21 Burst results for "Dave Freeman"

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:44 min | 3 months ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman at 7 46. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Leila Haldin and I'm Steve Inskeep. Additional evidence shows just how hard ex President Trump tried to overturn democracy. After his election defeat last year, the House Oversight Committee released documents showing that Trump tried to involve law enforcement in his scheme. Carolyn Maloney is the committee chair. President Trump repeatedly pressured the Department of Justice to overturn the election he had lost. The defeated president pushed the Justice Department to engage in schemes that were so baseless that his own appointees refused. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Gonzalez is here. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What documents reveal and confirm what we just said. Yes, it was quite a packet of documents, 232 pages of emails in others showing Trump and his allies pushing the Justice Department to look at the various sham allegations of voter fraud. In one email uncovered by the House Oversight Committee, Trump asked Justice official Jeffrey Rosen to probe certain claims. Just minutes before Trump announced Rosen would take over the top jobs. Acting Attorney general and some of these were pretty out there. For example, former Trump Chief of staff Mark Meadows pushed justice officials to probe the conspiracy theory that voter fraud was caused by Italian satellite Oh yes, and rose and shared one conspiracy theory with another DOJ official, who called it quote pure insanity. But we saw Trump's own appointees rejecting these claims. That said all of this pressure Democrats say culminated in the January six attack. They just found no legal basis to join a lawsuit before the Supreme Court on this or take any other kinds of steps in order to try to effectively take over the government and democracy. Um, this House oversight committee was also hearing testimony on the insurrection. The attack on Congress January 6th as they were certifying the election. What do we learn there? Yes, FBI Director Christopher Wray, along with two Defense Department officials testified. They testified for the first time. This is General Charles Flynn and Lieutenant General Walter Pyatt. They all defended their response that day. Now we should note. Flynn is the brother of former embattled Trump advisor Michael Flynn. He and Pyatt said military officials were delayed sending the National Guard because they needed time to develop a plan. Let's take a listen Now when people's lives on the line to two minutes is too long. We were not position to respond to that urgent request we had to re prepare so we would send them in prepared for this new mission. So again, we hear Pyatt. They're defending their role that day. Democrats also focused on what they said were contradictions in the testimony of how the day unfolded, and they say this fuels the a call for an outside commission a probe January six, But that plan is currently stalled. Okay, so many aspects here and so many revelations we've heard about President Trump ex President Trump's effort to overturn his election defeat. We've heard about problems during the time of the insurrection, and then there are efforts to track violent extremists which continue now. What did you hear there? Right. New York Democrat Alexandria, Ocasio. Cortez asked Ray to detail what contributed to the insurrection failures, and he admitted their hands are tied. When it comes to tracking these threats on Social media, Let's take a listen I think what this shows is the challenge of getting sufficient information about what is out there on social media to be able to have, uh, the ability to distinguish between what we're calling sort of aspirational versus the intention. And so, he said, This could be one of the more important lessons learned out of the attack. That is, if policies could be changed to address social media tracking.

Leila Haldin Carolyn Maloney Michael Flynn Steve Steve Inskeep Claudia Gonzalez Dave Freeman Pyatt 232 pages Flynn Mark Meadows Christopher Wray NPR January 6th House Oversight Committee Jeffrey Rosen Rosen FBI last year NPR News
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman at 8 30. Live from NPR news. I'm Janine Herbst resident. Biden is in Geneva for a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin tomorrow. Earlier, he wrapped up his work in Belgium, where he and EU leaders worked on trade issues. NPR's Franco Ordonez has more from Brussels. Biden and the European leaders are going to launch a new trade and Technology council. The idea is to address issues together like regulation for technology platforms and how to reform the World Trade Organization and trade has been a point of tension. For example, there are still some U. S tariffs on European exports of steel and aluminum. These were put in place by former President Donald Trump, and they really offend some European allies. NPR's Franco Ordonez reporting California is said to fully reopen its economy. Today, more than a year after lockdown. Some restrictions were put in place to curb the spread of the coronavirus. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports daily Infections have plummeted and vaccination rates are up significantly. California imposed the first statewide shut down in March of last year and is among the last to fully reopened. Starting today, fully vaccinated people will not be required to wear facial coverings and most settings. The state is also rolling back capacity limits and social distancing guidelines. To date, more than 70% of Californians have received at least one dose of the vaccine for Covid 19. NPR's Windsor Johnston. Wall Street trading lower at this hour. You're listening to NPR news Live from KQED News. I'm Brian what the West.

Dave Freeman Janine Herbst World Trade Organization Geneva Franco Ordonez Today NPR Belgium tomorrow today Brian EU KQED News more than 70% Biden Brussels European Wall Street President Donald Trump first
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:27 min | 7 months ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dave Freeman on KQED. NPR news next Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. Security has stepped up at the U. S. Capitol this morning Police site intelligence, suggesting an unnamed militia group may be planning to attack the building today. NPR's Sarah McCammon says the potential plot stems from a far right conspiracy theory about the date march forth today has been the focus of online chatter among some trump supporters, including followers of the Cuban on conspiracy theory, and that's because until the 19 thirties March, 4th was the date that presidents were inaugurated. So some right wing extremists have formed this baseless conspiracy theory, of course, that President Trump would somehow return to power today, which they saw as the true inauguration day. There are no schedule events in the house as a precaution. Thousands of National Guard troops have remained in Washington, D. C since the January 6 assault on the Capitol building by Trump's supporters. India is reporting data on a covert 19 vaccine developed in that country. Shushed me to Pataki reports the Indian company and powered by a tech says it's vaccine prevented Cove in 1981% of patients who took two doses off it. That's good news for India's vaccination program, which approved this form lovable face. Three clinical trials were ongoing. India aims to vaccinate 300 Million people by July, but it's not on track to meet that target. This is NPR news from Washington. Live from KQED News. I'm Brian What in Oakland. Good morning, the San Francisco Unified School District is urging the city to do more to help educators get vaccinated against Cove in 19. That's after the city delayed getting the first batch of access codes out two teachers earlier this week. The codes give teachers priority appointments at Bay Area vaccination sites. Mayor London Breed said the delay was because all appointments were full of Mosconi center, the city's high volume vaccination site. Auntie Fong is a high school teacher who says educators have received little to no information on vaccinations from the city or the school district. I just don't see the end of the tunnel, then I'll just feels like we're going to be kept in the dark for a long time. Mayor Breed announced yesterday that the city finalized the plan with the state to distribute 2600 codes that educators can use. Because San Francisco is entering the states Red tear for reopening movie theaters are now allowed to open at 25% capacity. Cinemark senior manager Caitlin Piper says they are ready to welcome guests once again, But she says food and drinks will not be served at theaters in San Francisco in preparation for reopening. Piper says they have implemented new safety protocols are team members will be disinfecting every auditorium. We will also be reducing capacity to match that local ordinance love it, and then we're also staggering. Showtime's She says. All guests and employees will be required to wear face masks at all times. I'm Brian what KQED news Support today comes from the Asia foundations in Asia podcast insights on Asia wherever podcasts are heard. Had on morning edition on KQED. Noel King. Talks to Greg Cause are a member of the City Council in Austin, Texas, about why he opposes the governor's decision. Toe lift Covert.

