know the board needs to hear your ideas Dave and because after all you know I I'm one of the few Barbecue restaurant owners that was actually inducted into the National Barbecue Hall of Fame Yeah I'm a celebrity judge at all of the big barbecue events I live in this world of barbecue. But the is the company still publicly traded today. Yes. The company's still publicly traded I. Think our stock is around three bucks, right? So The only place in goes up. Do. You think that I mean we're in the midst this pandemic right and many states in which famous Dave's operating Ha have certain restrictions and a lot of delivery and as you know, the restaurant industry really been hit hard Do you know I mean how how is famous Dave's doing in the midst of? This crisis. Famous, Dave's really is. Built on what's basically picnic food barbecue travels it travels really well when you look at our menu when you're serving. barbecued ribs pulled pork sandwiches, beings call saw that's the type of food that travels the famous Dave's restaurants are built for takeout. We have our own dedicated takeout doors and that's why I think famous days for the first time in a long long time is on the road to recovery. So we're actually able to thrive unlike a lot of restaurants who are struggling. You know given given all the ups and downs of of your career in a lot of incredible ups and a lot of incredible triumphs, and successes. But also some really tough tough breaks. I mean you know even even with famous Dave's kind of taking public and then. You, know? Losing. The business for awhile and the brand, and and of course now you're back in involved with it but. I mean when you look back on on the different decisions you made, would you have done things differently or do you think that you kind of had to make the mistakes you made in order to? In order to learn how to do things. Right. Guy. I struggle I think every day sometimes thinking that I wish I could do things differently but you know the reality is I really have overcome a lot of diversity in my life. I, have done things in my life that I wish I and Don I should have been dead three times. I've been broke three times. But every time, I've always come back stronger. You know often tell people that. Life, is not always on top of the mountain. It's the valleys in. It's a struggles down there that you have to come back from where you learn things I think that's how you grow and so if you're not out there on the edge making things happen, how do you know what's possible but one of the things, I, I go back to his. The food famous days. My original recipes are still holding the test of time and. As, much as we shoot ourselves in the foot as much as we've made our mistakes and growing. People have always resonated with my food and so yes, we've had our tough times at famous Dave's but but look at what we've also accomplished our barbecue products are in big box retailers like target Sam's Club Costco. All, over America. It could not have happened if things were easy. So. I think my story of by struggles and overcoming the my. adhd. My alcoholism overcoming the tough times in my life is no different than the story of famous Dave's. Dave you know you your legacy will continue to live on after you're gone because some point we're all gone obviously and this brand will continue and is that more important to you that legacy than than than than wealth or are they both equally important? Well. First of all I don't think I've ever worked to to get a paycheck more than I've worked to be a positive difference in the lives of other people. I've worked really hard to be good at what I do but more than that guy. I think if anything people remember about me, I've been able to build something and give jobs to families create opportunity where there was none in Lotta people sometimes say God would I wish I was in your shoes I have to laugh at a I don't think. So but the one thing I can share is I am grateful I live a life of gratefulness I live a life of sobriety and I live a life that I am so fortunate to be living this country because. The things that I have done, it doesn't make sense. There's there's no rhyme or reason that I was able to get a bank loan on my signature alone. Much less having one point nine, eight grade average in high school, no Undergrad and getting into Harvard University who would ever known that from some Indian kid growing up on the west side Chicago. Yeah when you think about your story and and. Everything you accomplished to you. Do you think that what happened to you happened because of your skill and and hard work and perseverance or do you think a lot of it has to do with luck? Well. I don't know about luck I? Wish I had been lucky. You, know Luck is created when you have a dream, you're willing to work for that dream. You're willing to work hard You know I think lock is a byproduct of you just. Be. One. Hundred percent devoted to. Never ever giving up. That's Dave Anderson founder of famous Dave's by the way some of you may remember that several years ago Dave. Competed a food network barbecue challenge called best in smoke and he made it all the way to the finals until till right at the very end, they pull a surprise. You've got twenty minutes to cook something out of Tofu. What's toefl in all my years of cookie I had no clue what Tofu was and today I know there's like a firm Tofu serve like a silky of media they gave us the silky smooth and I lost fifty thousand dollars because I could not cook. CanNot Grill Silky off I tried it fell through the Gabriel greats. Hey thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts if you want to write to us or email addresses H. I. bt at NPR Dot Org if you WanNa follow us on twitter were at how I built this or at Cairo's and on. INSTAGRAM. It's at Guy Dot Roz. This episode was produced by JC Howard with music composed by teen Arab Louis. Thanks also to lose metzker dare GAELS, Julia Carney Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers our intern is faira safari. I'm Guy Rise and.

Dave Anderson Jeff Ed Rienzie Mike Right Corn Brin National Barbecue Hall of Fame Chicago Saint Eighth McDonald Jeff Criollo Don I Camden Colonel Sanders adhd NPR Dot Roz CEO twitter Harvard University JC Howard
"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:31 min | 8 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

