22 Burst results for "Dave Davies"

"dave davies" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"dave davies" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"I'm Dave Davies in for Terry Gross. Today. The story of Eddie Gallagher decorated Navy seal and platoon chief accused by his own troops of shooting at civilians from a sniper's post. And murdering a defenseless captive in Iraq will speak with New York Times national correspondent Dave Phillips, who spent years covering the U. S military. He interviewed many of the Navy Seals who said they saw Gallagher commit war crimes, and he acquired the evidence in the case, including thousands of documents, photos, text messages and video recordings of interviews. The seals gave two Navy investigators Gallagher was tried in a court martial and championed by President Trump and Conservative media. Dave Phillips book is Alpha, Eddie Gallagher and the war for the soul of the Navy Seals. First news live from NPR news. I'm like me, saying the security risks surrounding the mass evacuation from the Afghan capital or growing as Washington had feared, with just seven days to go before the U. S. Military mission ends The Taliban say they've closed the road that leads to the Kabul airport to Afghans, noting the country has special needs of doctors and other professionals, But a Taliban spokesperson says foreigners are being allowed through The Pentagon says flights are leaving the airport faster than once an hour as NPR's Quil Lawrence reports more than 21,000 people have been evacuated in the last 24 hours. Military planes are bringing out U. S citizens as well as Afghans who worked with the U. S military and other Afghans who might be targeted by the Taliban. The vast majority of those evacuees so far are Afghans who will go to bases in Europe and the Middle East for screening before they move on to the U. S or other countries. Pentagon spokesman John Kirby says the military is under pressure to keep up this pace. There's been Uh, no.

Dave Davies Dave Phillips Europe Eddie Gallagher John Kirby Terry Gross Middle East Taliban Gallagher Iraq Today New York Times seven days Pentagon NPR more than 21,000 people two thousands of documents U. S. Military once an hour
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dave Davies in for Terry Gross, who's getting a well deserved week off. There are a lot of things we take for granted. And among them are our voices. We sing, We laugh. We yell it ballparks and we talk all the time on the phone in the office on street corners in noisy bars, and in doing so we can damage our voice is our guest writer John COLUMN Pento has his own experience with that which will soon hear about He became interested in the voice, which is the subject of his new book. It's an exploration of the astonishing complexity of our vocal apparatus and of how we form words How babies learn to speak, how accents arise and how different kinds of voices affect us, which one sound authoritative for sexually appealing or politically persuasive. And call A Pinto argues that the development of our prehistoric ancestors vocal structures may have been the key to humans becoming the dominant species on the planet. Giancarlo Pinto is a longtime staff writer for The New Yorker. He's the author of the bestselling nonfiction book. As Nature made him In the novel about the author. He joins me from his home in New York City to talk about his new book. This is the voice. John Colapinto. Welcome back to fresh air. Thank you so much. I thought we would begin with the story that you tell in the book early when you're 41 years old, I think working at Rolling Stone magazine and the publisher Yahn winner is putting together a sort of an ad hoc rock band for a Big Staff party and Asks you to be the lead singer had you done any singing? I had. Actually, I've been singing since high school, just kind of casually. I sang in my school choir, and so on. I played piano in coffee houses and college. S o. I was, you know, Somehow I could carry a tune. I even knew what projection was, Um You sort of making the voice big and filling a room with it, but I had never done any proper vocal warm ups. And that's how I got into trouble When I was singing with you on winners Rock band with Rolling Stone magazine I was at the time finishing a book, actually, as nature made in which you just mentioned And I was being silent All day long. I would jump up at the end of the day. Take the subway to our rehearsal space and then just start wailing over there cranked up guitars and drums. I mean 0 to 60 with my voice. Just crazy Any anyone that knows anything about singing proper singing knows you don't do that. And I quickly developed a rasp and sort of hoarseness, which I'd had in the past and it had cleared up. This didn't and in fact, we rehearsed for weeks and then we had the performance itself, which was Highly nerve racking, and when you're nervous muscles tense up, you strain extra hard, so I was sort of Tripoli damaging my voice. I later learned that it was a vocal by a half a vocal polyp, which is a Started by a bleeding vocal cord, right? Yeah, describe it in one of the rehearsals. I mean, Rolling Stone was a pretty hot commodity then and The lead singer for the J. Geils Band drops by and Here's You singing in rehearsal and gives you a little advice. Yeah, he pulled me aside and said, Hey, man, you don't have to sing full out in rehearsal, save something for the show. And I know and he was actually doing a guest song with us, and I saw how he was doing it. I mean, just you know, he was kind of quarter power. Very, very smart. I've never forgotten it. Right, but it was new to you and so You get to the concert, and you don't quite have the range that you did You said. It's kind of painful to listen to the tape from that, Uh, we had deeply terrifying. I mean, there's nothing quite like the seconds and minutes ticking down. Who are performance in front of 2000, people that include Yoko Ono and her son, Sean. And Paul Shaffer and Val Kilmer and countless others and knowing that, you know, and and knowing that there's something wrong with your voice. I mean, my poor wife. I mean, I was just saying, I think something's not going to go right here. Um, a certain high note in one of the songs Miss you by the Rolling Stones. Have been really, really hard to get over the preceding days, and it was just terrifying. I mean, I remember getting up in the spotlight and thinking Oh, Lord, I just hope this all happens and, you know, somehow I kind of got through the performance. But, yeah, it's painful to listen to the CD because I can hear the tentativeness and This is one of the things about the voice and performing with a voice. We hear all of us actually tentativeness just anyone slightly holding back. You can't get away with those types of things without people recognizing something's slightly amiss. So it makes me wonder how professionals do it. Especially people, like opera singers who are being listened to so closely by people with acute critical skills. Terrifying, right? It is an instrument which is, I guess what your book is about? Yeah, yes. You have terrible laryngitis after the concert, and then you have this encounter in an elevator with a woman who? Yes. Catches this right away. What'd she tell you? It was amazing. We were brand new in the building. I said to her What floor is one does in New York you? You're going to push the button for someone. And those two words, she said. Oh, you've got a serious voice injury, and I said all that, you know it's nothing and it'll clear up and she said no, no, no. You know, I work with Broadway singers and so on and She said. I know what I'm hearing and she read me like a book. She said. You know, I bet you get kind of tired of the end of the day because you're using all your muscles you having to work harder with your back and your abs and your hip flexors. All of these muscles we use in order to actually push the air out when we speak. She even said, You know, I bet your neck gets pretty sore and it had been burning I almost as if I had liked scolded the skin. I mean, it was amazing, but the last thing she said to me, Woz, you should at least get a layer oncologist toe. Look at that, because it could be something else. I grew up in a medical family. Something else is the Approved euphemism for cancer or some kind of dangerous growth, so I immediately made an appointment with one of the top vocal surgeons in the World Peak. Woo He looked in my throat with a glaring geology instrument and said, You've got a pretty major polyp, which is a bump on the edge of my vocal chord. Yeah, well, let's go into that Had you had is a problem like that developed? How did it develop in your case? Yeah, you know, E. Amazingly, This is one of the mysteries of the voices. So so we still know so little about it. But as far as doctors understand, these polyps really begin with bleeding within the vocal cord itself, which which is effectively a bruise. And if you bleed, you know, without any staunching of that of that bleeding You could develop this scar tissue in this bump. The thing that Z critical about that, though, for the voices that are vocal cords don't produce sound like a violin string or a guitar string, a plucked guitar strength..

Rolling Stone magazine Rolling Stones Giancarlo Pinto New York City John Colapinto John COLUMN Pento writer hoarseness Terry Gross Dave Davies The New Yorker Yoko Ono staff writer laryngitis cancer J. Geils Band Paul Shaffer Tripoli hip flexors
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Y Y in Philadelphia. This is fresh air. I'm Dave Davies in for Terry Gross on today's show Historian carry, Greenwich tells the story of an African American weekly newspaper editor who was a forceful crusader for civil rights in the early 20th century. Will Bill Monroe Trotter is little known to Americans today, but he built a national following in his time as a fierce advocate for the full citizenship rights promised former slaves. After the Civil War, Trotter organized mass protests who confer Wanted presidents and openly challenged leaders such as Booker T. Washington who took more cautious approach to black empowerment. Granted, his new book is called Black Radical. Also, Justin Chang reviews promising young woman and pieces of a woman. Two new movies available for streaming first news. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear on this boat, the eyes or 2 32 the nays Air 1 97. Resolution is adopted without objection. The motion to reconsider is laid upon the Speaker Nancy Pelosi, reading the final vote tally today, formally impeaching outgoing President Donald Trump for a second time. Democrats, along with 10, Republicans voting to impeach Trump after several hours of debate on a single resolution of incitement of insurrection connection with last week's right at the U. S. Capitol. Island. Democratic Congressman Steny Hoyer said the event pulled back the curtain on Trump's presidency. Donald Trump Trump has constructed a glass palace of lies fear, Marjorie. And sedition. Republicans, meanwhile, largely avoided talking about the right of the capital that claimed five lives instead focusing on the damage to the nation. Impeachment would bring Republican Jim Jordan of Ohio. This doesn't unite the country. There's no way this helps the nation deal with the tragic and terrible events. Last week that we all condemn Senate, meanwhile, seems to be indicating no impeachment trial be called there until after the president leaves office next week. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he's not yet decided how he'll vote on the matter. This house Lawmakers debated whether we impeach him for a second time over his role in last week's violent right at the U. S. Capitol left five dead President Trump issued a statement today saying he opposes violence. Thing from the president read on the house floor as members debated impeaching him for helping to incite the right of the capital by quote, ordering his followers to fight like hell and March on the Capitol Building. Trump has taken no responsibility for the riot, including the five dead, including a police officer and one of the mob writers. Some health departments in the South are being overwhelmed by demand for covert vaccines. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports frustration There is mounting. Alabama home health worker Thomas Barfield tried 40 times before he got through to the state vaccine hotline on Lee to be told no appointments were available. The whole process is just kind of chaos, State health officer Scott Harris says. There's just not enough vaccine to go around. So there's just.