Dave Freeman Sarah McCammon Greg Cause Noel King Trump Oakland Caitlin Piper Washington Dave Mattingly Washington, D. C Bay Area July Brian NPR San Francisco Unified School D yesterday march forth 25% January 6 KQED News
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:39 min | 10 months ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman and the time of 6 22. It's morning edition on KQED. I'm Brian what skilled nursing facilities have born a lot of the weight of the pandemic. More than one quarter of covert related deaths in California have happened in nursing homes, even though they're residents make up less than half a percent of the state's population. Is the coronavirus surges again. A new study from the California Healthcare Foundation seeks to explain why some nursing homes have been more vulnerable to outbreaks over time. Joining me now is KQED science reporter Molly Peterson and Molly. We know the virus has hit older people harder was aged, just the biggest factor here. Yeah, ages a huge factor. But it's not the only one in a skilled nursing facility. And for this study, this group of researchers looked at all kinds of things that might affect outcomes for people in nursing homes. The size of the nursing home ownership, like whether it's for profit and whether it's not for profit. Staffing levels, demographics and something's actually mattered more than others. Bruce Spurlock is a doctor who directs Cal Hospital Compare. He helped leave the work. You could tell that the larger the facility the four profit facilities were doing worse. Then the smaller and nonprofit facilities and then the Phillies that were in hike over great counties were also struggling more than the ones that were in loco bit. Background reach. What's interesting over time is that the factors connected to more covert cases and deaths at nursing homes changed. Mm. And and how did they change? Spurlock said Bigger facilities were grappling with a lot of cases in May. But by late August size didn't matter so much. It turned out that latte next in black nursing homes were doing much worse for profit, not for profit was less of a predictor less of a variable. That was important and these characteristics age, gender, race and ethnicity were a much bigger predictor of who was doing worse in the August time frames. And, he says, nursing homes with a lot of black residents have done consistently poorly. Nursing homes with a lot of Latino residents, the report uses Latin X is a gender neutral form of Latino. These nursing homes are seeing more cases and deaths as the pandemic rolls on. We asked the advisory group. How do you explain this disparity and nobody really knows? And that's kind of the part that we really need to figure out. So let's bring this home to Northern California specifically. What can you tell me about nursing home outbreaks here well in larger facilities, we had some outbreaks early, particularly in Alameda County, Contra Kostya and Santa Clara. We cover them. Here in Kake, you Edie Windsor, Vallejo. There was almost 100 cases in May at Gateway Cared Rehabilitation Center in Hayward. That's a neighborhood with a high percentage of black residents. Around the same time there was a significant outbreak there that resulted in a lawsuit and an investigation. So the study seems to be describing that problem correctly. We decided to try to get a better sense of what's been going on in the Bay Area over time, so I talked to Lisa Pick up white, our data journalist about these factors locally. It turns out that a higher percentage of facilities in the Bay Area 17% compared to the state average of 12%. Are run by not for profit organizations. If you have a loved one in Marin, more than a third of facilities, there are not for profit, and those facilities did better at the beginning of the pandemic, But his things have gone on facility size in the background levels of covert in the community have become bigger factors. That's good news in the Bay Area were nursing homes are generally smaller than the state average. We also looked a little closer at demographics for nursing homes in these local counties. One thing to keep in mind is that Latinos are less likely to be a nursing homes in the first place compared to blacks and whites. Even still, facilities in the bay have fewer Latino residents and the rest of the state. What's unclear is whether we'll continue to see more cases in facilities as this winter surge continues to grow. What's clear is that these outbreaks are still happening in capital right now. In Santa Cruz County, for example, Pacific Coast manner is having a pretty big outbreak. Okay, So now that cases are rising again are the risk factors changing again, too? I mean, how is this information? Helpful now. So the study only really looked at this window of time when they could get useful data and that began in early May and went until late August. Some problems began before the pandemic and just continue like staffing. KGO television, the local ABC affiliate, looked at payroll hours to figure out that understaffing was a big problem before the pandemic last year, especially in Alameda County. Right now, Facilities are tightening up their protocols again. Ah, couple of months ago, San Francisco started to let family members visit with residents outside. That's going to go away and Santa Clara is tightening up protocols at long term care homes, too. And this, this report offer any recommendations for how to improve the situation. Yes, The authors of this report offer five recommendations for how to improve the situation like with staffing, for example, they recommend the facilities actually meet the standards they're supposed to for nursing hours for having enough nurses in the facility at the right time. And they say in a crisis like the one we've been in family members should be designated as essential workers, which is not the way it works right now, as essential workers, family members could continue to support their loved ones care, which would help minimize disruption, especially for residents with memory care problems.

Bay Area KQED Bruce Spurlock Alameda County Santa Clara Molly Peterson California Healthcare Foundati Dave Freeman California Brian Phillies reporter San Francisco Gateway Cared Rehabilitation C Santa Cruz County Cal Hospital Compare Hayward Northern California ABC Kake
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dave Freeman with a perspective for you next. The antidote to demonstration sparked by police shootings of black citizens, some say is law and order. Andrew Lewis questions who was following the law and promoting order. Each time a black man or boy is killed by the police. From some quarter, the tiring statement inevitably arises. Well, he did something to deserve it. He was selling CDs on the corner. He didn't follow orders. He had a warrant for his arrest. These air infractions? Yes. But in a civil society, no crime justifies immediate public execution. It should not be tolerated from a 17 year old vigilante brandishing a gun and even less so from those appointed to be our guardians. A system of policing that allows or even prompts officers to kill citizens under the guise of control is not law and order. In fact, it is the very opposite. We're a nation of laws in perfect, though they may be. They are what we have, and it's the responsibility of each generation to help. Perfect, Hm. That means that beyond all, neither citizens nor the police are allowed to be the sole judges and the dispensers of justice. Regardless of the color of our skin. Our current politics may boil down to one question. Do we believe officers and private citizens alike have the right to render judgment and kill with a knee or a gunshot in the back. If we allow private citizens to patrol the streets with guns, we call that anarchy. And if we subject noncompliant citizens to immediate execution than the word for that is fascism. If we accept your attempt to justify such killings, then rest assured, one day you are I will be next. We do have words for that. And those words are not law and order. With the perspective, this is Andrew Lewis. Andrew Lewis lives and surpassed Apple and you can share your thoughts on.

