22 Burst results for "Dave Davies"

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 2 months ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dave Davies in for Terry Gross. Christopher Dickey, the foreign correspondent and editor who covered war, terrorism and espionage for more than 40 countries. Died last week from a heart attack at his home in Paris. He was 68. Dickie was known for his coverage of conflicts in Central America and the Middle East. He worked for the Washington Post and Newsweek and for the Daily Beast where he was foreign editor until his death. In a moving obituary in the Daily Beast. Longtime colleague Barbie lots on the dope, recalled chasing a story with Dickie in Italy in 2003 when she finally tracked down the number of an Italian secret service agent who might have some information. He answered his phone from a restaurant where he was having a drink with Dickie. Nicky was the best beat reporter she ever met, She wrote Friend to spy masters and sheiks, cardinals and cops, insurgents and intellectuals. Vicki wrote two novels and five books of nonfiction, including securing the City on account of the New York City Police Department after the 9 11 attack. Did. He also did television reporting here. He is on MSNBC in March of last year, discussing a controversy surrounding Jared Kushner's trip to meet with the Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. To discuss US Saudi cooperation in the region. This was five months after the Washington Post journalist Jamal Cash Oh JI was murdered at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. The MSNBC anchor speaks first. All right. Let's talk now about Jared Kushner and his latest trip to Saudi.

Dickie Jared Kushner Washington Post Saudi consulate Saudi Christopher Dickey Saudi Crown MSNBC Terry Gross Dave Davies editor New York City Police Departmen Paris Nicky Barbie Prince Mohammed Central America Vicki Middle East Newsweek
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 5 months ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh AIR I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross back with her twenty fifteen interview with song writer and singer iris dement interview we thought would be nice to hear well so many of us are at home in this period of social distancing when they recorded the interview dement was at the piano with her guitar by her side in the studio at Iowa public radio she just released her album the trackless woods one of our early songs but the mystery B. was used as the theme of the HBO series the leftovers to mince music is influenced by the Pentecostal church her family belong to and saying in she was born in Arkansas on the delta the youngest of fourteen children when we left off she was telling Terry about how her mother love to sing but had to do it her own way which made it difficult to sing duets in church with the Mets father you recorded a duet with her mother that's on your first album infamous angel and I'd like to play that too wet it's of the song higher ground do you want to introduce this recording for us it's funny that you moved into that because I just remembered I was taught him in that what I was saying about my mom has she just had to do things her own way I brought her in that was my first record and that was her first time to go to Nashville and it had been my mom's dream to go off and be a singer in Nashville's grand Ole Opry we back in the day and keep my my mom was born in nineteen eighteen so we're going way back there and that she never made it made my dad have much kids instead but when my faith I did my first record of a broader Nashville and we got the studio and I wanted to sing that song with me in the regional plan was that she would harmonize with me which was the I don't know it just every the producer everybody thought well that's how they should go it's my record so we get in there we did that a bunch of times and it was just awful it was awful it just wouldn't work mom could get with it and we we decided just give up on it we can say that but we stopped and we were starting to leave the room all the players really even and my mom grabbed the layers she said let's get on in there and she told him to play or what could have played in and we cheese did the song and and we just followed her and at the end I don't know if you can hear it but at the end she says now that was my key so and it was great I was so happy you know and I'm her kids are you know she's gone now but it felt so right to be in there and have mom be in mom and maybe in the kid I loved it and she sang beautifully and but there again it said saying she she does her own deal all the way around and it wasn't a hateful thing it was like if I'm going to be here I got a B. the thing I am in the timing and everything I've got to do it my way it's a beautiful thing to witness and that's what she did so let's hear the duet with my guest iris dement and her mother recorded in this room in nineteen ninety two album which of me would have major mother on seventy four at the time probably yeah that sounds about right okay here we go he said it's iris dement.

Dave Davies writer Terry
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:22 min | 7 months ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One years or older learn more at NPR wine club dot org this is fresh AIR I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross whose home with a cold let's get back to the interview she recorded yesterday with James Jacoby about the new PBS frontline documentary Amazon empire the rise and range of Jeff bass us to Kobe is the film's director in correspondent it premieres Tuesday the documentary investigates how Amazon has disrupted and transforms nearly every aspect of our lives and is come under scrutiny for its tactics and expanding power let's talk about Alexa you know that Alexa is the Amazon device that you can talk to and give instructions to and I can play you something it can turn something on in your house if it speaks to Alexei Norfolk town of its own Bluetooth but Alexa not only lessons when you ask it to do something is listening to other things two one this has become a big concern so tell us more about Alexa as a listening device and how is what here is being used so Amazon takes issue with that describing a lex as a listening device but I think that that basically is what it is in that so there's there's a distinction to be made Alexa is the artificial intelligence of Amazon it's the it's the voice that you are speaking to the the little devices are called an echo or they can be embedded in cars in our in hotel rooms or even and showers they've got a lex what they call a Lexus enable devices and they're it's now compatible Alexa the system is compatible with over a hundred thousand devices I think basically what's going on is that with with the thing in your home the the echo device if the microphone is on that Alexa is on and you say Alexa she wakes up because she's listening for that word and then you see the blue light come on and essentially after she's awake she's listening and she is recording and she's recording so that the artificial intelligence can get smarter so they use that data at that she records in order to make Alexis smarter so for instance you know if you have a type of accent that accented English and she's not really understanding what you're saying what commander giving her or what question you're asking her there may be a team of human beings that are listening to that recording to try to understand and train her better to respond to this commands are questions this was not clearly disclose to consumers that there are teams of thousands of people around the world that are listening to the recordings once she's awake once that blue light is on trying to train her better now these are anonymized to some degree these recordings and not all recordings are listened to by human beings fact it's a rather jarring thing for people that have these devices to realize that well one she's actually recording when she's awake and I'm talking to our into there's a chance that a human being is actually listening annotating in transcribing what I'm talking about and we had an interesting exchange and that's featured in the film with this guy named Robert Frederick he's one of the founders of Amazon web services their cloud computing company and he talked about the fact that he approaches his Alexa with caution hill when he wants to have a private moment in his house he has an Alexa device yes several help press the button that disables the microphone because he doesn't want to even risk it that somehow she's triggered she wakes up and she records a private moment and he doesn't want those he doesn't he wants to eliminate the chance that any sort of private moment could be listened to by another human being which I think is fair and reasonable so it you know you talk about in your documentary how Amazon wants to have the entire environment liked so what other devices has it created or purchased two Mike or video our world your world so one purchase that Amazon made recently was this company called ring and ring makes these doorbell cameras that was their first main device and so you may see them these days and essentially it's doorbell that has a camera on it and in in part Amazon liked the idea of it because package that is a big deal for the company that a lot of people get packages to their door and then someone stealing that package so now you can watch your front step the you know of course if the cameras watching the front step it's also watching the public space on the street as well which is somewhat problematic but so there's this now this whole suite of ring devices or ring cameras and not just to monitor the outside of your home but also the inside of your home and there was a there was a recent hack of indoor rain cameras which was rather frightful where all of a sudden there is you know we showed in the documentary there's a there's a little girl in a room and her parents had installed a ring Cameron that room and all of a sudden there's a voice coming from the camera that's basically terrorizing her as she is alone in her room and I you know she's a young girl and you know we've we feature this moment it was it was it was a hack and this actually this hack happened all around the country and it was a rather embarrassing moment for Amazon certainly because here they are saying that these cameras are introduced to make your home more secure but here is an invasion of privacy that's rather frightening so as I'm as I'm trying to do anything to prevent further hacks yes absolutely I mean the company I think has tried to investigate what the nature of that hack was and the executives we spoke to about it say that they're you know they're putting new features and it it's you know that's one thing which is to address the actual security of these devices and we generally do have a an issue with the internet of things that not all of these devices are secure or not everybody sets them up properly not everybody is instructed to set them up properly but the larger issue at hand here is that in some ways these devices are being sold as a way to enhance your safety and security but people aren't necessarily taking into account what they're introducing to their homes that the risks attendant with putting cameras that are connected to networks in their homes and on their doorsteps let's take a short break here and then we'll talk some more of you just joining us my guess is James to Kobe he's the director of an correspondent for the new frontline documentary Amazon empire the rise in range of Jeff phase us which premieres Tuesday on PBS we'll be right back after we take a short break this is fresh AIR.

