13 Burst results for "Dave Gash"

"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Week is Dave gash. He is the executive producer and writer of the big bang theory. He has been with the show pretty much from the very beginning. Let let's talk a little bit about the show. It's been the top rated sitcom for how long now for a really long time. I'm not exactly. Sure, yeah. We, we've had a great run. And there are a ten riders. That all work together in this really unique way. And you say unique because I always think of my framework is shows like curb your enthusiasm, which is also its own thing. Or, or Seinfeld. We're one or maybe two people would write a script. And then we'd go to the riders, and the jokes would be added. You guys do a very different approach. It's not a single writer, and then it's punched up. It's a whole group discussion. Right, right. The standard model is to have you break the story around a big table. And then and come up with an outline and send one or two writers off to write it, and then come back and get notes, but which Lory noticed in his long storied career was that when those scripts came back, you spend a lot of time rewriting them. So what if we just had this board and had everybody's eyes on the script, and we went through it. And one of the things that happened when you go off to write a script is, of course it sounded great. When you were talking about it. Awesome in that little outline. But now it doesn't make sense or even better, you came up with a twist that is better for the story. But you've got it approved and you've got to kind of stick to the outline, and you don't want to bug show runner, but we've been able to do is sit around the room come up with it together, write the script together and then have that freedom to pivot and turn and follow the story. So sometimes people say, oh, my gosh. I didn't see how that was going to happen at the end. And we said we need to do. We, we discovered it along the way. It'd be more fun to go this way, or to go that way. No, no. We're in the Chuck Laurie era of television where the laws were passed the no sitcom to be on unless it's either created or produced by truck lorries that set more or less true. He he, he think about all of this shows right, is two and a half men was his. So it's civil grace under fire Dharma, and Greg tuned. A half man. Big bang theory. Mom, Mike and Molly. And the. I just wanna Golden Globe for Kaminsky with. Yeah. And now his new show just got picked up. Bob hearts Abbas Shola, which is going to be on CBS. And I saw the pilot. It's really, really funny. And so it's no, he's, he's incredibly talented but he all span. In addition to that he has this process for making a show, which is different from the, the way, other people make shows, and that ends up having a big impact on how successful the show or at least that's the correlation that seems to exist, he touches something. And it I mean, has he had many shows that haven't worked out, especially well. You have to think about it to know. Yeah. Yeah. There is. There's there's a story that a long time ago. Some network bought a show with him and Tyler Perry. The two most popular guy those guys that show didn't get on the air. Those two guys, it was supposed to be a dark documentary about the holocaust fly bring those two guys do that. It didn't make any sense, but he, I don't think anyone has the tracker. Life is astonished. So one, so my wife literally started watching the big bang theory from the first show, and I watched more or less, what she watches other than a handful of project. Runway you're flip this house. And I will specifically notice how the show has iterative over. What is it twelve twelve years twelve season two hundred and seventy nine episodes, which is slightly more than your episodes. You're like two fifty something? I'm coming up on two fifty right, soon soon, you'll pass. Taking me five years to get. Beauty of once a week. And, and that's the beauty of two idiot sitting and talking in a room as opposed to a whole television for our budget for this show is exactly zero. So it's pretty that's not true. Because the electricity cla something but anyway, and Medina close. So we so I've noticed in the beginning. The thing that was so appealing to me. I don't watch a lot of television, but I got pulled into the show 'cause everybody was pretty dysfunctional. This was a group where most of the main characters certainly the four mil characters were at various points on the spectrum. Certainly it's implied that Sheldon is either autistic or aspirin or somewhere on the spectrum and over the years. That's kinda moderated a little bit. We've mainstream them tell us about how this has evolved and how do you stay true to those original characters? Well, I think it's a testament to Bill Brady and Chuck, creating this show, which was those characters were inspired by Bill Pretty's experiences here in New York working at a computer company, and really brilliant, people, not exactly the most socially, exactly stepped so brilliant people who are not socially, as not the genius socially, that they are in other ways coming up. We continue our conversation with Dave gash,.

Dave gash writer Chuck Laurie Bill Pretty executive producer Tyler Perry Seinfeld Lory CBS Medina Kaminsky aspirin Bill Brady Sheldon Greg Mike Abbas Shola Bob New York Molly
"dave gash" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

