18 Burst results for "Dave Gilboa"

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

07:39 min | 1 year ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"No know mad. You're probably doing the right thing as the fed chair. If you're making both extremes at the party's man but i was also thinking a think. President biden listens to that wing of the party. And here's the progressive dance. He starts moving. He's looking right now. And he's looking to cut deals with progressives. Because if you are going to be turning down the size of that three and a half trillion dollars plan you are going to have to throw some chits their way from time to time. And that's the one thing that i started thinking through. You may win some battles. You're going to have to give up on others and you know a couple of days ago. We started talking about this. If you are looking for the progressives to suck it up and vote on the bipartisan infrastructure. Deal i what are you going to give progressives that they're looking for this just happens to be something that is coming up and coming down the pike and i wondered about that. The one thing i'll say is if you looked at the snp financials yesterday. They dropped back down. Even though yields were rising and you would anticipate that would be good news. For the financials. It was that tough. Talk coming from elizabeth warren about regulating the banks and by the way. Even if they do do. Renominate jay powell. The vice chair position is also and they'll probably be looking for somebody who is a little more strict in terms of regulating. The financials to put in that position so that that could be why you saw the financials come back down. We should also point out. They ran up for four days away on the leading into this. And we're sitting at all time highs so it could be that too but there's some tough talk about regulation. The banks financials might very well be. Considering that united giving update on the status of the company's vaccine mandate filipo joins us right now with more and fill. There are almost six hundred employees who have not gone along with that today too are set to be fired yes they they will be fired over the course of the next several days once. They do the paperwork and everything goes through. Here's an update. On where united stands with the vaccination mandate remember. They set this policy back in august. Then they finally said look. It's going to have to happen. By the end of september ninety seven percent complied they get vaccinated at least one chapter a few who still need to get the second shot. Approximately two thousand who were seeking a medical or religious exemption. Those cases will play out over the next couple of weeks. We'll talk about that in a bit. And then you've got five hundred and ninety three thousand of the sixty seven thousand employees so roughly a little over a little under one percent who will be fired let go from the company. United is seeking or united. Should say i should say no expected impact on its operations because of the vaccination deadline passing and those employees being let go the company. Also as i mentioned they've got about two thousand employees seeking a religious or a medical exemption. There's a lawsuit that will play out over the next couple of weeks by october. Fifteenth united expects that to be finished in some fashion and they'll have to proceed in terms of giving them either a medical leave or a personal leave. Those policies have already been outlined all the employees with regard to the five hundred ninety. Three who were let go in an employees memo ceo. Scott kirby along with president bret hart wrote for the for less than one percent of people who decided not to get vaccinated. We'll unfortunately begin the process of separation from the airline per our policy. This was an incredibly difficult decision but keeping are keeping our team safe has always been our first priority that you take a look. At shares of united remember they will be deciding the vaccination exemption cases those exception cases. That will happen over the next couple of weeks likely by october. Fifteenth guys back to you. Hey fill it strikes me that you kind of covered the gamut in terms of companies responses to these things yesterday you were with us with the ford ceo and his position was we can't make people take the vaccine because it's really something that needs to be negotiated with the union. Obviously united has unions too but they came out on on this end of it. What is that a difference in the language that they have with their respective unit unions or is that just a difference in interpretation to matter of negotiation and it depends on the company becky with regard to the airline unions. Those discussions were taking place for some time because there is so much interaction between the pilots the flight attendants and the crews that are here at the airports with the public. Those conversations started much earlier than perhaps other companies in other industries and so they did work out that policy with all of their unions and early and they had a lot of bienne. I think when they announced this policy something like seventy five or eighty percent of the pilots and flight attendants were already vaccinated. So they didn't have to go as far with those workers as compared to other companies in other industries may have to when they say look. We need to talk about some type of a vaccine mandate. Yeah it's interesting. You make the point that they have so many of their employees dealing face to face with the public on a daily basis to which makes a difference. Thanks a lot. Bill next unsquashed pod. Get your glasses on worby. Parker is going public. Because ceos neil blumenthal dave gilboa are expanding their companies footprint and their revenue. Even though you know in certain places like new york people were be parker. We're just trying to make people aware that we exist. You gotta take a listen to this. It's swap pot that's right. Cnbc's flagship is new. Show is a podcast squawk pot this control to is not just the show folks to be even better. Because it's only audio join me. Katie kramer as. I take you inside the squawk box control room and beyond the headlines of tv broadcast with joe kernan becky quick andrew. Ross sorkin every weekday subscribe to squawk pot on apple. Podcast spotify stitcher. Or wherever you get your podcasts tracks fan provide this pot from cnbc and we've got a story you might want to take a look at another hot. Startup is hitting the public markets. Here's indirect oregon war parker going public on the new york stock exchange through a direct listing. The company will list under the ticker w. r. b. y. And the reference prices forty dollars a share joining us. Right now i on. Cnbc parker's co-founders inco's neil blumenthal and dave go good morning to both of you. It's been quite some time. I brought by the way. I've got my glasses here. I don't know which which models you're wearing. But i'm putting him on for today. I think i was trying to figure out. I met you guys probably about a decade ago. You started the company. Eleven years ago so here we are five billion dollar valuation. Why why why go public now would probably be the first question to ask so. We built a strong business. And we're just excited for a bigger stage here to amplify the brand and our impact over the last twelve months. We've generated roughly five hundred million in revenue but we still only have one percent market share so we just think that we have a lot of white space in front of us. And now the right time so dave you guys are adjusted profitable but not truly profitable yet just yet. Walk us through what it looks like to get to profitability. And what timeline might be sure so. We look at a variety of financial metrics and we found that our investors use adjusted does the appropriate measure of profitability for business of.