Dave Davies Terry gross James Jacoby NPR Amazon
China’s coronavirus - Here’s what we know

Fresh Air

11:11 min | 8 months ago

China’s coronavirus - Here’s what we know

"This is fresh air I'm Terry gross the new corona virus that emerged in Wuhan China has killed almost five hundred people and prompted the Chinese government to impose severe travel restrictions within the country the virus has spread to at least twenty four other countries including the U. S. American air carriers have suspended flights to and from China the US government is barring from entering the country any foreign nationals who visited China within last fourteen days our guest science writer David Coleman says the new corona virus is just the latest example of an ominous trend humans contracting deadly contagious viruses from wild animals other examples include H. I. V. west Nile fever anthrax bola and another from the corona virus family sars severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China and killed more than seven hundred people David common has written frequently for National Geographic and is the author of several books including spillover animal infections and the next human pandemic he spoke with fresh tears Dave Davies well David common welcome back to fresh air yeah this is scary stuff this virus and it's also a very fast moving story you and I are talking on Tuesday afternoon things may change a bit by time people hear it but us a sense of how serious the threat is of this virus compared to other outbreaks we've seen well it is very serious and needs to be taken very seriously and yet it's not an occasion for panic it's an occasion for calm effective response comparing it to other viral outbreaks he is is illuminating in some ways and problematic in other ways compared say to influence every year there's a seasonal influenza sweeps around the world F. infects hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people kills something like thirty thousand or thirty five thousand people in the US every year and yet it has a very low case fatality rate case fatality rate how many diaper the number of people infected it's down I think usually around point one percent a tenth of a percent sars virus that emerged from southern China with the syndrome caused by a virus that emerged from southern China in two thousand three a severe acute respiratory syndrome it infected eight thousand people a little over eight thousand and it killed seven hundred and seventy four for case fatality rate of almost ten percent in other words a hundred times seasonal influenza the average seasonal influenza and it scared the be Jesus out of the public health and disease scientist experts that I know they told me that that was a really scary one because the case fatality rate was so high and it spread quickly but they managed to stop it and we can talk a little bit about that so here's this novel coronavirus as they're calling it to two thousand nineteen novel coronavirus and it comes in somewhere between those two case fatality rates and that is one of the most important numbers at the experts have been watching and I've been watching over the last week or two as the numbers of infected people have exploded and the number of deaths have increased steadily the case fatality rate has hovered moving downward slowly from about three percent to a little over two percent now and it it is still very unpredictable we don't know how many people it's gonna infect and therefore how many people it's gonna kill but it's in the range that that requires being taken very seriously so let's look at what's what officials are doing to try and contain this novel coronavirus and your describes what what's happened in China China was slow to react to this particularly the officials in the city of Wuhan and the province of who by and then the course got out of the barn and the national officials reacted strongly and sealed off essentially first the city of Wuhan and then a number of other cities so I think there's more than fifty million people who are essentially in locked down with no public transportation going in and out of those cities China has been cutting internal flights in and out and to other countries have been cutting flights international flights in and out of China the US in terms of flights of foreign nationals are barred from entering the U. S. if they have recently traveled to China and US citizens coming back from Wuhan or who day province are being quarantined for fourteen days which is the suspected incubation period of the virus other countries are eliminating flights in and out of China I saw this morning that Japan has eliminated flights in and out of China so there is this international curtailment of flights in and out of China and in some cases people are being screened at airports and in a limited number of cases people are being quarantined if they have been and bay province and and want to come back to the U. S. or to another country do all these seem like reasonable and appropriate steps to well the the controversial to some people but to me they do seem reasonable controlling containment is important at this point I don't think it's an infringement around do infringement on anybody's personal rights we have to control cases and monitor cases and trace contacts and any time the thirties learn that an infected person has written on an airplane and then then we headed off into the city where they've arrived medially there three hundred people roughly on that airplane who are contacts that have to be traced and have to be monitored if not isolated and the person who is to enter the city and has gone to his or her family and they're more context there that will immediately have to be traced that's what happened in Toronto early on during the sars epidemic one case got into Toronto and she spread the the infection rather widely as soon as she's gotten there right so so the steps that managed to bring the sars epidemic under control back in the early two thousands were exactly these kinds of steps exactly these kinds of steps we knew less about sars at the very beginning except that it there was some very dangerous infectious disease caused by an unknown pathogen that had come out of southern China to Hong Kong and gotten to Toronto Beijing Bangkok and one or two I think Hong Kong one or two other cities and then there was very rigorous no medical isolation and containment and contact tracing and public health officials were able to reduce the transmission rate of sars to a very low level now in terms of the average secondary cases caused by each primary case the average number of infections that each infected person cost they brought that to a very low level and essentially they stopped the sars outbreak right now they've been some rip reporting suggesting that the trump administration has over the last couple years reduced the government's ability to fight a viral epidemic do you have an opinion about that yes I think it's I think it's well documented in the trunk budgets and it's been I think disastrous for the CDC and for our preparedness my understanding is that trumps twenty twenty budget proposed cutting one point three billion from the CDC budget that's twenty percent below the twenty nineteen level in the twenty nineteen level contained cuts of seven hundred fifty million including I look this up recently including a proposed cut of a hundred and two million specifically for emerging and zoonotic diseases which is what this is so the trump administration budgets have been hamstring the CDC and our ability to react to circumstances just like this course budget proposals aren't always inactive your point is well taken that budget proposals don't necessarily translate into approve budgets but the effort has been there by the trump administration to reduce drastically the CDC and I think that they have succeeded to a very great degree there's been around understandably on protective masks and gloves should should people be trying to get them what's it's a it's a sign of panic that there has been around but there has been I went into my local drug store here in Bozeman Montana yesterday to see if I could buy some masks to take with me just in case when I fly to Australia on Thursday I thought well what if on the way back a typhoon re routes me through China or something so I thought I would carry some masks my local drug store was sold out of masks and that has happened a lot of places around the country is that called for I would say no despite the fact that I was one person trying to buy some is and you know an emergency travel precaution but masks particularly the simple surgical mask that you see on so many people specially travelers I hear the experts saying that those are very helpful in containing the spread of infected droplets from people who are infected containing costs containing CSE sneezes buy a sick person but much much much less effective in protecting a well person from the sneeze is coming out of another person so in other words where mask if you're sick if you're coughing as a courtesy to people around you don't be nearly as concerned about wearing a mask just as a preventive when you step on an airliner go to a big store right I think the CDC our recommends that ordinary civil citizens don't really need to worry about masks but health workout probably should I think this I think the CDC is also saying look ordinary people we have a shortage of masks let those masks be used by health care workers who need them most rather than wearing and when you go to the hardware store David common is a science writer and the author of the book spillover animal infections in the next human