President Donald Trump Capitol Building Bill Monroe Trotter president Majority Leader Mitch McConnel Congressman Steny Hoyer officer NPR Senate Philadelphia Nancy Pelosi Justin Chang Terry Gross Booker T. Washington Debbie Elliott Dave Davies Jack Spear Jim Jordan
"dave davies" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"dave davies" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We're going to listen to the interview Dave Davies just recorded with Fareed Zakaria, Washington Post columnist and host of CNN's weekly show. Fareed Zakaria GPS, which dance for Global Public square. Pilot, Dave introduce him. Fareed Zakaria has just published his fifth book, and it won't surprise you to hear it deals with the Corona virus pandemic, But it isn't about testing masks or vaccines. Instead, Zakaria has done some thinking about what the post pandemic world might look like and how we can manage it better. You notes that pandemics have had major impacts in the past. From the pestilence that raged through ancient Athens as it was battling Sparta to the bubonic plague that took 20 million lives and changed class relationships in Europe. Covert 19, Zakaria writes, will have impacts on economic inequality and our relationships to work in technology. And it should teach us something about the importance of science and guiding policy decisions and the value of honest and effective government. And he says, there's a lot to consider about the role of the United States in a very interdependent world. Fareed Zakaria grew up in India, then attended Yale University and got a PhD in government at Harvard. He became editor of Foreign Affairs magazine at the age of 28. He was a columnist for Newsweek editor at large and columnist for Time. He now writes a weekly column for The Washington Post. He's hosted his CNN show. Fareed Zakaria GPS since 2008. His fifth book is called 10 Lessons for a post pandemic world. Well, Fareed Zakaria, Welcome back to fresh air. Thank you so much, Dave. Um, you begin this book, and it's really looking forward at the world we will inhabit. But you begin by looking at the lessons we can learn from how we have responded to this health crisis. You write that in October of last year, Johns Hopkins University did an analysis of 100 countries best prepared to handle of pandemic, It found the US ranked first overall Great Britain was second. That's not exactly the way it worked out, would miss It's a It's a great question, Dave because I think that one of the things that we need to understand when we sort of look at the world is that the United States has so dominated the world not just militarily and politically but intellectually. We set the agenda are experts tend to be the world's experts are great institutions tend to be the ones that get to do the ranking in the evaluating, so we tend to have what I would call home country bias. So probably what happened with this These models is that we looked at the amount of money Spect Us does fantastically on that. We looked at the greatest research institutions and public health institutions like the CDC and the FDA. We looked at the great pharmaceutical companies and you put all that together and American looks formidable. But perhaps we didn't ask ourselves. What about access to healthcare? Does everyone have it easily? We do very badly on that. What about the the ease with which you can collect data? You know, having a centralized data system that allows the government or any organization to figure out who's healthy. Who's not who's had what tests Who's on we do terribly at that. So all our weaknesses get glossed over and all our strengths get magnified. I think that That's a large part of the story. And then, of course, there is the specifics of how the Trump administration handle this. You know, we think of authoritarian regimes as maybe better position to deal with a threat like this, because you know there's no dissent or debate. They can make rules quickly enforce them very strictly. What does the record show when you look at how countries have responded about whether authoritarians or Democratic governments have done better in this crisis? It's it's fascinating. It turns out that there's a mixture of results on both sides, the Democratic side and the authoritarian So I don't want to suggest that you know, authority and states are all good or a bad at this. There is no question that China handled it very well. Overall, they mishandled it that the start that mishandling had something to do with the secretive and repressive nature of the Chinese system. But then They pivoted and did a remarkably good job. I mean, they have done so well with covert Dave that when they've been texting their vaccines, they have to test them in Pakistan and Brazil because there's nobody in China who has covert anymore, and so that, you know, no question. At the end of the day, the Chinese do very well but consider other Dictatorships. Russia, Venezuela, Iran, They've all done terribly added. On the other hand with democracies. You see countries that like the United States and great Britain that have not done very well but some of the best performing countries in the world. Taiwan, South Korea, Germany are all democracies. And in fact, what's interesting is when you look at the Taiwanese response and you look at the South Korean response. It isn't that they used draconian powers of government very well. They did not actually in either of those cases do a shutdown ever. What they did instead was very good testing and tracing One of the things it seems that is a factor in getting more effective. Government is when the population Trusts the government as and is invested in it performing well, and it seems since the 19 eighties or so we've had this deep suspicion and mistrust of government. And that probably hasn't been helpful in terms of a building. A really effective government has it. Yeah. Look, the United States is born in an anti status revolution and has always had a suspicion of government. You know, this is an anti state ist country. In its inception. Even the British colonists, in their own way had some of this DNA as part of their makeup. It's always been a struggle. And, you know, Franklin Roosevelt revolutionized the country by creating for the first time, an activist federal government that saw itself as having the responsibility of the economic welfare of its people. What happened in more recent years as you correctly point out, is that ever since Ronald Reagan you have had this this deliberate attack on the federal government. As corrupt, inefficient, dysfunctional when it really wasn't I mean the American government..

Fareed Zakaria United States Dave Davies CNN The Washington Post American government editor Europe Global Public square Britain Newsweek Athens Franklin Roosevelt Johns Hopkins University China Foreign Affairs Yale University Harvard Ronald Reagan
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dave Davies in for Terry Gross. Christopher Dickey, the foreign correspondent and editor who covered war, terrorism and espionage for more than 40 countries. Died last week from a heart attack at his home in Paris. He was 68. Dickie was known for his coverage of conflicts in Central America and the Middle East. He worked for the Washington Post and Newsweek and for the Daily Beast where he was foreign editor until his death. In a moving obituary in the Daily Beast. Longtime colleague Barbie lots on the dope, recalled chasing a story with Dickie in Italy in 2003 when she finally tracked down the number of an Italian secret service agent who might have some information. He answered his phone from a restaurant where he was having a drink with Dickie. Nicky was the best beat reporter she ever met, She wrote Friend to spy masters and sheiks, cardinals and cops, insurgents and intellectuals. Vicki wrote two novels and five books of nonfiction, including securing the City on account of the New York City Police Department after the 9 11 attack. Did. He also did television reporting here. He is on MSNBC in March of last year, discussing a controversy surrounding Jared Kushner's trip to meet with the Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. To discuss US Saudi cooperation in the region. This was five months after the Washington Post journalist Jamal Cash Oh JI was murdered at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. The MSNBC anchor speaks first. All right. Let's talk now about Jared Kushner and his latest trip to Saudi.

Dickie Jared Kushner Washington Post Saudi consulate Saudi Christopher Dickey Saudi Crown MSNBC Terry Gross Dave Davies editor New York City Police Departmen Paris Nicky Barbie Prince Mohammed Central America Vicki Middle East Newsweek
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:47 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh AIR I'm Dave Davies in today for Terry gross as most of us remain socially isolated and anxious about the coronavirus several governors are making plans to relax controls in their states and revive economic activity against the advice of many public health professionals for some insight into the course the pandemic might take in the coming months and the prospects for a vaccine or effective treatment we turned to Donald G. McNeil junior he's a science and health reporter whose bio in The New York Times says he focuses on plagues and pestilence as he's covered aids Ebola malaria swine and bird flu sars and other infectious diseases and he's been talking to a wide range of experts about the future course of the corona virus pandemic Donald McNeil joined the times in nineteen seventy six and has been a night rewrite man an environmental reporter theater columnist and editor he was also a foreign correspondent in Africa and Europe and is reported from sixty countries I spoke to him via Skype from my home in Philadelphia he was at an apartment in New York City for Donald at Neil welcome to fresh AIR thank you very much let's talk about where we are here I mean most of us find these restrictions were living with him staying home and leaving only to get food and medicine pretty onerous you have looked at what's happening here and measures in other countries how likely are the restrictions that we have here how likely are they to really smother this virus and drastically cut infections well really smother not at all I I mean our lockdown is a giant garden party compared to the lockdowns in China and even in Italy and it's getting loose or I can even see that when I go out for a walk which if I were in Italy I would not be allowed to do but I go out for a walk to Central Park occasionally and you know I can see clauses where there were zero people three weeks ago now have twenty people of them lots of people sitting around I can see the traffic has probably tripled on the street and and you know those are all essential workers these are people kind of ignoring the the lock down and you know I I hear anecdotally that people holding you know quiet garden parties or barbecues and people still going out on the internet dates and and you know having playdates with kids and unfortunately that's the reason that we have about thirty thousand new infections a day in this country it is climbing a little bit actually above thirty thousand and you know China didn't reopen until they had zero new infections a day because that's when you've really gotten control of the virus and you know where it is you know where your new cases are and you can do contact tracing on on you know a hundred new cases a day you know you can't do contact tracing on the on the thirty thousand new cases a day if you serve that everybody has forty five contacts which is about the average in Sichuan province that's a one point three million contacts you have to trace every day so we're nowhere near getting on top of this this virus right now so we're in a place now where most states have had some kind of a stay at home order for weeks and the president is leaving decisions on reopening to governors and you know there are federal criteria but the government isn't really forcing it or taking charge and some governors are determined to lift these restrictions and I guess their best hope is that if we loosen you know the screws on on these restrictions the economy will gradually returned and affection infection rates will also gradually decline simultaneously do experts think this is likely as we watch now that is if people have all sorts of things are not in place yet that need to be in place I mean we didn't go on lockdown just for fun and lockdown itself is not how you beat the problem the lockdown is just the first step so some places locked down the probably didn't need to because they didn't have much virus but we didn't have enough testing out there to know where the virus was I mean we thought San Francisco and Seattle we're going to get slammed and they didn't and we didn't really know that is you know it's New York and and New Orleans we're going to get slammed did they did in a huge way and you know if you don't know what's in in Sioux falls South Dakota until people start dying your surveillance system is not good enough and and that's the problem we the Harvard study that came out recently that said we should have five million to ten million tests per day across this country in order to have a clear idea of where the virus is where cases are going up and cumulatively all the tests were done now it's been five million so we are testing a tiny amount compared to other countries that are on top of this problem we're really not responding to this in a in a rational way and the model is there were reluctant to follow China but they did it they did it brutally but brilliantly and and thank you to the somebody else ever expected like catching the wind they stop the fast moving pandemic an extract underdog well let's talk about the testing issue here you know the mean the healthcare delivery system in the United States is so decentralized some tests are given or denied by private providers and doctors offices and hospitals and urgent care centers all over the place and if we're gonna have a plan for widespread testing and the contact tracing you know somebody has to be planning this right I mean assembling large groups of staff or volunteers and giving them a quick minute and training and an organizing a strategy to do this and it's a big challenge but it's not impossible we do have a census every ten years is this happening anywhere is somebody taking this on and is there any sense that in two weeks or ten weeks that will have this kind of thing I don't see it happening in a way that I can look and say wow that's the model I mean the model in China was when it was time to be tested you were taken to a fever clinic you were screened in several ways your temperature was taken you were given a quick flu test and a quick go white blood cell count to make sure you didn't have the flu or a bacterial pneumonia and then you'll be given a cat scan a quick catch Gand they can run as many as two hundred cat scans a day and some of these portable machines so that they could check your lungs because their tests had some time before the results came back to and only after you click clear all those hurdles you were definitely still a common case then you got the test because their tests were perfect like ours are and and then you can go home to wait for results of your test you stay there in the fever clinic in the center you were told to sit you know far apart from other people succeed away from other people when people sat there sort of scared with around the location of their cat scan results in their hands waiting to hear if they were yes or no and then if you were positive you went straight into isolation not back with your family but in one of these gymnasiums or rub armories or someplace like that where you were in in beds there might be a hundred people in a row you know when a gymnasium and beds ten feet apart and there would be nurses in the road made full PP and that we have they were shelters for men shelters for women and even children for kids and so everybody was always under the eyes of a nurse and there was oxygen tanks and CT scanners if they have those but that be you know if you crashed and that's a phenomenon of this disease that you have the second week crash well you seem to be okay it's gonna get better and then suddenly boom you your oxygen levels drop and you're in serious trouble and you may need to be hospitalized and so they were able to keep eyeballs on everybody in order to say Hey this one's crashing they even have the sort of dance classes led by the nurses which sounds silly it was lots of internet and video of of these dance classes but really what you're doing is getting sick people with the money up out of bed that helps clear the lungs of a patient it also helps build up their upper bodies their lower body strength and they they exercise and that way you get some exercise into the patient which is good clears are long and the ones who can't get up are the ones who were in trouble and they need attention and maybe they're crashing and that's how we should be doing it we do not want people going home in inspecting the grandmothers well it seems like we're trying to do it is far more heavy handed than anything we're likely to see in this country but but let me ask you do you understand I don't feel heavy hi I have a problem with this whole you know it's brutal you know Chinese people love their families just as much as Americans love their families they were initially reluctant to go into these quarantine shelters too but when it became clear that it was saving the lives of their families I mean yes some of them were forced into another workshop in the back of of the ambulances by policemen but that was not the norm the normal as you were told please come with us to the shelter you will have food you will have medical care we'll keep an eye out for it and in three weeks if you're if you're good to go back home you know where to test you and make sure you're okay and then you can go back home and it's you know it's portrayed as brutal but you know there's a lot of little things that the government Beijing does but in this case it was not brittle to its own citizens it it saved probably ten million lives you know that's how many I am estimated would have died in China this is just gone unchecked Donald McNeil is a science and health reporter for The New York Times we will be back after this short break this is fresh AIR support for KQ weedy this afternoon comes from Xfinity Xfinity delivers in home wifi that lets subscribers stream their favorites including live TV on demand and their DVR recordings on any device throughout their home this is fresh AIR and we're speaking with Donald G. McNeil junior he's a veteran science health reporter for The New York Times who's covered many infectious diseases including aids Ebola swine flu sars and others he's been writing about the course the corona virus pandemic might take in the months or years to come well if we have a woefully inadequate structure for testing and inadequate plans for social isolation what happens if we start seeing you know people going back to work businesses reopening what's gonna be happening in that circumstance well it all depends on you know that he just left of the hammer of the dance the hammers come down and actually we have not done the hammer well enough we should be down at close to zero new cases per day but we're not worth thirty thousand plus you get to today but were we to do it right we would get as close to zero as we could and then we would go out carefully and sort of see if we if we all went back into baseball stadiums and churches and and and file in the grocery stores and got out of the subway everything would be quiet for about two weeks and then where will we be you'd see temperatures go up on the kids app and then you see positive tests go up and then you'd see hospital admissions go up and then you'd see people go being transferred and icy use go up and then you see that school would be on our way back to one point sixty two point two million whatever that's again so we have to go out very carefully little bits and if we have enough testing to know how much virus there is around you can you know that's what twenty five he means when he says the virus will tell us you'll see as as positive the percentage of positive tests goes up with you have millions of tests being done every day you'll see are we have a problem here in southern Georgia or we have a problem here in the upper Michigan peninsula or whatever we have a problem and then you you go back into hiding you you you'd socially distance yourself as much as possible in that area and that can include anything from closing the schools again to you know keep in universities open because you know our students can socially distant but kindergartners captain you you you you make choices and you see how far you have to back off and this is probably going to be a series of steps we're gonna have to do this again and again dancing and dancing out until we get to the point where we either have a vaccine or a prophylactic pill or some regimen you know some curative regimen that's so good that we're confident that you know if I get sick maybe I get sick but if I crash I can count on being saved and if we get to that point maybe we can say okay we can all take chances now on I'm getting sick and making ourselves at noon by self infected the equivalent of chicken pox parties maybe we can do that if we were sure we can save people but we're not there yet so so so would you see like half measures I mean like half full subway cars restaurants with people seeking eight feet apart kids going to school every other day we can see things like that yes and those things are all in practice in China right now even though the country has virtually zero cases you go to a restaurant in in China you can go up to the counter and get some food if you wanted the restaurant you have there has to be six feet between you and the person next to you and nobody in front of you six feet around at all times and you and you and you have to wear a mask and and they have regular spray downs with disinfectants may have extra ventilation coming through and lots of other measures and you also have an app on your phone that that in which the government lets you know you will know whether it thinks you are that healthy or not so if you're immune because you've recovered you've got a green light on your app if you're around also have not been any place where they know there's been a it's been a lot of exposure recently then you you have a great life and you have to show that app in.