Andrew Lewis Dave Freeman Apple
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of KQED I'm Dave Freeman it's a thirty five it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning in order for the U. S. economy to work well Americans have to spend money but the wealthiest Americans are not spending money the way they were before the cold at nineteen pandemic Harvard researchers have been tracking spending patterns and our chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley has been looking at what they found his cat good morning to retail sales are rebounding but not among everyone that's right as you mention consumer spending is ordinarily huge driver of economic activity in the U. S. we saw it nose dived in March and April when we have the coronavirus lockdown it started to bounce back in may but it's not bouncing back even late either across the country or across the income spectrum Nathan Hendren and his colleagues at Harvard have been studying credit card data and what they find is people at the bottom of the income ladder are now spending almost as much as they were before the pandemic started but not so people at the top when the stimulus checks went out you see that spending by lower income households went up a lot spending by higher income households can go up by as much and then more recently you know just in the course of the past month for higher income individuals that that spending is still way far off from where was prior to coding is not recovered as much in fact hindrances fully two thirds of the total decline in spending since January is from people at the top of the income ladder the wealthiest twenty five percent and because the wealthy control a big portion of your spending that's been a big drag on the broader economy is if rich people are so rich why would they not be spending money not lack of money by and large these are not folks who've lost their jobs or who are worried about paying the rent they are people though with a lot of discretionary income and before the pandemic they were using their discretion to spend up a lot of that money on nice restaurants or that the theater or travel or maybe staying in hotels precisely the kinds of things that have been off limits since the corona virus yet and that makes this very different from ordinary recession we're spending on services is usually stable Hendren and his colleagues found that businesses that deliver in person services in wealthier neighborhoods have seen the biggest drop in sales whereas retail stores and maybe take out restaurants in poor neighborhoods did see a little bit of a climb but now they're seeing a strong rebound so what is that mean for economic recovery in this country it spells trouble for the people who work in those nice restaurants and those other service oriented businesses that cater to the wealthy hindrance team found big job losses among workers in high income neighborhoods much bigger than the job losses in poor communities and many of those jobs in wealthy areas may not be coming back anytime soon no because it's not a lack of money that's keeping the rich from spending the kind of tools the government usually uses to to stimulate spending into recession are not terribly helpful here from the perspective of people who are not living paycheck to paycheck the main concern here is really fighting the virus and unless we remove the threat of getting sick or getting your family member sick it's hard to imagine that that spending will be covered to the pre code levels we know from the public health experts that removing that threat could take a long time fell reserve chairman Jerome Powell warned a Senate committee yesterday that while you know revert retail sales have picked up some and there's been some pickup in jobs there could still be millions of people out of work for an extended period of time and the fed chairman suggested they might need some additional help from the government NPR's Scott Horsley thanks Scott you're welcome among its many other effects the pandemic created opportunities for organized crime police in Rome say today that they have dismantled a loan sharking operation it targeted small and medium size businesses during a lockdown NPR Sylvia Poggioli reports one of the very first to warn that criminals were exploiting the covert nineteen crisis was pope Francis mission take a inquisitive imposed upon the MEA G. denouncing that those people who take advantage of the needs of others and he added sell them out to the mafiosi and loan sharks overall crime plunge during the lockdown according to the Italian ministry of the interior but there was one notable exception loan sharking which grew by almost ten percent in the first quarter lack of liquidity has led many businesses to the edge of bankruptcy one worried businessman is to be no charge.

KQED Dave Freeman
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On KQ weedy good morning I'm Dave Freeman and the time now is five thirty live from KQED news I'm Brian white in Oakland UC San Francisco doctors are calling on law enforcement agencies to stop using rubber bullets to disperse crowds they say the police practice can lead to permanent injuries KQED science reporter Lesley McClurg explains the inside of rubber bullets can be metal when fired in close proximity UCSF doctors say they can penetrate the skin fracture of school or explode and I have all a recent study of nearly two thousand people hit by rubber bullets found that three percent of people died and fifteen percent were permanently injured the American academy of ophthalmology is calling on physicians health officials and the public to condemn the practice and although tear gas and pepper spray are considered safer options UCSF researchers say those topics can also lead to severe eye injuries I'm Lesley McClurg KQED news inmate advocates say medically vulnerable people incarcerated at a men's prison in Chino the side of a corona virus outbreak should have been tested immediately before their recent transfer to San Quentin the California department of corrections and rehabilitation says fifteen of the more than one hundred twenty inmates sent to the Marin county lock up have since tested positive KQED Serra Hosein reports prison law office director don specter says he believes there was a two week delay between the testing and transfer of the prisoners during which some got sick when they were transferred to San Quentin where there had been any positive cases they then now introduced the virus into the present Marin county public health officer Dr Matt Willis says the California department of corrections and rehabilitation may have overlooked fundamentals around protecting San Quentin the CDC R. spokeswoman says sick inmates haven't been in contact with the per isns general population I am Serra Husayni KQED news state education officials have released the guidelines on how schools might reopen campuses safely this fall facial coverings temperature checks and spacing of students per public health recommendations are among the guidelines Mary Jane Burke is head of Marin county schools which is already been piloting small in person classes for students with special learning needs for the past three weeks with IT at so many levels on there that we just have to be I think kind to each other but also be clear it's not are we gonna open school it's one of the conditions that need to be in place because we gotta get kids back in the classroom Burke says her schools in her district will be increasing the total number of students in schools to three hundred next week most bay area districts have said they aren't willing to reopen until robust contact tracing and testing is in place in Oakland I'm Brian what KQED news good morning good morning to you Brian thank you and coming up on morning edition in just a few minutes residential candidates Joe Biden told CBS yesterday that he does not support de funding the police ahead on morning edition why this may be a tricky issue for Biden to navigate hi Marco Werman the killing of George Floyd has inspired demonstrations.

Dave Freeman
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"McConnell for KQED and I'm Dave Freeman with a perspective next on this Monday on KQED public radio like many African Americans ebony hate is tired of pretty words and disavowal of racism not backed up by action it is she says your turn to do something about it despite the good intentions of people I love and respect it makes me angry to hear them say what a hard week it's been it has been a hard week but it's been hard for a very long time and by heart I mean her breaking I mean that each time I have to say another name I have to sit with the feeling that I live in a country that can't seem to figure out how to value me up hold my life as something delicate worth protecting I mean that even before the data I knew black people would be disproportionately affected by this fire and then denied access to testing and health care that's just the normal people are so desperate to return to this must be more than another hash tag moment and there's plenty you can and should do beyond just posting thank you must speak to your family your church your co workers neighbors and friends and don't just say it's hard to say it's the inevitable result of white supremacist policies drafted into the constitution and the violent systemic disenfranchisement of every black person everyday throughout the history of our country we can all stop saying we're not racist America wouldn't exist without racism to developed all non black Americans have benefited from racist systems and have acted at some point in a racist way so change will need to be personal not just for now but forever decide who you want to be offline when no one is watching if we truly want change we will need to get real about changing the entire composition of this country it will be uncomfortable but believe me when I say you can handle it it's something that I and everybody person striving to craft a life in this country have always had and we're tired but I can't just stop doing the work and neither.