Wuhan China Chinese Government
Bat Soup, Anyone? How Viruses Transfer From Animals To Humans - Yahoo News

Fresh Air

08:10 min | 8 months ago

Bat Soup, Anyone? How Viruses Transfer From Animals To Humans - Yahoo News

"Let's get back to the interview. Fresh air's Dave Davies recorded yesterday with science writer. David common about the new Corona Rona virus epidemic which broke out in Wuhan China. Kwame ince's the corona virus is just the latest example of how were increasingly contracting dangerous. Viral infections since from animals in his book spillover published in Twenty twelve kwame attractive viruses spilled over from animals to infect humans with HIV West S. Nile fever anthrax. Bola and another from the corona virus family SARS severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China China. You know you're right. That as scientists tried to track down the source of the SARS virus back in two thousand three and four. They focused on this practice in southern China of eating and in some cases raising wild animals. Not kind of things that you typically think of as food or or where we don't want to just explain this trend and how it figured you're into this yes There is a vogue. There has been a vogue for eating wildlife wild animals when I was in Southern China researching searching the book only briefly. I got to see some of these markets. Where all form of wild animal were on sale A lot of the trade by the time I got there had gone underground because it was suppressed after the SARS outbreak but then it gradually came back and it had been allowed to continue in you again and proliferate win this new virus began but if you go into a live market and you see cages containing bats stacked upon cages containing porcupines stacked upon cages containing palm civics stacked upon cages containing chickens and hygiene is not great and and the animals are defecating on one. Another it's just a natural mixing bowl situation for viruses. It's very very dangerous situation and and one of the things that it allows. Dave is something that we haven't mentioned. I think so far and that is the occurrence of of amplifying hosts hosts that are not the reservoir host the permanent hiding ground of a new virus but represent intermediates between the reservoir of our host and the human population for instance those horses in Australia. From the point of view of a horse they were ultimate hosts and they were being killed by this virus but from the human point of view they were amplifier hosts the virus got into them it multiplied abundantly it caused them to froth and Chauque and bleed through their nostrils veterinarians and trainers. Were trying to take care of them. They amplified the virus. So that One trainer in one stable form and got very sick from that virus in the case of this new corona virus. One of the questions is was there. An amplifier host in that wet market where these cages are stacked are called wet markets white wire called wet markets. Well assume they're called wet markets because the animals are alive alive rather than butchered and in dead and refrigerated They're also wet. Because there's there's water flowing everywhere. They usually have seafood as well as as wild mammals and birds As I said hygiene isn't great. Animals are being butchered on plywood. Boards blood is flowing down into the gutters in the water and there is just a great Liquidity Mix in these markets at at their worst now when scientists were trying to track down the origin of the SARS virus Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome which was associated with the virus in in the early two thousands. They eventually focused focused on something called the civic cat What is that? That's right the civic cat is not really a cat. It's more accurately called the palm palm civic the civic type of mammal that belongs to the to the family of Mongooses But it's a it's a medium sized animal and and it is both captured from the wild for food and captive bred and raised for food And it was the first big eggs suspect of In the SARS outbreak It was found that some of the people who got sick very early on had eaten a butchered civic and so in the civic head though the the antibody for this this virus right and they and they tested him civics and they found they found evidence of the virus. They found antibodies. Antibodies or fragments of DNA A. R. N. A.. In these civics suggesting that they had been infected with the virus and That didn't prove they were the reservoir host but it made them the number one suspect until a couple of Chinese scientists did further work and they established that in fact virus was not living permanently in the civic population in the wild or in captivity. It was it had a different reservoir host it was living in bats and it had passed presumably market somewhere it had passed from a bat into one or more sits and they became the amplifier host. Right and the the Chinese government I think decreed that all sits in captivity would be slaughtered. Right that's right. Thousands of sits in captivity were butchered an an electric electrocuted and and smothered and drowned In this I panicked blind reaction in China to the SARS outbreak. Now when you were looking at you actually went to China with and spent some time in the field with people who were investigating this right. Tell us tell us about that experience. I I went. I went with a fellow named Alexi. Kamara was working as a researcher for a group. That's called ECO health alliance based in New York A group of disease scientists who study see these emerging viruses these emerging pathogens in animals around the world. They generally have cross training in Virology Veterinary Medicine Ecology combinations nations of skills so Alexi was one of them Alexi and a number of Chinese colleagues and I flew to a city called Gua Lynn In the province of Guangdong southern China and we went out climbing into into caves that caves in the karst mountains the limestone stone mountains and hills outside of the city of Gwynn Looking to trap Various different kinds of small bats insectivores bats not giant fruit bats Small bats at lived in these caves including Horseshoe bats which is a particular group of bats so that Alexi and his colleagues could draw draw blood samples and test those for Looking for the SAR SARS virus that point or or any other virus that suspect unit. Just describe a little bit of what what it felt like to be trapping bats and these caves well. It was a little bit claustrophobic. It's not for everybody. Had Castle Castro. We climbed through. We climbed on our bellies through a very low hole to get into one of these caves. We had we had to squirm down and then and up through this whole to get into the cave and then the cave opened out and Alexi and his Chinese colleagues had essentially pillowcases and butterfly nets. And that's how we caught these bats. The Bat started flying around and they would catch them in butterfly nets and they were wearing gloves and and they would untangle a bat from a butterfly net and then Drop it into one of these cloth bags that were like pillowcases. And in this case as I recall they they would tire tied the knot often then handed to me and I would go over and and hanging on sort of a clothesline. So that the bad dangle and we were doing this I don't know if we were in there for a couple of hours oddly enough. We were not wearing masks of any sort we were not wearing with the called. Personal Protective Equipment has met suits or anything and and described this in the book. I asked Alexi. Why the hell