Dave Davies reporter Terry gross Donald G. McNeil
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:45 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fresh AIR I'm Dave Davies in today for Terry gross our guest Ali volts writes that before she could spell her own name she knew she was from and help our family in the late seventies when she was a baby and a toddler her parents had a roaring business baking and selling marijuana laced brownies thousands of months to hippies artists office workers and activists in San Francisco votes often made the rounds with her mom selling their wares to grateful customers every Friday as colorful as that sounds and it was it's no less interesting than another story told in her new memoir detail of her parents relationship too free spirited psychics who made their way in the city of enormous cultural and social change the explosion of the counter culture the growth of the gay liberation movement the horror of the aids epidemic as well as the assassinations of mayor George Mosconi in city supervisor Harvey milk and the suicides in Guyana the followers of Jim Jones whose peoples temple was an influential presence in the city for years Ali involves writing has appeared in the best American essays two thousand seventeen the New York times and other publications her new book is home baked my mom marijuana in the stoning of San Francisco like many of you I'm working from home these days I spoke to all your votes who was at her office in San Francisco all you have also welcome to fresh AIR this book is in part about the city of San Francisco and your mom was there I guess in the mid and late seventies it was a city undergoing remarkable change just paint a little bit of a picture what was going on the scene at fisherman's wharf the performances give us a sense of it of course well San Francisco in the nineteen seventies was coming out of the summer of love this huge influx of young people who'd come out to experiment with new lifestyles that was very much over but all kinds of new subcultures were flourishing the way that I think about it sometimes is if the sixties were a sketch pad the seventies would be the box of crayons it was just wonderful and crazy experimentation some of it went horribly awry and some of it was spectacular so the scene down at fisherman's wharf was one of the spectacular emergence is there were actually at the time thousands of artists and craftspeople who sold to tourists on the street all kinds of things they made themselves and there was a a busking scene of people like Robin Williams and Penn and teller and magicians and tap dancers and musicians and whole dance troupes this really elaborate scene that was called the new vaudeville right and then through all this there was your mom with sticky fingers brownies the marijuana laced brownies which at its height was you know moving something like twenty eight hundred brownies a week your mom and an interesting crew of others that distributed these what's interesting is that this wasn't the kind of operation where you knock on the door and get a password and explain how this enterprise connected with its customers my mom came up with this really innovative business plan where she sold exclusively to people on the job so she would go around to boutiques and restaurants and real estate offices and even medical offices and only sell to the people who were working they would buy at large volume and then redistribute the brownies through their own social circles and in this way the brownies were really all over town by late nineteen seventy seven I think is when they were doing ten thousand brownies a month it was smart in that there was no fixed location for police to find the brownie seem to come from everywhere and at the same time it enabled them to reach all of the little culture pockets that were flourishing in the late seventies you were born while the business was going and after Momberg recovered from the birth she started bringing you along on her deliveries what was that like what did you learn about how she carried you kind of how you fit into this whole thing my mom from the beginning she just sort of took me everywhere and so in the early days of sticky fingers this meant that I went on brownie runs with her first she had me in a front Kerrier than on a cherry carrier and eventually in the stroller and she would hang a duffel bags of brownies from the back bars of the stroller because they were very heavy so she would use the stroller to transport the brownies and we'd go from business to business and our customers just absolutely adored me and fawned over me so I was very little obviously I don't remember much clearly from this period but I do have these flashes of memory and there's a certain feeling that comes to me when I think of it it was a very exuberant period in the city and especially in the Castro where my mom was mostly working and there was I think a lot of pinching and fawning and a lot of joy around it is is that the feeling that I get anywhere the business was still going when you were a toddler and I guess in the kindergarten right yes well in some form or another it continued until I was an adult but this original iteration carried on Intel about second or third grade which meant that you as a kid had to keep a really big important secret a family secret do you remember being told what the stakes were or how you know no and I know that seems strange but it was something that I learned so young that I don't have a specific memory about it it was always who we are so I have this understanding of my family as an outlaw family from the very beginning and did you know that that could mean prison you know foster carer for you or to an extent my parents weren't trying to scare me with it bites from a practical standpoint they needed me to understand that what we were doing was illegal and that if I told anyone including other children who might tell an adult it could have very serious consequences for our family so I didn't know from the very beginning that if I told anyone about what my parents really did that they could go to prison and do you remember ever finding that hard as you as you know we got a little older and had friends not in a very conscious way although I think it did affect me I was a child who always enjoyed hanging out with adults and was awkward around other children and I didn't have a lot of friends growing up as an adult I look back at it and wonder how much of that might have come out of the idea of carrying a big secret and how that makes you build walls around it and how that makes you shut down in some ways at the time I wasn't very conscious of it I just I had a Pat answer for when people asked what my parents did and I knew very clearly that there were huge parts of our home life that I couldn't talk about what was the Pat answer when kids ask what your parents did artists okay which is also true so it wasn't an outright lie it was a withholding of information and so will you had this secret and you knew that you are not my family it was illegal did it ever seem wrong to you know my parents I think like a lot of hippie is a lot of people from their generation saw marijuana as wholesome and harmless and I was taught that is it the legislation around it and the government's view of it was wrong and that what they were doing was right so I grew up with that idea that we were outlaws but good outlaws kind of like Robin Hood outlaws and I didn't question that for a long time came from the people you love and trust it right it did and I think that by the time I was maybe old enough to really question those ideas myself the role of marijuana had changed so much culturally that I had a whole different answer you know you write in the book that brownie crumbs blanketed the floor we played between secondhand smoke secret finger swipes of batter and stolen crumbs you the tots probably consumed a significant amount of cannabis and there was some drug use among your parents and their friends beyond marijuana you know of a lot of cocaine you know there are people who would be appalled reading this what's your take on this did you ever feel like the any of this seemed irresponsible in retrospect in retrospect sure of course I feel in general that marijuana is relatively harmless it's certainly not something that should be consumed by children and I want to be clear that I don't think I was tottering around stone during my childhood I was certainly discouraged from consuming marijuana as a kid it was grown up stuff if that was something that I understood but it was around it was so much a part of the environment that it would be unreasonable to assume that I didn't inhale it and as second hand smoke and of course the brownies taste like chocolate so I'm sure I snuck some but it's not like I was you know it's not like my parents were feeding me pot brownies I want to be really clear about that where I think it might be more damaging is with the harder drugs cocaine is the substance that alters one's personality in a fairly significant way so there's that but I also want to say that all of the kids growing up in the sticky fingers warehouse came out just fine we're all responsible adults and contributors to society so and it sounds like you I don't want to be an apologist either so it you know clearly this was not an ideal situation on the other hand I mean it sounds like you felt very much loved and accepted which probably has a lot more to do with how kid grows up than what they necessarily inhaler read absolutely I you know I I want to say that I I was so well cared for and surrounded by love and affection I was not left to run wild I was looked after basically at my mom's hip through my entire childhood so there's no there's no neglect in that all your votes new memoir is called home baked my mom marijuana and the stoning of San Francisco we'll be back after a short break this is fresh AIR at seven eighteen support for KQ weedy comes from Xfinity Xfinity internet delivers in home wifi with coverage for all devices throughout the home customers also receive comprehensive protection with Norton security suite this is fresh AIR and we're speaking with writer Alya volts she has a new memoir about her mother's business selling pot laced brownies in San Francisco in the nineteen seventies it also deals with old friends relationship and some remarkable events in San Francisco in the period the book is called home baked you know the relationship between your parents as described in the book is just fascinating these are two really interesting people and this is a very intimate portrait of them their courtship their marriage involving invents that were made in many cases before you were born and I know you did lots of interviews I'm wondering what it was like to kind of get in your parents heads your parents in their twenties hats and kind of almost like a reconstructing a three hundred sixty degree view of your early life a little at a time so I have a very intimate relationship with my mom and it's nothing unusual for us to talk about her very personal feelings about things both from the past and today but I started this book having been estranged from my dad for many many years and really for the first couple of drafts I didn't ask his side of the story because I didn't know how I finally realized that I could not write an honest book without spending as much time on his thoughts and feelings and motives as I had with my mom and what surprised me so much as how ready he was to go there we dug through boxes together we talked about some of his actions from back in the days that were really hurtful to other people and he was I think very brave about it acknowledging his role in it and also having a certain curiosity himself about both how he had acted in what drove him to act that way you read about the first night they had sex which is interesting both because you know about it but also for what happened during the night tell tell us about this how awkward is that writing about your parents having sex I did I tried to skip in my writing group that's wonderful kept saying look you can't you can't cop out on this but what's interest so my my father is a grand mal epileptic and my mom didn't know he was an epileptic they had slept together for the first time in the middle of the night my mom wakes up and the bed is shaking like crazy here we are in San Francisco she thinks it's an earthquake she sets up realizes that nothing else in the room is moving that it's Doug shaking wildly in bed and.