President biden jay powell filipo joins Fifteenth united Scott kirby president bret hart elizabeth warren united neil blumenthal fed worby dave gilboa Katie kramer joe kernan becky quick andrew Ross sorkin
"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

"To any student who needs them I mentioned were We're not We don't need to do this alone. our goal is to make sure that every child in america who needs classes has access to them and so if there are additional partners Anyone listening who is he credible. Constantly looking for ways that we can do more and and can scale These efforts into create more awareness. Or you're working with celebrities or what kind of a portfolio of a folks that you're working with outside of the ica industry because that's a big piece you know you gotta be able to touch people where they're asked. Are you working with any kind of celebrities with this project so we have done some some collaborations That have created awareness for our people's project effort We created the a pair of glasses. Called spinneys with jimmy fallon We're at a cat spin on on their temples and I remember seeing that everywhere. All the proceeds. I went to support People's project effort and jimmy super excited by it and he kept promoting it on his show and his last now We did a recent collaboration with tashaun jones. who's a super cool skateboarder From the bronx and he actually went Attended as a student one of the schools where we have our people's project program At albert einstein and so We we are constantly looking for ways that we can Built more awareness create more excitement but most importantly help as many students as we can. Nice nice nice. Well this has been awesome man. You you know this is. This is exciting because We've never had anyone from maury parker. Come on the on the podcast and You know it's great to to really get to know you as a person Understand the story of worby parker in to You know know what you do in any optimistic community because again i know a lot of things that takes place behind closed doors but not a lot of people know about it You know i would love to bring you back on the show maybe annually just to get an update on what's happening at war parker but also ask you any tough questions that my colleagues had That way we could make sure that we are one family. And i here at the end of the day. If we're all helping people see with the most the most precious since known to mankind vision we gotta work together as a family as a team as a unit. And the only way we're going to do that is if we come together and have a conversation like we're having today but again. Thanks for all the things that you do and when it comes to diversity as big piece Continue to great work with branding. Eyecare as a whole. And i look forward to your success and i just wanna say. Thank you so much for hanging out with your favorite optometrist today..

jimmy super tashaun jones maury parker jimmy fallon worby parker albert einstein america parker Eyecare
"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

"Designers academia. You name it. There's no reason that we shouldn't be able to reflect what the us census look like So you know a glad that you guys dwayne the Movement over at new england college optometry And i'm glad that dr howard sale sign at thirteen percent promise because he is seeing a difference at his school because he signed it guys supported it and I hope to see more work with you. Guys in industry aside goes by. Now you know i know you're not just doing the the work diversity over at new england college tommichi but you're also involved in some other programs. I mean there's this Program out there known as the pupils project I would love to hear what you doing. Any eyecare industry with the pupils project and how england college of optometry is actually evolve with that as well absolutely non so going back to the day that we launched. We introduced our bypass. Give a pair program. Where for every pair of glasses we sell distribute a pair to someone in need and we distribute over a million pairs of glasses throughout our history and most of those classes have gone have been distributed through international partners in countries ranging from guatemala to to bangladesh and Those nonprofit partners are having a very significant impact and we're excited to continue to scale those efforts. We also recognize that. There's a huge need in our own backyard in york city alone It's the country's largest public school system. There are one point one million public school students. We estimate that there are two hundred thousand kids who need glasses. That don't have access to them in. It's primarily students in low income areas in in many of those students don't know that they have a vision needs Some of them just disengaging school summer misdiagnosed with special needs And so In two thousand fifteen. We kicked a program called people's project along with the mayor's office in new york where we would go into Schools around at the new york area provide free vision tests at free eye exams and then offer africa's to any student who needs them. And i we sense. Expanded that program To a few other cities. Baltimore philadelphia in boston and Netco was a great partner When we piloted that program in boston just before the pandemic It was very successful but Of course the pandemic through a ball in everyone's plans including Our plan to to scale this program In the city of boston in a number of other areas but we are excited For this Next coming school year To be able to re-engage with students and provide a lot more glasses to you need them awesome awesome in. You've teamed up with some big names for this project as well right yeah absolutely No we work with You know in boston in particular Regret the boston public school system. Twenty twenty on-site netco and prevent blindness to provide students in a number of schools. I with free eye exams and provide free glasses.

dr howard england college of optometry new england dwayne guatemala bangladesh Netco boston york city new york us Baltimore africa philadelphia boston public school
"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