McConnell KQED Dave Freeman America
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As badly back up as it was earlier John McConnell for KQED I'm Dave Freeman with a perspective now on KQ weedy they seem to come from no where relentless impossible to ignore product of staying at home all day Richard Levitt asks what's with all the dishes gosh dishes they're the hidden scored a sheltering in place every time I look they're piling up in the sink I've never seen so many accumulate so fast we cook and eat at home all the time but while this whole deal was staying in has changed everything I'm not sure why we have breakfast same as always a bowl of yogurt with some dried fruit or museli sometimes meal sometimes we get fancy with I'm left off the nerves but it most it's a couple bowls and maybe a skillet so imagine my surprise when I turn around and see stacks of plates glasses bowls cups forks and knives and they all need to be washed there are only two of us we don't need any more than we ever did last season what's with all the dishes lunch a sandwich or leftovers come on a couple slices of bread or stuff out of the fridge and yet an hour later they're back the dishes is a street coffee Cup a teaspoon a tiny ramekin it gives me a Pang of anxiety even the cats in there supposedly cute little bowls a pink one for all other than a blue one for Edwin as I write this they're in the sink and I feel my blood rising those cats only ever do is eat and sleep are there disagreements do neighbors sneak in and dump their dishes on us good this is being trans modified from a parallel universe where they are equally sick of washing whatever it is they eat off of and Karen she is more than our share which makes it even weirder the other day I was warming soup and forgot an hour later after bubbling up and all over the stove top it burned itself into a dense acrid crust at the bottom of the pan extreme dishwashing imagine my delight the good news in all this is it we're eating more interesting meals more slowly and taking more pleasure in it that said now I'm going to go make dinner dinner here we go again with the perspective I'm Richard Levin Richard Levitt is.

John McConnell Dave Freeman Edwin Karen Richard Levin Richard Levitt
"dave freeman" Discussed on Seek Outside Podcast

Seek Outside Podcast

13:00 min | 1 year ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on Seek Outside Podcast

"So we spent one winter dog sledding from the Mckenzie River across Great Bear Lake and then down across great slave lake and it was about a thousand miles as is to seek outside. Podcast Kevin Dennis and today's guest is Dave Freeman from Freeman explore. Many of you may be familiar with them from wilderness But we spent the boundary waters. Also they've done some other awesome tropes up fourteen month sailing trip after the boundary waters North American Odyssey We're going to touch base on all that stuff today. super interesting So anyway how you doing today doing great. Thanks for having me all. Thank you for coming out and so let's kind of get to the point. What is the current status of the boundary waters in the mining? Sure so So amy I live in a little town called easily right. On the edge of the ours cure wilderness and there's a coppermine being proposed just outside of town and just on the edge of the boundary waters. And we've been working against This proposed mine since two thousand twelve In the Spencer of Iraqi Star gets wins. We got some some setbacks and So what's happening? Right now is the mind has not been built But to win medals which is a Chilean mining company Recently released their mind plan and so The of scientists say the boundary waters in other groups are sort of the mind plan figuring out You know what kind of comments the submitted to to really help show why this shouldn't be built So that's that's a big thing that's happening right now There also is a bill against Wade through the house That was introduced by one of our state representatives mccollum and then Also representative from Michigan and Florida. So that's a really good action item right now because that's working to basically withdraw all of the land within the Superior National Forest in the watershed of the of the Wilderness of the boundary waters From hardrock mining like these copper mines and Against Wade through the house. And that's something that people can do if they go to save the boundary waters dot org. There's a way for them to contact their representatives and encourage them to back that bill which is Which is doing pretty. Well it's making its way through the house. Okay so what is. What do you feel is going to happen? Or do you just not have a redone. It yet Well I think we're still a good place. I don't think the Minasian a go through because there's overwhelming opposition to it Both here in Minnesota but across the country as well And so I think eventually it's GonNa get stopped but it's the kind of thing that is You know it's a it's a long. It's a long fight for things like this And we can't really sort of let our guard down because you know the mining companies are trying to Sorta a grind ahead and you try to meet him at every step of the way now one of the things. I know. We're GONNA have some people that are very pro mine. I know even an ally easy chirs ends up that are pro. Mind Pro job part I live in south western Colorado. We have a lot of mines around here. We've had you know tailings ponds that have Busted out basically flooded the animus Jill everything there right and it seems to me that You know the boundary waters is a giant watershed. Right in the danger there would seem to be relatively large if something went awry and it seems like so many times mining companies and where. I probably sit on. The anti side comes from two things one. They don't really always seem to have a plan to Take care of the stuff after they're done so it seems relatively short sighted in that fashion but also I went to a Talk a couple months ago. It was local guy here who used to be relatively high up in the Forest Service. Can he was his was. His talk was on the history of public lands and a lot of things associated with it and he was like you know the mining companies and stuff they. They don't pay a fair share. You know people talk about the Anti Public. Land's people say well public land's don't pay for himself well because you don't charge royalty on the mining of the land that you're basically giving away and a lot of it is given away to foreign companies like you mentioned. Chilean mine and stuff too right so it's not even like it's really kind of be given away to an American company right. Yeah that's true and I think he made a really good point about the fresh water. At a part of the superior. National Forest is one million of the three million Acre spear national forests in this pure national forest contains twenty percent of all the fresh water in all of our national forests across the country. So like when you look at the boundary waters from above it literally. Looks like it's like half land and half water and you know I'm sure like when you came and visited us in the boundaries. It's like we just we just drink the water right out of the lakes like you don't even have to filter it or treated or anything. It's like it's so clean you can just drink it So it really is a unique place but that also makes a very fragile place for type of binding operation like this Just because of the massive amounts of clean fresh water that we have here I agree now. You guys I know a lot of people know. But you guys spent a whole year in the wilderness. I went in and think it was march and helped with resupply and it wasn't like you came out and met me at the trail head. You met me at the wilderness boundary us. You stayed in there the whole time And I think it's funny because I often see our customers chatting and they'll be talking about what which I do for a five day or seven day or a nine day trip. That seems long and you. You know you're planning year. I mean we're going to talk about body waters. Sailing trip you said was fourteen months The North American Odyssey was about three years You plan really long scale expeditions. Yeah that sort of our thing I guess but know one of the sort of strategies we use for that is you know we really break Break those long journeys down into much smaller chunks for the year in the Wilderness. We had resupplies approximately every two weeks except for in the spring as the lakes were thought line and in the fall as lakes were freezing and then we had about six weeks worth of supplies brought in but but basically as a general rule we were thinking about two weeks at a time So we really broke it down like that. You know what food what supplies we need for this two week chunk and we just sort of really thought of it is like know twenty. Four Twenty Six Two Week Canoe trips to what dog sledding trips or whatever. The season was rather than sort of getting overwhelmed with the large long timeframes. Can You Can you give me like a brief history of the year in the Wilderness? So were you moving the whole time? It sounds like you were maybe paddling Or or dog setting. Were you moving or did you have a base camp? So so We enter the Wilderness on September twenty third so the folly who knocks and the lake started freezing in the middle of Well around Thanksgiving and then they didn't actually really freeze until Christmas time But so the first few months we were traveling by Canoe In the Ours is a massive series of lakes. we visited over five hundred different named lakes rivers and streams inside the wilderness during the year and there were still over three hundred that we didn't have time to visit so it's it's a vast area we can't in about one hundred different places So during the paddling season we were. You know moving camp not every day but you know we were moving camp you know maybe three or four days a week And then after the lakes throws over we traveled by on Cross Country Skis and we had three sled dogs in and they pulled our supplies on too long like ten foot toboggans and during the winter we didn't move as often. We were moving camp on average like once or twice a week. And then when we were basecamp we would We skid your so basically we would ski and the the sled dogs would be hooked to like a rope with a little bungee cord in a waist belt And so they would certainly help. Help pull us. It would be skiing. So we're sort of working with the dogs to travel And so the lakes were frozen from December through the end of April This time of year In April is when the lakes are breaking up the the ice goes way and so then once ice was gone. We were traveling by canoe again for the rest of the year until we paddled out in September does the Wilderness. Area have a restriction. I guess on how many days you can spend in one spot Yes so it's basically it's a rule that I believe is in place for almost all of the national forests It's a fourteen Night Limit. So you can't camp in the same place for more than fourteen nights and there was only one time. We used up all fourteen nights and now is during the season when the lakes were Were freezing. In the fall we use all fourteen and then we started scrambled to another one. That was really close but most of the time we were moving much more frequently than that's the social distance on that trip. Yeah we did. Yeah we yeah we did. No I know you had you met people that came in and did resupplies. I mean I came in and did a resupply you had people from Patagonia that came in and tell them. Was it and stuff like that so you had we did. We did we we. Actually we had over three hundred people. Come in and bring resupplies We were overwhelmed. You know By the number of people that wanted to come in and so we would set up these resupplies. Approximately every two weeks and we we set the dates in place Sort of rough place where we would meet people And then People could sign up through our expedition manager Levi who works for the campaign to save the boundary waters the on July seventeenth. I want to bring in supplies and so Different groups would sign up Some of the people you know were good friends in a lot of the people we've never met before but they just love the boundary waters in. So they wanted to help. Bring some supplies in. It's a real unique place. I mean it's it's a different type of adventure that isn't can be done by a whole lot of people you don't have to be necessarily super fit You don't have to Yano. Chew off all these big extreme things just about anyone can do it with a canoe and you know a little bit of teamwork paddling. Sometimes that doesn't seem to work so I did a trip with Angie after that. And she didn't necessarily like my canoe work all the time so different. Yeah so then. You guys wrote a book about it. After the fact I know you were on our very first podcast. Maybe and then we kind of gave up podcasting for like four years or three years. Something like that and you said that it was actually really difficult getting used to sleeping in the bed when you were out of out of the Wilderness or getting you sleeping in the house or something like that an was..