"Hate welcome back to how I built this from. Npr I'm guy is so after losing a seat on the board of famous Dave's Dave. Anderson continued to do publicity work and consulting for the company but had much less of a say in how it was being run day day. Famous Dave's was going three lot of management shakeups and in two thousand fourteen, the job of CEO went to a former CEO from McDonald's named Ed Rienzie tried to turn famous Dave's into a mcrib. Got Rid of a law the history of famous Dave's there was a lot of fun antiques that were part of the core. Start pulling the stuff off the walls he started getting rid of. Our honey buttered cornbread he thought it would be easier to take the honey butter off the top of the Corn Brin. Just put it in the corn bread. This'll. One of the most interesting stories of famous Dave's was in the beginning I didn't have money enough to have a smoker I used a garbage Camden and so are all American. Barbecue feast served on a garbage candlelit while at. Got Rid of the garbage can let's try to put it on some type of stainless steel platter and I can remember people just coming up to me and Saint Eighth. My. Family just absolutely loves the garbage can lead with all your barbecue on it where garbage can lid go? A lot of things that just was being the heart and saw famous Dave's was being ripped out. I guess you were So angry that you I read that you like severed ties with the company in two thousand fourteen is what happened. Well, I wasn't going to listen to some guy who ran McDonald's tell me how to be a barbecue pit master I had barbecue sauce running through my veins. I wasn't going to stand for it and I just said look. If. The board at the time wanted to have. Somebody like Ed Rienzie. This is what you're going to do. I'm not going to be part of it and so I basically emotionally. Legally financially was separated out famous Dave's wow financially to. Everything you divested. It's all gone. Sold all your socks well, I didn't have much stock left. You know what? A lot of people don't realize. They may think I had a lot of stock well over the years in the beginning you know like any business you have your eyes and you have your lows. Well, there are times when famous Dave's had it slows. I put up my stock as. Collateral and there were margin calls and. By time things were were they were there wasn't much left. I mean. Your name was still on all these storefronts all over the country Well, you know one of the things I didn't realize that when the company went public is you don't own your name anymore. Yeah. So consequently, I lost something that I had worked all my life for and you know I wish I had attorneys that had given me better council in the early days because you know I'm a native American I. I don't have a community of people around me that could give me good counsel and if the attorneys really cared for me, what they should have said was Dave, you shouldn't go public you really have something special you should really keep this in your family. So. You step away and the brand is is doing well at this point, they're number of management shakeups and again in two thousand sixteen. You get a call they some they want you back. They want you to come help them rebrand and Return to their roots what was the story? So I'm kind of out of famous Dave's and one day I get a call from Mike Right who was running the famous products retail line and really mike was a good friend and he called me up Dave. He said, I'm in the area. Do you mind if I stop over some mic shows up my house. He said Dave. He said there's some things we got talked about. He said the company misses you off the franchise owners. Miss you your customers. They Miss. You people who love famous dates are missing. You got to come back. And I said well I don't think the leadership wants me. He said, that's not true. He said people want you. They want you involved and I said, well, I am out of famous Dave's I'm not going back. and. He really laid a guilt trip on me. He said Dave. Time and they're in never be another time those every time you come back you gotta come back now because Ed runs is not going to be around. The company really needs you. There's new leadership we need you back how Felt. Pretty. Validating. I was in tears. I thought I would never hear that again. I. After Mike Left my wife and I talked and. It was really. A tough conversation of what do we do? Famous Dave's has really been such a love hate relationship where I. Love the Food I created I love being with our guests and the reason why came back was My wife and I came to an understanding that it was really the people that we cared about. It was the franchise owners. It was the people who came to famous states who've loved the food. And I think it was for that. Is I. Knew I had to come back. So you you start to against essentially consult with. With a company to to help them like do a rebrand and things I. Guess you kind of suggested was to to. Bring back the classics, Right. The the Cajun Chicken Sandwich and the brisket burgers and other things but also I guess at that time this twenty sixteen at even to this day, a famous Dave's started to buy back some of its franchises in order to kind of retake control I guess of the business. One of things I think the company realized is that there was some franchise owners who probably had enough there was a number of management changes over the years and and they kind of got disenfranchised with the you know not having a passion they once had. So one of the things company realizes that the only way they could write the ship was they probably had to buy back some the franchise reinvest in them, get back the training programs that we used to have an just kinda reinvent ourselves and bring back the basics. Getting back to what made us famous in the beginning, we needed to be devoted to making people. Happy. and. You see you came in in two thousand, eighteen, Jeff Criollo and I guess I mean did he starts ask kind of bring back some of those things like the the trash can and the the history I mean you go on the website now and the your.

Dave Ed Rienzie McDonald Corn Brin Mike Right CEO Anderson Saint Eighth Jeff Criollo Camden
"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:44 min | 8 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

"For and you know over the years it just kind of built up where. I couldn't wait till Friday so I could party and couldn't wait till. Saturday. So I could party after work and you know what I didn't realize sat pretty soon I was partying on Sunday and it wasn't too long after that I was partying on Monday Tuesday, Wednesday partying all the time. and. One morning my wife came to the bedroom. She said Dave you got some friends downstairs. You better go down and save on I. So I don't remember inviting anybody over she said while they're here and they say your friend of yours. I'm all confused I have no idea what's going on. So I go downstairs and sure enough. There is people that I knew and it didn't take me too long affair at was going on, they were doing intervention on me. And that was a tough thing. Nobody wants to admit that they struggle with alcohol. Some nobody wants to admit that they need help. Cure I was listening to my wife, my son. and. Some really close friends. Tommy how much my drinking was taking a toll on the family? And when they said Dave, you gotTa choice here. What are you going to do? IS I. Let's do this thing. How were you able to Did you treatment? Yes I Treatment sounds like a tough thing I think it's one of the reasons why People were struggling kind of don't want to have anything to do with it. Because it sounds like something people do to you but today, I am so grateful twenty-five years April than sober that I today I look at the treatment is really recovery and recovery as a gift. And I mean meantime things were moving fast with famous Dave's like you open that first location in in ninety four and then a second one. In Ninety, five in Minneapolis and then. By, Ninety six, you've got four restaurants I think all of them in that region. But then with with just four restaurants, you decide that year to to take the company publishing. Well. I'm very open about it I. think that was one of the worst mistakes of my life going public because I didn't realize that when you call public, you don't own it anymore, but we went public and we we actually have salt. We were supposed to open up at six dollars we ended up opening at eleven. Wow. So. Famous Dave's goes public in nineteen ninety-six and a new CEO is named Douglas. Lanham did you did you bring Douglas on because you were now a public company and and you thought it was better that he can run the operation? Well, one of the things I was told by the Wall Street guys with that I was just a barbecue guy that I need to hire Wall Street savvy casual dining executives. Yeah. The one thing was is that they tried to run famous Dave's as a casual dining company. When really we were a barbecue company, we SORTA lost our. Of being just barbecue and and people were trying to turn it into something else. So you are basically the chairman of the Board Douglas Lanham lasted like a year or so before he stepped down because the stock price was falling and and I, guess round two, thousand famous Dave's kind of shifted or pivoted into a franchise model. Did you support that idea I think I was always supportive looking back though I wish we had kept it within the family, but you know we had some good franchise partners but I think one of the problems early on was. They tried to get rid of the lines that we had around the block, and so they thought that the way to levy eight that was to build bigger boxes to giant giant restaurants too big too big and today there's a lot of sixty five, hundred square foot boxes that probably should have never been built but to me, the franchise model was going to be tough for famous Dave's because it was your recipe it was a. Technique and you're kind of handing off to Franchisees and you you risk giving up the quality right when you when you turn to a franchise model. Well I think that's one of the things that hallmark about famous Dave's never really lost the quality of our food. My original menu is actually inspired by Jimmy Johns Dad James Todd who he said Dave, he said first of all, you want to keep everything simple. In the second thing you always want to do everything in threes and he said there's something magic about threes whether it's the Holy Trinity it's the three little pigs three me goes on your market set gall ready aim fire people remember things threes. So the original famous dates menu is really pork beef and chicken coffee milk and pop co saw beans and potato salad. is on threes and even how we trained people we would season small conserve. Now there might be several steps underneath, but everything was done in threes and I think that speaks to going back to that one hundred. Best of the best things that I wanted to accomplish was I wanted to have the best training program in America so I never really days I spent about two million dollars developing my training programs and I created this leadership from the heart training program that. Focused on building up the people. The second thing I did was I created off of university I wanted to create certified pitmasters and then I also created a train the trainer program. And so we spent a lot of money on training. In fact, people would look a famous Dave's and they say, wow, you guys spend a lot of money training people. What happens when you spent policy money training And they leave. All add to do is look at it and say What if I didn't train with the best training I could do. and. They stayed. After the company went public and you kind of founded outside CEO and then. You know there were other kind of corporate folks who were brought in to run the company. Did you feel like you're losing control over the business that that this idea that you had was kind of slipping away from you I think for the most part. The. Only thing I regret it was the company building these bigger boxes and you know barbecue is a type of thing that grows slow and it's slow spell king I. I think that Tried to grow too fast I think was one of the problems of being a publicly traded company. Now, it seemed like we were being run by the quarterly earnings report in if we were to miss earning statement by one penny, my God, the stock got slaughtered and as a native American, I didn't have a lot of people around me that could council me. I was sort of at the mercy of people that knew how to run publicly. Traded companies on Wall Street that. That's what I think.