11:04 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Former CIA director, John Brennan, about the situation in Iran at a private caucus meeting on Tuesday. He was invited to speak amid concerns over the Trump administration sudden moves in the region. I'm Barbara Kusak. I'm Barry ritholtz. You're listening to masters in business on Bloomberg radio. I am speaking with Dave gash. He is the executive producer of the big bang theory, which is having its season finale. Let's talk a little bit about the entertainment industry. There are so many interesting things that are going on. But I, I have to ask you about the Emmys Lewis show and its actors and writers have been nominated. I dunno ninety seven times for EMI's do you go to the Emmys. What is that experience? Like if you get nominated you go to the, you just go, and there's a editor, Peter Cheik Ohs was started getting numb. And he's on cheers and nominations on. Cheers and unwilling graze. And by the time he started getting on big bang. It was his twentieth nomination. No win. So you know it's do so he went well, he just thought he sees in Lucci. He's never gonna be never going to happen. I believe in mean reversion eventually he has to win and he did it was he reverted to the mean so he won I think three or four in a row, the and then that's it. We'll never win and get high. He the, the Emmys, a really fun. And what's interesting is when you go in different years and see, like who's show it is. So one year, we got to sit in the row right with homeland, and that was the year. I think it was the first season and they won they won big, and it's, you know, first of all, it's like Lee look down. You're like, hey, there's many Potemkin. That's fun. Claire Danes is great in that layer Danes is wonderful and that show. And then and then they win they go up on stage and it's amazing. And so it's fun. No matter what. And, but it's fun to win, isn't it? It's I've never wanted to EMMY. So I don't know. But it seems really fun. And it's been it's interesting to think about Chuck glory, who while he hasn't won an EMMY ever, how is it possible not wanna writing AMI, but almost all of his characters have, and I think it's a testament to how he creates shows that are so focused on characters that an actor can have a great script to really knock it out of the park. And it's, it's, it's, you know, you'd think he'd Allison Janney just one one Jim Parsons, one rubber right every year. Yeah. But didn't shit wasn't the show best comedy. Emmy for long does it really the creators so that we got? I think three or four times, and, but it was during the run of modern family. So modern family Ryan won a lot. And then we went a couple times for the rock from the sun. But that was when Frazier was winning Frazier won the eight years, six years in a row. But you guys started long before mon- family, right? We were a couple of years before. Yeah. Sure. So, so that's, that's the that's kind of interesting. Have you noticed any changes in Hollywood since the metoo movement, began specifically within your show. So I think that around Hollywood people people get it now, it's I've been hopeful that this time would happen. And so I think the culture is changing and it's not that hard to do you know if there when you're in a writer's room, it's important to have everyone be able to speak freely. And so there was. Even a friend's lawsuit years ago where the California Supreme Court guaranteed the right of the writers to cross the line bright. At one is you, you, if you start self editing yourself in a creative format you're gonna really radically cut back. What, what can be done right? And there is a way to speak freely, but also be respectful of everyone in the room. And in fact, if you're trying to get the most out of everybody if you're pitching jokes that might hurt people's feelings, or even want to do anything that silences other people in the room, you know. So I think that the I think this is all positive for making better shows, and we're going to see I think in the next few years. Just more at what we've seen already which is more diversity of voices, which is terrific. It's gonna make better content as executive producer how much responsibility do you take for the financial success of the big bang, theory, almost none? So. The I certainly. Yeah, I'm just so grateful to be a part of this show. And you really started pretty much from the what was it? The second episode. Yes. So the pilot is the first episode and then, you know, the first episode of season, one is, is episode two. So Stephen Lauren, I were there from the beginning. There are so many people that deserve credit way ahead of me. And I think that it's been so cool to just watch how this has grown and evolved. And nobody really I don't think people knew that this show show up for nerds was going to be connected with people and be so popular with them. And when did you start to think, hey, this thing is becoming a monster. How long did it take? There was a press tour that the cast took. And I think it was. Maybe at the end of season want between season one and season two or between season to season three that while you guys went to comic con. So we went to Comecon and now those definitely a moment. We were like, wow. People are into the euro earnings for sure. Yes. But these guys write it into the show would. Yes. Hilarious. And we always had every year of Comecon we'd have a little real. So we'd have all been nervous jokes. And the superhero references and references to come on and we always wanted to shoot at Comecon but it's in July. And it never it was always too hard to do. And so the, I think the moment for me was when the actors came back from a press tour, Mexico City, and they were all this is your wide open, and they were just like we were the Beatles like it with, you know, there was security, and there are hundreds of people waiting at the hotel, and they didn't even know the show was they thought they were promoting the that the show is going to be in Mexico. Already become a huge hit and there's a moment for me. Also where I met somebody a Chinese person who said, I learned English watching your show. Really? That's interesting. And it's the number one comedy in China to let me think about that. I'm wondering what cultural things would translate? But I guess it doesn't matter. It's just a quirky family. And so that's kind of universal even though the specifics are so unique to the show. Right. You know jokes about Pasadena aren't gonna play amazing. But you can you know what it's like that? It's that core dynamic of friendship about relationships about trying to find love trying to find career success and that has been able to translate when you look around what's going on with Hollywood? You've giant mergers. You have related to the show all the superhero stuff, just going ballistic when, when Disney starts crank. Taking out marvel comics, after that purchase marvel comic movies four times a year. What do you think the future of this is gonna be in the entertainment space? I don't mean just from the Ford guys perspective. But broader, is it becoming a nerds entertainment world? It's such an interesting question I feel we're in this wild moment where within three weeks of each other. The marvel arc game of thrones big bang, thrilling. And so will we look back just the adventures orcas, ending marvel is going to go forever? Malian comics, they haven't even touched into, you know, that's you. That's you. I do think it will. It will have to continue to innovate right? You have to find you can't there, weren't there never been an arc lake avengers in a movie. You've never seen anything like game of thrones before big bang. You hadn't had a show like that. And so that's why reality TV was hot where you're like. Oh, wait. I've never seen a show with guys stuck on an island. But that was cheap. That's why that was so, so, well, those ratings were great those ratings really great. And so if I will I will admit to watching the first couple of seasons of survivor, and then it kinda got repetitive. It's interesting me, people on staff, still love that show. They still love it, and it, there's something special about it. The so it's just about being able to innovate and entertain an audience as you have fewer giant corporations. Are they going to become more risk averse? Are they going to say, well, we know avengers, worked so let's make more marvel. It's they just did that with Star Wars. Right. They cut back on a Star Wars movie because the one before it didn't do as well. Cranking out Craig came out, too fast and too, too much. Although when we look at risk aversion, look at Disney. All right. So they buy Star Wars and they buy marvel and they by FOX, and they said, oh, yeah. Net flicks. We're gonna put out Netflix at half the price. They seem to be taking or embracing risk. I don't know if everybody else is. But when a joint company like Disney has figured out if we don't throw stuff up against the wall. We'll never know what you know. That's a great Jeff Jesus quote. If we don't fail. We're not taking enough chances to see what might work. Yeah. Exactly. And it just took a big right down on vice. So they're like, that's the thing you take big right down for them. It was a couple of hundred million dollars, which is really a I thought you don't track all this stuff, or is that Hollywood enough entertainment. Yeah, exactly. We have been speaking. With Dave guests he is a writer and the executive producer for the big bang theory, which just had its season finale, if you enjoy this conversation. Well, be sure stick around for the podcast, trews, we keep the tape rolling and continue discussing all things television related. You can find that at items overcast Stitcher, Bloomberg, wherever you're.