Dave Davies Terry Ali
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

15:37 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh AIR I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross we're listening to my interview with writer Althea volts her new memoir describes her mother successful business serving marijuana laced brownies in the nineteen seventies in San Francisco and her parents relationship at a time of cultural and social change in the city Fulton's book is home baked my mom marijuana in the stoning of San Francisco this operation got pretty big your mom was moving something like twenty eight hundred brownies a week at its height how did she manage the risk I mean this was after all a class one narcotic you know the these were felonies every day or every week how did she manage the risk of it okay so this is kind of a I wanna say ridiculous part of the story although I think my parents would disagree but my mom both of my parents actually believed strongly in the occult and specifically the E. chain which is a four thousand year old Chinese divination method rooted in Taoism and Confucianism and you would consult it in the way that you might Consultores and my mom believed wholeheartedly in this practice and so every week she would throw the eating coins and ask about their safety and ask about the risk and she always did what the E. Chang said I mean the business opened up following an E. Chang hexagram there was a point when the business closed following an E. chain hexagram there was no question too big or too small to run past the E. Chang you know your your dad had a habit of not taking his medication for epilepsy which led to some really troubling and bizarre incidents at times it was one point where he said he had to go off hitchhiking to beat the Dalai Lama and other things like that happen do you have insight into why he chose not to take the medicine for the op Appalachian I've done a lot of thinking about this and I think it's pretty interesting my dad has a spiritual relationship or had a spiritual relationship with his epilepsy he described that in the moments leading up to a seizure his pre seizure or a would appear in his peripheral vision as a multi colored Mondal love with all colors of the spectrum the most beautiful thing he had ever seen he describes it as being like looking at god and my dad is such a spiritually serious person that this really attracted him and so I think he would kind of edge up to it he didn't want to deny himself that connection with the godhead that he felt was there and so he would try to control his seizures internally at a point he had a method where he thought that if when the Montale appeared if he shifted his eyes hardened in the opposite direction he could stop himself from having a seizure so it kept trying to control it but he would have these grand mal seizures and and sometimes they lead to psychological instability as well as memory loss but I I find it fascinating because the idea of a spiritually associated seizure is not new does story have ski wrote rapturously about seizures and some pretty interesting historical figures have been posthumously diagnosed with temporal lobe epilepsy so I don't know if my dad might be in that category in in any case if it was a strong force in his life yeah it is he does he still have seizures today he takes not the lantern but another medication I think its Tegra tall and he says he hasn't had a seizure in twenty years you know you mentioned that your mom would often make business decisions in life decisions often by consulting the the each and you know this way of tossing these coins to to get a reading on on what should be done I'm I'm wondering as a kid did you ever feel like your life was being governed by these forces that couldn't be seen but everybody that good question makes me laugh a little bit so as a child I was pretty accepting of especially my mom's world view I had a lot of trust in her she was always cool in a crisis and I believe that she knew what she was doing my parents I would say did not use the E. Chang to decide what I should or shouldn't be allowed to do I didn't have a whole lot of rules as as a child it kind of felt like I was part of the decision making process to a degree that I think is pretty unusual but my relationship with the Chang as a kid was that I I I trusted it and the fact that my mom felt confident using it made me feel confident as well so I sometimes think about how you know the knowledge that my parents could have gone to prison at any time how that should have been terrifying to me as a kid and yet it didn't keep me awake at night because I I trusted my mom's decision making abilities and I'd I trusted the aging then it was later more as a teenager that I was like oh no wait science no and I started to rebel more against the idea but it's really only as an adult that I I look back at the situation we were and and worry about the kid I was now you've also new memoir is called home baked my mom marijuana and the stoning of San Francisco we'll be back after a short break this is fresh AIR support for NPR comes from this station and from whole foods market who is committed to helping make meal planning easier by offering meal guides and recipes on its website learn more at whole foods dot com and from the corporation for public broadcasting a private corporation funded by the American people this is fresh AIR and we're speaking with writer Alya volts she has a new memoir about her mother's business selling pot laced brownies in San Francisco in the nineteen seventies it also deals with old friends relationship in some remarkable events in San Francisco at the time her book is called home baked one of the things that you do in the book as you talk about kind of the history of San Francisco in the nineteen seventies there was all of this kind of explosion of creativity and art and experimentation but there was also some really dark stuff you know the people's temple which was led by Jim Jones was active in the city and very connected to a lot of the liberal politicians and then there was the horrific assassinations of the mayor Mosconi and then the supervisor that the councilman Harvey milk Vegas was not a customer of your mom but somebody that she met on her rounds a lot how did all of that sector well first of all say Harvey was not a customer gets worn off drugs but his camera shop which was also his campaign headquarters was one of my mom's regular stops because other people around him and who were working on his campaign where customers so so that was how that connection happened but he was very much out in the neighborhood walking around talking to people he was very personable and very connected to the community and so my mom knew him the Jonestown massacre and the assassinations of Milken Mosconi happened within ten days of each other it was like a one two punch it just knocked San Francisco completely sideways I mean nine hundred eighteen people died in one day and then these two very important and beloved civic leaders ten days later for my mom it was a seismic shift a feeling of everything is changing she describes becoming aware in an instant that the wave that they had been riding was about to crash right and so not so long after there was finally the the business came to an end or at least its first and you want to describe the circumstances of the sure we were talking about the change earlier and suddenly in mid nineteen seventy nine my mom goes to throw her usual weekly hexagrams and the passage is really dark the results are bad and the imagery in the passages has to do with imprisonment and punishment and things like that and she became fairly convinced very well very convinced very quickly that they were going to be busted and the business was huge at this time and I mean everybody knew about them it was a little maybe a little too high profile and she became sure that they were going to get busted so my parents taking this extremely seriously packed up closed up shop and we moved out of San Francisco within two weeks you moved out of San Francisco and there's an eight year stretch of your childhood and you describe them is pretty tough you know your parents relationship fell apart in part because you know your dad would not take the medicine for his epilepsy and had some pretty strange experiences your mom is reviving the business kind of with once a month trips and disenfranchise go from where they were living outside of town as you moved into the eighties the brownie business changed in a way right it wasn't just recreational because it became a way to ease the suffering of people afflicted with aids and this is at a time when the epidemic was in a poorly understood scientifically there was little treatment and it was you know deeply associated with homophobia as your mom made these trips to the city how did the epidemic present itself to her she remembers one day in December of nineteen eighty one walking down Castro street making her deliveries and in the window of star pharmacy there was a poster that said gate cancer and it had photographs of a man's legs and feet with little purple spots on them which turned out to be Capozzi sarcoma and my mom saw that poster interest thought huh that's strange I saw one of those spots on on one of my friends rest today it just was a little thing and then pretty quickly people started to get sick but the illnesses varied a lot and there was a long time when nobody knew what it was some people got the pneumocystis Carini some people had of the wasting syndrome a terrible Tyree as some people had the Capozzi sarcoma lesions the variety of presentations of the symptom made the ONS said very mysterious and didn't get a lot of press at first because it emerged first within the gay male population and this was a community that broader society was maybe eager not to look at and not to acknowledge as you and your mom made these deliveries did you find people who you had known for years and years of getting sicker and sicker yeah of course so as a kid it was something that I was of course I was aware of it you would see the presentation of aids will was so dramatic physically and it could move it could happen very quickly and we'd be gone for a month and come back the next month and somebody who had been a beautiful thirty year old would look seventy it was really striking you know the with the weight loss and the way that it transformed help people carry themselves suddenly a young man would be using a Walker was terrible and then people started to disappear as a child I only understood so much you know as the years passed I came to understand what was going on and people began to disappear from our lives nine and part of the business was actually finding people who needed the relief that marijuana would would bring there was another woman named Mary Jane Rathbun who had been making and distributing marijuana brownies she became known as what brownie Mary as opposed to your mom who was the brownie lady in the kind of mice used in the in the civic consciousness but anyway they had a place in the sort of recognition of the medical benefits of marijuana to oh absolutely so there had been since maybe the mid seventies at the beginnings of American medical marijuana movement but it really had not made it into the press in a significant way and it was very small and and marijuana was still in the American consciousness not considered a medicine it was considered a party drug well the situation with HIV aids was that the first effective drug treatment didn't come out until nineteen ninety six it was fifteen years and this is a disease with an eighty plus percent fatality rate let that sink in for a moment so during that span of time when there was just nothing for people to do to take care of themselves cannabis emerged really early on as helpful with some of the symptoms nobody thought we'd was going to cure aids but it helps with the wasting syndrome which manifested with a total loss of appetite and crushing nausea cannabis was good for that it helped with insomnia depression pain so people began to turn to cannabis to help feel a little better well this horrible horrible thing was going on in in the case of the wasting syndrome it helps them eat and help them hang on longer it became very important however recognized officially for any of the stuff not back then and I'll tell you why she never got busted and so she certainly wasn't going to announce herself in the press.

Dave Davies writer Althea marijuana Terry gross
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh AIR I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross back with her twenty fifteen interview with song writer and singer iris dement interview we thought would be nice to hear well so many of us are at home in this period of social distancing when they recorded the interview dement was at the piano with her guitar by her side in the studio at Iowa public radio she just released her album the trackless woods one of our early songs but the mystery B. was used as the theme of the HBO series the leftovers to mince music is influenced by the Pentecostal church her family belong to and saying in she was born in Arkansas on the delta the youngest of fourteen children when we left off she was telling Terry about how her mother love to sing but had to do it her own way which made it difficult to sing duets in church with the Mets father you recorded a duet with her mother that's on your first album infamous angel and I'd like to play that too wet it's of the song higher ground do you want to introduce this recording for us it's funny that you moved into that because I just remembered I was taught him in that what I was saying about my mom has she just had to do things her own way I brought her in that was my first record and that was her first time to go to Nashville and it had been my mom's dream to go off and be a singer in Nashville's grand Ole Opry we back in the day and keep my my mom was born in nineteen eighteen so we're going way back there and that she never made it made my dad have much kids instead but when my faith I did my first record of a broader Nashville and we got the studio and I wanted to sing that song with me in the regional plan was that she would harmonize with me which was the I don't know it just every the producer everybody thought well that's how they should go it's my record so we get in there we did that a bunch of times and it was just awful it was awful it just wouldn't work mom could get with it and we we decided just give up on it we can say that but we stopped and we were starting to leave the room all the players really even and my mom grabbed the layers she said let's get on in there and she told him to play or what could have played in and we cheese did the song and and we just followed her and at the end I don't know if you can hear it but at the end she says now that was my key so and it was great I was so happy you know and I'm her kids are you know she's gone now but it felt so right to be in there and have mom be in mom and maybe in the kid I loved it and she sang beautifully and but there again it said saying she she does her own deal all the way around and it wasn't a hateful thing it was like if I'm going to be here I got a B. the thing I am in the timing and everything I've got to do it my way it's a beautiful thing to witness and that's what she did so let's hear the duet with my guest iris dement and her mother recorded in this room in nineteen ninety two album which of me would have major mother on seventy four at the time probably yeah that sounds about right okay here we go he said it's iris dement.

Dave Davies writer Terry
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:52 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Back to the interview Dave Davies recorded with wired editor at large Steven levy about the social media giant Facebook Facebook CEO mark Zuckerberg gave leaving nine interviews and permission to talk to many other present and former employees of the company for levy's new book Facebook the inside story when we left off they were talking about the damage to Facebook's reputation from its role in the twenty sixteen presidential election the criticisms about the fake news and the ad campaigns for some of them from foreign sources we're almost overshadowed by the Cambridge analytica scandal this really grew out of the decision Facebook had made to make its products not just a social networking site but a platform so that outside software developers could use Facebook data to create apps software products on Facebook this was kind of a fateful decision wasn't it that's right and this took place really early in Facebook's history two thousand seven it was a big leap the Facebook all of a sudden said we want to be kind of the next operating system in the world this will be a social operating system that the internet should be built around people and we're the place that's going to host that and it you can't say that platform was an unmitigated failure because they really lifted Facebook to the top rung of technology companies and it's a place in two thousand seven and all of a sudden everyone was talking about Facebook in a way they weren't before M. couple months afterwards I wrote a cover story about Facebook for Newsweek where I was working them but the problem with it was first in order to do this you are to hand over personal data to outsiders to the software developers who are writing applications for this Facebook platform and the platform itself had its dreams dashed when mobile phones became popular and people use those operating systems so your iPhone apps to your android apps would be the operating system that you used in the developers turned their attention to writing applications for phones the platform still persisted but it became more of an exchange of information between the developers and Facebook with Facebook giving a lot of the information to the developers in two thousand ten and this was where I really say Cambridge analytica started Facebook said will give more information than ever to the developers so when you signed up as a user for one of these apps the third party would not only get your information the U. posted on Facebook but the information that you're friends posted on Facebook you would be giving away your friends lakes which are very revealing and their relationship status sometimes their political status all falling out of the hands of Facebook in the hands of these developers who could use them for their apps and we're told you can't sell these are given to anyone else but Facebook didn't really have strong enforcement to make sure that happens and so Cambridge analytica ends up getting the data of tens of millions of Facebook users that's right there was it was an academic researcher who followed Facebook's rules in getting the information but then broke Facebook's rules and licensing the information to this company called Cambridge analytica which was run by this British military consultancy company which made a partnership with a big funder of the far right in the United States right the Mercers right right you said that it's to this day it is unclear whether the company selection efforts used Facebook profiles is that right I thought that was accepted fact well they have the data handed over but the trump campaign which worked with Cambridge analytica said that they really didn't use it much as a data source but they help with television ads and they've liked some of the people who work there it is fuzzy because the other hand the head of Cambridge analytica the company behind it was boasting about the information they use so I think it is a big mystery the degree to which that data was used in the election but we do have the trump campaign did use a lot of data and merge that with other databases I think the shock to people was that this information got handed over to this company that no one ever heard of the work for trump and that became Facebook's biggest scandal ironically even though some of this information have been published in twenty fifteen by the guardian the same place that returned with the scoop in twenty eighteen but this is pre trump and it wasn't a big deal them so this information about the twenty sixteen campaign and then a subsequent hack of like fifty million user accounts set the company's public image into a real nosedive and mark Zuckerberg went before Congress and the promised serious steps to change things what are they doing well they they've done a number of things for one thing they give you more information when you see something that looks like it's fake on Facebook they have fact checkers go over some of these claims and when they turn out they're not factual they don't take them off but they might down I get the news feed your people might say it they give you a chance to mouse over and see a little more information about the publication where this is printed maybe it's like a phony publication that doesn't exist besides Facebook how does our hands those are items posted the news feed right right yeah and also they during elections they monitor things they look for the signals of disinformation campaigns and try to shut them down so they're doing certain things they're one of stop some of the tricks in the twenty sixteen election and in the a couple Lexus since the mid term in twenty eighteen elections in France and other places they've done a better job but it's it's an open question how well they're going to do in twenty twenty when the people of using Facebook trying to abuse it again we're going to come up with a new set of tracks Steven levy's book is Facebook the inside story we'll continue our conversation in just a moment this is fresh AIR support for NPR.