National Forest Kevin Dennis Dave Freeman Forest Service Mckenzie River Wade amy Great Bear Lake Superior National Forest slave lake Colorado Minasian Minnesota Cross Country Skis Jill Yano Levi
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman it's now eight thirty five it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin good morning the presidential campaign has gone quiet but there's little doubt that president trump's handling of the corona virus pandemic will affect his political fate his rallies have been canceled but he's getting plenty of air time with his daily briefings at the White House during the briefing yesterday he was asked about an offer Joe Biden made to call them up and talk about the coronavirus crisis I was shown to be a nice guy I don't know very well frankly but I think he's probably honestly know he'd like to call it absolutely check is hello to talk about the political implications of the pandemic we've got NPR national political correspondent Mara license with us I'm Mara hi Rachel so a potential call between president trump and Joe Biden is that for real maybe it all started yesterday when kellyanne Conway the White House adviser was taunting Joe Biden on television saying why hasn't he called to offer his advice is he stuck in his bunker in Wilmington Delaware and then the Biden camp said sure he'd talked to trump and then you just heard trump say when asked that yes he'd be happy to take a call from Biden of course this is a stunt in some ways it's in both candidates political interests down trump would get to look statesmanlike not purely partisan and political Biden would get some attention trump has said in the past he doesn't want to take phone calls from governors who are critical of him and certainly his opponent and then in the election is very critical of him but on this one he sought in his interest so primaries are on hold there are no big rallies happening obviously president trump though clearly sees an opportunity with these daily coronavirus briefings at the White House there's no doubt that the president has recognized the huge platform of the briefings give him bigger television audience than any rally people are holed up in their homes in front of the television they're desperate for information about the virus and most of the regions have been about the virus except for yesterday he started talking about other issues he talked about narco trafficking from Venezuela that's a chance to send a message to some of his voters in Florida very important battleground state on the people of Venezuela descent there but for a president whose favorite metric is television ratings and how many eyeballs are watching him this has been a huge opportunity and he has boasted about the ratings saying they're bigger or as big as the bachelor finale or Monday Night Football and yesterday he said did you know I was number one on Facebook so people are watching him is it changing their opinion of the president it is changing their opinion a little bit there usually is a rally effect around the president in a crisis people want their president to succeed so he has gotten a little bump in his approval ratings not as big as the bump that governors have gotten bought it right now it looks like the higher marks that he's been getting for his handling of the crisis are not translating into an equally higher overall job approval rating he's still in that forty three to forty nine percent range that he's been and ever since he got forty six point one percent of the vote in twenty sixteen so we've got a long way to go the death rate and the unemployment rate are probably going to go up and we'll just have to watch that number so where does this leave Joe Biden the presumed front runner right now on the democratic side well it leaves him deprived of oxygen it's harder when you're stuck in your home to do a lot of things that he needs to do like fundraising unite the party on the other hand there's an argument that whatever Joe Biden could say right now doesn't matter that much this phase of the campaign as a referendum on Donald Trump and his leadership it will become a binary choice later on in the fall but this the campaign is going to be shrunk into a narrower window of time and maybe some voters will will be pretty happy about that all right NPR's national political correspondent Mara lies in Mara thank you we appreciate it thank you.