Dave Douglas Lanham CEO Cure Minneapolis Tommy America chairman Jimmy Johns James Todd
"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:02 min | 8 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

"All around this country, and if you were to tell me that you know for a fact, they had better costs on Anchorage Alaska I will be on a plane today I will be flying up to Anchorage Alaska and by tomorrow night, I will have stolen that recipe. But I mean you I mean, you knew you had recipes because you were you were making barbecue like from the time you were a kid, right? Yeah. I can remember even back. Then we were the first family on our block that had a charcoal grill, and so I started learning how to grill foods and then I wanted to smoke things and we we didn't have a smoker. So I took a an all trash. Can I cut a hole in the bottom took rebar Poor across. So I could put my ribs on top of that, and so by time I open famous Dave's I actually have been working on my recipes for twenty years because the ingredients that you use to create the the sauces, the seasonings barbecue is not easy. It's hard because the to make good barbecue sauce. You know it's almost like Chinese cooking. There's a lot of flavors involved in making a good barbecue sauce. It's our Scott, a robust spiciness to it it's sweet and then. There's different forms of sweetness to it. You you've got your Brown sugars you have your honey's you've got your fruit sauces. There's a lot of nuances to making great tasting barbecue sauce and I think especially when you're creating robust flavors that he is very important. A lot of people may not realize this but every menu item at famous Dave's is hot mic cost saw has a bite. My beans have helped knows. That he opens up the taste buds and that's when you really can enjoy the full flavor of my cooking. And did you give it the name famous Dave's as kind of a joke because you weren't get famous right? Well, the road to famous Dave's not only are we in a small town but I was also eight miles out of town and on the road out of town there's Dave's guns Dave's antiques Dave's boats. So I was going to name my place Dave's famous barbecue check we're getting ready open I get my business cards and it said famous Dave's barbecue. I am mad can't believe the printer messed up my business cards and my wife an all her was them said Dave calmed down. Why don't you just leave? You know we're about ready to get open just leave it. So famous Dave's. The rest is history. I read that like you were obsessed with all kinds of things like when you. When you set out to make the restaurant, you wrote in hundred things that you want us to be the best at not just like the best ribs and the best brisket and. The coleslaw but like the best bathrooms like is that is that right there you want to put a lot of attention into the bathrooms in the restaurant I believe that I'm the first one they coined the term bathroom marketing I. think that's one of the things that people talked about was was my bathrooms my ladies bathroom had imported rose painted basins in twenty four karat gold faucets on a Marble Base I had wrought iron around the mirror I had crown molding I mean who puts crown molding in a bathroom but I remember when we first opened I got a call within the first week. Some Lady said Anderson Right me down for eight thirty on Thursday your women's restroom. I said what she said. You heard me eight thirty I want your women's bathroom. She says I'm going to hold my next cocktail party. Wow. Tell us about you know. There's all kinds of details. It wasn't just great food, but you wanted people to talk about the bathrooms. Wasn't just the bathroom so I, think it goes back to my best the best list Brenston, smy music. I, personally inventory every blue song that was played in famous saves had something like six thousand blues CDs back. Then I knew the difference between Jump Blues, pushed Blues I didn't want any all blues. I wanted all the sort of Chicago Jump Blues. So when people are sitting in a famous Dave's, I, almost wanted to be subliminally they had to start getting in this groove and they felt good and they were bopping around. So that was all the experience I wanted to touch off five senses from the smell of the wonderful would aromas of meat smoking in my To them feeling good because of the music and then per visuals i. T kes my famous Dave's so everything about famous Dave's was really. Sensory Overload I'm looking at Hayward on on the map and it is I mean it's up there. It's northern Wisconsin it is far from everything. It's like got to be what two hours from. Minneapolis. Three hours, three hours we're. We're we're out in the middle of nowhere and. I never advertised it wasn't but months that the word quickly spread throughout Wisconsin and even as far away as Iowa. We're serving six thousand people a week and and as I be walking through the restaurant people would grab me and say Dave you gotta open up one of these in my town. So where you from? Well, we're from Des Moines. Iowa we drove all the way up here. We heard about your barbecue. We just came all the way up here. Just eat people actually demanded us to have famous Dave's and so the the first famous Dave's. Hayward was in Minneapolis, I found an abandoned gas station. It was only twenty nine, hundred square feet. We only had fifty seats and we opened up again without any advertising. But within weeks I've got a line around the block how we're doing phenomenal numbers. I can't even keep food in stock I had to get a refrigerator truck to park next to my little restaurant just so we had food to cook. What what was the I mean what was it that you were? You were doing that was it I mean obviously your food was good but you gotta put the word out how how people finding out about it was just word of mouth. You know it was like word of mouth on steroids I? You know I have no idea. But people were telling friends and friends telling friends you gotta try the barbecue but you know I think that's What speaks to famous Dave's is that I went through all of the the things that took to make great barbecue I slow smoked are ribs until they were tender I flame charged him. So we were able to caramelized sauce on them. We but more than anything guy it's America's food barbecue is how America celebrates you know if you if you WanNa, have a good time. You tell your friends come on over while the backyard barbecue out. I know that while you were starting to get. Famous Dave's up and running. You also Kinda struggling in your personal life. You were drinking heavily at the time. And you would. Later recognized that his alcoholism. Can you. Can you tell me about that about what was going on in your life? Well I'm pretty open that my life. Has, had some very dramatic transformations, I. I do think sometimes that are native American. Folks struggle with the alcoholism. I. Know My. My Mom side. It was in the family on my Dad's side. It was a family and but you know you didn't talk about those things and so I wasn't really aware that was something I needed to watch out.