EMMY Hollywood Disney executive producer Bloomberg Dave gash writer Barry ritholtz Comecon Barbara Kusak Claire Danes EMI Peter Cheik Ohs editor CIA Allison Janney California Supreme Court John Brennan Lucci Frazier
"dave gash" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"My extra special guests this week is Dave Geshe. He is the executive producer and writer of the big bang theory. He has been with the show pretty much from the very beginning. Let let's talk a little bit about the show. It's been the top rated sitcom for how long now for a really long time. He's using. Yeah. We've we've had a great run. And there are a ten writers. That all work together in this really unique way. And you say unique because I always think of my framework is shows like curb your enthusiasm, which is also its own thing. Or, or Seinfeld. We're one or maybe two people would write a script. And then we'd go to the writers, and the jokes would be added. You guys do a very different approach. It's not a single writer, and then it's punched up. It's a whole group discussion. Right. Right. The standard model is to have you break the story around a big table, and then and come over to outline, and send one or two writers off to write it, and then come back and get notes, but with Chuck Lory noticed in his long storied career was that when those scripts came back, you spend a lot of time rewriting them. So what if we just have this board and had everybody's eyes on the script, and we went through it, and one of the things that happened when you go off to write a script is, of course it sounded great. When you were talking about it. Awesome in that little outline. But now it doesn't make sense or even better, you came up with a twist that is better for the story. But you've got it approved and you got to kind of stick to the outline, and you don't want to bug the show runner, but we've been able to do is sit around the room come up with it together, write the script together and then have that freedom to pivot and turn and follow the story. So sometimes people will say, oh, my gosh. I didn't see how that was going to happen at the end. And we said we need to do. We, we discovered it along the way. It'd be more fun to go this way, or to go that way. No. We're in the Chuck Laurie era of television where the laws were passed and no succumb to beyond unless it's either created or produced by truck lorries that set more or less true. He he, he think about all of his shows, right? Is soon. And a half men was his, so it's civil grace under fire Dharma, and Greg tuna half man. Big bang theory. Mom, Mike and Molly. And the. You just wanna Golden Globe for Kaminsky with Alex, and now, his new show, just got picked up. Bob hearts Abbas Shola, which is going to be on CBS and I saw the pilot. It's really, really funny. And so that's no, he's, he's incredibly talented. But he also in addition to that he has this process for making a show, which is different from the, the way, other people make shows, and that ends up having a big impact on how successful the show or at least that's the correlation that seems to exist, he touches something. And it I mean, has he had many shows that haven't worked out, especially? Well think about it to know. Yeah, yeah, there is a there's, there's a story that a long long time ago. Some network bought a show with him and Tyler Perry, right? To most popular those guys that that show didn't get on the air. But those two guys. Because she was supposed to be a dark documentary about the holocaust bring those two guys do that it didn't make any sense, but he, I don't think anyone has the tracker. Truly amazing. So, so my wife literally started watching the big bang theory from the first show and I watch more or less, what she watches other than a handful of project. Runway you're flip this house. And I will specifically notice how the show has iterative over. What is it twelve years twelve season? Two hundred and seventy nine episodes, which is slightly more than your episodes. You're at two fifty something. I'm coming up on two fifty right soon soon. You'll pass taking me five years to get the beauty of once a week. And, and that's the beauty of two it's sitting in the room as opposed to a whole television predominate, our budget for the show is exactly zero. So it's pretty that's not true because the electric city close something but anyway, and Medina Klis dumping. So we so I've noticed in the beginning. The thing that was so appealing to me. I don't watch a lot of television, but I got pulled into. The show 'cause everybody was pretty dysfunctional. This was a group where most of the main characters so only the four milk characters were at various points on the spectrum. Certainly it's implied that Sheldon is either autistic or aspirin or somewhere on the spectrum and over the years. That's kinda moderated a little bit. We've mainstream them tell us about how this has evolved and how do you stay true to those original characters? Well, I think it's a testament to Bill Brady and Chuck, creating this show, which was those characters were inspired by Bill Pretty's experiences here in New York working at a computer company, and really brilliant, people, not exactly the most socially, exactly stepped so brilliant people who are not socially, as not the genius socially, that they are in other ways coming up. We continue our conversation with Dave gash,.

writer Dave Geshe Chuck Lory Chuck Laurie Bill Pretty executive producer Dave gash Tyler Perry Seinfeld Medina Klis Greg tuna CBS aspirin Sheldon Bill Brady Kaminsky New York Mike Abbas Shola Chuck
"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Week is Dave gash. He is the executive producer and writer of the big bang theory. He has been with the show pretty much from the very beginning. Let let's talk a little bit about the show. It's been the top rated sitcom for how long now for a really long time. I'm not exactly sure. We, we've had a great run. And there are ten writers are that all work together in this really unique way. And you say unique because I always think of my framework is shows like curb your enthusiasm, which is also its own thing. Or, or Seinfeld where one or maybe two people would write a script, and then we'd go to the riders, and the jokes would be added. You guys do a very different approach. It's not a single writer, and then it's punched up. It's a whole group discussion. Right, right. The standard model is to have you break the story around a big table. And then and come up with an outline, and send one or two riders off to write it, and then come back and get notes, but which Lory noticed in his long storied career was that when those scripts came back, you spend a lot of time rewriting them. So what if we just had this board and had everybody's eyes on the script and. We went through it. And one of the things that happened when you go off to write a script is, of course it sounded great. When you were talking about it Senator awesome in that little outline. But now it doesn't make sense or even better, you came up with a twist that is better for the story. But you've got it approved and you've got to kind of stick to the outline, and you don't want to bug the show runner, but we've been able to do is sit around the room come up with it together, write the script together and then have that freedom to pivot and turn and follow the story. So sometimes people say, oh, my gosh. I didn't see how that was going to happen at the end, and we said, we need to do. We, we discovered it along the way. It'd be more fun to go this way, or to go that way. Now, now we're in the truck. Laurie era of television where the laws were passed the no sitcom to be on unless it's either created or produced by truck lorries that set more or less true. He he, he think about all of his shows, right, it soon. And a half men was his. So it's civil grace under fire Dharma, and Greg tuna. A half man. Big bang theory. Mom, Mike and Molly and the Egypt won a Golden Globe for Kaminsky with Alex. Yeah. And now his new show just got picked up. Bob hearts Abbas Shola, which is going to be on CBS. And I saw the pilots really, really funny, and so that's no, he's, he's incredibly talented, but he also. And in addition to that he has this process for making a show, which is different from the, the way, other people make shows, and that, and that ends up having a big impact on how successful the show or at least that's the correlation that seems to exist, he touches something. And it I mean, has he had many shows that haven't worked out, especially well. Think about it to know. Yeah. Yeah. There is. There's, there's a story that a long long time ago. Some network bought a show with him and Tyler Perry. The two most popular guy those God that that show didn't get on the air those two guys, it was supposed to be a dark documentary about the holocaust Libran those two guys do that it didn't make any sense, but he, I don't think anyone has the tracker Lake Chad. It's really amazing, so one so my wife literally started watching the big bang theory from the first show and I watch more or less, what she watches other than a handful of project. Runway you're flip this house. And I will specifically notice how the show has iterative over, what is it? The twelve years twelve season two hundred seventy nine episodes, which is slightly more than your episodes. You're like two fifty something coming on fifty right soon soon. You'll pass it's taking me, five years to get that is very impressive beauty of once a week. And that's the beauty of two. It's sitting in the room as opposed to a whole television for our budget for the show is exactly zero. So it's pretty that's not true, because the electric city course something but anyway and Medina custom. So we so I've noticed in the beginning. The thing that was so appealing to me. I don't watch a lot of television, but I got pulled into the show. 'cause everybody was pretty dysfunctional. This was a group where most of the main characters so only the four milk characters were at various points on the spectrum. Certainly it's implied that Sheldon is either autistic or aspirin -gars, or somewhere on the spectrum and over the years. That's kinda moderated a little bit. We've mainstream them tell us about how this has evolved. And how do you stay true to those original characters? Well, I think it's a testament to Bill Brady and Chuck, creating this show, which was those characters were inspired by Bill Pretty's experiences here in New York working at a computer company, and really brilliant, people, not exactly the most socially, exactly so dept so brilliant, people who are not socially, as not the genius socially, that they are in other ways coming up. We continue our conversation with.