Dave Freeman Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin NPR
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Radio I'm Dave Freeman at eight thirty live from NPR news in Washington I'm Lakshmi saying noticeable shift in tone from the White House today with president trump emphasizing that federal social distancing guidelines or matter of life and death resent your trunk or Dhoni as president trump said the corona virus pandemic it's a great national trial unlike any we have ever faced before he said millions could die if the measures were not properly followed if they are followed White House public health officials say still between a hundred thousand and two hundred and forty thousand could die residents says it will require the full an absolute measure of America's strength love and devotion to minimize the number of people affected NPR's Frank Oregonians halting images are surfacing in social media of bodies draped in sheets fully fork lift it on to larger fridge raider trucks that have been converted into a mortgage in New York City this is the grim reality of hospitals and funeral homes in the region struggling to find space for a rapidly growing number of bodies while also trying to preserve the dignity of loved ones mourned by families who were forced to grief from afar the U. S. Coast Guard is directing all cruise ships to make sure they're equipped to treat passengers who appear to be showing symptoms of covert nineteen the ships are also being told to prepare to quarantine their crewmembers offshore during the pandemic this is to Holland America cruise liners carrying some sick or deceased passengers' attempt to dock at port Everglades Florida this is NPR news live from KQED news I'm Brian what governor Gavin Newsom is urging Californians to check on their elderly relatives and neighbors who have been told to isolate themselves at home during the covert nineteen outbreak KQED politics reporter Katie or has details on a new initiative announced yesterday isolation might be a good way to stay physically healthy but it can take an emotional toll governor Newsom says a call text or physically distanced knock on the door can help seniors get what they need right now whether that some food or just someone to talk to I don't want to be hearing stories that someone finally knocked on a door and no one answers only to find out when they opened that door that someone had passed away because we didn't meet the moment the state has also launched a new hotline seniors can call to be connected with resources in their area such as grocery and medication deliveries that number is eight three three five four four two three seven four in Sacramento I'm Katie or KQED news the city of Oakland officials are giving five thousand dollar emergency grants to small businesses to help them stay afloat during the coronavirus crisis the grants will be given to low income business owners they can be used to pay for rent and utilities workers and other immediate costs three hundred thousand dollars and all will be distributed from the.

Dave Freeman NPR
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"KQED I'm Dave Freeman at eight forty three with a perspective next on Kiki reading good morning almost everything about you has become mere data that companies turn into money for themselves but art pretty vanish says Californians have a new tool to take back lost privacy ten years ago when I worked for the giant internet company in Sunnyvale I try to sell your data our customers marketers weren't interested we explain how the data could help them target consumers with precision and we show them but no amount of explaining or demonstrating mattered ten years ago your online did was for sale but almost nobody was buying five years later the salmon changed markers with their billion dollar advertising budgets came around venture capitalists invested and start ups whose business models could be summarized as capture user data then converted to revenue intact we spotted a modern day gold rush and we frantically started taking it paid off the biggest winner so start ups for hundreds of millions of dollars to the tech whales companies like Facebook oracle in adobe and the wells one two as to their shareholders unlike five years previous there was a bidding war for your data and the price was in the tens of billions of dollars while much of this occurred out of sight for most Californians is a force the continues to threaten our privacy that's why I am overjoyed that we now have a means to assert control the California consumer privacy act the law navigated a most improbable path to come into being overcoming opposition from tech firms that saw it as an attack on their life blood and continued growth the law declares that we have a right to know what data is being collected about us and we have a right to opt out of the sale of our data and as of January first every company must comply or face penalties the law is a triumph for Californians any gifts but when I asked friends and neighbors whether they intend to exercise their new rights I hear the same response now our new privacy law forces a reckoning for companies that use our data but only if enough of us exercise our power my hope is that everyone will invest time to learn about or any rights you can find many sources online to describe what you can do it today we don't show that we care about our privacy tomorrow we won't have any choice.

Dave Freeman Sunnyvale adobe Facebook California
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good afternoon I'm Dave Freeman it's the take away at noon happy new year everyone I'm tens innovate got and today on the take away whose moment is it in comedy it's anybody's game it really belongs to people like alley why I still think it's a white man anybody can step up and say I'd like the Mike now please and have an audience all this hour we'll hear from some of the women of color shape today's comedy landscape including long time stand ups like Margaret show we have so little representation and then the ones that we have a really an act and so to play into that and to make fun of that I think is really empowering and fun and up and coming TV writers like Kerinci this new wave has really opened up a lot of new voices and a lot of new avenues to joke in which I think is ultimately only good for comedy that's all coming up on the take away after these headlines live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein secretary of state Mike Pompeii always postponing a trip to Ukraine to help deal with the deteriorating security situation in Baghdad and peers Jackie north some reports the decision comes after another day of protests outside the US embassy in the Iraqi capital secretary Pompeii had planned to leave on Thursday on a five day tour including Kiev where he was due to meet with your cranium president Vladimir salen ski for the first time since president trump was impeached in part for his conduct toward Ukraine the state department says the trip is now postponed so Pompeii can monitor the ongoing situation in Iraq earlier in the day US forces in Iraq use tear gas on supporters of a run back malicious outside the embassy before the protesters withdrew from the area US marines have been dispatched from neighboring Kuwait to deal with the increasingly tense situation at the embassy in Baghdad the Pentagon has also authorized the immediate deployment of seven hundred and fifty soldiers to the region Jackie north them NPR news Australia's navy is being deployed to help communities ravaged by raging bush fires Michael Sullivan reports navy ships and planes are bringing in supplies food fuel and water to communities inaccessible by road due to the fires they're also bringing in more firefighters to help battle the blazes which have destroyed at least ten million acres of land in at least a thousand homes in New South Wales alone more than one hundred fires are still burning in the neighboring state of Victoria roughly four thousand people in the coastal town of mullah kuta fled to the waterfront after fires threaten to engulf the entire town cooler temperatures on Wednesday are giving authorities a chance to restore power and communications in some areas but officials warn higher temperatures and the threat of more fires will return by this weekend for NPR news I'm Michael Sullivan in Chiang rai Thailand starting today nearly seven million Americans are getting a slight pay raise as NPR Scott Horsley reports minimum wages are going up in twenty two states lawmakers in nine states voted to boost the minimum wage this year voters sort of pay raise for minimum wage workers in six days and seven states are hiking their minimums as part of an automatic adjustment for inflation all told some six point eight million low wage workers are in line for a pay increase raises range from ten cents an hour in Florida to a Buck and a half in New Mexico in Washington state collectively the higher minimums will boost paychecks by an extra eight point two billion dollars over the course of the year in addition nearly two dozen cities and counties have adopted their own higher minimum wages the federal minimum has increased in more than a decade and during that time the purchasing power of the wages fallen by seventeen percent Scott Horsley NPR news Washington this is NPR in Germany investigators are trying to determine whether new year's eve fireworks caused a fire that burned down part of the zoo it destroyed the monkey sanctuary and all of the animals died that's more than thirty Aranda tans chimpanzees and gorillas Germany is the largest importer of fireworks in the E. U. hundreds of thousands across the country set off explosives each year on new year's eve for major college football games are on tap this new year's day including the one hundred six Rose Bowl in Pasadena California as Chuck form bulk of member station W. you W. M. reports are again takes on Wisconsin Wisconsin lost three rose bowls in a row from two thousand eleven to two thousand thirteen the badgers are seeking revenge against one of those opponents the Oregon ducks Wisconsin which was runner up to Ohio state and the big ten is hoping for a big day from star running back Jonathan Taylor twelve champion Oregon is counting on top quarterback Justin Herbert Los Angeles Times reports still barriers have been installed at the Rose Bowl and rose parade to reduce the risk of vehicle related terrorism for NPR news I'm Chuck from Bach in Los Angeles the US army is banning soldiers from using that tictoc app on their government owned work phones the app is owned by the Chinese company by dance in the army says it's a cyber and security threat the navy already prohibits it.