"Hey this is something that has been important to us. But maybe we haven't clearly articulated our goals and what we wanna accomplish as it relates to diversity equity and inclusion and what we wanna do internally or parker and and then how can impact the communities that were part of and so we created our racial equity strategy that has ten pillars and Has very clear goals around what we wanna accomplish. Whether that is increasing representation within where parker not just overall but within our senior levels and management levels to provide trainings for our team internally or to think about the ways that we can impact the greater the broader communities that we were a part of that including the optometry community and and One pretty shocking stat. Is that only two point seven percent of optometrist's in this country identifies black And we know that optometry is a great profession and There is no reason for that disparity Relative to the overall makeup of the country and so We were talking with our personnel and and thinking through ways that we could help address adan and In this was right after netco had signed onto the thirteen percent. promise thanks to black perspective and We talked about cable. What's the easiest way that we can ensure that there are more black optometry students and greed that the best way to provide full scholarships to students. And so we. We kicked that off last year and a half. A couple of great optometry students at nikko through that scholarship in We've recently expanded that to cover additional students in so We're excited to be able to do our part to ensure that their students who are getting that grade education from netco were A recruiting teams all spending time At a lot of historically black colleges and universities through career fairs Educating students on the fact that optometry is a great profession and Making sure that our recruiting efforts in education efforts Help a drum of interest for different career paths Within the world now is great work and you know when you put when you put money where your mouth is. You know that speaks volumes and i know you know dr howard cosell personally as you do and he told me straight up you know the Mono of students color the black hispanic it jumped quite a bit and is because you know he understands the importance of diversity and yeah that number two point seven three percent. I mean it's been flat for quite a bit of time. In regards to the amount of optometry students entering optometry school and to have optometrist's even lower mean. That's that's bad you know. The thirteen percent promised for those that are unfamiliar with. It is something that myself. Dr adam ramsey created over at black hair perspective and whole goal was to really make sure that the care industry reflects the us census and at the time is around thirteen point. Two thirteen point four percent of blacks that were in the united states. So we wanted to see that in. I care we wanted to see that With the students. We wanted to see that with Optometrist we wanted to see that with Leadership positions for positions even eyewear.

parker netco adan dr howard cosell nikko Dr adam ramsey united states
"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

"Needs getting new prescriptions and will continue to do so As we scale we we also You would love to partner with anyone else in the space Through a lot of the programs that we've either initiated or are working to scale Right it's pretty shocking. How many people around the world and how many people In our own backyards in in the us new glasses and don't have access to them and so If there are ways that we can work together out with anyone in the community. Our certainly left to do so yeah. Let's talk about that. Because i mean one thing that really touch me and really resonated with me was That you guys understand the importance in the need for diversity in i care and you know you guys have really stepped up to the plate along with some other companies out there You know i've been Able to work with you guys on the back end with black eye care perspective and You know you Sued ounce of my fear. ceo shutout by dr You know refocus over at in the i You know there's a lot of things that you guys do on the back end that a lot of people don't see and they don't understand i'd just want to say thank you for everything that you done to help. Increase the diversity in i care but I really want to spend the rest of the show. Just really touching on some of the impact that you've made in our industry and I really wanna get started with The relationship with a partnership that you have at the new england college of optometry There's a great leader over there by the man by the name of dr howard cosell and he has vision and he understands what needs to take place in order to really move our profession for Let's talk about some of the scholarships that you guys have Created over at the new england college. Tommy tree i mean there's a big number out there known as forty four thousand and we can multiply that a couple times in regards to how you've really helped out some students of color blackston particular So if you don't mind just you know. Just give me an overview of what you're doing at worry parker when it comes to diversity but also why did you make that jump. Why did you make that step to help. Try to increased black representation in yes. A diversity equity and inclusion has been something that has always been a core part of parker or something that we always been very passionate about During the During twenty twenty In the wake of the george floyd murderer and and uh so many other upsetting events that were happening around the country We had a lot of internal conversation and said..

new england college of optomet dr howard cosell new england college us Tommy parker george floyd
"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

"Do you feel like you guys are a marketing company to a certain extent as well because you do a fantastic job with reaching the consumer at the place that they play at and attracting those patients to your offices into the online footprint. What's what's your perspective on the marketing piece. Is this something that just kind of fell into placing just cup kept coming up with all these cool ideas or is something that was really planned out on the back that we don't know about or just came for wishing out of nowhere like let's touch on that a little bit. We certainly don't think of ourselves as marketing company We have a brand team That focuses on ensuring that our brand is represented in the right way and that Were creating awareness with the rate at consumer base but first and foremost We really think about Are creating the best products and experiences for our customers and If we get those things right than They're wearing this will follow and one of the metrics that we track most closely. Net promoter score Customer satisfaction so To measure a net promoter score you ask consumers to to rate from zero to ten. How likely they are to refer you to a friend. I take all the people who rate you. A nine or ten Subtract all the people who radio six below. And that's your net promoter score and our. Nps has been in the eighty s for our entire company's history Less corridors eight three and as a result We have a lot of happy customers who tend to tell a lot of other people About the experience and the product that they had and said to this day Even though we've been around for eleven plus years have over one hundred stores throughout the country The majority of a customers tell us that they heard about per through a friend on that they were ferch Through a friend and so We really do our customers as our best marketing channel And we do you think about ways that we can amplify that whether it's I interesting Mechanisms where we can engage with consumers like Our class trip the school bus that that we few years ago Or thinking about how we can use our stores In creative ways where we can add custom murals and unique art.