Dave Wisconsin Alaska Anchorage Alaska Hayward Minneapolis Des Moines Iowa Chicago Scott Anderson America
"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:34 min | 8 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

"Just watched you today sal out every one of your products. I'M GONNA take a fly on this. And with that, he wrote out a check for ten thousand dollars on my signature. And obviously you, you're really able to grow this business I read that like. As certain point, you were doing more than like three hundred, thousand dollars in revenue a year and hired a bunch of people. Employees but up. I. Guess It. Ground to a halt it eventually like went under what happened well. Act of God. I don't know how to explain it other than the Chicago Blizzard of Nineteen seventy-nine, look it up. You will see snow that goes over the rougher cars. The mayor of city of Chicago could not clean city streets for three months because of that blizzard that snowstorm that created a gridlock in the Chicago, a lot of businesses went bankrupt and in the flower business I had a whole bunch of floors that could not pay me at all and then for months no orders. At that time, you're in your twenties were you married? Yeah. Teach you have kids at that point when you were when you had the terrarium business. We just had one young son James and you know a lot of people don't realize. When you can't pay bills you know back then I was digging through seat cushions to find change just so I could buy my kids melk it was tough. It was just so tough that because the snowstorm I ended up going bankrupt lost everything because of that. Yeah. So this is the early nineteen, eighty s and win at business collapsed I guess I guess you worked at a few other jobs in sales before you landed a consulting gig with a native American tribe in Wisconsin Wha. What kind of what kind of business do they have if they needed help with? My Mom's tribe, the lake superior band of Likud Array Right Ojibway, they get called the up dave we understand that you own your own business in Chicago, we could really use your help. They had a cranberry marsh, they had a logging company they had a construction company that was building houses for Indian people the head, a grocery store, they had a printing company they had a gas station and they had a Bingo Hall. But one of the things they noticed right away was every time I was in one of these businesses. Were failing we were losing money like water flowing Alvis. Hundreds of thousands of dollars Easley half a million dollars a year we were losing, and then I realized that the problem was is. With any of the people working within these businesses, they didn't think successfully they. They didn't talk about achievement. So they wanted you to help them kind of turn their businesses around. and. You kind of realize that that morale was actually the biggest problem. It wasn't mismanagement. It wasn't but morale was top challenge not not just morale just the basic understanding of thinking successfully. Yeah. They didn't talk about profits. They didn't talk about achievement. That's when I called up Zig Ziglar I said, Segr- member me. You met my dad where the native Americans from Oklahoma my dad's choctaw. Dave I. so I would like to bring twentieth my managers and my sister managers down to Dallas Texas to go through your born course. So I bring this group down there. I come back and boy did I catch holy how? The tribal leadership comes to me and said, we heard you took all of our managers down to happy camp. Wait could use that money to have groceries for the poor. We could go roofs over the elderly I says, yeah. But you're failing in your businesses because nobody thinks about success. And when they came back from the Zig Ziglar experience sessions like the team that you brought there were they transformed. Very. Much. So we had a group of native business people who went from doing a job to becoming entrepreneurs away that really wanted to be successful in their businesses and within three years returned around all the businesses were now making money. We now have accountability and we got recognized by President Reagan's commissioner Indian reservation economies as being one of the top eight most progressive tribes in the country. So. I'm I guess on the strength of this success. You you decided to go and get more education you decide to do. A, master's degree in the mid eighties and by the way just because we talked about this much you actually went to college back in the seventies you went to Roosevelt. University in Chicago. But you never finished But. Still you went and pursued a master's degree in public administration at Harvard data that happen. Well kind of what happened for years I mean years I would enroll every fall religiously I roll at school and I always dropped out I I mean I think if you went back and looked at Roosevelt University's. Records. You'd laugh because you'd see enrolled dropped out enrolled dropped out. I just could never make it. I think what made the difference for me at Harvard was I was able to take the courses that I wanted to take and I took courses that I understood because once you get into any masters program in Harvard or any graduate program, you can basically go to any school there in and take a course. So having worked for tribe, I, really flourished and of course that had to do with community development? and. So I was able to design a course that really made sense to me and I was passionate about it and I did well, I I mean infect a did really well. So by then I'm starting to understand that maybe I'm not as dumb as I thought. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, six you you. To degree from Harvard Master's degree and and you are then. Recruited by another tribe in Minnesota to help them. With their Bingo operation and this is like early days I mean get sort of Indian casinos in Indian gaming was stolen kind of its nascent. Phase at that point tell me what you what you can get there and they were they had like Bingo parlors there that and that was a how they were making some of their money. Right, and I didn't know nothing about Bingo. But again, you know one of my strengths is seen things that other people don't see. So I'd watch as Bingo game and I would see generally ladies and some guys all the guys a come to. Bingo. Spent a few dollars and have a good time and I got to thinking you know some of these Gals really spend a lot.