Alexi China Sars Kwame Ince Dave Davies China China Wuhan China Bola David Australia Writer Respiratory Syndrome Chauque Guangdong Southern China Personal Protective Equipment Kamara A. R. N. New York Castle Castro Virology Veterinary Medicine E
How Coronaviruses Jump From Animals To People: David Quammen Explains

Fresh Air

11:08 min | 8 months ago

How Coronaviruses Jump From Animals To People: David Quammen Explains

"The new corona virus that emerged in Wuhan China has killed almost five hundred people and prompted the Chinese government to impose severe travel restrictions within the country the virus has spread to at least twenty four other countries including the U. S. American air carriers have suspended flights to and from China the US government is barring from entering the country any foreign nationals who visited China within last fourteen days our guest science writer David Coleman says the new corona virus is just the latest example of an ominous trend humans contracting deadly contagious viruses from wild animals other examples include H. I. V. west Nile fever anthrax bola and another from the corona virus family sars severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China and killed more than seven hundred people David common has written frequently for National Geographic and is the author of several books including spillover animal infections and the next human pandemic he spoke with fresh tears Dave Davies well David common welcome back to fresh air yeah this is scary stuff this virus and it's also a very fast moving story you and I are talking on Tuesday afternoon things may change a bit by time people hear it but us a sense of how serious the threat is of this virus compared to other outbreaks we've seen well it is very serious and needs to be taken very seriously and yet it's not an occasion for panic it's an occasion for calm effective response comparing it to other viral outbreaks is is illuminating in some ways and problematic in other ways compared say to influence every year there's a seasonal influenza sweeps around the world F. infects hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people kills something like thirty thousand or thirty five thousand people in the US every year and yet it has a very low case fatality rate case fatality rate how many diaper the number of people infected it's down I think usually around point one percent a tenth of a percent sars virus that emerged from southern China with the syndrome caused by a virus that emerged from southern China in two thousand three a severe acute respiratory syndrome it's infected eight thousand people a little over eight thousand and it killed seven hundred and seventy four for case fatality rate of almost ten percent in other words a hundred times seasonal influenza the average seasonal influenza and it scared the be Jesus out of the public health and disease scientist experts that I know they told me that that was a really scary one because the case fatality rate was so high and it spread quickly but they managed to stop it and we can talk a little bit about that so here's this novel coronavirus as they're calling it to two thousand nineteen novel coronavirus and it comes in somewhere between those two case fatality rates and that is one of the most important numbers at the experts have been watching and I've been watching over the last week or two as the numbers of infected people have exploded and the number of deaths have increased steadily the case fatality rate has hovered moving downward slowly from about three percent to a little over two percent now and it it is still very unpredictable we don't know how many people it's gonna infect and therefore how many people it's gonna kill but it's in the range that that requires being taken very seriously so let's look at what's what officials are doing to try and contain this novel coronavirus and your describes what what's happened in China cities China has been cutting internal flights in and out and other countries have been cutting flights international flights in and out of China the US in terms of flights of foreign nationals are barred from entering the U. S. if they have recently traveled to China and US citizens coming back from Wuhan or who bay province are being quarantined for fourteen days which is the suspected incubation period of the virus other countries are eliminating flights in and out of China I saw this morning that Japan has eliminated flights in and out of China so there is this international curtailment of flights in and out of China and in some cases people are being screened at airports and in a limited number of cases people are being quarantined if they have been in bay province and and want to come back to the US or to another country do all these seem like reasonable and appropriate steps to you well the the controversial to some people but to me they do seem reasonable controlling containment is important at this point I don't think it's an infringement around do infringement on anybody's personal rights we have to control cases and monitor cases and trace contacts and any time the thirties learn that an infected person has written on an airplane and then we headed off into the city where they've arrived Lee there three hundred people roughly on that airplane who are contacts that have to be traced and have to be monitored if not isolated and the person who is to enter the city and has gone to his or her family and they're more context there that will immediately have to be traced that's what happened in Toronto early on during the sars epidemic one case got into Toronto and she spread the the infection rather widely as soon as she's gotten there right so so the steps that managed to bring the sars epidemic under control back in the early two thousands were exactly these kinds of steps exactly these kinds of steps we knew less about sars at the very beginning except that it there was some very dangerous infectious disease caused by an unknown pathogen that had come out of southern China to Hong Kong and gotten to Toronto Beijing Bangkok and one or two I think Hong Kong one or two other cities and then there was very rigorous no medical isolation and containment and contact tracing and public health officials were able to reduce the transmission rate in of sars to a very low level in terms of the average of secondary cases caused by each primary case the average number of infections that each infected person cost they brought that to a very low level and essentially they stopped the sars outbreak right now they've been some rip reporting suggesting that the trump administration has over the last couple years reduced the government's ability to fight a viral epidemic do you have an opinion about that yes I think it's I think it's well documented in the the trump budgets and it's been I think disasters for the CDC and for our preparedness my understanding is that trumps twenty twenty budget proposed cutting one point three billion from the CDC budget that's twenty percent below the twenty nineteen level in the twenty nineteen level contained to the cuts of seven hundred fifty million including I look this up recently including a proposed cut of a hundred and two million specifically for emerging and zoonotic diseases which is what this is so the trump administration budgets have been hamstring the CDC and our ability to react to circumstances just like this of course budget proposals aren't always inactive your point is well taken that budget proposals don't necessarily translate into approve budgets but the effort has been there by the trump administration to reduce drastically the CDC and I think that they have succeeded to a very great degree there's been around understandably on protective masks and gloves should should people be trying to get them what's it's a it's a sign of panic that there has been around but there has been I went into my local drug store here in Bozeman Montana yesterday to see if I could buy some masks to take with me just in case when I fly to Australia on Thursday I thought well what if on the way back of a typhoon re routes me through China or something so I thought I would carry some masks my local drug store was sold out of masks and that has happened a lot of places around the country is that called for I would say no despite the fact that I was one person trying to buy some this and you know an emergency travel precaution but masks particularly the simple surgical mask that you see on so many people specially travelers I hear the experts saying that those are very helpful in containing the spread of infected droplets from people who are infected containing coughs containing CSE sneezes buy a sick person but much much much less effective in protecting a well person from the sneezes coming out of another person so in other words where mask if you're sick if you're coughing as a courtesy to people around you don't be nearly as concerned about wearing a mask just as a preventive when you step on an airliner go to a big store right I think the CDC our recommends that ordinary civil citizens don't really need to worry about masks but health workout probably should I think this I think the CDC is also saying look ordinary people we have a shortage of masks let those masks be used by health care workers who need them most rather than wearing and when you go to the hardware store David common is a science writer and the author of the book spillover animal infections in the next human

Wuhan China Chinese Government
"dave davies" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 9 months ago

"dave davies" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Gave the Davies Dave Davies who along with his older brother Ray Davies founded the Kinks in nineteen sixty four you can often recognize the king saw before a single word is song thanks to the sick signature distortion of Dave Davies guitar Dave had a ten watt opal coal amplifier that he hated so he ran the speaker output leads through a vox AC thirty then slashed the speaker cone of the elco which resulted in the epic guitar tone on you really got me and this okay go the the yeah okay we'll post.