Dave Davies editor Steven levy Facebook CEO mark Zuckerberg
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:26 min | 2 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dave Davies in for Terry gross who has a cold today we're listening to my interview with Jill wine banks she's a legal analyst for MSNBC and she has a new memoir about her days in the nineteen seventies as an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate investigation it's called the Watergate girl when we left what she was talking about president Nixon's longtime secretary and executive assistant Rosemary woods who was close to the first family and an integral part of the administration now she ends up being a very important figure in this case people know her name because it turned out that one of the critical conversations just a few weeks the short time after the break in conversation in the oval office had an eighteen and a half minute camp where only a harm appears on the tape very suspicious a lot of people in the White House had access but she ends up on the stand having to explain this and you were the one cross examining her tell us about that Rosemary woods was basically thrown under the bus by the White House counsel they said we have now discovered as part of the drip drip drip of bad news after the hearing on the first two missing tapes they came back on the day before thanksgiving and said whoops there is a problem in a third tape there's an eighteen and a half minute gap and only rose merry which can explain it and we can find no innocent explanation for it which was really a dramatic announcement at the end I had cross examined her when she first testified about the two missing tapes as basically just a chain of custody witness because she had handled them and she was a tough wasn't sure she was feisty for sure we definitely had a situation where I knew that nothing that I got from her would be easily obtained that I was gonna have to be very precise and careful in my questioning to get information but at the first time she wasn't suspected of having done anything I buy some amazing coincidence asked her questions that turned out to be devastating once we found out that she had possibly you raced eighteen and a half minutes of a tape because she had told me about working on it for twenty nine hours at camp David they had very tape without ever mentioning that by the way there is an eighteen minute gap in that tape and she also I had asked her about precautions that she had taken to avoid your racing and she basically screamed at me well I use my head it's the only thing I had to use and it turned out that wasn't very effective obviously because the mistake was made and when she finally was called the second time to testify I had to give her her Miranda warnings which is something that lawyers seldom ever do but she was now a suspect in a criminal investigation and so I had to do it before I could ask her any questions right so she ends up giving this explanation of than people who remember Watergate will remember this that the it seems the only way she could have a race this ship she said the phone rang and she went to pick up the phone but somehow kept her foot on a pedal that was connected to the recording and then that's what caused the erasure but what's remarkable about this is that she says well it was different and might when you made a comment about this awkward she's as well it's different in my office and then I did what I said well then let's go to your office and continue the questioning and for some reason the court agreed the White House lawyers agreed and her lawyers agreed and so we went to the White House it was my first time ever in the White House and she demonstrated they would not they the White House would not let us bring in a photographer so I had to rely on Ali Atkins who was the president's White House photographer and the pictures are dramatic proof that her story didn't hold up she also just to make it clear she she said she had to make two mistakes she had to push the wrong button and keep her foot on the pedal which was a physical impossibility certainly for eighteen minutes you might have been able to do it for one second but not for any prolonged period of time so it just wasn't possible the pictures made her basically a laughing stock there were a lot of cartoons about the rose merry twist or the rose merry stretch that were really hard on her I am sure it must have been a very devastating thing for her I got a lot of mail from secretaries around the country saying I've used that same equipment and it's not possible no one could do that it wouldn't work that way and then to make it even worse when the court ordered that we have the tape investigated we hired a group of professionals in this field first of all hoping that we could recover the a race to material but we couldn't but also what they discovered was that it was not one erasure there were multiple erasures now this photo ironically taken by White House photographers kind of made Rosemary woods a laughing stock because it showed her in this incredibly contorted position where she's stretching holding her foot on the pedal and reaching for a phone it just seems kind of ridiculous did you have sympathy for her probably at that moment I didn't I have a an ability to sort of compartmentalized and I was really compartmentalized on what questions do I have to ask while listening to her answers so that I can follow up and make sure she's not invading my questions in retrospect I definitely have sympathy for her because I I know that she may actually believe that she did that but she certainly didn't and I feel badly that the president let her believe that she did it that the White House blamed her they withdrew she was represented initially by White House counsel they withdrew that made her hire a private attorney and which is probably the right thing because if they actually were blaming her ethically they shouldn't represent her but I'm sure that was a an expense and an embarrassment to her she was certainly more deflated in the second hearing then when she had been called in the first time to testify about how she had handled the tapes and the eighteen and a half minute gap was never officially explained there was a lot of speculation about you write in the book that you have a theory that places Richard Nixon himself as the prime suspect why there's a lot of reasons why he has the motive to erase it because it was the very first tape on our subpoena likely in preparation for whether he was going to give them to us or not he listened to the tapes and logically he would have listened to that one first my theory is he listen about who this is bad it shows that I know everything just a few days after the break it I can't let people hear that so he races then he goes to the second tape in because all my gosh they're all bad I can't erase them all so I'm just going to have to stone wall and refused to turn them over Jill one banks is a legal analyst for MSNBC her book about her days as a lawyer in the special prosecutor's office investigating the Watergate scandal is called.

Dave Davies Terry gross analyst MSNBC Jill wine
China’s coronavirus - Here’s what we know

Fresh Air

11:11 min | 2 years ago

China’s coronavirus - Here’s what we know

"This is fresh air I'm Terry gross the new corona virus that emerged in Wuhan China has killed almost five hundred people and prompted the Chinese government to impose severe travel restrictions within the country the virus has spread to at least twenty four other countries including the U. S. American air carriers have suspended flights to and from China the US government is barring from entering the country any foreign nationals who visited China within last fourteen days our guest science writer David Coleman says the new corona virus is just the latest example of an ominous trend humans contracting deadly contagious viruses from wild animals other examples include H. I. V. west Nile fever anthrax bola and another from the corona virus family sars severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China and killed more than seven hundred people David common has written frequently for National Geographic and is the author of several books including spillover animal infections and the next human pandemic he spoke with fresh tears Dave Davies well David common welcome back to fresh air yeah this is scary stuff this virus and it's also a very fast moving story you and I are talking on Tuesday afternoon things may change a bit by time people hear it but us a sense of how serious the threat is of this virus compared to other outbreaks we've seen well it is very serious and needs to be taken very seriously and yet it's not an occasion for panic it's an occasion for calm effective response comparing it to other viral outbreaks he is is illuminating in some ways and problematic in other ways compared say to influence every year there's a seasonal influenza sweeps around the world F. infects hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people kills something like thirty thousand or thirty five thousand people in the US every year and yet it has a very low case fatality rate case fatality rate how many diaper the number of people infected it's down I think usually around point one percent a tenth of a percent sars virus that emerged from southern China with the syndrome caused by a virus that emerged from southern China in two thousand three a severe acute respiratory syndrome it infected eight thousand people a little over eight thousand and it killed seven hundred and seventy four for case fatality rate of almost ten percent in other words a hundred times seasonal influenza the average seasonal influenza and it scared the be Jesus out of the public health and disease scientist experts that I know they told me that that was a really scary one because the case fatality rate was so high and it spread quickly but they managed to stop it and we can talk a little bit about that so here's this novel coronavirus as they're calling it to two thousand nineteen novel coronavirus and it comes in somewhere between those two case fatality rates and that is one of the most important numbers at the experts have been watching and I've been watching over the last week or two as the numbers of infected people have exploded and the number of deaths have increased steadily the case fatality rate has hovered moving downward slowly from about three percent to a little over two percent now and it it is still very unpredictable we don't know how many people it's gonna infect and therefore how many people it's gonna kill but it's in the range that that requires being taken very seriously so let's look at what's what officials are doing to try and contain this novel coronavirus and your describes what what's happened in China China was slow to react to this particularly the officials in the city of Wuhan and the province of who by and then the course got out of the barn and the national officials reacted strongly and sealed off essentially first the city of Wuhan and then a number of other cities so I think there's more than fifty million people who are essentially in locked down with no public transportation going in and out of those cities China has been cutting internal flights in and out and to other countries have been cutting flights international flights in and out of China the US in terms of flights of foreign nationals are barred from entering the U. S. if they have recently traveled to China and US citizens coming back from Wuhan or who day province are being quarantined for fourteen days which is the suspected incubation period of the virus other countries are eliminating flights in and out of China I saw this morning that Japan has eliminated flights in and out of China so there is this international curtailment of flights in and out of China and in some cases people are being screened at airports and in a limited number of cases people are being quarantined if they have been and bay province and and want to come back to the U. S. or to another country do all these seem like reasonable and appropriate steps to well the the controversial to some people but to me they do seem reasonable controlling containment is important at this point I don't think it's an infringement around do infringement on anybody's personal rights we have to control cases and monitor cases and trace contacts and any time the thirties learn that an infected person has written on an airplane and then then we headed off into the city where they've arrived medially there three hundred people roughly on that airplane who are contacts that have to be traced and have to be monitored if not isolated and the person who is to enter the city and has gone to his or her family and they're more context there that will immediately have to be traced that's what happened in Toronto early on during the sars epidemic one case got into Toronto and she spread the the infection rather widely as soon as she's gotten there right so so the steps that managed to bring the sars epidemic under control back in the early two thousands were exactly these kinds of steps exactly these kinds of steps we knew less about sars at the very beginning except that it there was some very dangerous infectious disease caused by an unknown pathogen that had come out of southern China to Hong Kong and gotten to Toronto Beijing Bangkok and one or two I think Hong Kong one or two other cities and then there was very rigorous no medical isolation and containment and contact tracing and public health officials were able to reduce the transmission rate of sars to a very low level now in terms of the average secondary cases caused by each primary case the average number of infections that each infected person cost they brought that to a very low level and essentially they stopped the sars outbreak right now they've been some rip reporting suggesting that the trump administration has over the last couple years reduced the government's ability to fight a viral epidemic do you have an opinion about that yes I think it's I think it's well documented in the trunk budgets and it's been I think disastrous for the CDC and for our preparedness my understanding is that trumps twenty twenty budget proposed cutting one point three billion from the CDC budget that's twenty percent below the twenty nineteen level in the twenty nineteen level contained cuts of seven hundred fifty million including I look this up recently including a proposed cut of a hundred and two million specifically for emerging and zoonotic diseases which is what this is so the trump administration budgets have been hamstring the CDC and our ability to react to circumstances just like this course budget proposals aren't always inactive your point is well taken that budget proposals don't necessarily translate into approve budgets but the effort has been there by the trump administration to reduce drastically the CDC and I think that they have succeeded to a very great degree there's been around understandably on protective masks and gloves should should people be trying to get them what's it's a it's a sign of panic that there has been around but there has been I went into my local drug store here in Bozeman Montana yesterday to see if I could buy some masks to take with me just in case when I fly to Australia on Thursday I thought well what if on the way back a typhoon re routes me through China or something so I thought I would carry some masks my local drug store was sold out of masks and that has happened a lot of places around the country is that called for I would say no despite the fact that I was one person trying to buy some is and you know an emergency travel precaution but masks particularly the simple surgical mask that you see on so many people specially travelers I hear the experts saying that those are very helpful in containing the spread of infected droplets from people who are infected containing costs containing CSE sneezes buy a sick person but much much much less effective in protecting a well person from the sneeze is coming out of another person so in other words where mask if you're sick if you're coughing as a courtesy to people around you don't be nearly as concerned about wearing a mask just as a preventive when you step on an airliner go to a big store right I think the CDC our recommends that ordinary civil citizens don't really need to worry about masks but health workout probably should I think this I think the CDC is also saying look ordinary people we have a shortage of masks let those masks be used by health care workers who need them most rather than wearing and when you go to the hardware store David common is a science writer and the author of the book spillover animal infections in the next human