Nps
"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

"I'm curious you went from online two now brick and mortar and you're growing quite a bit throughout the united states. What went off in your head to say. Hey we need to have brick and mortar locations because a company that came out. That was taking you know a storm with online and digital footprint shipping out glasses. Now it's hey. Let's let's do brick and mortar supper. Back what what made that change take place. Yesterday it really came down to listening to our customers and So when we we launched We were still full-time students. Working out of our apartments But we recognize that we only had one opportunity to launch a brand a designer brand and We worked with a publicist. Who able to meetings with the right editors g. q. In vogue and we were able to launch with great features and and both of those magazines and immediately put us on the map and the world was very different back then at two thousand ten. Instagram didn't even exists Back asking people were discovering brands and very different ways We did get a lot of attention online through facebook and twitter and all the sudden These articles were being shared and we ended up hitting our first year sales targets in three weeks. We had weightless of twenty thousand customers We thought we were We had this great triumph program that would let people try and glasses and then we just didn't have any inventory for i nine months of business to shift glasses out And so we started getting calls from people we were based in philly at the time And people called in said. hey. I read about unique. You are vogue. I tried to order trion. But there's this massive waiting list. Can i come to your store. Your office to try on glasses said well Store and office is my apartment but come on over and We had strangers coming into our apartments and we laid out the glasses on our dining table and we were at first a little hesitant. This new york. You have people come to your apartment. Just random folks just covered trial or glasses. This was in philadelphia. Okay that's better right. Yeah it's all about that's crazy but yeah we. We found that people love the experience. They love meeting behind the brand and we learn so much from those interactions around which frames people gravitated towards which ones they tried on versus which ones they actually ended up buying. They give us a ton of feedback on what they were looking for and so When we graduated and moved to new york We got an office on near union. Square on sixteenth street is the sixth floor of a commercial building with no china. Jn we said well..

Instagram united states philly twitter facebook new york philadelphia china
"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

"Harry's the the shaving and grooming brand And andy when inter venture capital and and runs a very successful refund called elephant They're still on the board of or be parker and and we're still great friends and they still provide a lot inputting value But we were able to Kind of Ensure that no matter what the future outcomes would be that we had a framework with how to deal with it up front. Oh man that's awesome. I love that you guys really thought about this company. you know start to Because a lot of times as i care professionals i'll be up front Yes we all businesses but were not the best business people and that can really hurt a practice But if you are business savvy and there are a lot of time. she's that are that are business savvy. It can really help. Take your brand to the next level You know one thing. That i'm excited about or i was very excited about when worry. Parking at the scene is that you guys all about innovation You know and for me you know. I know there's some some re parker haters out. There is no doubt about it. I felt like you guys came in at a great time. Because he really made the eyecare industry connor reset and rethink how we actually do business and it really made us really look at i care and you know how we should present i care. I care wasn't sexy. You guys kind of made it a little more attractive in a little more sexy which is great because although you had a different way of doing it It brought more attention to people wanting to get glasses exams and things of that. Nature's well so. I can appreciate you know what you did to to shake up the industry But you know some people are big fans of innovation and i'm a big fan of innovation. I feel like we need that to be able to grow Let's talk about innovation a little bit. You mind talking about that..

parker Harry
"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

"Than four dollars a day and had been to Factories and kind of knew something about the production process and so the four of us got together And ended up creating or parker waller students. Wow that's impressive Number one you have a hell of background is no doubt about that. I mean you've pretty much traveled across the world You know great business. mindset Wharton i mean. That's you know top notch. I can't i can't lie. You know. I mean that's that's that's pretty impressive in you know to to build something with your friends. I mean i have some pretty incredible friends but a lot of them really knuckleheads. So i'm trying to figure out. How did you pick these two other colleagues to to really want to make this Business take place because you know friendship in businesses. Sometimes those two things. Don't go hand in hand. So i know that was probably a difficult decision to make or was it not a difficult decision to make me. Let's let's talk a little bit about that because that's the piece that you know people don't really talk about in business. I know i trust my wife. I trust my my mother my father my family but when it comes to business sometimes it can be a little difficult finding the right people to help create that dream and that vision come the place to be difficult so if your mind just maybe thompson on that a little bit to start. I didn't say we weren't Chuckle hits but You feel incredibly fortunate to have met my co-founders we were friends at school Before we started the business and we made a commitment to one another that our friendship and treating each other with integrity was more important than the success of the business and And we've really stay true to the to that principle and what we've certainly Starting a business places strain on any type of relationships and There have been difficult moments in conversations But to this day all four of us are still Best friends we vacationed together. We probably spend way too much time together. And i think we were able to achieve that because we went in eyes wide open. We got a lot of advice from other people who had started companies that Told us don't start a company with friends. You're gonna end up eating each other suing each other definitely. Don't start a company with four people That's way too many Too many cooks in the kitchen. And we said you know this is gonna be Challenging but we're all super passionate about creating value base business all our values were aligned. All our goals were aligned And we recognize that All four of us may not stay with the business Forever and so from day one even before we had launched anything we set up a vesting schedule with the equity of the company so that If someone left for whatever reason That they got credit for time served. They were able to maintain the ownership that They helped produce a but we want to get into contentious conversation at the point when someone was leaving around how much value they created. And how much should be divvied up We got established rules of the road ahead of time before those challenging conversations occurred and then we gave each other tons of feedback Even when it was just the four of us We would go to our local bar and we put one of us in the hot seat and we do a.

parker waller Wharton thompson
"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on Defocus Media