Dave Davies Ray Davies Kinks
Peter Morgan Presents "Successor" To "The Crown" As Series Enters 1960s, '70s

Fresh Air

05:48 min | 11 months ago

Peter Morgan Presents "Successor" To "The Crown" As Series Enters 1960s, '70s

"Let's get back to fresh air contributor Dave Davies and his twenty eighteen interview with Peter Morgan creator and writer of the crown and writer of the queen the last king of Scotland and frost Nixon the third season of the crown starring Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth the second begin Sunday on Netflix you know therefore is just terrific in this role and I've been I assume you were involved in the casting what were you looking for and what did you see in her arms thirty one year old on the cost of care for which is now sort of with almost impossible to imagine we'll see you know she was overlooked so this doesn't reflect well on me but I will tell the story and live in shame so what time is we'd be so I would be sent the list of people coming to the costing some are looked on the list and Wednesdays as it were costing session would involve the following five young actresses I looked on the list like a one is that when that when that one of the other ones are interesting I'll come in at eleven to see that one I'll come in at twelve because I'm busy and important to lime faltered and who whoever the sky for business I'm I'm not into that I overlooked and snapped on no fewer than five occasions until there was one time where like simply couldn't avoid it because interest in the one before the one off the hook and so I then states to see her none of what what what no one should what's the matter with and if you want to talk to this when they said pizza she's been on for five occasions and each time you have studiously avoided and I suppose she's fantastic he what did you see what what did you see captivate what but it's not an easy part I mean you have to be both forgive me well I said but we have to be both playing in stunning you know the she has to have both and and then a number of the actors that came in was simply too beautiful you know to conventional beautiful too the faces did not have the full range because Elizabeth winter is a beautiful walls it is arguably still a beautiful woman but not all the time not from every angle and her face lights up you know with a smile and can look quite grumpy quite like a wet weekend when not smiling and be overlooking pulling quite plain and you need to believe she has intelligence and understand her intelligence because the queen country to what people think I think she has an intelligence and a very sharp memory and intolerance of fools but at the same time she's not that intellectually curious and so she three both quick and alert and yet at the same time capable of repose and being quite does fall so it's not easy and she has to be emotionally stable and I don't think and act to connect I'm across the chasm but it's so helps if they all thought and clamp brought a lot of thought into the pond and then active a lot of the stuff they shouldn't have to perfection eyesore in a in an instant but she could do it want to talk about we've talked a bit about the queen which is this the feature film that you did before you did the series the crowns was directed by Stephen Frears and we'll we'll hear seen here this is about the moment in nineteen ninety seven when princess Diana has been killed in a car accident and because she is divorced from the royal family the queen sees her death as a private matter with no need for a public appearance reason statement from her the queen in fact she takes her family and Diana's two boys who are her grandchildren to the royal St in Scotland come to to just get away while London is morning and be in this scene we're gonna hear she gets a call for the prime minister Tony Blair played by Michael sheen who is concerned because the public and the press are seeing the royal family as heartless because it's expressed no grief at Diana's passing so we hear the queen pick up the phone to speak to the prime minister prime minister good morning match day sorry to disturb but I was just wondering whether you'd seen any of today's papers we managed to look at one or two in which case five question would be whether you felt some kind of response might be necessary I believe a few over either editors are doing their best to sell newspapers that would be a mistake to dance to their tune under normal circumstances I would agree box well my advice is I've been taking the temperature among the people on the streets and all the information I'm getting is that the mood what would you suggest prime minister some kind of a statement ma'am I believe the moment the statements has passed I would suggest flying the flag at half mast about pounds and coming down to London the earliest opportunity it would be a great comfort to all people and would help them with that grief grief if it's come down to London before I attend to my grandchildren who just lost her mother

Dave Davies Writer Scotland Peter Morgan Thirty One Year
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Davies this is fresh air. Then you've our family foundation supports WHYY's, fresh air and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation support for NPR comes from this station and from Tyra for the past forty years tirerack has remained committed to helping people find the right tires wheels and performance parts. Learn more at tirerack dot com. Helping drivers find deliver and install and from the main office of tourism with.