Wuhan China Chinese Government
Bat Soup, Anyone? How Viruses Transfer From Animals To Humans - Yahoo News

Fresh Air

08:10 min | 2 years ago

Bat Soup, Anyone? How Viruses Transfer From Animals To Humans - Yahoo News

"Let's get back to the interview. Fresh air's Dave Davies recorded yesterday with science writer. David common about the new Corona Rona virus epidemic which broke out in Wuhan China. Kwame ince's the corona virus is just the latest example of how were increasingly contracting dangerous. Viral infections since from animals in his book spillover published in Twenty twelve kwame attractive viruses spilled over from animals to infect humans with HIV West S. Nile fever anthrax. Bola and another from the corona virus family SARS severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China China. You know you're right. That as scientists tried to track down the source of the SARS virus back in two thousand three and four. They focused on this practice in southern China of eating and in some cases raising wild animals. Not kind of things that you typically think of as food or or where we don't want to just explain this trend and how it figured you're into this yes There is a vogue. There has been a vogue for eating wildlife wild animals when I was in Southern China researching searching the book only briefly. I got to see some of these markets. Where all form of wild animal were on sale A lot of the trade by the time I got there had gone underground because it was suppressed after the SARS outbreak but then it gradually came back and it had been allowed to continue in you again and proliferate win this new virus began but if you go into a live market and you see cages containing bats stacked upon cages containing porcupines stacked upon cages containing palm civics stacked upon cages containing chickens and hygiene is not great and and the animals are defecating on one. Another it's just a natural mixing bowl situation for viruses. It's very very dangerous situation and and one of the things that it allows. Dave is something that we haven't mentioned. I think so far and that is the occurrence of of amplifying hosts hosts that are not the reservoir host the permanent hiding ground of a new virus but represent intermediates between the reservoir of our host and the human population for instance those horses in Australia. From the point of view of a horse they were ultimate hosts and they were being killed by this virus but from the human point of view they were amplifier hosts the virus got into them it multiplied abundantly it caused them to froth and Chauque and bleed through their nostrils veterinarians and trainers. Were trying to take care of them. They amplified the virus. So that One trainer in one stable form and got very sick from that virus in the case of this new corona virus. One of the questions is was there. An amplifier host in that wet market where these cages are stacked are called wet markets white wire called wet markets. Well assume they're called wet markets because the animals are alive alive rather than butchered and in dead and refrigerated They're also wet. Because there's there's water flowing everywhere. They usually have seafood as well as as wild mammals and birds As I said hygiene isn't great. Animals are being butchered on plywood. Boards blood is flowing down into the gutters in the water and there is just a great Liquidity Mix in these markets at at their worst now when scientists were trying to track down the origin of the SARS virus Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome which was associated with the virus in in the early two thousands. They eventually focused focused on something called the civic cat What is that? That's right the civic cat is not really a cat. It's more accurately called the palm palm civic the civic type of mammal that belongs to the to the family of Mongooses But it's a it's a medium sized animal and and it is both captured from the wild for food and captive bred and raised for food And it was the first big eggs suspect of In the SARS outbreak It was found that some of the people who got sick very early on had eaten a butchered civic and so in the civic head though the the antibody for this this virus right and they and they tested him civics and they found they found evidence of the virus. They found antibodies. Antibodies or fragments of DNA A. R. N. A.. In these civics suggesting that they had been infected with the virus and That didn't prove they were the reservoir host but it made them the number one suspect until a couple of Chinese scientists did further work and they established that in fact virus was not living permanently in the civic population in the wild or in captivity. It was it had a different reservoir host it was living in bats and it had passed presumably market somewhere it had passed from a bat into one or more sits and they became the amplifier host. Right and the the Chinese government I think decreed that all sits in captivity would be slaughtered. Right that's right. Thousands of sits in captivity were butchered an an electric electrocuted and and smothered and drowned In this I panicked blind reaction in China to the SARS outbreak. Now when you were looking at you actually went to China with and spent some time in the field with people who were investigating this right. Tell us tell us about that experience. I I went. I went with a fellow named Alexi. Kamara was working as a researcher for a group. That's called ECO health alliance based in New York A group of disease scientists who study see these emerging viruses these emerging pathogens in animals around the world. They generally have cross training in Virology Veterinary Medicine Ecology combinations nations of skills so Alexi was one of them Alexi and a number of Chinese colleagues and I flew to a city called Gua Lynn In the province of Guangdong southern China and we went out climbing into into caves that caves in the karst mountains the limestone stone mountains and hills outside of the city of Gwynn Looking to trap Various different kinds of small bats insectivores bats not giant fruit bats Small bats at lived in these caves including Horseshoe bats which is a particular group of bats so that Alexi and his colleagues could draw draw blood samples and test those for Looking for the SAR SARS virus that point or or any other virus that suspect unit. Just describe a little bit of what what it felt like to be trapping bats and these caves well. It was a little bit claustrophobic. It's not for everybody. Had Castle Castro. We climbed through. We climbed on our bellies through a very low hole to get into one of these caves. We had we had to squirm down and then and up through this whole to get into the cave and then the cave opened out and Alexi and his Chinese colleagues had essentially pillowcases and butterfly nets. And that's how we caught these bats. The Bat started flying around and they would catch them in butterfly nets and they were wearing gloves and and they would untangle a bat from a butterfly net and then Drop it into one of these cloth bags that were like pillowcases. And in this case as I recall they they would tire tied the knot often then handed to me and I would go over and and hanging on sort of a clothesline. So that the bad dangle and we were doing this I don't know if we were in there for a couple of hours oddly enough. We were not wearing masks of any sort we were not wearing with the called. Personal Protective Equipment has met suits or anything and and described this in the book. I asked Alexi. Why the hell

Alexi China Sars Kwame Ince Dave Davies China China Wuhan China Bola David Australia Writer Respiratory Syndrome Chauque Guangdong Southern China Personal Protective Equipment Kamara A. R. N. New York Castle Castro Virology Veterinary Medicine E
How Coronaviruses Jump From Animals To People: David Quammen Explains

Fresh Air

11:08 min | 2 years ago

How Coronaviruses Jump From Animals To People: David Quammen Explains

"The new corona virus that emerged in Wuhan China has killed almost five hundred people and prompted the Chinese government to impose severe travel restrictions within the country the virus has spread to at least twenty four other countries including the U. S. American air carriers have suspended flights to and from China the US government is barring from entering the country any foreign nationals who visited China within last fourteen days our guest science writer David Coleman says the new corona virus is just the latest example of an ominous trend humans contracting deadly contagious viruses from wild animals other examples include H. I. V. west Nile fever anthrax bola and another from the corona virus family sars severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China and killed more than seven hundred people David common has written frequently for National Geographic and is the author of several books including spillover animal infections and the next human pandemic he spoke with fresh tears Dave Davies well David common welcome back to fresh air yeah this is scary stuff this virus and it's also a very fast moving story you and I are talking on Tuesday afternoon things may change a bit by time people hear it but us a sense of how serious the threat is of this virus compared to other outbreaks we've seen well it is very serious and needs to be taken very seriously and yet it's not an occasion for panic it's an occasion for calm effective response comparing it to other viral outbreaks is is illuminating in some ways and problematic in other ways compared say to influence every year there's a seasonal influenza sweeps around the world F. infects hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people kills something like thirty thousand or thirty five thousand people in the US every year and yet it has a very low case fatality rate case fatality rate how many diaper the number of people infected it's down I think usually around point one percent a tenth of a percent sars virus that emerged from southern China with the syndrome caused by a virus that emerged from southern China in two thousand three a severe acute respiratory syndrome it's infected eight thousand people a little over eight thousand and it killed seven hundred and seventy four for case fatality rate of almost ten percent in other words a hundred times seasonal influenza the average seasonal influenza and it scared the be Jesus out of the public health and disease scientist experts that I know they told me that that was a really scary one because the case fatality rate was so high and it spread quickly but they managed to stop it and we can talk a little bit about that so here's this novel coronavirus as they're calling it to two thousand nineteen novel coronavirus and it comes in somewhere between those two case fatality rates and that is one of the most important numbers at the experts have been watching and I've been watching over the last week or two as the numbers of infected people have exploded and the number of deaths have increased steadily the case fatality rate has hovered moving downward slowly from about three percent to a little over two percent now and it it is still very unpredictable we don't know how many people it's gonna infect and therefore how many people it's gonna kill but it's in the range that that requires being taken very seriously so let's look at what's what officials are doing to try and contain this novel coronavirus and your describes what what's happened in China cities China has been cutting internal flights in and out and other countries have been cutting flights international flights in and out of China the US in terms of flights of foreign nationals are barred from entering the U. S. if they have recently traveled to China and US citizens coming back from Wuhan or who bay province are being quarantined for fourteen days which is the suspected incubation period of the virus other countries are eliminating flights in and out of China I saw this morning that Japan has eliminated flights in and out of China so there is this international curtailment of flights in and out of China and in some cases people are being screened at airports and in a limited number of cases people are being quarantined if they have been in bay province and and want to come back to the US or to another country do all these seem like reasonable and appropriate steps to you well the the controversial to some people but to me they do seem reasonable controlling containment is important at this point I don't think it's an infringement around do infringement on anybody's personal rights we have to control cases and monitor cases and trace contacts and any time the thirties learn that an infected person has written on an airplane and then we headed off into the city where they've arrived Lee there three hundred people roughly on that airplane who are contacts that have to be traced and have to be monitored if not isolated and the person who is to enter the city and has gone to his or her family and they're more context there that will immediately have to be traced that's what happened in Toronto early on during the sars epidemic one case got into Toronto and she spread the the infection rather widely as soon as she's gotten there right so so the steps that managed to bring the sars epidemic under control back in the early two thousands were exactly these kinds of steps exactly these kinds of steps we knew less about sars at the very beginning except that it there was some very dangerous infectious disease caused by an unknown pathogen that had come out of southern China to Hong Kong and gotten to Toronto Beijing Bangkok and one or two I think Hong Kong one or two other cities and then there was very rigorous no medical isolation and containment and contact tracing and public health officials were able to reduce the transmission rate in of sars to a very low level in terms of the average of secondary cases caused by each primary case the average number of infections that each infected person cost they brought that to a very low level and essentially they stopped the sars outbreak right now they've been some rip reporting suggesting that the trump administration has over the last couple years reduced the government's ability to fight a viral epidemic do you have an opinion about that yes I think it's I think it's well documented in the the trump budgets and it's been I think disasters for the CDC and for our preparedness my understanding is that trumps twenty twenty budget proposed cutting one point three billion from the CDC budget that's twenty percent below the twenty nineteen level in the twenty nineteen level contained to the cuts of seven hundred fifty million including I look this up recently including a proposed cut of a hundred and two million specifically for emerging and zoonotic diseases which is what this is so the trump administration budgets have been hamstring the CDC and our ability to react to circumstances just like this of course budget proposals aren't always inactive your point is well taken that budget proposals don't necessarily translate into approve budgets but the effort has been there by the trump administration to reduce drastically the CDC and I think that they have succeeded to a very great degree there's been around understandably on protective masks and gloves should should people be trying to get them what's it's a it's a sign of panic that there has been around but there has been I went into my local drug store here in Bozeman Montana yesterday to see if I could buy some masks to take with me just in case when I fly to Australia on Thursday I thought well what if on the way back of a typhoon re routes me through China or something so I thought I would carry some masks my local drug store was sold out of masks and that has happened a lot of places around the country is that called for I would say no despite the fact that I was one person trying to buy some this and you know an emergency travel precaution but masks particularly the simple surgical mask that you see on so many people specially travelers I hear the experts saying that those are very helpful in containing the spread of infected droplets from people who are infected containing coughs containing CSE sneezes buy a sick person but much much much less effective in protecting a well person from the sneezes coming out of another person so in other words where mask if you're sick if you're coughing as a courtesy to people around you don't be nearly as concerned about wearing a mask just as a preventive when you step on an airliner go to a big store right I think the CDC our recommends that ordinary civil citizens don't really need to worry about masks but health workout probably should I think this I think the CDC is also saying look ordinary people we have a shortage of masks let those masks be used by health care workers who need them most rather than wearing and when you go to the hardware store David common is a science writer and the author of the book spillover animal infections in the next human