"What's up everyone. If you figured optometrist. Dr daryl glover today. I am super excited because i am hanging out with a big name in i Friends and family. I would like to walk. One of the cofounders from worby parker dagoberto. How're you doing today. Sir then great. Thanks for having me on. No thanks for joining the podcast. You know I i'm super excited. Because you know. I want to pick your brain. I want to know more about you. Wanna know about you know How worry parker is maneuvering the eyecare industry and all the great things that yet done any eyecare industry as well but before we jump into any of that. Let's take the top dave. I wanna learn more about you. You don't mind telling me about where you from where you did you school in Where they've just give me a little bit of a background of who you are. Let's bill from there I was born in sweden. But when i was six moved to san diego grew up there but my parents are doctors and growing up as a hundred percent. Sure i was also going to become a doctor ended up going to berkeley for undergrad. Was a bioengineering major. So took all the pre med classes took the mcat. I was kind of all set to follow my parents footsteps and this was in the late nineties early. Two thousands and the rely changes that were happening. I within the world of healthcare. As i guess there always are but in particular the rise of hmo's were kept taken taking over parts of industry and talking to my parents and their friends who were doctors. they express a lot of frustration and then talked about the good old days and that they can spend his time as much time with patients and and they just seemed more frustrated than Than i had heard In a as a child. When i shared my parents and so i started considering other potential options. Don't wanna do something to help people one day But i had a lot of friends that were going into the world of business and Thought that maybe there was a another potential avenue where I could learn something about business and maybe one day Either help run a company or helped started.

Dr daryl glover worby parker dagoberto Sir parker dave sweden berkeley san diego hmo
"dave gilboa" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"It's Jill on money. And this is the program that takes the mystery out of your financial life, but also tries to give you some unconventional or entertaining interviews to chew on, get you thinking. In this interview that we're doing this hour. We are broadcasting in a conversation that I had with two of the founders of Warby Parker. Co CEOs Dave Gilboa and Neil Blumenthal. First couple of segments were kind of finding out what their story Woz and the story of the company, and now we're going to shift a little bit into the where they are now with Warby Parker. What's happening, how they've used physical stores to expand? That was interesting when you see a company that starts as an online mostly and then goes and opens a physical store, kind of like a Just a little bit of an apple model like the retail store experience. It is cool. I encourage you to check out a Warby Parker store If there's one near you anyway, here is more of our interview with Dave Gilboa and Neil Blumenthal. So how many physical outlets do you have A 98 100? Something like that. Ah, 115 115. Do you have like a site? Location person Who does all that work for You guys, We have Ah real estate team. We also often leverage or data science team, the beauty of being any commerce companies that we know where our customers are. So what was interesting is right. We start selling out of our apartment. Then when we moved into a proper office after graduation, we moved back to New York. We deliberately moved into an office that was in Union Square, so a place with good access with with public transportation and was a loft space with Southern facing windows with good light. We allocated about a third of the office to be Showroom. A store on We just started selling lots of glasses on De Eventually, we moved our office to SoHo. We were on track to do over $3 million of sales out of our office. So we figured if we're doing this in an office, and so what if we just open up a store nearby will probably do at least that And then we also built a mobile store. We bought an old yellow school bus. We ripped out all the benching the chairs we put in oak shelving, and we went To about 15 cities and in each city. We were about three locations s O. We knew which intersections performed well, so we had basically a road map of where to open up stores. We married that with some of our customer data, and we now have sort of a model where we can punch in any address in the U. S and get a sales range with the confidence. Interval day. You guys are co CEOs, but you obviously have different areas of responsibility. So how does it break down between the two of you really split up company? I think each of us have seven or eight. Direct reports operates more functionally as a Venn diagram, where example, says Gold retail stores reported to Neil. But I'm on a real estate committee. And so it's still involved in kind of looking at every new story that we're opening and Technology reports into me. But if we're making any big tech decision you know was providing as much input as I am into those decisions, and so it allows us to divide and conquer on kind of day to day things, But then I think we get the benefit of having kind of two brains instead of one for major decisions across the business. You come of age in a different time where it seems to me that more of your cohorts are interested in community as well as your people who work for you. And also making sure the company does well, I wonder from your perspective. I know you started with you came from the nonprofit world you You started with. This premise about giving away a pair of glasses. So can you talk a little bit about the journey of have that really was sort of one of your leading messaging points. Now you still do it, but it doesn't. It doesn't seem to be front and center. Yes. So when we were starting the business we often would discuss. Hey, what's gonna keep us excited Tonto, go to work every single morning and not roll over and hit the snooze button. Then it was about having big positive impact, And we thought, well, let's one way to do that. Well, there's hundreds of millions of people on the planet that don't have glasses. And how are we failing as a species when a product and technology that's been around 800 years is not widely available to everybody. So even though we thought it was an inherent good to bring down the price of glasses from $500 to $95, right, we want to serve those hundreds of millions of people that couldn't afford $95. So we first thought, Well, why don't we commit percent of revenue or profits? We thought hey, at the end of the day that is good and positive, but the outcome that we're looking for his glasses on people's faces. So that way they can, you know, fulfill their potential at work at school, and we also thought If for some reason, we weren't running the company, like a percent of revenue, percent of profits could maybe be manipulated a little bit. So we want to make a bold commitment that was also tied to the brand to give away a pair for every pair that we sold. We've now distributed over five million pairs of glasses to people around the world and in in the United States, That's sort of what we probably talked most about from Social Mission perspective, but we try and.