dave davies
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:59 min | 1 year ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. I'm Dave Davies sitting in for Terry gross. Let's get back to Terry's interview with author Sigrid Nunez, her latest novel. The friend won the two thousand eighteen national book award for fiction. It comes out in paperback February fifth. The story in the friend. The narrator is a woman who's mentor from college who was close to her age became a dear friend, and he has just committed suicide. She's left grieving and wondering why and she also inherits his dog, and it's not just like any dog. It's one hundred eighty pound great, Dane, and she lives in a small rent controlled apartment in New York. And it's legal. It's against the regulations to have a dog in that apartments is she she kind of violates the regulations takes the dog, kind of reluctantly, and they become very close. And they're both grieving the dog is grieving too. But as you've said you can't describe death to a dog. You can't explain death to a dog. Yeah. That's something. That has struck me. Well, before I started writing this book, how difficult that is really because you know, they're the dog is at home as far as the dog knows everything is fine. And then the person the dogs person the most beloved one, then she's into thin air just doesn't, you know, doesn't isn't there anymore. There is no way to explain to the dog. What happened, and it just seems to me that that must be a remarkable emotional tumult for the for the dog. She walks the street with a dog, you know, she talks takes the dog on walks. Of course, you have to because the dog is. So so big. She feels like she's a spectacle when she's on the street with the dog, and everybody's like stopping and wanting to do a selfie or asking how much he eats her. How much he defecates? And she's she's kind of you know, I think she feels like partly her privacy is being invaded. But partly just like amused by the whole thing, but it connects to something larger that her friend who took his life used to say, which is you know, he used to like love to walk and felt like he did his best writing while he was walking and just kind of losing himself in his thoughts and in his surroundings. But he always thought that that would be harder for a woman to do. Because a woman always has to be on guard is this guy following me is this guy going to grope me is this guy Garnett attacked me. What about that cat call? And so I'm wondering if you thought about that from both directions about you know, the difficulties. Sometimes losing yourself as a woman who has to be on guard when walking the streets and the difference when you're when you have this like Eugene dog who everybody wants to stop and admire when you're walking. Well, it's true that I was I was writing about Flannery and the planner who who is an urban Walker. Let's there's a friend. Yes. And the mentors idea that can there really be such a thing as a planners can a woman the AFL winner because real Flannery requires that you are able to lose yourself in an urban setting and just walk and dream and discover and and that that is very difficult for women. Now, we were talking about walking in the country that would be different. But that's not what the what if what if Leonard does it did strike me. I guess just an it's an idea when I was was writing that that of course, it's it is true. What he says that a a woman is raised to be always on guard. Is there someone behind me is there? You know is is not to mention remarks that are made or stairs. That are given that certainly does make it much different for a woman then for a man. And with my narrator walking with the dog. She does feel embarrassed you she's very private person. And she doesn't want to be interrupted constantly when she's taking the dog for a walk. And then there's a certain amount of irritation with the same things always being said like why don't you ride him? And as you say how much does he eat and also people putting in their two cents, such as it's a syndicate crime is one woman says I think it's a crime to keep a dog that large in the city or that dog shouldn't be in the city, which is something that people do say if you walk a big dog a new walked big dogs. You've had big dogs. Right. I've had my family had a enormous. Great Dane, and I was already out of the house by then. But I did walk him in and children would follow. And and people would say things, but I also have. Had a a dog that was half great, Dane half German shepherd and looked like a somewhat smaller. Great Dane that I walked in. And yes, yes, people do make a lot of comments. I'm guilty of being one of the people who say how much does the dog eat what I could probably ride the dog because I literally could probably ride the dog. I mean, I'm sure I could I could I could probably do it. I know people who won't get a Pat after their beloved pet has died because they feel like they can't go through that grieving process. Again, reminds people who won't remarry because they can't bear the thought of losing a second spouse. Yes. I get a lot of emails from those people to a lot. You know, they they they have lost a pet and it's been overwhelming to them. And very many of them say, I don't know if I could get another one or if I should get another one. Yeah. I mean, people become so emotionally attached to the animals in their lives. We probably underestimate how powerful at pain is. When people leave lose an animal that they love do you have pets now. No, I don't I I had two cats, and they they grew to be quite old. And they they both died, and it was when the second one died that again, I was one of those people who was so overwhelmed, and I I have not been able to bring myself to get another cat since then that was years ago because of the grief. Yes. Largely largely because of that it just not wanting to go through all that again. But there was something about the way that can't died in the end the the loss of it. In fact, I I do write about that in in in the novel that I just was not able to get over that had of the Catta. Well, she she she was elderly and she became very ill. And then I took her to the vet who. You know, agreed that she should be put down because she was so the because she would have to have surgery and at her age, you know, that was probably not such a good idea. And then the vet said I have to give her I have to give her two shots when to calm her down. And and and something went wrong. And then the the she she picked up the cat and ran off with it should said to me. Do you want to be with her when she dies? I said, of course. And then something went wrong it had to do with the vein being too dehydrated when she made the first injection, and she then picked up the captain and ran off with it. And then I waited and then she came back and put the cat on the table and the cat was dead. And I remembered her saying do you wanna be with her? Well, then I wasn't with her. And yeah, it was it was it was very very painful, and there was a certain point. In the four before the cap died where she was so ill, and I brought her in and and and to the vet and she was there. And and I felt that the way I write it. I said I'm not saying this is what she said. But this is what I heard she put her paw on my arm, and I imagined her saying, wait, you're making mistake. I didn't say I wanted you to kill me. I wanted you to make me feel better. Yeah. You never really know. Do you with a cat or a dog is thinking about whether it's time to to end their life. Exactly. So and that it was just very overwhelming experience. Yeah. If you're just joining us, my guest is writer Sigrid Nunez, her latest book, the friend is a novel that won the national book award for fiction, and is about to be published in paperback in early February will be right back after we take a short break. This is fresh air. Support for NPR comes.

Dane Sigrid Nunez national book award Terry gross Flannery guy Garnett Dave Davies AFL New York Eugene Leonard writer NPR Catta Pat one hundred eighty pound
Ray Davies: The Kinks are officially getting back together

Yellowhammer Radio

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Ray Davies: The Kinks are officially getting back together

"Huntsmen's coming up in the near future because they've got to get someone to play bill o'reilly megan kelly that'll be interesting to see who they pay your bill o'reilly's available to ray davies has surprised the music world after announcing that the kinks are planning to reunite after twenty years apart the band has notoriously endured one of the longest feuds in the music is seen since disbanding in the late nineties but now appear to bury the hatchet davies revealed the news in an interview stating that he was making a new kings album with brother dave davies and make at bori davies said the trouble is the two remaining members david mic never got along very well but you said he's made that work in the studio and it's fired him up to make them play harder fire i used to like the kings i can't really well there goes millennial x games for tomorrow and.

Huntsmen Dave Davies Megan Kelly Bill O'reilly Ray Davies David Mic Twenty Years
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air i'm dave davies in for terry gross we're speaking with presidential historian john meacham whose new book reflects on current political controversies by looking at past episodes in american history when the nation faced bitter partisan divides and presidential leadership made a difference his book is called the soul of america the battle for our better angels when we left off we were talking about the resurgence of the ku klux klan in the nineteen twenties and how changes in public opinion led to its decline by the end of the decade the clan rose and fell in the nineteen twenties before mostly the stock market crash and then the growth of unemployment that characterized the great depression had it remains such a pervasive for some nineteen thirties what would might our history have looked like oh it's such a great question because it's one of the great bullets dodged in american history of their many historians who believe that had the class dan continued to grow into the late twentieth into the early thirties and then you have this existential crisis of democratic capitalism in the early nineteen thirties franklin roosevelt became president an aide came to advise her came to him and said mr president if you succeed in the present crisis you will go down as our greatest president but if you fail you'll go down as one of our worst and fdr looked at him and said if i fail i'll go down as the last this was a moment where there were two live options in the world the democratic capitalism didn't have to make it there was bolshevism in soviet union was european style to talibanism fdr said the two most dangerous man in america were huey long and douglas macarthur because long of louisiana might lead apocalypse revolt from the left and macarthur the chief of staff the army might lead a populist revolt from the right you had live fears of fascism live fears there was a plot against fdr called the wall wall street plot where financiers were putting money out trying to get the american legion to follow a general to depose fdr fortunately the general was patriot and blew the whistle on it but imagine all of that unfolding when if you had.