writer Dave gash Bill Pretty Lake Chad executive producer Tyler Perry Lory Seinfeld Laurie era Senator Greg tuna CBS Medina aspirin Bill Brady Sheldon Egypt Abbas Shola Bob Mike
"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"With Dave gash executive producer and writer at the big bang, theory, discussing, America's most popular sitcom. You're listening to masters in business with Barry ritholtz on Bloomberg radio. Just really, really good guy. The term good egg isn't enough to describe him. He's also certified organic and free range. Rich puts the cap back on everything, the toothpaste, the olive oil, the shampoo, everything. He lets his tenure nephew beat him at virtual tennis, even though he can straight up slay his ten year old Matthew in virtual tennis. When the toilet paper is running low rich replaces the roll on the actual holder, not just on the back of the toilet reaches texting and driving rich. No. What are you doing? Rich. I was just telling everyone how great you are. Texting and driving makes good people look bad. Visit stoptextsstopwrecks dot org. A public service announcement brought to you by the National Highway Traffic safety. Administration and the Ad Council. Why do hedge funds and other alternative managers rely on Pershing Mark aldoroty a managing director at bien y Mellon's Pershing and head of prime services explains in today's environment of market, volatility, Pershing's prime services, who's well positioned to support the needs of hedge funds and other alternative investment managers, whether it's customized financing or securities lending solutions, platform access or business expansion being why Mellon's Pershing is a prime broker who's committed to this business and agile enough to meet your volving demands? Pershing helps to solve the needs of clients by advocating for that providing unwavering strength, deep supply, and award winning service. It is at the core of everything. We do find out what sets Pershing's prime brokerage team apart. Learn more about the unique and industry leading solutions for hedge funds and other alternative managers offered by BSN wide Mellon's Pershing visit our website at Pershing dot com. Hurting LLC member FINRA NYSE. See civic with the Bloomberg small business report. I'm John Tucker business development companies investment vehicles that lend to small and medium sized firms and are run by some of the biggest asset managers on Wall Street are now borrowing more after lawmakers gave them the go-ahead the BBC universes mushroomed assets for the vehicle stand at around ninety point nine billion dollars. The firms are filling in gaps in lending to small or startup companies as some banks of scaled back, the BBC's ramping, up their borrowing after the passage of twenty eight teens, small business, credit availability act that law essentially allows a BBC to get approval from either..

Pershing Pershing dot com Bloomberg BBC Barry ritholtz bien y Mellon Rich Dave gash tennis Ad Council America LLC executive producer FINRA NYSE John Tucker writer Mark aldoroty managing director nine billion dollars
"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Week is Dave gash. He is the executive producer and writer of the big bang theory. He has been with the show pretty much from the very beginning. Let's talk a little bit about the show. It's been the top rated sitcom for how long now for a really long time. I'm not exactly sure. Yeah. We, we've had a great run. And there are ten writers. That all work together in this really unique way. And you say unique because I always think of my framework is shows like curb your enthusiasm, which is also its own thing. Or, or Seinfeld where one or maybe two people would write a script, and then would go to the writers, and the jokes would be added. You guys do a very different approach. It's not a single writer, and then it's punched up. It's a whole group discussion. Right, right. The standard model is to have you break the story around a big table, and then and come up with outline, and send one or two writers off to write it, and the comeback and get notes, but which Lory noticed in his long storied career was that when those scripts came back you spent a lot of time rewriting them. So what if we just had this board and had everybody's eyes on the script, and we went through it. And one of the things that happened when you go off to write a script is, of course it sounded great. When you were talking about it. Awesome in that little outline. But now it doesn't make sense or even better, you came up with a twist that is better for the story. But you've got it approved and you've got to kind of stick to the outline, and you don't wanna bug show runner, but we've been able to do is sit around the room come up with it together write this script together and then have that freedom to pivot and turn and follow the story. So sometimes people say, oh, my gosh. I didn't see how that was going to happen at the end, and we needed we, we discovered it along the way, it'd be more fun to go this way, or to go that way. No, no. We're in the Chuck Laurie era of television where the laws were passed the no sitcom to be on unless it's either created or produced by truck lorries that set more or less true. He he, he think about all of his shows, right? Is two and a half men was his. So it's civil grace under fire Dharma, and Greg tuna half man. Big bang theory. Mom, Mike and Molly. And the. I just wanna Golden Globe for Kaminsky with. Alex. Yeah. And now his new show just got picked up. Bob hearts Abbas Shola, which is going to be on CBS and I saw the pilot. It's really, really funny. And so that's no, he's, he's incredibly talented, but he all spent in addition to that he has this process for making show which is different from the, the way other people make shows, and that ends up having a big impact on how successful the show or at least that's the correlation that seems to exist, he touches something. And it I mean, has he had many shows that haven't worked out, especially well. Think about it to know. Yeah. Yeah. There is. There's, there's a story that a long time ago some network a show with him and Tyler Perry. Those are the two most popular those that show didn't get on the air. But those two guys supposed to be a dark documentary about the holocaust. I bring those two guys do that. It didn't make any sense, but he, I don't think anyone has the tracker. So one, so my wife literally started watching the big bang theory from the first show, and I watched more or less, what she watches other than a handful of project runway or flip this house. And I will specifically notice how the show has it A-Rated over. What is it twelve years while season two hundred seventy nine episodes slightly more than your episodes to fifty something coming up on two fifty soon soon, you'll pass? Take me, five years to get. Once a week. And, and that's the beauty of two sitting and talking room as opposed to a whole television for our budget for this show is exactly zero. So it's pretty that's not true. Because the electricity to something but anyway and Medina them. So we so I've noticed in the beginning, the thing that was so appealing to me. I don't watch a lot of television, but I got pulled into the show because everybody was pretty dysfunctional. This was a group where most of the main characters certainly the four mil characters were at various points on the spectrum certainly it's implied that Sheldon is either autistic or Asperger's or somewhere on the spectrum and over the years. That's kinda moderated a little bit. We've mainstream them tell us about how this has evolved and how do you stay true to those original characters? Well, I think it's a testament to Bill Brady and Chuck, creating this show, which was those characters were inspired by Bill Pretty's experiences here in New York working at a computer company, and really brilliant, people, not exactly the most socially, exactly so brilliant, people who are not socially, as not the genius socially, that they are in other ways coming up. We continue our conversation with Dave gash, executive producer of the big bang.