Warby Parker Dave Gilboa Neil Blumenthal Jill apple De Eventually United States Union Square Gold retail New York SoHo
"dave gilboa" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"At that point we put in the prescription and send you a new pair of glasses. We had come up with the idea of the home. Try on program because in the work that we're doing, prelaunch, we kept getting feedback from our friends. It's like Hey, I don't know if I would buy glasses online. I don't want to touch and feel them. I want to see how they look on my face. Eh? So we thought that you know home try on would get over that hurdle. The other things. We were very committed to customer service and were inspired by you know some of the policies of Suppose, for example, which you always have free shipping and free returns on Gui had learned at that point in time that suppose had, like 40% return rates, and we would never have a viable business with a custom product like glasses. If we had return rates that high because you basically someone returns a pair of glasses, you have to trash the lenses. So we have this home trying program and within 48 hours of launch, we ran out of inventory because so many people had order their home try ons. And then a funny thing happened where people heard that we were in Philadelphia because we were going to warden and they said, Hey, can we come to your office to try and glasses like we can't do a home trying because you're stocked up? But can we at least come into your office? We're like, um, you could come to our apartment our apartment in South Philly. Go to the bull more and have fun after that. Yeah, That's awesome. Literally. We said, you know what the hell that zoo we had five people come in. We wanted to limit it to five people, too. So if this was such an awkward experience that we would only destroy the brand's reputation with five people think Philadelphia had the second highest murder rate in the country at the time, so inviting strangers into our home. Exactly way, you know, move the dining room table. Put the glasses across. It moved a mirror. We took out our laptop. So if people selected a pair of glasses, they would literally check out on our website and the first five people came in. They were definitely confused because they saw us there. They saw some of the first folks that we hired scrunched on our couch type vehicle, a process of quarters and responding to customer emails, But it was this. Pretty special experience, because how often do you get to peek behind the curtain of a startup? And we remember vividly that there was one person who was in scrubs. They were a resident at the hospital, the University of Pennsylvania. They bought a pair of glasses and then literally over the next week, we saw 15 more orders come in with email addresses from the hospital, the University of Pennsylvania so we thought, like, Oh, like This is a great way to also acquire knew. Absolutely. That is so cool. We'll get back to our interview with the co CEOs of Warby Parker, Dave Gilboa and Neil Blumenthal and Justice second. Hey, why did you do this during the break head on over to Jill on money dot com and just bookmark it. All the stuff is there for you Whenever you need it, Jill on money dot com will be right back. Hi. It's Jamie Progresses. Employee of the month, two months in a row. Leave a message at the Hi Jamie with me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song. What the name your price tool. So when it's like, tell us what you want to pay. Hey, trombone was Baa, Baa baa And you say we'll help you find curvature options to fit your budget. Then we just all do. Finger snaps will acquire goes statement.