louisiana chief of staff douglas macarthur huey america terry gross american legion army dave davies fdr president franklin roosevelt dan ku klux klan john meacham
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air i'm dave davies in for terry gross today cartoonist and essayist tim crider a new collection of personal essays he reflects on all kinds of relationships in his life the girlfriend he traveled with on a circus train a married woman he fell in love with and the straight cat the became his companion for nineteen years there's just a certain reservoir of affection we all have that needs to be expressed in the literal sense and and so will lavish it on pets those are less complicated less demanding relationships than human relationships crider also tells us about something not in this book getting stabbed and how it affected his view of the world is new collection of essays is called i wrote this book because i love you and marine corps good reviews what she calls an eloquent and raw memoir of the iraq war net young's eat the apple that's all come ming up on today's fresh air first news live from npr news in washington i'm jack sphere in a meeting with the nation's governors today president donald trump promised to turn grief over school shootings in the action mbr scott horsely reports trump's proposal to arm some schoolteachers drew pushback from at least one state leader trump says he wants to harden schools defenses and improve what he calls the early warning system so authorities can deal with wouldbe shooters before they attack trump's proposals won support from some governors in the room but democratic governor jay inslee of washington rejected the president's call to let some schoolteachers carry concealed weapons as a deterrent i've listened to the first grade teachers at don't wanna be pistolpacking first grade teachers i've listened to law enforcement who said they don't want to have to train teachers as law enforcement agencies which takes about six months texas governor greg abbott defended a program that arms some teachers in his state abbott calls that program wellthought out scott horsely and they are news washington in oakland california the mary issued an alert warning residents of her city federal immigration agents were planning large scale raids in the san francisco bay area and fears which gonzalez has that story merely be shaath issued her warning saturday evening after receiving.

oakland gonzalez san francisco greg abbott texas scott horsely npr iraq terry gross california dave davies washington president governor jay inslee donald trump apple tim crider
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air i'm dave davies in for terry gross whose off this week we're speaking with tara west dover whose new book is about growing up with fundamentalist parents in rural idaho as a kid she didn't have a birth certificate never saw a doctor and didn't go to school she eventually made her way to college and earned a phd at cambridge her memoir is called educated your family was mormon and you grew up with some pretty clear understanding of gender roles i'm wondering what you know as as you were a kid and then she got a little older did you have a vision for the kind of life that you would lead well my family was i think a bit more radical the most mormons especially on on the question of gender so in my mind growing up there was never any question of what my future would look like i would get married when i was seventeen or eighteen and i would be given some corner of the farm and my husband would put a house on had and we would have kids and possibly i would become a midwife like my mother and takeover with the herbs when i was a child this was very much the path as it was laid out for me and music became very important to that because music became something i wanted to learn how to do and the first time that i had had heard something like opera bora choir i realized this is something that takes discipline and you have to go somewhere or learn how to do this and that there are people in the world who know about this and can teach this to you and so i think it was really had a draw music that first made me think maybe it would be all right if i went away and went to university which my father was against but maybe it would be alright because the reason i would go is to learn about music and that i could come back and live on the farm and and be a voice teacher or direct the church choir and so in my mind that was that was acceptable i i could do that did you rebel of getting married and getting of a house on the corner of the farm did it feel constricted eventually i suppose i did that initially now.

dave davies dover idaho terry gross
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mm this is fresh air i'm dave davies and for terry gross terry has to be out of town today but before she left as she recorded the interview were about to hear with journalist franklin four whose written a new investigative profile of paul manafort just published in the atlantic manafort served as president trump's campaign chairman and last october became one of four people indicted in robert muller's investigation into connections between the trump campaign and russia manafort first made his name in the 80s as a political consultant in lobbyist for says manafort transformed lobbying by obliterating traditional concerns about conflicts of interest his clients eventually included authoritarian president's militia commanders in russian oligarchy he made a fortune stashed his money in offshore tax havens then ended up deep in debt to one of the russian allah guards his personal financial crisis led him to join the trump campaign fours article is titled american hustler oligarchy shady deals foreign money how paul manafort helped corrupt washington and laid the groundwork for the subversion of american politics faith in for mark antifrench law see your story starts in 2015 before paul manafort joins the trump campaign and at this point manafort is in a clinic recovering from an emotional breakdown he appears to have considered suicide what led to this breakdown professionally paul manafort slave wiz amass he'd been a very powerful political consultant in lobbyists but he'd bit every thing in his career on his work in ukraine he'd become the i chief political advisor to victory on a janaka shoe had been president of ukraine and they developed a very personal relationship in they developed a very lucrative relationship for paul manafort but after spending nearly ten years in ukraine revolution had swept that government for power and manafort was deprived of his primary source of income and he was struggling to find anything to replace that financially paul manafort with struggling he owed a russian oil garc nearly twenty million dollars in that russian oligarch wasn't going to let go of that debt and then finally personally paul manafort was struggling um he'd had an affair which his family had uncovered and despite telling him to go into therapy veen to break off.

dave davies terry franklin four atlantic manafort trump chairman robert muller russia consultant president financial crisis washington ukraine political advisor twenty million dollars ten years
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot org and by the listeners of kqed partly cloudy this evening mostly cloudy overnight lows in the lower to mid 40s and tomorrow it'll be a mostly cloudy day with temperatures in the fifties this is fresh air i'm dave davies in for terry grows whose off today if watching president trump and listening to american political discourse these days makes you feel something's gone wrong our guest today will tell you it's not your imagination steven levinsky and daniels zip latte have spent years studying what makes democracies healthy and what leads to their collapse and they see signs that american democracy is in trouble in a new book they argue that trump has shown authoritarian tendencies and that many players in american politics are discarding longheld norms that have kept our political rivalries imbalance and prevented the kind of bitter conflict that can lead to a repressive state steven levinsky and daniels if blatter both professors of government at harvard university the vits he's research focuses on latin america and the developing world zip latte studies europe from the 19th century to the present their new book is called how democracies die will steven levinsky daniels zip welcomed a fresh air you know you write that some democracies die in a hail of gunfire there's a military coup the existing leaders were imprisoned or sometimes shot um not this is not.

dave davies terry trump steven levinsky harvard university america kqed president blatter steven levinsky daniels
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The the performance that i've been doing it uh mocha the museum of contemporary art in los angeles is a different experience altogether because in that case i'm actually in front of an audience of uh just about two hundred and in that case i don't feel that particular experience because i do a performance which is similar to the radio programs that i present and of the audience seems to enjoy it but it's not how attractive you are it's simply that people have a preconceived notion somehow of vote what you look like based on this voice that they've been listening to maybe for years and whatever you look like it's not going to be what they they've imagined radio artist joe frank speaking with terry grows recorded in 1989 frank died monday he was seventy nine coming up we speak with daniel ellsberg whose decision to leak the top secret study of the vietnam war known as the pentagon papers is portrayed in the new filmed the post i'm dave davies and this is fresh air oh but three the with the leader two dortha the food the food the food.