Wuhan China Chinese Government
Peter Morgan Presents "Successor" To "The Crown" As Series Enters 1960s, '70s

Fresh Air

05:48 min | 2 years ago

Peter Morgan Presents "Successor" To "The Crown" As Series Enters 1960s, '70s

"Let's get back to fresh air contributor Dave Davies and his twenty eighteen interview with Peter Morgan creator and writer of the crown and writer of the queen the last king of Scotland and frost Nixon the third season of the crown starring Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth the second begin Sunday on Netflix you know therefore is just terrific in this role and I've been I assume you were involved in the casting what were you looking for and what did you see in her arms thirty one year old on the cost of care for which is now sort of with almost impossible to imagine we'll see you know she was overlooked so this doesn't reflect well on me but I will tell the story and live in shame so what time is we'd be so I would be sent the list of people coming to the costing some are looked on the list and Wednesdays as it were costing session would involve the following five young actresses I looked on the list like a one is that when that when that one of the other ones are interesting I'll come in at eleven to see that one I'll come in at twelve because I'm busy and important to lime faltered and who whoever the sky for business I'm I'm not into that I overlooked and snapped on no fewer than five occasions until there was one time where like simply couldn't avoid it because interest in the one before the one off the hook and so I then states to see her none of what what what no one should what's the matter with and if you want to talk to this when they said pizza she's been on for five occasions and each time you have studiously avoided and I suppose she's fantastic he what did you see what what did you see captivate what but it's not an easy part I mean you have to be both forgive me well I said but we have to be both playing in stunning you know the she has to have both and and then a number of the actors that came in was simply too beautiful you know to conventional beautiful too the faces did not have the full range because Elizabeth winter is a beautiful walls it is arguably still a beautiful woman but not all the time not from every angle and her face lights up you know with a smile and can look quite grumpy quite like a wet weekend when not smiling and be overlooking pulling quite plain and you need to believe she has intelligence and understand her intelligence because the queen country to what people think I think she has an intelligence and a very sharp memory and intolerance of fools but at the same time she's not that intellectually curious and so she three both quick and alert and yet at the same time capable of repose and being quite does fall so it's not easy and she has to be emotionally stable and I don't think and act to connect I'm across the chasm but it's so helps if they all thought and clamp brought a lot of thought into the pond and then active a lot of the stuff they shouldn't have to perfection eyesore in a in an instant but she could do it want to talk about we've talked a bit about the queen which is this the feature film that you did before you did the series the crowns was directed by Stephen Frears and we'll we'll hear seen here this is about the moment in nineteen ninety seven when princess Diana has been killed in a car accident and because she is divorced from the royal family the queen sees her death as a private matter with no need for a public appearance reason statement from her the queen in fact she takes her family and Diana's two boys who are her grandchildren to the royal St in Scotland come to to just get away while London is morning and be in this scene we're gonna hear she gets a call for the prime minister Tony Blair played by Michael sheen who is concerned because the public and the press are seeing the royal family as heartless because it's expressed no grief at Diana's passing so we hear the queen pick up the phone to speak to the prime minister prime minister good morning match day sorry to disturb but I was just wondering whether you'd seen any of today's papers we managed to look at one or two in which case five question would be whether you felt some kind of response might be necessary I believe a few over either editors are doing their best to sell newspapers that would be a mistake to dance to their tune under normal circumstances I would agree box well my advice is I've been taking the temperature among the people on the streets and all the information I'm getting is that the mood what would you suggest prime minister some kind of a statement ma'am I believe the moment the statements has passed I would suggest flying the flag at half mast about pounds and coming down to London the earliest opportunity it would be a great comfort to all people and would help them with that grief grief if it's come down to London before I attend to my grandchildren who just lost her mother

Dave Davies Writer Scotland Peter Morgan Thirty One Year
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is fresh AIR I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross according to the U. S. national oceanic and atmospheric administration June was the planet's hottest month on record today we're going to listen to Terry's interview with self described conservation photographer Paul Nicklin whose beautiful photos documents some of the most dramatic consequences of climate change in the arctic and Antarctic he's been working in those regions since nineteen ninety five taking pictures of polar bears penguins sea animals and the ice and it's been a lot of time in frigid waters taking underwater photos the threat of hypothermia and of getting attacked by predators makes it a risky business despite the inhospitable temperatures he works in Nicklin feels at home he grew up in an intuit community just a few hundred miles from the North Pole Nicklas done about twenty stories for National Geographic he and his partner man fellow photographer Christina Mittermeier founded the group C. legacy which uses photography and film to inspire people to protect the oceans in a few moments you'll hear Nicklin talk about working in the arctic archipelago of Svalbard this week researchers in Norway reported that two hundred reindeer had starved to death on an island there were the ecosystem has been affected by climate change a new book of Paul Nicolas photographs called born to ice was published last year Terry spoke to him in two thousand seventeen Nicklin welcome to fresh air one of your most famous photos has to do with melting in Svalbard this is a photo that Al Gore has used to illustrate the changes caused by climate change and it's basically like a glacier that's become a waterfall because melting ice absolutely it is one of my favorite images you know we were working as fall barred photographing it was a really traumatic day because we had been photographing polar bears and traveling around Svalbard there was no sea ice to be found anywhere the bears were stranded on land and and I was actually had philanthropists who were who I was the guy you know in guiding bring in with us to do our C. legacy work and they were not allowing us to show them what's at stake as well allowing us to do our our journalism in our storytelling and that day in the morning I had found them finally some polar bears that were sleeping and we sat there waiting for hours for the bears to get up until I realized that the bears were probably never going to get up and I walked up to the bears and they were both dead they had starved to death and they were young three year old bears on the shores of small barred it was just a gut wrenching moment we filmed and documented it and then later that night we had to move the vessel.

Dave Davies Terry gross hypothermia Nicklin Christina Mittermeier Norway Paul Nicolas Svalbard Al Gore Paul Nicklin arctic partner three year
"dave davies" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh air. I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross. Who's off this week? We're talking with Washington Post Beijing bureau chief Anna Fifield about her new book on North Korean leader. Kim Jong own. She's traveled to North Korea, a dozen times and has interviewed many of its citizens, including members of Kim Jong UN's family. Her book is called the great successor. What's the level of? Surveillance and repression that ordinary people feel political repression. It's really hard to overestimate how repressive North Korea is, you know, there is no official access to any outside information. There is no internet and North Korea. There is. No, you know, some his literature. There's no Solzenitsyn of North Korea. There's no graffiti in North Korea. It's very, very crackdown on Tim's of information that people can get from the outside world. And this is the biggest reason why the North Korean regime has Pacific for so long, because it is, so repressive, if you are caught with foreign media or saying, anything even slightly negative questioning about Kim Jong own and his regime. The punishment can be extremely severe. So, for example, if you were to criticize Kim Jong in. Spending all this money on his nuclear program when people can't even feed themselves North Korea. That's the kind of political crime, that could have used the perpetrator and to other generations of your families, and maybe your parents and your children and also your spouse consigned to a re education camp for maybe ten years, maybe the rest of your life, depending on.

North Korea Kim Jong Kim Jong UN political repression Terry gross Dave Davies Anna Fifield bureau chief Washington Beijing Tim official ten years
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:02 min | 3 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Air. I'm Dave Davies in fraternity gross. Who's off this week the Pulitzer prize for history was awarded this week? To historian David blight for his book about nineteenth century abolitionist. Frederick. Douglas, Douglas is best known for his autobiographies which described his experiences as a slave and his escape to freedom. Blights book also illuminates less well-known parts of Douglas's long and remarkable life his break with leading abolitionist. William Lloyd, garrison his complicated, personal life, his support for and bitter feud with leaders of the women's suffrage movement and his years as a Republican party functionary when he took patronage jobs in the government Douglas was a passionate writer and powerful orbiter and blight says the most photographed person in the nineteenth century, David blight is a professor of history at Yale and the author or editor of a dozen books, including annotated editions of Douglas's first to auto-biography I spoke to him. Last year when his book Frederick Douglass prophet of freedom was first published. Well, David blight. Welcome back to fresh air. Tell us about Frederick Douglass early life. Where was he born what was his life like as a slave? Well, I thank you. Dave. It's great to be back on fresh air. Frederick Douglass born along a horseshoe. Ben on the taco river on the eastern shore of Maryland in eighteen eighteen it's a kind of a remote backwater, the point of the American slave society was born in the home hill farm, which was owned by his then master Aaron Anthony, his mother was a still young woman named Harriet Bailey. He was probably born in his grandmother Betsy Bailey's cabin. Although for sure. And he never will know exactly who is father was although one candidate is Aaron Anthony himself. Douglas was always told this was his master or one of his masters, so one of the facts of his youth that everyone should know is that he was in essence an orphan, he never knew his father. And he never saw his mother after the age of six and he had to practically invent images of her. He had very little memory of her. So as a child, he's essentially not altogether abandoned, but he's left without parents. And then he grows up for twenty years as a slave about eleven of them on the eastern shore and about nine of those years in Baltimore, which in fact, the city has everything to do the fact that he would ever be able to escape right in Baltimore. He lived among some a lot of free black men, right and women. That's right. That's right. Baltimore was a great ocean port and a great shipbuilding city. And when in the year, he escaped eighteen thirty eight Baltimore had about one hundred thirty thousand people. It was a big ocean port city, it only had about three thousand slaves but had about seventeen thousand free blacks. It was a very large, very active energetic. Free black community, and he grows up. Amidst them as well, especially midst them, and it's there that he would have met Anna Murray who became his first wife probably when he was eighteen or nineteen. He got involved in three or four different churches. He was involved in debating society, and he had a relative freedom of movement within the city on its confines. But he also had this visual and emotional and imaginative window on the world with the ocean port with all the great ships that would come in and out of Baltimore harbor, and it's there that he discovered his literacy and his his eventual genius with words and language. It's there where he first began to, cultivate, his his abilities as an orator and even probably as abilities as a writer, right? He was fortunate in that Sophia Auld who was the wife of his then owner started. Teaching him the alphabet and he built on that. And and learn to read kind of an enterprising way with other sources, how did you come to escape can't have been easy. No, it wasn't easy. It was a brave. Plan. He had with Anna his fiancee at the time as well. As a few other people clearly who were in on the planning he got on a train in late August, eighteen thirty eight and by three train rise and three boat rides across rivers. He ended up in New York City in about thirty eight hours at the base of chambers. St. right down in the lower Manhattan on the Hudson riverside. It was an extraordinary escape through what one might call the underground railroad. But he did this essentially all on his own without his help. They made their way to Massachusetts. Was it New Bedford, right? Yes. Okay. Yes. And then the whaling town, right? He works and ends up becoming quite an orator at an early age. How did that happen? Well, he'd already practiced or a toy even while he was a slave. And it gave gave the young Douglas the teenager source of power source of something. He was good at. He was good at getting on his feet and just trying to speak. Now, he wasn't well formed yet by any means. But when he gets to New Bedford he's twenty one twenty two and twenty three years old. They live there three years. He worked down on the docks. He worked in a foundry. He did all kinds of odd jobs, but he very quickly. Joined the local AME Zion church black church and within a year. So they had him preaching. They said this kid can preach put him up front, and he then learns to preach from the text, which is of course, the Protestant tradition. And it's there in that AME Zion church as well as a couple public meetings where he gets discovered so to speak by the Massachusetts abolitionist to are disciples of William Lloyd garrison and in the late summer of eighteen forty one they invited this very young, man. He's twenty three years old out to Nantucket to a big anti-slavery convention, and it was there in the AM on then tuck it when he gave his first speech to a room full of abolition as a room full of white people in innocence. He got up and told some of his stories about his youth about being slave, and he was a hit a huge hit. And they hired him to then go out on the road. As an itinerant lecture across New England at first and eventually within a year or two all across the northern states. He eventually becomes an establishes several newspapers. And for the next twenty years becomes an activist for abolition, how did Frederick Douglass views about the means to abolish slavery. Ivanov between then and the civil. Yes, that's. Fascinating aspect of his life because he undergoes a kind of idiological strategic even intellectual transformation and the late eighteen forties early eighteen fifties. I think it's the first great transformation of his public life. He also had quite a breakdown in this period. He could barely make ends meet for his family. He he's trying to be the self made man who could not provide. But he embraced for example, things like the possible uses of violence, and that's in the wake one must know of the fugitive slave act, which radicalized a lot of people fugitive slave eighteen fifty made everyone complicitous with returning fugitive slaves to their owners if they could be found and by the eighteen fifty one eighteen fifty two Douglas's writing at a Tory with lines such as why do slave catchers fear having throats cut. It's because they deserve to have them cut. He also embraced political parties vehemently he came to to see that. If you don't attack the law, and you don't find a way to to change the power at the base of slavery. You would never destroy it. So he's moving knowing moving away from garrison. He's moving full force into the politics of anti-slavery is not going to be a smooth ride by any means through the eighteen fifties. But by fifty one and fifty two he's become a thoroughgoing political abolition as believing in political parties believing in political activism and also should say here that this moment when he does have a real emotional breakdown. He spent days at a time bedridden even with paralytic limbs, he said, he couldn't even work on the newspaper. It's also a period in which he wrote some of his greatest works, which is probably been to of lots of great writers. But it is certainly true of Douglas as. He becomes a celebrated author and speaker, he has a wife Ana who never learns to read and write right? What what was that relationship like as far as well? Over time. It became very difficult. One has to be honest about it. The the man who becomes the most famous African American writer order, intellectual in the world was married to a woman who remained largely illiterate. She did not share his intellectual life for his professional life and almost never traveled with him. And he traveled all the time as an itinerant orator. So it became with time of a very traditional marriage and around the house. She was a brilliant domestic woman, but as a as a marriage in which he could share his intellectual curiosity and enormous ambition. That was not that kind of marriage. Douglas, never wrote much of anything about Anna in his twelve hundred pages of autobiography there's one mention of his wife in and she's called my wife. He also didn't write much about his children at least in the autobiographies. We have a lot of letters where we can get at those relationships, but Douglas did not discuss his more personal standing in his life in his many many pages of Ota biography. David lights book is Frederick Douglass profit of freedom. We'll continue our conversation in just a moment. This is fresh This is fresh air. And we're speaking with historian David blight, his biography of nineteenth century abolitionist. Frederick Douglass, Frederick Douglass profit of freedom has just been awarded the Pulitzer prize. Douglas, watched the crises over slavery build towards the civil war. He was prepared to see a war in order to see slavery ended. What was his attitude towards ABRAHAM LINCOLN? Did they have a relationship dog was dead of relationship? Lincoln benun until the war years. Douglas. I became aware of Lincoln during the Lincoln, Douglas debates. He followed in the newspapers and even out in Illinois during one or two of the debates, and we should note. This is not Lincoln versus Frederick Douglass. No, no, Stephen Douglas for the Senate race in eighteen fifty eight he became intrigued Lincoln, though, of course, two years later Lincoln runs for president. But their relationship was very testy. I Douglas was one of Lincoln's most ferocious critics in the first year or year and a half of the war because the war wasn't being made against slavery, and they were even trying to return fugitive slaves so before they ever met Douglas. It said some of the harshest things any critic of Lincoln had ever said. But things changed over the course of the war. I guess the did the emancipation proclamation was probably critical there. It was absolutely critical in day. Sixty two Douglas was still hammering away at Lincoln at one point. He called him the most powerful slave catcher in the country. But after the preliminary proclamation September, sixty two and of course, the final proclamation janoris sixty three Douglas's tune on Lincoln, greatly changed, and especially with the recruiting of black soldiers in the wake of the emancipation proclamation in Douglas got deeply involved personally in recruiting members of the fifty four th Massachusetts, regiment. Two of his own sons were members of that, regiment, he slowly, but surely changes his tune about Lincoln. He comes to see the war. Now's a crusade led by Lincoln and the Republicans to not only save the union, but do it by destroying slavery in. He would he would everywhere he got. A chance to say he would say freedom to the slave is is freedom to the nation..