executive producer Abbas Shola writer Chuck Laurie Tyler Perry Bill Pretty Lory Seinfeld Greg tuna CBS Kaminsky Sheldon Bill Brady Alex New York Mike Bob Molly twelve years five years
"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Special guests this week is Dave gash. He is the executive producer and writer of the big bang theory. He has been with the show pretty much from the very beginning. Let let's talk a little bit about the show. It's been the top rated sitcom for how long now for a really long time. I'm not exactly sure. Yeah. We, we've had a great run. And there are a ten writers that all work together in this really unique way. And you say unique 'cause I always think of my framework is shows like curb your enthusiasm, which is also its own thing. Or, or Seinfeld where one or maybe two people would write a script, and then we'd go to the rioters, and the jokes would be added. You guys do a very different approach. It's not a single writer, and then it's punched up. It's a whole group discussion. Right, right. The standard model is to have you break the story around a big table, and then and come up with an outline and send one or two writers off to write it in the comeback and get notes, but which Lory noticed in his long storied career was that when those scripts came back you spent a lot of time rewriting them. So what if we just had this board and had everybody's eyes on the script and. We went through it. And one of the things that happen when you go off to write a script is, of course it sounded great. When you were talking about it Senator awesome in that little outline. But now it doesn't make sense or even better, you came up with a twist that is better for the story. But you've got it approved and you've got to kind of stick to the outline, and you don't want to bug show runner, but we've been able to do is sit around the room come up with it together, write the script together and then have that freedom to pivot and turn and follow the story. So sometimes people say, oh, my gosh. I didn't see how that was going to happen at the end, and we said, we need to do. We, we discovered it along the way. It'd be more fun to go this way, or to go that way. Now, now, we're in the Chuck Laurie era of television where the laws were passed in no succumb to beyond unless it's either created or produced by truck lorries that set more or less true. He he, he think about all of his shows right, is too, and a half men was his. So it's civil grace under fire Dharma, and Greg tuna. A half man. Big bang theory. Mom, Mike and Molly. And the he just wanna Golden Globe for Kaminsky with Alex. Yeah. And now his new show just got picked up. Bob hearts, Atta Shola, which is going to be on CBS. And I saw the pilot. It's really, really funny. And so that's no, he's, he's incredibly talented. But he all spent in addition of that he has this process for making a show, which is different from the, the way, other people make shows, and that, and that ends up having a big impact on how successful the show or at least that's the correlation that seems to exist, he touches something. And it I mean, has he had many shows that haven't worked out, especially well. You have to think about it to know. Yeah. Yeah. There is. There's, there's a story that a long long time ago. Some network bought a show with him and Tyler Perry. The two most popular guy those guys that that show didn't get on the air, but those two guys was supposed to be a dark documentary about the holocaust fly. Bring those two guys do that. It didn't make any sense, but he, I don't think anyone has the tracker. So one, so my wife literally started watching the big bang theory from the first show and I watch more or less, what she watches other than a handful of project. Runway you're flip this house. And I will specifically notice how the show has iterative over, what is it? The twelve years twelve season two hundred and seventy nine episodes, which is slightly more than your episodes to fifty something coming up on two fifty right, soon soon. You'll pass taking me five years to get that's the beauty of once a week. And, and that's the beauty of two it's sitting in a room as opposed to a whole television predominate, our budget for the show is exactly zero. So it's pretty that's not true, because the electric city to something but anyway and Medina close. So we so I've noticed in the beginning. The thing that was so appealing to me. I don't watch a lot of television, but I got pulled into. The show 'cause everybody was pretty dysfunctional. This was a group where most of the main characters so only the four milk characters were at various points on the spectrum certainly it's implied that Sheldon is either autistic or Asperger's or somewhere on the spectrum and over the years. That's kinda moderated a little bit. We've mainstream them tell us about how this has evolved and how do you stay true to those original characters? Well, I think it's a testament to Bill Brady and Chuck, creating this show, which was those characters were inspired by Bill Pretty's experiences here in New York working at a computer company, and really brilliant, people, not exactly the most socially, exactly so dept so brilliant, people who are not socially, as not the genius socially, that they are in other ways coming up. We continue our conversation with Dave gash,.

Dave gash writer Chuck Laurie Bill Pretty executive producer Tyler Perry Lory Seinfeld Greg tuna Senator CBS Sheldon Bill Brady Kaminsky Medina Bob hearts Atta Shola Mike New York Molly
"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"My special guest this week is Dave gash. He is the executive producer of the top rated sitcom, the big bang theory as well as an investor. Let's talk a little bit about your really terrible relationship with money as you have described it. When you growing up explain that. So I. My parents were teachers and so we always had enough money but it wasn't money that was being saved. And so when I started to work in Hollywood, I had some money and I, I, I didn't know what to do with it. And I think from the very early days, I would always read the business section to try and get worked up to look think about what's bad stuff could happen. Okay. And there's lots of that. And there's lots of bad stuff and their screens and screens of it. And so, I would I describe myself on the writing staff as the chief warrior is I was because I knew enough to get scared about the Asian currency markets or what's going to happen, and I was the Asian currency more. The good news is it doesn't matter my new philosophy long-term investors, so I don't care, right? What happened? So in other words, what happened last Tuesday's not relevant to your retirement. Exactly. So for me, it's a it's about if I've, what's your time you've much talk about with your clients all the time. What are your goals, but your time horizon, if you are thinking about twenty years from now? Then what happens in today's markets on? I'm telling people look at a long-term chart charter, the market, the single worst day, the nineteen eighty-seven crash twenty three percent. One day crash on a bit long term chart. It's like a little wiggle you barely even see it. Although while you're in it the world is coming to an end. But that's just a function of perspective. Exactly. And I think that there's this problem that I had, which is even after I knew that I didn't internalize it. There's kind of that moment when you start to see how all this stuff fits together. And that's when you have the ability to start feeling better. Now, not just not feeling like okay, I have enough money or I've, I'm going to be okay. It's more like I have confidence in this approach that I've taken and also. Being comfortable with the uncertainty. So let's talk about that because there's a line that you wrote quote, the markets haven't changed. They still go up and down the differences. I don't anymore. So how did you get from that process of worrying about where the in was to? Hey markets, volatile. They'll fluctuate but I can't be bothered. So I was a mess. So I had my I had my retirement in cash and the Alito nine happens, and it starts everything starts to tank, and I think to myself, I've been waiting since thirteen for this is the end of the world. I knew it was going to happen, but it wasn't the end of the world. And it was around that time that I read this article about Gordon Murray, who is writing called the investment answer in his race against cancer. He was trying to finish the book before I think it was brain cancer. And so it was extremely moving article ordered the book on Amazon before it came out. I read it and things click for me in a different way to say understanding. How the market works being a long term investor and no one ever talked about having the fiduciary investment advisor. And once you realize that there's somebody who's on your side, who's not trying to make extra money and every single trade and they're beating partner for the long term, I sought out an adviser and it's funny I say met with him. I said, okay, I'll give you a year to see how it is. So proves. I didn't really know I wasn't really allowed months once is enough. I, I heard something amusing you had you had your agent and his brother was an adviser. And you said I've given enough that family enough money. Exactly. Right. So CA is one of the leaders, see as Brian Lord and his brother Blaine Lord. His name is also an advisor ten percent to the Lord's give Levin. That's really that's really funny. So, so you're, you're looking. And what is at least by traditional standards a fairly substantial salary. However, there's always the risk. Hey, we could get cancelled anytime who knows if the show is going to get picked up. How do you deal with that sort of uncertainty? You have to be fairly risk embracing if that's the career choice. So this is what I realized, which is when I became a second rider, because I saw my friend, get a job on cheers after a year and a half. I totally miss priced risk. I thought going into Hollywood was going to be a lot easier, a lot more stable than it was. And once I got there, I was like, oh my God. This is a mess. I went to Newton account and once and he said, okay, well, what's your what, what kind of income, can you expect over the next five years, said, well, well, I might never work again. So zero or I might syndicated shows two hundred million dollars. So can we budget for somewhere in between? Paralyzing in west paralyzing for a long time. And the difference for me is getting on their side of it and saying hold on a second risk. We know risking reward or related to be afraid of that, or we can try to make a little piece with that, and so much of my life. So much of everyone's life is. How do you reduce risk mitigate? How do you try to make everything seem to make more sense than as a storyteller? I was always telling myself stories either to get racked up in nervous or try to calm down, and it's hard. But I think trying to get comfortable with that unknown is, is really powerful. I can imagine. So before we leave the investing space, I have to ask you have a patent how on earth did that happen. So I have a couple of friends from college, and this was we graduated early nineties and. We had the site we always wanted to start a company and so all of us were at the beginning of our career and John's train, who's now this internet law. Professor Harvard right is a big, big deal. He had this idea, which was wait. He was a colleague or friend of you defend from college. So, so it turns out, it's like this guy Xinmin, who he just sold his company to target and. Zac main who runs a neuroscience institute in Portugal, and me and Zach and Marilyn Berg who another college friend who worked at Google and the thing that was incredible a couple of things that were fun. It was a great chance for a stall to be together in this idea for the patent was could there, be a way to communicate with me to talk and without having to type? Could it be touch based way of communication? So if you and I had a bracelet. You know, and we can give it a squeeze. You say you know what? When this interview rather rather than me, giving you a sign when we wanna break to go get a snack. Just give me a squeeze and so, you give me a squeeze or you'd be able to tell your, your kid would say, when it gets to school, I'm gonna give you a squeeze. And so it was a, a half dick way of communication coming up, we continue our conversation with Dave Geshe executive producer and writer at the big.