los angeles joe frank terry daniel ellsberg vietnam war dave davies museum of contemporary art pentagon
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mm this is fresh air i'm dave davies in for terry grows whose off this week we're speaking with medical journalist jeannie linzer whose written a new book about the risks and implanted medical devices such as artificial joints cardiac stents and pacemakers she says they're approved with far less scrutiny than new drugs and some can cause serious harm her book is called the danger within us a on when i returned to the to the story of dennis fagan uh dennis fagan this said firefighter in paramedic who suffered from epileptic seizures and out of some desperation got this vegas nerve stimulator planted in in this little box that stick with wires that would stimulate the vagus nerve that runs down his body and hopefully ease his epileptic seizures he ended up in a lifethreatening situation in when was this two thousand i guess anti fathur sector fell acid tell us what happened so one night he was awakened about a with a pain in his throat about two in the morning he woke up and he knew that the pain in his throat was associated with a seizure so he got up and any put a vertical mark on his calendar on that date and he used that calendar uh for a says neurosurgeon and his neurologist said they could manage his medications so he could mild liked he was a way for him counting them right yes yeah and when his parents found him the next morning they saw him stumble out of his room and follow unconscious onto the floor and when he came till he got out sat down on a dining room chair and immediately felt facefirst into the floor again this time you know he's afraid of falling again salih wiggles across the room with his back against the wall his legs of splayed in front of him his genes of soaked with iran he looks half dead his parents frantically call for an ambulance by the time the ambulance gets there he's already passed out eight more times.

dave davies terry jeannie linzer dennis fagan iran
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air i'm dave davies in for terry gross get out the satirically funny horror film written and directed by jordan peel has earned a golden globe nomination for best motion picture in the comedy or musical category the film was a hit at the box office and among critics some of whom wondered why thiel himself was nominated in the best director best screenplay categories dangled kolui of who costars in the film is also nominated in the best actor category the golden globes will be broadcast on sunday you may know jordan peel as half of the dual key and peel who had a sketch comedy show on comedy central terry interviewed peel last march when get out was in movie theaters the films about a young african american photographer chris played by kolui it who's dating a white woman rose played by allison williams they go to meet her parents who go out of their way to be friendly in show their appreciation for black culture but chris find something sinister beneath their geneal liberal surface and this seen chris kristen rose are on their way to her parents home she's driving when the car hits a dear they pull and a police officer asks chris for his id certain i see your license please life easier steve harvey and are no he wasn't driving i didn't ask who was driving i asked to see is by day yeah y that doesn't make any sense you you don't have to give them your ideas you haven't done anything editing decent peak any time there is an incident we have every right to asphalt ma'am.

dave davies jordan peel director allison williams chris kristen officer steve harvey terry gross
"dave davies" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KPCC

"Brush share i'm dave davies in for terry gross today food writer and tv host anthony board dane his cnn series parts unknown in which he travels the globe sampling food from diverse cultures is now in its ten th season today board aimed talks about his travels some of the best and worst food he's eaten and how kitchen work transfer armed in from a lazy kid the someone who wanted to prove himself on the job this was the first time in my life that i went home feeling respect for myself was very hard work the how to be there on time there were certain absolute rules for whatever reason i responded to that it was a mix of chaos but also considerable order also rock critic kentucky reviews the new album by singersongwriter nor a jane struthers which he says is her most personal yet and justin chang reviews the new horror film the killing of a sacred dear that's coming up on today's fresh air first news live from npr news in washington i'm jack spear arizona senator jeff flake says he will not seek reelection next year in a speech on the senate floor today flake citing a flagrant disregard for truth and decency on the part of the current administration which he says is undermining american democracy in this century a new phrases entered the language to describe the accommodation of a new an undesirable order that phrase being the new normal that we must never adjust to the present coarseness of our national dialogue with the tone set at the top we must never regard as normal the regular and casual undermining of our democratic norms and ideals like as a conservative who favours limited government unlike fellow republican bob corker of tennessee who also will not be seeking reelection flake did not mention president trump by name the top us military officer says islam state losses in its court territory are hampering the group's effort to spread its message and other regions as well and bureau's greg mari has that story the chairman of the.

greg mari president senate senator arizona npr justin chang kentucky cnn chairman dave davies officer us tennessee bob corker jeff flake washington jane struthers writer
"dave davies" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for fresh air and the following message come from rocket mortgage by quicken loans when it comes to refinancing your existing mortgage or buying a home rocket mortgage lets you understand all the details so you can be confident that you're getting the right mortgage for you goats her rocket mortgage dot com slash fresh air from wh why why in philadelphia this is fresh air i'm dave davies infra for gross today behind the lines of jihad we talk with suod mccann it she was raised as a muslim in germany now she's a national security correspondent for the washington post shall talk about meeting with commanders of the taliban and isis and you'd at they had kidnapped gentleness and in fact actually the person who did help arranging this interview told me as well look if you ask him a question that he does not like arctic makes him suspicious you may be in huge danger mckinnon will also talk about being thrown into an egyptian prison i was actually whiter ingrate that night end am i said no matter what happens now it's not you solve it's your body but you will not allowed him to take his saw her new book is i was told to come alone and linguist jeff numbered tells us why the exclamation point gets a bad rap that's coming up on fresh air hey there i'm hunter isen and i wanted to let you know that in this biliac is back this season were asking the question how is it the two people can look at the exact same thing and see something completely different you can listen and subscribe to and visibility are on the npr one app or wherever you get your podcasts by.

philadelphia suod mccann taliban mckinnon jeff npr dave davies germany washington
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air i'm dave davies and for terry gross what kind of fighting is regarded a house that from linda will don't you ever expected to experience this guy little streetfighting non annoyed and and this is the my first for his leagueleading lincoln was reportedly street fighting since seoul of nineteen fifty that cbs correspondent don webster reporting on what our guest mark bowden says was the single bloodiest battle of the vietnam war and one of its defining events bowden's new book tells the story of the ferocious battle for way vietnam's old imperial capital in one of the targets of the ted offensive on nineteen sixty eight when communist forces surprised american troops in their vietnamese allies with coordinated attacks across south vietnam the offensive soured many americans on the war which us commanders had insisted was going well bowden interviewed dozens of participants in the battle as well of civilians who suffered terribly and journalists who covered the fighting mark bowden is the author of black hawk down and twelve other books he's also a national correspondent for the atlantic and a contributing editor at vanity fair will mark valve in welcome back to fresh air i want to begin with the reading of your book this is a moment where we meet an american soldier whose within a unit that has pinned down by north vietnamese soldiers he's in a fox will you wanna just set this up in greece this poor yes name is carl delay oh and he was a infantrymen with an army cavalry units that had been sent out to of push toward the citadel from the north and they got trapped in the middle of a feel where these were stuck for a day or two essentially with the north.

dave davies terry linda lincoln don webster mark bowden vietnam war vietnam american troops contributing editor greece seoul cbs ted us