Dave Freeman
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dave Freeman on KQED thanks for listening it's now a thirty live from NPR news in Washington I'm Laxmi saying the house intelligence committee schedule to hear from an additional eight witnesses this week as part of the public impeachment inquiry into president trump and peers body Allen says that over the weekend congressional Democrats release more transcripts from their closed door depositions White House a Jennifer Williams told lawmakers she was listening to the July call between the Ukrainian president and trump and said she found it quote unusual and inappropriate that's according to a transcript of a closed door remarks she's among the slate of witnesses who are expected to sit for questions and open hearings trump on Sunday attacked Williams on Twitter calling her a quote never Trumper in Hong Kong clashes between anti Chinese government protesters and police at a major university let officers storming the entrances to the macarthur reports university is now locked down the students hurled petrol bombs down on police from these footbridges the police fired back with a water cannon tear gas and rubber bullets and in the night warned that they would use live ammunition if the students did not cease Julie McCarthy NPR news Hong Kong U. S. stocks are mixed this hour the Dow Jones industrial average up ten points to twenty eight thousand eighteen the nasdaq is down eight point since the open SNPs also up a fraction of a point you're listening to NPR news live from KQED news I'm Brian what federal agents from San Francisco have been deployed to the scene of a mass shooting in Fresno that is killed four people and injured six others the shooting took place at a family party attended by about three dozen people in the southeast section of the city yesterday evening Fresno police say at least one suspect began firing into a crowd in the backyard they say all the victims were Asian men between the ages of twenty five and thirty five police say they don't have any suspects in custody the bureau of alcohol tobacco firearms and explosives says it isn't a team of special agents from San Francisco to help investigate the shooting state officials are again delaying the start of commercial dungeon is crabbing on California's far north coast he cuties Tiffany cam hive reports the delayed area covers the coast of Mendocino Humboldt and down or counties California's department of fish and wildlife made the call to postpone after tests earlier in the month show that the crustaceans are not quite big enough to harvest is statement from the department says it could open on December sixteenth after more tests are conducted this is the second delay of the month one was called Intel November twenty second and coastal areas south of Mendocino due to concerns over well entanglements California's commercial Dungeness crab fishery was valued at more than sixty seven million dollars and twenty eighteen I'm Tiffany camp high kick you reading news and there's more at KQED news dot org I'm Brian what support today comes.

Dave Freeman NPR KQED sixty seven million dollars twenty second
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The listeners of KQED public radio eighty eight point five FM I'm Dave Freeman good morning it's eight thirty five this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David green in Culver city California and I know well king in Washington DC acting secretary of homeland security Kevin mac lean and announced changes just this morning two how long government can detain migrant children yes the trump administration has established a new rule to respond to the realities of for an immigration flows rule based on the principle that family should remain together during immigration proceedings all right Ted Hesson is with me in the studio he's an immigration reporter at politico ten thanks for coming in thank you for having me okay so what was the rule and what is the change so this involves a settlement agreement that actually outlines the standards for children who are detained in federal immigration custody and it dates all the way back to a court fight in the nineteen eighties that led then led to a nineteen ninety seven settlement that essentially said that children need to be held in the least confined setting and released as expeditiously as possible I'm one of the things the trump administration has said is that the those rules basically constrain their ability to enforce immigration laws and to remove people from the country quickly because they have to let the kids go at a certain point right after a certain number of days and so I guess with this change allow the administration to hold migrant children to detain them indefinitely so under a judge's order related to the settlement agreement the current limit for holding children with their parents is twenty days and what this regulation seeks to do is essentially lift that any doesn't have a new upper limit it's essentially indefinite on the administration would say their opportunities to be paroled out of detention that you could post a bond and leave detention or essentially you could also be removed from the country so they're saying that it's not indefinite but there is no official upper limit that said in this regulation and what would this mean for the parents of these kids I mean it means that they could potentially be detained together I'm now what acting secretary my clean it said today was that not every family that's encountered will be detained under this measure but I think we can expect that if it goes into effect and it hasn't gone into effect yet that the administration would ramp up their family detention and seek more money to have more family bets talk about money I mean I guess it we've heard immigration authorities say again and again that they're strapped does the government have resources to hold to hold children for longer than twenty days right now ice has immigration and customs enforcement has about three thousand three hundred family beds and even though those are not all available I mean many of them are filled in some of them are restricted for various reasons the trump administration has sought more funding from Congress from for beds but they haven't got it so far and it's something that you can imagine that if this regulation is put into effect that they're going to come back and they're going to ask Congress for more money to hold parents and children together okay so what happens now when is this rule supposed to go into effect so technically it has a sixty day effective date and that would start on Friday but the reality of how it will work is because there's ongoing litigation around this question of whether you can detain children with their parents the the trump administration will actually have to file a motion with a federal judge in Los Angeles who will then have to approve the termination of the current settlement agreement that outlines the tension conditions and then allow them to put this into effect so you know we're looking at at least one court battle over this in there could be separate legal challenges in the meantime Ted has in his immigration reporter at politico ten thanks so much for coming and we appreciate it thank you for having me axis may be emerging as a battleground heading into the twenty twenty campaign Democrats flipped to Texas house seats last November for Texas Republicans have recently said they are retiring next year and in pairs Jessica Taylor traveled to one of the districts on a steamy August evening.