Hollywood executive producer advisor Dave gash brain cancer Gordon Murray Brian Lord Portugal Alito Xinmin Amazon Google Paralyzing partner Newton fiduciary Professor Harvard Levin Blaine Lord
"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Special guests this week is Dave gash. He is the executive producer and writer of the big bang theory. He has been with the show pretty much from the very beginning. Let's talk a little bit about the show. It's been the top rated sitcom for how long now for a really long time. I'm not exactly sure using. Yeah. We, we've had a great run. And there are ten writers that all work together in this really unique way. And you say unique because I always think of my framework is shows like curb your enthusiasm, which is also its own thing, or, or Seinfeld, where one or maybe two people would write a script, and then we'd go to the writers, and the jokes would be added. You guys to a very different approach. It's not. A single writer and then it's punched up. It's a whole group discussion. Right. Right. The standard model is to have you break the story around a big table, and then and come up with an outline and send one or two writers to write it in the comeback and get notes, but which Lory noticed in his long storied career was that when those scripts came back you spent a lot of time rewriting them. So what if we just had this board and had everybody's eyes on the script, and we went through it, and one of the things that happened when you go off to write a script is, of course it sounded great. When you were talking about it Senator awesome, in the outline, but now doesn't make sense, or even better, you came up with a twist that is better for the story. But you've got it approved and you got to kind of stick to the outline, and you don't wanna bug show runner, but we've been able to do is sit around the room come up with together write the script together and then have that freedom to pivot and turn and follow the story. So sometimes. People will say, oh, my gosh. I didn't see how that was going to happen at the end. And we said, we needed we, we discovered it along the way, it'd be more fun to go this way, or go that way. No. We're in the Chuck Laurie era of television where the laws were passed and no sitcom to be on unless it's either created or produced by truck lorries that set more or less true. He he think about all of his shows right is and a half men was his. So it civil grace under fire Dharma, and Greg tuned. A half man. Big bang theory. Mom, Mike and Molly. And the he just wanna Golden Globe for Kaminsky with. Yeah. And now his new show just picked hearts Abbas Shola, which is going to be on CBS. And I saw the pilot. It's really, really funny. And so that's now he's he's incredibly talented but he all span. In addition to that he has this process for making a show way which. Is different from the, the way, other people make shows, and that ends up having a big impact on how successful the show or at least that's the correlation that seems to exist, he touches something. And it I mean, has he had many shows that haven't worked out, especially? Well think about it to. No. Yeah. Yeah. There is. There's, there's a story that a longtime ago some network bought a show with him and Tyler Perry. The two most popular guy those guys that that show didn't get on the air, but those two guys who was supposed to be a dark documentary about the holocaust and some fly bring those two guys do that it didn't make any sense. But he had think anyone has the tracker. It's amazing, so one. So my wife literally started watching the big bang theory from the first show, and I watched more or less, what she watches other than a handful of project. Runway you're flip this house. And I will specifically notice how the show has iterative over. What is it twelve years twelve season? Two hundred and seventy nine episodes, which is slightly more than your episodes to fifty something coming onto fifty right, soon soon. You'll pass me five years to get very the beauty of once a week. And that's the beauty of two. It's sitting in the room as opposed to a whole television for our budget for the show is exactly zero. So it's pretty that's not true, because the electric city course something but anyway and Medina crystal. So we so I've noticed in the beginning. The thing that was so appealing to me. I don't watch a lot of television, but I got pulled into. The show 'cause everybody was pretty dysfunctional. This was a group where most of the main characters so only the four mil characters were at various points on the spectrum. Certainly it's implied that Sheldon is either autistic or Asperger's or somewhere on the spectrum and over the years kinda moderated a little bit. We've mainstream them tell us about how this has evolved. And how do you stay true to those original characters? Well, I think it's a testament to Bill pretty and Chuck, creating this show, which was those characters were inspired by Bill Pretty's experiences here in New York working at a computer company, and really brilliant, people, not exactly the most socially, exactly stepped so brilliant people who are not socially, as not the genius socially, that they are in other ways coming up. We continue our conversation with Dave gash, executive producer.