Philadelphia Jill Jamie University of Pennsylvania Philly murder Warby Parker Neil Blumenthal Dave Gilboa
"dave gilboa" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"You are back. It is our number two of Jill on money, and we are delighted that you are joining us. And we've got a real nifty guest an interview that we conducted before the pandemic. You know, we had a whole bunch of stuff that was in the can. And then all the sudden the pandemic came. And we had to shift quick, pretty quickly. So we have a lot of really great interviews. This one was really one of my faves. It is with the founders or two of the founders of Warby Parker. Maybe you're familiar with Warby Parker. I had a pair of Warby parkers myself. Um, stylish, cool glasses but not so expensive that it will set you back hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of dollars so very happy that these guys were able to come in. They are co CEOs of Warby Parker, Dave Gilboa and Neil Blumenthal. And we start the interview as we often do kind of getting a sense of who these guys are themselves. So here is our interview with Dave Gilboa and Neil Blumenthal. So, Neil, what is the best career or financial decision you've made after Warby Parker after Warby Parker, the best decision I ever made was marrying my wife, who ended up being an entrepreneur started her own jewelry line helped put me through business school now has Line of Children's apparel called Rockets of Awesome. That's all directed consumer online. You guys air power. Couple G's. Yeah, there's finding the right partner. Probably one other story would be joining vision, spring the nonprofits or start up on baking a risk of moving down. Tell Salvador toe work on a pilot program. I find what I'm speaking to young people. Sometimes they underestimate the amount of learning that you can get in. An environment where you have a lot of autonomy and independence, where there isn't a lot of structure and you need to sort of figure out right how to have impact and I use some of the skills that I learned that vision spring every day. I will be Parker. Okay, Dave. West, choosing to optimize for learning early on in my career, So after graduating from Berkeley, I was a bioengineering. Major didn't know anything about business and on decided join Bain and company strategy consulting firm. I knew that I could go there for a couple years and developed really meaningful skills and still kind of used a lot of thinking and skill set that I developed. Early on, and we've also hired a bunch of people out of veins since that time, and I think it just set up a great foundation for my career, whichever direction it was going to go next. Let's just start back a little bit of your origin story. So, Dave, why don't you start off and tell us kind of the beginning of what happened for this company? How did it form where you guys were in your lives? Sure. S O Neal. I met the first week of business school, along with two other co founders Andy and Jeff. And I've been working in consulting and finance for a few years and realized I wanted to take that kind of do something a little more entrepreneurial something that was gonna have a bigger positive impact on the world. Take six months off to travel between working and going to school. And along the way I lost my only pair of glasses and some damn it left him on the plane. I was backpacking and I said, Shut up to warden hours getting my MBA. A zoo full time student didn't have ah, pair of glasses and was frustrated that was going to pay several $100 to buy a new pair. The paranoid losses cost me $700. And I just bought a new iPhone for $200. And just the math. That makes sense to me. And started complaining to anyone that would listen around. You can understand my glasses were so expensive Andy. They're co founder can't understand why no one was selling glasses online and connected with Neil, who had just spent several years running this amazing nonprofit called Vision Spring, The light bulbs started going off and in the four of us got together and we ended up bootstrapping the business taking the money that we had saved from working for a few years. Launching out of our apartments all their full time students and started to tow build what became Warby Parker. And that was so we launched in early 2010. Okay, So Neil talk about what drove you to attend business school coming out of the nonprofit world. I felt like the work of the nonprofit sector is equally complex on DCI, challenging as a for profit sector but often doesn't get the same sort of credibility s O. Felt actually that going to business school. I'll get a name premature, especially from school like warden that would open up a lot more opportunities for May on ball, So I realized that I loved leading organizations and managing and you know the skills that you learn business will can help you to scale and lead organizations in the future. So I understand you're going to business school to get a different skill set. So, Dave, we're undergrad. Where'd you go? S I went to Berkeley. I was a bioengineering. Major. Both my parents are doctors. I was 100%. Sure I was going to become a doctor, So I took all the pre med classes took them Cat When I was getting ready to graduate. They're a bunch of changes in the health care industry. HMO's We're taking over and just talking toe, my parents and their friends who are doctors. They didn't seem quite as excited to be practicing physicians and said, Um, thought that there might be a different path where I could learn something about business and then kind of applied Those skills toe hopefully Help make the world better. It's um some point down the road. So it's interesting, though, because you know, neither of you were sort of came out with, like I'm an entrepreneur. Like you know, I'm sure that you get a ton of people who come to like we want to be into entrepreneurs like you. But you you didn't pre planned this like You live your lives, but you didn't micromanage each choice. So I wonder how you deal with this question where people are like, Well, I want to be like you and I wanna go to business school. Do this Your unicorns? What would your advice be? The younger people who listen to this story or their parents who hope that they become a successful is you? What's the lesson here? What should they be telling their kids? And what should people be thinking about? The best business is solve real problems, and the real problem we were trying to solve is that glasses were to accept expensive and the experience of shopping for glasses with sub optimal and often you can't discover what problems you want to solve until you've actually done some work. You know, there's this perception that entrepreneurs all look like Mark Zuckerberg and, you know, dropped out of school and launch businesses while they were teenager in their early twenties. And that just doesn't line up with the actual statistics and the majority of people that start businesses are in their late thirties and early forties. And I think the average CEO right now of all unicorns is actually like 47 something odd like it like shockingly higher than you would think. So, what is it about your business when you look back on it, and you solved a problem, But what were some of the things that there was No way you could have anticipated until you were in it. Like Dave. What we're like. Oh, my God. This is so much harder than we thought. What would the things you didn't consider? Yeah. I mean, none of us said had ever started a business before. None of us knew how to build a website. None of us came from kind of a formal design background. Everything that we were doing. We were doing for the first time and learned a lot of painful lessons early on, particularly around the areas where we didn't have expertise like how to how to build a website. Most of us came from backgrounds where we had spent a lot of time and excel in power point. And so we're really proficient at that. We didn't know how to make wire frames, and so when we wanted Teofilo out how to design Site. We designed it in power point, and we printed out a bunch of PowerPoint slides and had stacks of paper and we would walk into the local Starbucks and offered by people a cup of coffee if they would take a few minutes and we put a page in front of them and say, pretend this is a home page that you're looking on a computer screen and your hand is the mouse. Where would you click? And then they would kind of point somewhere, And then we Shuffle the papers and find the next part of the site and put that in front of them. And so, you know, we tried toe in areas that we were deficient. Try to find scrapping ways that we could generate Learnings. Try to solve for either hire or or find the capabilities that we didn't have on the team ourselves. We'll get back to the guys behind Warby Parker in just a minute..

Warby Parker Dave Gilboa Neil Blumenthal Berkeley Andy Jill Bain Starbucks DCI HMO Mark Zuckerberg Salvador partner Um Teofilo Neal co founder CEO
"dave gilboa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"How did you guys come up with the name because it sounds like like a an aristocrat from like you know North Summerlin in England or something like Warby Parker yeah we have insisted that the hardest thing that we did in those early days was sent on a name at all four of us like to think we still have our spreadsheet and over two thousand names that we tested on our very patient friends yeah too early Jack Carroll lack characters that Dave actually discovered when he went to the New York Public Library exhibit on Cadillac and to the characters were Warby pepper and Zach Parker and that's a good thing and now everybody that joints were B. Parker on their first day on their desk to get a copy of dharma bums I think it is that's the eleventh of were B. Parker after the break Neil and co founder Dave Gilboa will talk about moving that well thought out business plans for the paper and into the real world I'm guy rise and you're listening to how I built this from NPR support for KQ weedy comes from Xfinity Xfinity voice is home phone service that keeps customers connected to family and friends around the world customers also get calling features like caller ID on their TV support I end up also from leaf Cabraser Hyman and burn stain seeking justice for the injured victims of fraud whistleblowers employees and investors in the bay area and.