Stephen Douglas Frederick Douglass David blight ABRAHAM LINCOLN Baltimore Anna Murray Pulitzer prize Dave Davies New Bedford Massachusetts writer Lincoln American slave society Blights Yale William Lloyd New York City New England AME Zion church black church Betsy Bailey
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Davies this is fresh air. Then you've our family foundation supports WHYY's, fresh air and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation support for NPR comes from this station and from Tyra for the past forty years tirerack has remained committed to helping people find the right tires wheels and performance parts. Learn more at tirerack dot com. Helping drivers find deliver and install and from the main office of tourism with.

dave davies
"dave davies" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Davies Dave Davies who along with his older brother Ray Davies founded the kinks in nineteen sixty four. You can often recognize the king song before a single word is song. Thanks to the signature distortion of Dave Davies guitar. Dave had a ten watt Alpo amplifier, they'd he hated. So he ran the speaker output leads through vox, AC thirty. Then slashed the speaker cone of the PICO which resulted in the epic guitar town on you, really got me. And this. And. Would you? Dave. Polish.

Dave Davies Ray Davies PICO ten watt
"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:59 min | 3 years ago

"dave davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. I'm Dave Davies sitting in for Terry gross. Let's get back to Terry's interview with author Sigrid Nunez, her latest novel. The friend won the two thousand eighteen national book award for fiction. It comes out in paperback February fifth. The story in the friend. The narrator is a woman who's mentor from college who was close to her age became a dear friend, and he has just committed suicide. She's left grieving and wondering why and she also inherits his dog, and it's not just like any dog. It's one hundred eighty pound great, Dane, and she lives in a small rent controlled apartment in New York. And it's legal. It's against the regulations to have a dog in that apartments is she she kind of violates the regulations takes the dog, kind of reluctantly, and they become very close. And they're both grieving the dog is grieving too. But as you've said you can't describe death to a dog. You can't explain death to a dog. Yeah. That's something. That has struck me. Well, before I started writing this book, how difficult that is really because you know, they're the dog is at home as far as the dog knows everything is fine. And then the person the dogs person the most beloved one, then she's into thin air just doesn't, you know, doesn't isn't there anymore. There is no way to explain to the dog. What happened, and it just seems to me that that must be a remarkable emotional tumult for the for the dog. She walks the street with a dog, you know, she talks takes the dog on walks. Of course, you have to because the dog is. So so big. She feels like she's a spectacle when she's on the street with the dog, and everybody's like stopping and wanting to do a selfie or asking how much he eats her. How much he defecates? And she's she's kind of you know, I think she feels like partly her privacy is being invaded. But partly just like amused by the whole thing, but it connects to something larger that her friend who took his life used to say, which is you know, he used to like love to walk and felt like he did his best writing while he was walking and just kind of losing himself in his thoughts and in his surroundings. But he always thought that that would be harder for a woman to do. Because a woman always has to be on guard is this guy following me is this guy going to grope me is this guy Garnett attacked me. What about that cat call? And so I'm wondering if you thought about that from both directions about you know, the difficulties. Sometimes losing yourself as a woman who has to be on guard when walking the streets and the difference when you're when you have this like Eugene dog who everybody wants to stop and admire when you're walking. Well, it's true that I was I was writing about Flannery and the planner who who is an urban Walker. Let's there's a friend. Yes. And the mentors idea that can there really be such a thing as a planners can a woman the AFL winner because real Flannery requires that you are able to lose yourself in an urban setting and just walk and dream and discover and and that that is very difficult for women. Now, we were talking about walking in the country that would be different. But that's not what the what if what if Leonard does it did strike me. I guess just an it's an idea when I was was writing that that of course, it's it is true. What he says that a a woman is raised to be always on guard. Is there someone behind me is there? You know is is not to mention remarks that are made or stairs. That are given that certainly does make it much different for a woman then for a man. And with my narrator walking with the dog. She does feel embarrassed you she's very private person. And she doesn't want to be interrupted constantly when she's taking the dog for a walk. And then there's a certain amount of irritation with the same things always being said like why don't you ride him? And as you say how much does he eat and also people putting in their two cents, such as it's a syndicate crime is one woman says I think it's a crime to keep a dog that large in the city or that dog shouldn't be in the city, which is something that people do say if you walk a big dog a new walked big dogs. You've had big dogs. Right. I've had my family had a enormous. Great Dane, and I was already out of the house by then. But I did walk him in and children would follow. And and people would say things, but I also have. Had a a dog that was half great, Dane half German shepherd and looked like a somewhat smaller. Great Dane that I walked in. And yes, yes, people do make a lot of comments. I'm guilty of being one of the people who say how much does the dog eat what I could probably ride the dog because I literally could probably ride the dog. I mean, I'm sure I could I could I could probably do it. I know people who won't get a Pat after their beloved pet has died because they feel like they can't go through that grieving process. Again, reminds people who won't remarry because they can't bear the thought of losing a second spouse. Yes. I get a lot of emails from those people to a lot. You know, they they they have lost a pet and it's been overwhelming to them. And very many of them say, I don't know if I could get another one or if I should get another one. Yeah. I mean, people become so emotionally attached to the animals in their lives. We probably underestimate how powerful at pain is. When people leave lose an animal that they love do you have pets now. No, I don't I I had two cats, and they they grew to be quite old. And they they both died, and it was when the second one died that again, I was one of those people who was so overwhelmed, and I I have not been able to bring myself to get another cat since then that was years ago because of the grief. Yes. Largely largely because of that it just not wanting to go through all that again. But there was something about the way that can't died in the end the the loss of it. In fact, I I do write about that in in in the novel that I just was not able to get over that had of the Catta. Well, she she she was elderly and she became very ill. And then I took her to the vet who. You know, agreed that she should be put down because she was so the because she would have to have surgery and at her age, you know, that was probably not such a good idea. And then the vet said I have to give her I have to give her two shots when to calm her down. And and and something went wrong. And then the the she she picked up the cat and ran off with it should said to me. Do you want to be with her when she dies? I said, of course. And then something went wrong it had to do with the vein being too dehydrated when she made the first injection, and she then picked up the captain and ran off with it. And then I waited and then she came back and put the cat on the table and the cat was dead. And I remembered her saying do you wanna be with her? Well, then I wasn't with her. And yeah, it was it was it was very very painful, and there was a certain point. In the four before the cap died where she was so ill, and I brought her in and and and to the vet and she was there. And and I felt that the way I write it. I said I'm not saying this is what she said. But this is what I heard she put her paw on my arm, and I imagined her saying, wait, you're making mistake. I didn't say I wanted you to kill me. I wanted you to make me feel better. Yeah. You never really know. Do you with a cat or a dog is thinking about whether it's time to to end their life. Exactly. So and that it was just very overwhelming experience. Yeah. If you're just joining us, my guest is writer Sigrid Nunez, her latest book, the friend is a novel that won the national book award for fiction, and is about to be published in paperback in early February will be right back after we take a short break. This is fresh air. Support for NPR comes.

Dane Sigrid Nunez national book award Terry gross Flannery guy Garnett Dave Davies AFL New York Eugene Leonard writer NPR Catta Pat one hundred eighty pound
Ray Davies: The Kinks are officially getting back together

Yellowhammer Radio

00:57 sec | 4 years ago

Ray Davies: The Kinks are officially getting back together

"Huntsmen's coming up in the near future because they've got to get someone to play bill o'reilly megan kelly that'll be interesting to see who they pay your bill o'reilly's available to ray davies has surprised the music world after announcing that the kinks are planning to reunite after twenty years apart the band has notoriously endured one of the longest feuds in the music is seen since disbanding in the late nineties but now appear to bury the hatchet davies revealed the news in an interview stating that he was making a new kings album with brother dave davies and make at bori davies said the trouble is the two remaining members david mic never got along very well but you said he's made that work in the studio and it's fired him up to make them play harder fire i used to like the kings i can't really well there goes millennial x games for tomorrow and.

Huntsmen Dave Davies Megan Kelly Bill O'reilly Ray Davies David Mic Twenty Years