executive producer writer Chuck Laurie Bill Pretty Tyler Perry Abbas Shola Seinfeld CBS Senator Lory Sheldon Medina crystal Mike Greg Kaminsky New York Molly twelve years five years
"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"He has been with the show pretty much from the very beginning. Let let's talk a little bit about the show. It's been the top rated sitcom for how long now for a really long time. He's, he's using. Yeah. We, we've had a great run. And there are a ten writers that all work together in this really unique way. And you say unique because I always think of my framework is shows like curb your enthusiasm, which is also its own thing, or, or Seinfeld, where one or maybe two people would write a script, and then we'd go to the riders in the jokes would be added. You guys do a very different approach. It's not a single. Well writer and then it's punched up. It's a whole group discussion. Right. Right. The standard model is to have you break the story around a big table. And then and come up with an outline and send one or two writers off to write it in the comeback and get notes, but which Lory noticed in his long storied career was that when those scripts came back you spent a lot of time rewriting them. So what if we just had this board and had everybody's eyes on the script, and we went through it. And one of the things that happen when you go off to write a script is, of course it sounded great. When you were talking about it Senator awesome in that little outline. But now it doesn't make sense or even better, you came up with a twist that is better for the story. But you've got it approved and you got to kind of stick to the outline, and you don't want to bug show runner, but we've been able to do is sit around the room come up with it together, write the script together and then have that freedom to pivot and turn and follow the story. So sometimes people say. Oh my gosh. I didn't see how that was going to happen at the end. And we said, we needed we, we discovered it along the way, it'd be more fun to go this way, or to go that way. Now, now, we're in the Chuck Laurie era of television where the laws were passed a no sitcom to be on unless it's either created or produced by truck lorries that set more or less true. He he, he think about all of his shows, right? Is three and a half men was his. So it's civil grace under fire Dharma, and Greg two and a half man. Big bang theory. Mom, Mike and Molly. And the he just wanna Golden Globe for Kaminsky with Alex. Yeah. And now his new show just got picked up. Bob hearts Abbas Shola, which is going to be on CBS and I saw the pilot. It's really, really funny. And so that's no, he's, he's incredibly talented. But he also spent in addition to that he has this process for making a show, which is. Is different from the, the way, other people make shows, and that ends up having a big impact on how successful the show or at least that's the correlation that seems to exist, he touches something. And it I mean, has he had many shows that haven't worked out, especially well. You have to think about it to know. Yeah. Yeah. There is a there's, there's a story that a long long time ago. Some network bought a show with him and Tyler Perry. Right. Those are the two most popular guy those guys that that show didn't get on the air, but those two guys because it was supposed to be a dark documentary about the holocaust bring those two guys do that it didn't make any sense. But he, I don't think anyone has the tracker. It's, it's really amazing. So one, so my wife literally started watching the big bang theory from the first show, and I watched more or less, what she watches other than a handful of project runway or flip this house. And I will specifically notice how the show has iterative over, what is it twelve years twelve season two hundred and seventy nine episodes, which is slightly more than your episodes. You're like two fifty something? I'm coming on to fifty right soon soon. You'll pass. Taking me five years to get very that's the beauty of once a week. And, and that's the beauty of two it's sitting and talking in the room as opposed to a whole television predominate, our budget for this show is exactly zero. So it's pretty that's not true. Because the electricity close something but anyway and Medina Klis. So we so I've noticed in the beginning, the thing that was so appealing to me. I don't watch a lot of television, but I got pulled into the show because everybody was pretty dysfunctional. This was a group where most of the main characters only the four mil characters were at various points on the spectrum certainly, it's implied that Sheldon is either autistic or Asperger's or somewhere on the spectrum and over the years. That's kinda moderated a little bit. We've mainstream them tell us about how this has evolved. And how do you stay true? To those original characters. Well, I think it's a testament to Bill pretty and Chuck, creating this show, which was those characters were inspired by Bill Pretty's experiences here in New York working at a computer company, and really brilliant, people, not exactly the most socially, exactly stepped so brilliant people who are not socially, as not the genius socially, that they are in other ways coming up. We continue our conversation with Dave gash, executive producer of the big bang theory, discussing.

Bill Pretty Chuck Laurie Tyler Perry Seinfeld Lory Medina Klis Senator Dave gash CBS writer Sheldon Greg Kaminsky executive producer Mike Abbas Shola New York Bob Molly Alex
"dave gash" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Masters in Business

"And really the thing that so fun for me to do is to teach I teach every fall at USC and this web class, and it's so fun to take these things that I've learned in my career in television, but then apply them to this new medium, and give say to these kids, you have all the power to make your own TV show, which I never had, you know, for years and years into my career. What are you most excited about within the entertainment industry? What you can do, just with your phone is more than Martin Scorsese, and Ted Turner could ever do in the nineteen seventies that that's amazing. So if a millennial or college student came up to you and said, we're interested in career in television or entertainment, what sort of advice, would you give them if you're a writer if they're writer, I'd say their three kinds of writing, there's writing on the page? There's writing when you're working with an actor and how you change it to fit that actor's voice. And then there's the writing you do when you edit and you used to have to be a Showrunner to do all the things, but now you can do it. So how you write is different now and you can post and get feedback and build an audience make your web sewed and have a discipline, so that you're able to fit it into your schedule so that you can say one weekend a month, I'm gonna shoot and I'm gonna make one minute episodes, four of them, and every Monday, just like Barry ritholtz, I'm gonna drop my of my episodes. And by the time you've made fifty of them, you're going to say I've learned so much. I'm such a better writer, and number thirty six is the best thing I've ever done. And it's the one thing I want to show somebody. And our final question. What do you know about the world of producing and writing and comedy today that you wish you knew twenty years ago when you were first getting started? Almost twenty years ago. No more than twenty twenty five years ago, I would say that it is the one of the lessons from Chuck, Lori. Is he treats writing with a group of people someone described it like jazz, where you sit down and you don't know where it's going to go? There's a structure, you know, in a jazz thing you do. Eight bars and I do eight bars. When we go around there's a structure to the scene and a goal to the scene, but being open to that freedom. It's kind of being comfortable with uncertainty. They were talking about the being being able to execute, but being able to be open to that possibility of, maybe not knowing where you're going to go and drawing. The best out of people is absolutely magical, and just have faith in that process quite quite fascinating. We have been speaking with Dave gash. He was the executive producer and writer for the big bang theory, as well as other shows, if you enjoy this. Conversation. Well, be sure look up an injured down an inch on apple itunes, Stitcher overcast, Bloomberg dot com. Wherever finer podcasts are found, and you could see any of the other on a let's call it two hundred and thirty eight episodes. We've done previously, I'm just ballpark in that we love you comments feedback, and suggestions. Write to us at M I B podcast at Bloomberg dot net. I would be remiss if I did not, thank the crack staff who helps put out this conversation each week Medina parwana is my producer slash audio engineer, Michael Boyle is our Booker Attiya vow Brin is our project manager Michael bat. Nick is my head of research. I'm Barry ritholtz. You've been listening to masters in business on Bloomberg radio. Indepth analysis. Concise reporting need to know global business news around the world and across the markets, Bloomberg connect the dots for decision-makers subscribe today to the global standard business reporting. Get it all Bloomberg dot com slash subscribe.