North Summerlin England Jack Carroll Cadillac Zach Parker Neil Dave Gilboa Cabraser Hyman Warby Parker New York Public Library co founder NPR fraud
"dave gilboa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Arts Hey it's guy here so before we start the show today we are all following the news really closely as I'm sure you are as some of the interviews are here over the next few weeks we're done long before anyone even heard of coronavirus including this one today and as we recorded interviews in the days and weeks ahead I'll be asking founders about how they're coping with everything that's happening right now with the hope of hearing creative ideas that might help all of us make some sense of it okay now wanted today show so back in two thousand eight Neil Blumenthal and Dave Gilboa both arrived on the campus of the Wharton school at the university of Pennsylvania they were there to start business school and they met each other and to other students Andy hunt and Jeff raider and for them we'll go on to co found Warby Parker but in two thousand eight at that time they didn't know that yet but they did now is something that they all had in common was they were really frustrated with how my glasses work too and it stemmed from this thing that well most people probably experienced at some point they kept losing their glasses and Dave in fact right before he started business school had accidentally left his glasses on their flight and they cost me seven hundred dollars and I just couldn't justify as a full time student paying that much for a new pair of glasses yeah the new iPhone three G. have come out that way to mine is apple store pays two hundred dollars for instance all these magical things and meanwhile the technology behind a pair of glasses is a hundred years old and it just didn't make sense and what you're like okay I've got this this amazing I found this magical portal to all human knowledge and it cost me two hundred Bucks and get these eye glasses made of plastic are like super expensive yes it yeah I was complaining to anyone that would listen about like last year's expensive and then and he kept losing his classes and he was buying everything online but consider how you can buy new classes online and why no one is effectively science classes on my right because I mean this like two thousand eight and I mean by that plan wasn't like like selling things online was brand new idea yeah and so we kind of started this conversation where we were kind of frustrated by different pieces of the eyewear industry and we knew that Neil had spent a number of years I'm working for and I were nonprofit and.

Neil Blumenthal Dave Gilboa Wharton school Andy hunt Jeff raider Warby Parker university of Pennsylvania
"dave gilboa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That this doesn't sound cheap and that it looks deliberate and visually looks decent how did you guys come up with the name because it sounds like like at an aristocrat from like you know North Summerlin in England or something like Warby Parker yeah we have injected that the hardest thing that we did in those early days was set on a name that all four of us like to think we still have our spreadsheet of over two thousand names that we tested on our very patient friends yeah too early check Carolina characters that Dave actually discovered when he went to the New York Public Library exhibit on Cadillac and to the characters were Warby pepper and Zach Parker and that's and now everybody that joints were B. Parker on their first day on their desk they get copies dharma bums a lot of other goodies that's the element for B. Parker after the break Neil and co founder Dave Gilboa will talk about moving that well thought out business plans of paper and into the real world I'm guy rise and you're listening to how I built this from NPR I'm Stephen up there on the next Freakonomics radio what is the best immediate response you can omit damage done by the novel coronavirus this is the time to write unconditional checks in in the sphere of lockdowns in very close quarters does familiarity really brief contempt and if so what can we do about the.

North Summerlin England Cadillac Zach Parker Neil Dave Gilboa Stephen Warby Parker Carolina New York Public Library co founder Freakonomics
"dave gilboa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"dave gilboa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dave Gilboa both arrived on the campus of the Wharton school at the university of Pennsylvania they were there to start business school and they met each other and to other students Andy hunter and Jeff raider and for them would go on to co found Warby Parker but in two thousand eight at that time they didn't know that yet but they did now is something that they all had in common was they were really frustrated with how my glasses worked and it stemmed from this thing that well most people probably experienced at some point they kept losing their glasses and Dave in fact right before the start of business school had accidentally left his glasses on airplanes and it cost me seven hundred dollars and I just couldn't justify as a full time student paying that much for a new pair of glasses yeah the new iPhone three G. had come out that wait in line at the apple store pays two hundred dollars for instead all these magical things and meanwhile the technology behind a pair of glasses is a hundred years old and it just didn't make sense in and what you're like okay I've got this this amazing iPhone this magical portal to all human knowledge and it cost me two hundred Bucks and get these eye glasses made of plastic are like super expensive yes it yeah I was complaining to anyone that would listen about my glasses were so expensive and then and he kept losing his classes and he was buying everything online but can figure out what you can buy new classes online in Winona's effectively sunglasses on my right because I mean this like two thousand eight and I mean by that point wasn't like you know like selling things online was just brand new idea yeah and so we kind of started this conversation where we were kind of frustrated by different pieces of the eyewear industry and we knew that Neil had spent a number.

Dave Gilboa Wharton school Andy hunter Jeff raider Warby Parker Winona Neil university of Pennsylvania
Dave Gilboa explains how the idea for Warby Parker came about

Good Life Project

00:51 sec | 4 years ago

Dave Gilboa explains how the idea for Warby Parker came about

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