KQED Dave Freeman twenty days sixty day
"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"dave freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman with a K Q E, D perspective. Now, it's not just San Francisco's population of homeless people that so troubling many residents of the streets have pets too with more. Here is Richard swallow. The dog was adorable. Great pup with floppy ears, and I was tempted to pet the cute puppy. But I didn't not because I don't love dogs. I totally do but because his bearded wild. I don't I was sitting in a tent on a downtown San Francisco sidewalk. It's familiar sight walking by someone living on the street with all their belongings, including the pet some say, it's ridiculous. You can't take care of yourself. How can you take care of a pet, but as many as ten percent of San Francisco's homeless residents actually, keep pets pets from cuddly? I've seen fluffy cats furry little dogs too creepy snarling pit bulls rats to exotic birds once a snake people who are homeless have pets for the same reasons. Any of us do companionship and protection a dog is both deterrent to attack and attraction for passersby donate. Which is a sad statement. People feel sorry for the animal, but not for the human being living on the street. I know someone who cares treats in her purse to give the homeless dogs. It raises interesting questions she these pets be removed from owners placed in animal shelters people who are homeless appear to take excellent care of pets even denying food for themselves. So they can provide. Food for their pets. People living on the street often struggle with mental health and emotional benefits of animal friendship. I well known, but it's not just mental illness. Individuals end of homeless too, bad luck, an abusive spouse, addiction, it's easy to see how people suddenly find themselves with no place for them or their pet to go. They may look like ragtag survivors of some post apocalyptic disaster. But when I pass people and living sidewalks, any strange Topi times it occurs to me. Everyone deserves love and companionship from people or pets. And while I'm added every person and every pet deserves a roof over their head to a perspective. I'm Richard Richard sword. Low teaches in the San Francisco unified school district. Share your thoughts on his commentary online at key Q E D dot org slash perspectives. Support for perspectives today comes from leaf KEB razor Hyman in Bernstein seeking Justice for the.

San Francisco San Francisco unified school d Richard Richard sword Richard swallow Dave Freeman Hyman Bernstein ten percent
Supreme Court nominee steers clear of Trump criticism

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 3 years ago

Supreme Court nominee steers clear of Trump criticism

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. Employers in the US added two hundred one thousand jobs last month as the nation's jobless rate held steady unemployment remained at three point nine percent. That's near an eighteen year, low hourly wages rose and are two point nine percent higher than this time a year ago. Wells Fargo senior economist Sarah house says that's significant wages are rising at the fastest pace. We've we've seen this expansion. And so I think that's a straight of of the fact that the labor market is in fact, tightening and workers are getting a little bit more and their take home pay. The job gains were spread across many industries.

United States Congress Senate Judiciary Committee NPR Washington Brad Kavanagh Dave Mattingly San Francisco Representative Dave Freeman Sarah House Bill Wells Fargo Jackie Speier Ro Khanna Senior Economist Brian Watt Nancy Pelosi
Ebola outbreak in large city 'very concerning'

Morning Edition

02:27 min | 3 years ago

Ebola outbreak in large city 'very concerning'

"In washington i'm dave mattingly the world health organization says there's now a high risk of bola spreading regionally from the democratic republic of congo npr's ava peralta says there are fourteen confirmed cases of the virus in the country including one case in a major city outbreaks of ebola in drc are usually easily contained because they happen in rural areas the chief of the world health organization says a confirmed case in the city of more than one million is concerning but he says the global community now has more tools to deal with any poll outb break a vaccine for example is already being deployed in congo more than four thousand doses of the new experimental ebola vaccine arrived in the country this week a house committee will be questioning the justice department's point person on civil rights this morning he is expected to be pressed about a citizenship question added to the twenty two thousand census npr's hansie lo wong reports the government says the question will help enforce the voting rights act many democratic lawmakers are skeptical of that reasoning and they're worried that this question will discourage non citizens from participating in the upcoming national headcount that's why they went to question the acting director of the justice department civil rights division john gore he was invited to testify last week at a hearing but he didn't show up and now he has agreed to attend a foul appearing with the house oversight committee i'm dave mattingly in washington and i'm dave freeman in san francisco on kiki we at five forty three coming up on morning edition in a few moments us wine exports to greater china which includes taiwan were two hundred ten million dollars up ten percent last year and four hundred fifty percent in the past decade but chinese tariffs have fifteen percent put into place after trump put tariffs on steel imports are threatening the export market the export market growth the story on american wine and much more ahead you run an american company you use imported steel and aluminum yellen we had ships on the water with material so we are paying the tariffs but as far as going forward we're kind of in a pause i'm kai ryssdal yes please we would like an exemption trade of a global nature next time on marketplace the financial story of the day in the week on marketplace today at four pm on k q public radio i'm judy woodruff on the next news hour ahead.

Dave Freeman John Gore Justice Department Dave Mattingly Judy Woodruff Taiwan China San Francisco Washington Acting Director Congo Ebola Ava Peralta Two Hundred Ten Million Dollar Four Hundred Fifty Percent Fifteen Percent
South Korea foreign minister to visit U.S. as planned despite Tillerson dismissal

00:59 sec | 3 years ago

South Korea foreign minister to visit U.S. as planned despite Tillerson dismissal

"To examine ways to prevent school shootings its recommendations are expected within one year the man accused of carrying out the school attack in florida is due in court today south korea's foreign minister says president trump's decision to fire secretary of state rex tillerson does not change his plans to travel to washington to coordinate policy on north korea npr's elise hugh reports from seoul south korea and the us will continue to meet as planned to pave away forward on potential north korea talks south korea has gone young was set to meet with rex tillerson but will now sit down with deputy secretary of state john sullivan instead trump abruptly removed tillerson as the chief diplomat of the us following a series of public riffs president trump is nominating c i a director mike pompeo to replace tillerson i'm dave mattingly in washington good morning i'm dave freeman in san francisco on key we d another day of rain when she'll wipers and such so if you're starting your driving.

Washington Dave Mattingly Director Seoul Elise Hugh North Korea President Trump San Francisco Dave Freeman Florida Mike Pompeo John Sullivan Deputy Secretary Rex Tillerson United States South Korea One Year
Kobe Bryant honored by Los Angeles Lakers in jersey retirement ceremony

SportsCenter AllNight

00:59 sec | 4 years ago

Kobe Bryant honored by Los Angeles Lakers in jersey retirement ceremony

"At eighty one point game last performances 60point gave five nba titles won mvp two finals mvp eighteen allstar appearances the lakers retiring kobe bryant to number's eight and twenty four both jerseys in the raptors that the staples

Jim Baz Falcons Atlanta MVP Lakers Kobe Bryant Raptors NFL Dave Freeman Tampa Mohammed NBA Four Hundred Ninety Four Yards Thirty Two Yard