Chicago Harvard Zig Ziglar Bingo Hall Wisconsin Roosevelt University President Reagan Easley James Oklahoma Roosevelt Minnesota Dallas Segr Dave I. Texas
"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:39 min | 8 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

"To Zig Ziglar was that completely separate? I. Think Six Ziglar was the spokesperson for multilevel company. Got It. Cost Twenty five hundred dollars to join. Now twenty five, hundred dollars in one thousand, nine, hundred, seventy one was a lot of money at my dad for the first time. Realized that his son who wasn't the best student. Who Barely got through school? who had adhd maybe this was something that he could do. So my dad had some savings and then he borrowed some money to give me this chance what just out of curiosity what was the product tiny with the product they were trying to sell it was called steed conditioners. There is a gas additive which made your car run better there was oil conditioner right and did you have success selling it? Sold one case of the stuff my dad had a garage full of steed oil and gas conditioners which never went away I didn't sell anything. But here's the thing part of this opportunity was we had to go through a five day how to sell training program. That training program changed my life because part of the training program every day was they would tear down everything you thought about yourself, and then they would build you up. I read that you even you'd like Stanford Mirror and practice shaking hands to gain confidence is a salesman. Would you do that? Yeah. Because you know growing up I was really probably shy bashful kid in class, and here I am trying to be a salesman and so for years and my dad's basement I stood in front of a five dollar mirror that I got from Kmart and I had a candle and I would say A. B. C. and I tried to put the candle out with my voice and I would practice smiling in the. Mirror. Today everybody thinks I'm photogenic thick. I've got a good spile. Well, I, worked at that smile in fact, I even would wink at myself but these were the things that I. Did because I realized I had to change I, was I had to go from being a shy bashful dumb kid into being somebody that could go into Roman be able to share a story being able to tell somebody who you were. But meanwhile, the gas conditioner business did not work out and I guess you you then got like another job working at a at a new store location for any power. Right. And that was a pretty important turning point in my life because I. helped. Open up a brand new store a start to finish which would help me later on in life. But I went over there and a significant part of this is that not only did I meet my wife there who is selling the menswear Eddie Bauer. That's Kinda how I get into selling terrariums play terrariums. Yeah. there was a young lady, their who is selling these little bobble balls Christmas that had partridge berries in what they call Princess Pines wrapped in some moss and I never seen anything. So beautiful. Well she had said that she just couldn't go on some. The said Wa, I can sell and so on my own time when I wasn't working at eighty hour, I would go out and I go to a flower store and show these bubble Paul's. They wiped them. Then I realized that I should be doing this for myself so. I. started. Making my own line of terrariums in plant to dish gardens, and you just make yourselves. You would just make the little garden inside the balls. Yeah I actually had a corner in my dad's basement where I would bring these huge bags of dirt and. Sand and other ingredients to to make the right dirt for these terrariums and Then my dad being electricity set up a whole line of grow lights and his basement. So I started bringing in hundreds and hundreds of plants, how did you know what to do you? Just kind of figured it out how did you make them look Nice. Well, I think it goes back to my art teacher who said, Dave. You see things other people don't see. So I think I had this ability that I could take these little plants and arranging them so that there was almost this sort of. Feeling to them, you know they they were alive they had collar and and I was able to arrange them. So they they really looked special and I think that's what the floors you know saw when I would bring my samples. So they saw something that was really special. So. Did you start to make some sales. Yeah the first time I have my own samples I go to Richard Link floors. And I got my first order from. Mr Ash at Richard Lang Florist and that mother's Day, I went to his flower shop because I knew it was going to be busy and you don't WanNa loud people don't realize this at Florus unlike retail store that can order toys. Three months in advance floors have to work like days around the clock because it seems like everybody forgets they have A. Mother. Until Mother's Day. But all these flower arrangements have to be fresh. So I went to him and I helped them busted down his boxes I swept his floor I even cleaned his bathroom for him and then I helped them deliver flowers, and after that mother's Day everybody's exhausted he comes up to me and he said here puts us in your pocket and he hands me a fistful of cash. And I said Mr Astra I can't. I can't accept this. I came here to help you because that's how grateful I am you gave me my first opportunity. Mr. Ashton couldn't believe that I would work for nothing. And he went and told everyone of US florists that he was good friends of these said, you gotTa meet this kid he's a hard worker. He's got beautiful stuff give them a chance give him an opportunity. So after that first summer I had almost every major retail floor. Say Chicago wow buying your terrariums by my transplanted discards. Yeah. So what are you starting to feel pretty confident about the business? Well Part of my story said, I'm native. American just started out in business. My parents don't have money I don't have money. Businesses growing and I can't get a bank loan. I. Must have pounded the streets of Chicago I went to Bank after bank and always got turned down. You GotTa have assets you got to have collateral and I said, well, I'm starting out I really don't by the way what what's an asset? I mean I would have. Stacks of orders and I would go into a bank and I wasn't able to get anywhere. But something else Mr Ashton Schnur shared with me one day he said you know Dave if you really want to get ahead. You've got to join the local chamber of Commerce. So I dressed up and I went to a chamber of Commerce meetings and here every mover and Shaker community that was in business was there and they always had a speaker and so I like that I joined. My local chamber of Commerce and I was there religiously in fact I started helping set up. And one day I was at a Chamber of Commerce meeting. A one of the presence of the bank. grabs me after meeting his name was Gerhard. He was a president of the Bank of Chicago on Wilson Avenue. He said Anderson Jim. Nash ner speaks highly of you. He said, I'm having a promotion at my bank this Saturday. How would you like to set up in our lobby? I'm going to have somebody on the other side, pass out hot dogs and balloons and popcorn, and you can sell your dish gardens. So the next morning I show up at the bank I.

chamber of Commerce Mr Ashton Schnur Zig Ziglar Chicago Dave salesman Bank of Chicago Mr Astra US Eddie Bauer A. Mother Nash ner Wa Mr Ash Gerhard Kmart Anderson Jim Richard Lang Florist
"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:11 min | 8 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