writer Bloomberg Barry ritholtz Bloomberg dot Martin Scorsese USC executive producer Ted Turner Chuck Medina parwana Nick head of research Michael bat Michael Boyle Lori project manager producer Brin engineer twenty years
"dave gash" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Masters in Business

"But I think this new, Bob hearts, shoal is a really cool show, which is about a Billy Gardell, who Mike from Mike and Molly in the pilot has a cardiac event and goes the hospital and wakes up, and there's a nurse and she's a Nigerian emigrant, and he falls for her and such a simple, sweet story. But you watch this pilot. I wanna see more wanna see these characters wanna see what's going on. So I'm really excited for that. So I only have you for a finite amount of time. Let's jump to our favorite questions that we ask our guests sort of our speed round. Tell us the first car you ever owned year making model a nineteen seventy six AM, see white hornet, would my parents got from the telephone company and meaning it was a fleet car, fleet car and got it for five hundred dollars and too much. That's a PO s for sure. I hit a telephone pole because I it was Connecticut in the spring in too much sand from the, and I told the car because it will cost six hundred dollars to fix it, so cost more just as simple repair, the whole the whole car. What's the most important thing, people don't know about Dave gash will they know about the patent. That's really so that's the I was shocked, that's thing. But I tried to start a chocolate company in the first season of big bang theory at the same time while. It was going to be called Rx chocolates, and the idea was, it was gonna be Pathak Gary bottles. And it was gonna have the amount recommended of dark chocolate every day, and you pop it in your mouth. Okay. There's a good idea. Yeah. And what happened to that? Well, it turns out, I'm much better coming up with us. I haven't starting businesses right? It's concept versus execute. Exactly. That's why you need a partner. Who are some of your early mentors who really got it your career in television. Well, I mentioned rob long who's this guy who showed me that there was actually a path, and other guy in that radio station was a teacher named Craig thorn and Hugh, has since passed away, and he just couldn't have more of an impact in terms of how to live your life, how to help people, the power is one of the funniest guys in all the years in Hollywood, one of the funniest guys have ever met and just how to how to live your really how to live your life. And then working with bunny, Terry Turner on the rock from the sun. They, they created a family in their running staff and. I'll I remember working that first night that first year to be a Friday night, and they'd say, oh, I'm sorry. We have to work past dinner, and I would think to myself, great. I don't wanna go home. This is so fun. So you're investor and have been for a while who has influenced your approach to either investing or thinking about markets. Well, I mentioned the that Gordon Murray book, which had a really profound impact on me. And, you know, I, I think the work of Jean pharma this, I wish everybody knew more broadly about the efficient market theory. If only he would win a Nobel prize for that people would find out that we'd get out, right? I took I took macro econ with Nord house. And I took winner took micro Giannakopoulos who might win it some day. Right. And didn't he win win the Bates, you want something? Right. And they. They didn't talk about personal. They should I wish they would just say be a long term investor. Keep fees, low investment abroad basket of stocks. You sound like me now. Yeah. And, and what are they going to do for the next sixteen weeks of the class?.

Mike Bob Billy Gardell Dave gash Pathak Gary Gordon Murray Hugh Connecticut Nobel prize partner Terry Turner Nord house Jean pharma Molly Bates rob Hollywood Craig thorn five hundred dollars
"dave gash" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"dave gash" Discussed on Masters in Business

"This on a Monday. And the by the time this drops either the same day or the night before the finale. We'll have aired. So the one question I didn't get to that. I have to ask you what's next for Dave gash when are you going to do after this? I know you probably the assumption is, oh, he doesn't have to do anything again, the shows minutes in the case forever, but you're young guy. You don't want to not work for the rest of your life. Do you. I definitely want to keep working and not to work. Yeah. No, for sure, I'll end and I didn't create the show. So, so if I greeted the show, I've been a floating hovercraft or something. I want to take the lessons of the last twelve years and apply them on new shows, I think this multi Cam world, where you get the chance to rehearse for a couple of days and tweak the jokes, and then do in front of a live audience is it's old. It is old fashioned. But I the success of the big bang is testament, that people like it, and even bringing back full house on Netflix. That has been a big hit for them. Really? I would not have guessed that I was never a full house Yemi neither. So I have to ask you. So your comedy writer what comedy shows do you like to watch? So I don't like to watch much because it all feels like work. So when I'm watching you can't help critique and take notes more feel jealous and have low self esteem. That that's such a good joke that I wish I'd come up with. So I mean I. Thought thirty rock was flawless. I was obsessed with it. I what they did in there, especially the first two, seize my is amazed. I remember I had like the worst flew a couple years ago and having seen it all when it broadcast I just binged, all three season or the first whatever it was. And you could see when it starts to change. Like at a certain point, you could tell different writers mouth, but the first two seasons were so fresh. And so Larry Astaire amazing. It's like there are special seasons right? It's like the office seasons two and three and it just has to do with kind of where those characters are right. I have I have been able to watch and see how hard it is to make television that I have a lot of forgiveness for when people say, like, oh, that show, stinks and might install understand much work. Distinct. It's hard that they got that on TV do you know how many they got notes from the studio and the network on every outline in every rewrite, and then they still had to get there and just Chuck Laurie shows still get notes. Can you guys do you want? He has earned this place where he does not get notes, and that is in extrordinary luxury for us as writers to work in that world. So the, the story was Seinfeld. And, and Larry Davis notes were not interested, somehow, they managed to carve that out. And obviously curb doesn't seem to get a whole lot of notes because it's so improv do you what, what shows do you find interesting that way, do you watch either of those? Yeah. I think what they did. Uncurbed is is, is great. And it's fascinating how they do that. It's in Provis, but heavily it's really interesting. If you have a read one of those outlines where it's really dense the I have students who think, oh, well since. Curb is improvised, I'm gonna go do improvise thing, if you've ever shoot it in provides thing, it's just a nightmare, because they'll spinoff off all these actions, you have to be really focused on. And that's only knows story beats and that's an amazing cast. It's incredible. Right. Really stop and think everybody on that show is a rockstar. It's just a snatch any other comedy shows that tickle your fancy. I think the arrested development it was hilarious. And I'm really excited about I'm not trying to just like promote the other Chuck Lorre world. But I think this new, Bob hearts, shoal is a really cool show, which is about a Billy Gardell, who Mike from Mike and Molly in the pilot.

Chuck Laurie Dave gash Chuck Lorre Netflix Larry Astaire Larry Davis writer Mike Provis Billy Gardell Seinfeld Uncurbed Bob extrordinary Molly twelve years