"Institute, for Indians, Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. Don't know. Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. She was A choctaw speaking Indian and When he got put into these boarding schools, he can remember. Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. No, they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? My Dad was electricity and My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. In Chicago being a great pizza town. Chicago hotdogs, my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. For rips and growing up I. Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. As Barbecue. Capital because of the great migration. So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, what a great combination in. So Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, barbecue. Dave as a kid. Did your mom and dad instill strong. Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? Indian identity as a kid. You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. We were America's first people. My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom with growing up. She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. And so throughout years. My Dad would always. Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. Corn. Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and but more importantly to raise money for the family. My parents would have a Indian. Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried over to me, how are you as a student and how was school difficult for you or were you pretty good student? I was not a good student. I. Thought I was the dumbest kid in class you know I. I remember my dad's sitting me at the kitchen table. I would have a blank piece of paper in front of me and I would cry because I, didn't know what to do and it wasn't until years later that I found out that I had attention deficit disorder, which explains a lot you know explains why was bouncing around all the time and you know back then I don't think there was a name for attention deficit disorder other than your problematic kid. If it wasn't for an art teacher telling me he said Dave he said I I know you struggle in the rest of your classes he said. But when I watch you, you may not be the best artist but you see things that other people don't see. I would have never heard that from an English teacher I'd never would have heard from a math teacher and that really stuck with me all these years I'm to see things other people don't see I'm able to visualize I'm able to. See where things can go. You should clearly high school was not school was not did not come easy for you and was challenging for you. I mean I guess when you were eighteen, you kind of had your first experience with entrepreneurship. Selling fuel additives or some what was that? Tell me about that so I was right out of high school. In that year I had gotten a call from a friend who said Dave you have a suit. Of course I got a suit. He said put your suit out I'm picking you up. So I, put my suit on. I have no clue what's happening. We drive to a beautiful hotel near O'hare airport and he still wouldn't tell me what's going on and then we go onto the lower level. We go into this beautiful room and there's a lot of people in there. And he said you are about to witness when the most incredible things you'll ever see. And then all of a sudden. The most. Dynamic person comes out and starts telling all the people in this room. This incredible story how it doesn't matter where they've been what they've been through or what they think of themselves. They can be successful and this person was none other than Zig. Ziglar. The famous motivational speaker six. Yeah. I mean listening to Zig Ziglar share how I could become an entrepreneur selling oil additive and gas conditioner and I never heard anybody so motivating. So inspiring telling me that I could be successful. So. And my dad s why put on a suit and where I go I said you know I heard the most amazing thing that I could be successful I could all my business and I said, dad, you gotta hear this guy, he's having another meeting tomorrow night you please go with me I'm bagged up. So he goes with me the next night and here this guy sounded like my Dad Skyros from Yazoo City Mississippi spoke with a southern accent he. Said doesn't matter where you come from doesn't matter what you've been through anybody could succeed and my dad was blown away to for the first time he thought his son maybe could be a businessman maybe you know and it's oil conditioners as they do with a car and maybe my son can do that. So you went to seize ziglar speak, and by the way we had holly tag on who who founded supergroup a also was influenced by his tapes. had. You find this opportunity to get involved in selling a fuel additive was connected.

Chicago Dave Zig Ziglar America Indian Freiburg secretary English Lawrence Kansas Likud George Washington Mississippi Abraham Lincoln Jim Crow South Yazoo O'hare
"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:06 min | 8 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

"So, , most of the biggest restaurant chains started in small places McDonald's was born in San Bernardino California Domino's in Epsilon t Michigan Sonic Shawnee Oklahoma Arby's Boardman Ohio. . There are a number of reasons why this is the case there's usually less competition. . The rent is lower, , and if white you're offering is new or different people will stand in line for it as they did at the original boardwalk fries in ocean city Maryland which is now a franchise company with more than one hundred locations nationwide they stood in line the chicken. . Salad Chicken Auburn Alabama up which now has one hundred forty stores same with five guys in Arlington, , Virginia and empire of more than fifteen hundred locations today, , and as you will hear in the mid nineteen, , ninety s people came from far and wide for some of the best pit barbecue they ever had and it wasn't in Texas Hill country or eastern North, , Carolina. . But rather in Hayward Wisconsin town of twenty three, , hundred people in the northern reaches of the United States where in January he can get down to minus seventeen degrees. . This is where Dave Anderson, , after years of trying out different business ideas decided to open famous Dave's barbecue in nineteen, , ninety four. . Today famous Dave's has about one hundred and twenty five locations nationwide making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. . But the story of Dave's is also a story of how a simple passion for serving smoked ribs chicken and brisket Kim grow too big and too fast and how a founder of can almost lose complete control of a good idea. . Dave Anderson grew up in a working class family in Chicago in the nineteen fifties and sixties both his parents were native Americans who grew up on reservations in different parts of the country. . My Dad's a full blood choctaw Indian from idol. . Homa and if you were to look at a map, , of Oklahoma, , you'd see that I had a bell is in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, , which is way down south, , and then my mom is from the Likud array reservation wishes way up north she's. . A member of the Likud Ray Lake Superior Band of Ojibway says she grew up in Wisconsin he grew up in Oklahoma and how did they meet both of my parents? ? I think is the unfortunate part of my story where taken by the Bureau of Indian affairs away from their families and stuck an Indian boarding schools basically making orphans out of them <hes> now fortunately for me, , though my parents met at Haskell Institute, for , Indians, , Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. . So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. . Don't know. . Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. . She was <hes>. . A choctaw speaking Indian and <hes>. . When he got put into these boarding schools, , he can remember. . Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. . But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. . No, , they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? ? My Dad was electricity and <hes>. . My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. . So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. . In Chicago being a great pizza town. . Chicago hotdogs, , my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. . For rips and growing up I. . Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine , eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. . Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. . As Barbecue. . Capital because of the great migration. . So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, , what a great combination in. So . Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, , barbecue. . Dave as a kid. . Did your mom and dad instill strong. . Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? ? Indian identity as a kid. . You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. . We were America's first people. . My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. . My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. . My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom <hes> with growing up. . She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. . And so <hes> throughout years. . My Dad would always. . Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. . Corn. . Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, , and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and <hes> but more importantly to raise money for the family. . My parents would have a Indian. . Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. . Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried

Chicago Dave Zig Ziglar America Indian Freiburg secretary English Lawrence Kansas Likud George Washington Mississippi Abraham Lincoln Jim Crow South Yazoo O'hare
"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:06 min | 8 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

"So, , most of the biggest restaurant chains started in small places McDonald's was born in San Bernardino California Domino's in Epsilon t Michigan Sonic Shawnee Oklahoma Arby's Boardman Ohio. . There are a number of reasons why this is the case there's usually less competition. . The rent is lower, , and if white you're offering is new or different people will stand in line for it as they did at the original boardwalk fries in ocean city Maryland which is now a franchise company with more than one hundred locations nationwide they stood in line the chicken. . Salad Chicken Auburn Alabama up which now has one hundred forty stores same with five guys in Arlington, , Virginia and empire of more than fifteen hundred locations today, , and as you will hear in the mid nineteen, , ninety s people came from far and wide for some of the best pit barbecue they ever had and it wasn't in Texas Hill country or eastern North, , Carolina. . But rather in Hayward Wisconsin town of twenty three, , hundred people in the northern reaches of the United States where in January he can get down to minus seventeen degrees. . This is where Dave Anderson, , after years of trying out different business ideas decided to open famous Dave's barbecue in nineteen, , ninety four. . Today famous Dave's has about one hundred and twenty five locations nationwide making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. . But the story of Dave's is also a story of how a simple passion for serving smoked ribs chicken and brisket Kim grow too big and too fast and how a founder of can almost lose complete control of a good idea. . Dave Anderson grew up in a working class family in Chicago in the nineteen fifties and sixties both his parents were native Americans who grew up on reservations in different parts of the country. . My Dad's a full blood choctaw Indian from idol. . Homa and if you were to look at a map, , of Oklahoma, , you'd see that I had a bell is in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, , which is way down south, , and then my mom is from the Likud array reservation wishes way up north she's. . A member of the Likud Ray Lake Superior Band of Ojibway says she grew up in Wisconsin he grew up in Oklahoma and how did they meet both of my parents? ? I think is the unfortunate part of my story where taken by the Bureau of Indian affairs away from their families and stuck an Indian boarding schools basically making orphans out of them <hes> now fortunately for me, , though my parents met at Haskell Institute, for , Indians, , Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. . So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. . Don't know. . Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. . She was <hes>. . A choctaw speaking Indian and <hes>. . When he got put into these boarding schools, , he can remember. . Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. . But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. . No, , they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? ? My Dad was electricity and <hes>. . My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. . So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. . In Chicago being a great pizza town. . Chicago hotdogs, , my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. . For rips and growing up I. . Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine , eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. . Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. . As Barbecue. . Capital because of the great migration. . So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, , what a great combination in. So . Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, , barbecue. . Dave as a kid. . Did your mom and dad instill strong. . Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? ? Indian identity as a kid. . You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. . We were America's first people. . My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. . My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. . My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom <hes> with growing up. . She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. . And so <hes> throughout years. . My Dad would always. . Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. . Corn. . Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, , and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and <hes> but more importantly to raise money for the family. . My parents would have a Indian. . Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. . Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried

chamber of Commerce Mr Ashton Schnur Zig Ziglar Chicago Dave salesman Bank of Chicago Mr Astra US Eddie Bauer A. Mother Nash ner Wa Mr Ash Gerhard Kmart Anderson Jim Richard Lang Florist
"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:16 min | 8 months ago

"dave l." Discussed on How I Built This

"Did you. Give . it the name famous Dave's as kind of a joke because you weren't get famous, , right Well on the road out of town, , there's Dave's guns, , Dave's antiques, , Dave's boats so. . was going to name my place Dave's famous barbecue shop. . I get my business cards and it said famous Dave's barbecue. . I imagine I can't believe the printer messed up my business cards and my wife's a dave calm down when she just leave it. . So famous Dave's. . History. . From NPR, , it's how I built this show about innovators, , entrepreneurs, , idealists, , and the stories behind the movements they built. . I'm guy rise and on the show today our passion for smoked ribs lead Dave Anderson open a barbecue. . In the middle of nowhere and how it grew into famous Dave's one of the biggest barbecue chains in the country. . Are. . So, , most of the biggest restaurant chains started in small places McDonald's was born in San Bernardino California Domino's in Epsilon t Michigan Sonic Shawnee Oklahoma Arby's Boardman Ohio. . There are a number of reasons why this is the case there's usually less competition. . The rent is lower, , and if white you're offering is new or different people will stand in line for it as they did at the original boardwalk fries in ocean city Maryland which is now a franchise company with more than one hundred locations nationwide they stood in line the chicken. . Salad Chicken Auburn Alabama up which now has one hundred forty stores same with five guys in Arlington, , Virginia and empire of more than fifteen hundred locations today, , and as you will hear in the mid nineteen, , ninety s people came from far and wide for some of the best pit barbecue they ever had and it wasn't in Texas Hill country or eastern North, , Carolina. . But rather in Hayward Wisconsin town of twenty three, , hundred people in the northern reaches of the United States where in January he can get down to minus seventeen degrees. . This is where Dave Anderson, , after years of trying out different business ideas decided to open famous Dave's barbecue in nineteen, , ninety four. . Today famous Dave's has about one hundred and twenty five locations nationwide making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. . But the story of Dave's is also a story of how a simple passion for serving smoked ribs chicken and brisket Kim grow too big and too fast and how a founder of can almost lose complete control of a good idea. . Dave Anderson grew up in a working class family in Chicago in the nineteen fifties and sixties both his parents were native Americans who grew up on reservations in different parts of the country. . My Dad's a full blood choctaw Indian from idol. . Homa and if you were to look at a map, , of Oklahoma, , you'd see that I had a bell is in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, , which is way down south, , and then my mom is from the Likud array reservation wishes way up north she's. . A member of the Likud Ray Lake Superior Band of Ojibway says she grew up in Wisconsin he grew up in Oklahoma and how did they meet both of my parents? ? I think is the unfortunate part of my story where taken by the Bureau of Indian affairs away from their families and stuck an Indian boarding schools basically making orphans out of them <hes> now fortunately for me, , though my parents met at Haskell Institute, for , Indians, , Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. . So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. . Don't know. . Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. . She was <hes>. . A choctaw speaking Indian and <hes>. . When he got put into these boarding schools, , he can remember. . Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. . But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. . No, , they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? ? My Dad was electricity and <hes>. . My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. . So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. . In Chicago being a great pizza town. . Chicago hotdogs, , my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. . For rips and growing up I. . Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine , eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. . Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. . As Barbecue. . Capital because of the great migration. . So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, , what a great combination in. So . Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, , barbecue. . Dave as a kid. . Did your mom and dad instill strong. . Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? ? Indian identity as a kid. . You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. . We were America's first people. . My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. . My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. . My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom <hes> with growing up. . She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. . And so <hes> throughout years. . My Dad would always. . Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. . Corn. . Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, , and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and <hes> but more importantly to raise money for the family. . My parents would have a Indian. . Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. . Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried

"dave l." Discussed on Pratt Cast

Pratt Cast

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"dave l." Discussed on Pratt Cast

"What's about to happen. Sing with me whatever happens to predict? The Middle Man. Okay so I know. You might be thinking if you're a fan of this show. Well already done someone from full House and you'd be. Right, Andrea Barber Aka Kimmy. Gabler. was on the show. I don't know month ago or so. But today in the wells cast. We're going. Have someone else from the show. Someone who is a little bit higher on the call? She I mean you know him as Joey Gladstone from ABC's hit television series, full house, which aired were freaking eight seasons between eighty seven and ninety five, resulting of course in worldwide syndication over one hundred countries a mailbox money. Oh! Cut It out also you could've seen joey playing joey again in the spin off fuller house. But after he landed the cultural phenomenon that was full house, he did a bunch of stuff. Primetime hit series the host of ABC's America's funniest people which ran for four seasons. He also hosted ABC's world's funniest videos. Animal Planet's Animal Kingdom Pax TV's America's most talented kid zone series out of control for Nickelodeon, and then of course he's known for his voice over lending his talents to Jim Henson's multiple Emmy Award winning animated series, the muppet babies, voicing characters of animal, which by the way as my favorite character in the band, actually I don't know. Janice is pretty great, which looks way too much plastered. You. Also Dr Bunsen honeydew as well as additional characters, Waldorf Bean Bunny. Come on, you gotta be. Thank men in the real ghostbusters cartoon. Of course in robot chicken American Dad Scooby Doo and then he many more. We're talking credits on the surreal life. How I met your mother doll face skating with celebrities, and so much more at of course right now. He's on a little show. I'm on called worst cooks in America as celebrity edition. Let's be fair. He's the biggest liberty on the show. Very excited to have on the wealth cast the One the only Joey Gladstone Aka Dave. Who Year if you leave right now before the show starts? Cut Out got it in their. A.

Joey Gladstone ABC America Andrea Barber Emmy Award Dr Bunsen Jim Henson Nickelodeon Janice Gabler.
"dave l." Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"dave l." Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Like a pretty good choice to I'm quite Lewis you're listening to ground zero Dave L. is with us tonight at ground zero talking about big foot course big put making an appearance on traffic cams in the Pacific Northwest now and certainly some interesting footage is compatible probably to the given Patterson film especially one particular image was released by the Washington department transportation of a big foot walking on a mountain pass being picked up by a traffic jam and and they were talking about what kind of thing scientists are looking for when you produce hair samples and gave us an idea because you always hear the you know the submit hair samples we always have the story well they're a lot like deer or they're like elk a rabbit or whatever and I've you never get what they're looking for because you know it's like it's like you know well I've got big foot here will okay how you gonna tell if it's a big for their weapons is something that's normal like I I was talking earlier about how they discovered that the yeti was sort of a hybrid bearer that is doesn't look anything like the Tibetan bears looks nothing like the Himalayan bears but it walks upright and if you look more like a hominid in looks like a bear and I thought well maybe if they discovered that yet he's are like that maybe big for like that how would they be able to look at some DNA differences are strange differences with the big fort now they determine it and another thing too is that look like for example you hear scat samples they say well I got scat samples so they're if they're analyzing scat are the analyzing dietary habits of of the creature are there certain enzymes that would be produced it would be different from a regular animal what are we looking for their well okay let's start with scat scat has a very short shelf life for being able to collect any viable DNA it's almost like you have to be right under the you're collecting it as they they put because the enzymes once they're exposed to the elements they could die off quickly so finding DNA and a stool sample scat sample is almost next to impossible however there are certain things and like you said what is the diet of the of the crater and also are there you know specific things within minutes storks gap that bill that reflected the way it died yes who so if it digest food like a bare it's probably a bear if I died yes like a human or has the you know certain forms are certain things that we have within our skeptical then it becomes a little bit more you know something worthy of of discussion however most people don't go to that that link you know collecting of us got sample is one of the least things that I'd be interested call me do I just I just know that's one of the things they do collect and now one of the reasons why the skookum casted comes to mind where they had the back and the buttocks of a of a big foot to the cast of the mud and they were saying that the way they would attract it is they would use like dole fruit that fruit left out forded eat the fruit and then it laid back in the mud and they got the cast of this big foot right but that was that's why I was asking about Scott was because what are we looking at for diet here are big foot Sasquatch omnivores or they what what do they eat mostly yeah I'm pretty sure that they are omnivores I bet still in the speculation game we don't have a septic to actually analyze what their their dietary preferences are but it would just make sense that they would be more like a bear as far as the the diet goes when you know they eat both plants and animals for specific reasons and specific names it certainly would have fish in al there there there's a another question to what about bone abnormalities because I I remember back during investigations when I was younger bed they're actually bone Abner out abnormalities in some of the foot cast where you'd see big big ed that Sasquatch big foot can can they they actually get arthritic there are there of the you can get the same type of bone disorders a we get I think your wrist hi am I may be wrong but correct me please the boss Berg track yes worry though that definite abnormality and that what is attributed to more likely a broken foot then a arthritic area okay well yes that that's what Grover Krantz I believe determined so she was able to take that bone structure however and pretty much make a solid case that this was not a human and not a hoax so because the bones were where they should be for supporting a creature of this particular weight and size well see the thing is most interesting about deformities in feed and certain things that aren't normally talked about with big foot is that you can always tell if something's.

Lewis Dave L.