17 Burst results for "Dashiell Hammett"

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Pulp

Pulp

07:57 min | 2 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Pulp

"Page at a time through the literary underground of Pulp Fiction. You can't talk about pulp literature and not acknowledged this next genre. We're GONNA dive into. Today. Hard boiled mystery. COPS gumshoes private is detectives slinging Matt Oh. So unique slangy dialogue while standing the thin Blue Line against the societal underbelly of violent crime. The detective mystery genre was arguably the most popular of all the pulp genres with scores of titles released every week or month with names like ellery Queen's Mystery magazine, Spicy Detective Detective Story Detective. Tales detective mystery mammoth mystery, and true detective that last one should sound familiar to all. You HBO fans it was very big business but the crown jewel in this genre was a magazine called black mask because it fostered two of the most influential writers in the. Raymond Chandler and today's author Dashiell. Hammett? The things that set hard boiled apart from predecessors like Arthur CONAN doyle was that they're gonNA, is defined by its no sugarcoated presentation of violence sex and the danger of the emerging criminal class of the Nineteen Twenties and Nineteen Thirties. Every day newspapers at the time printed crime stories of elaborate bank robberies, bootleggers, and gunfights as names like baby face, Nelson Al Capone, and Bonnie and Clyde became folk anti heroes. So naturally, the public's thirst for these types of stories grew to epic levels. People craved the grimy visceral experience that the newspapers only hinted at and so the pope's expanded on it and presented the stories in all their realistic. Gruesome glory. And out of that grew the hardboiled detective. But don't by any means think that this genre has gone away. It is alive and thriving today in the form of TV shows like mind Hunter Hannibal Fargo Bosh, cold case, criminal minds, the wire this list literally goes on forever. The modern crime genre is hard boiled murder mystery repackaged and reconfigured and sold to you a million different ways. Why because just like the readers of yesteryear. We love to revel in those gritty details that amplify. Dark sides. Today's story is bodies piled up by Dashiell Hammett and it was originally published in the December first nineteen twenty-three issue of black. Mask. Hammett himself lived in incredibly interesting life and drew from his experiences working as an operative for the Pinkerton Detective Agency as well as service in both World War. One and World War Two to create the realism he presented in his stories. He is also notably recognized for his political activism as an early anti-fascist and open supporter of communism like many activists of his time. Hammett was investigated by Congress in the nineteen fifties and eventually blacklisted under the McCarthyism. Movement. Bodies piled up features. One of Hammett's most famous characters an unnamed private detective known only as the continental op. The continental op is considered one of the very first hardboiled detectives and was featured in thirty six stories written between nineteen, twenty, three, and nineteen thirty. Okay. It's time to give up the dope and get to the goods. This story includes graphic violence and content along the lines of an R. rated film. So without further ADO. Grab your trenchcoat dust off the fedora. Sit Back, turn out the lights and let me tell you a story. The Montgomery hotels regular detective taken his last week's Rakoff from the hotel bootlegger in merchandise instead of cash had drunk down and fallen asleep in the lobby and been fired. I happen to be the only idol operative in the Continental Detective Agency San Francisco Branch at the time and sit came about that I had three days of hotel cooperating well, a man was being found to take the job permanently. The Montgomery is a quiet hotel of a better sort. So I had a very restful time of it. Until the third and last day. Then things changed I came down to the lobby that afternoon to find stacy the assistant manager on duty at the time hunting for me. One of the maids just phoned that there's something wrong in ninety six, he said. We went up to the room together. The door was open. In the center of the floor stood a made staring google at the closed door of the clothes press for Monday it. Extending. Perhaps, a foot across the floor toward us was a snake shaped ribbon of blood. I stepped past the made and tried the door. was unlocked. I opened it. Slowly. Rigidly a man pitched out backward and there was a six inch slit down the back of his coat and the coat was wet and sticky. That was an altogether a surprise the blood on the floor had prepared me for something of that sort but when another one followed him. Me With a purple distorted face I dropped the one I had caught in jumped back, and as I jumped a third man came tumbling out after the others. From behind, me came screaming a thud as the made fainted I. wasn't feeling any to myself. I'm no sensitive plant and I've looked at a lot of unlovely sites in my time. But for weeks afterwards, I could see those three dead men coming out the clothes breast a pile at my feet. Coming out slowly almost deliberately. In a ghastly game of follow the leader. Seeing. Them you couldn't really doubt that they were really dead every detail of their falling every detail of the heap in which they now lay had a horrible certainty of lifeless in it. I turn to Stacey who deathly white himself was keeping on his feet only by clinging to the foot of the brass bed get the woman out get doctors police. I pulled the three dead bodies apart. Laying amount in a grim row faces up. I made a hasty examination of the room. A soft hat which fitted one of the dead men lay in the center of the unruffled bed. The room he was in the door on the inside. There was no blood in the room anywhere except where it had leaked from the clothes press and the room showed no signs of having been the scene of a struggle. The door to the bathroom was open in the bottom of the bathtub was a shattered Jim bottle. which from the strength of the odor and the dampness of the TUB had been nearly full when broken. In one quarter of the bathroom I. Found a small whiskey class and another under the tub both were dry cleaned and odorless the inside of the clothes press was stained with blood from the height of my shoulder to the floor and two hats lay in the puddle of blood on the closet floor. Each of the hats fitted one of the dead men. That was all. Three dead men a broken GIN bottle blood. Stacey return presently with the doctor, and while the doctor was examining the dead men, the police detectives arrived. The. Doctors work was soon done. This man. He said pointing to one of them was struck on the back of the head with a small blunt instrument and then strangled this one pointing to the other was simply strangled. And the third Was Stabbed in the back with the belaid perhaps five inches long. They have been dead for about two hours..

Dashiell Hammett Pinkerton Detective Agency Stacey Mystery magazine Nineteen Twenties Arthur CONAN doyle Matt Oh Montgomery ellery Queen Raymond Chandler Nelson Al Capone murder HBO Hunter Hannibal google TUB San Francisco Branch
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Supreme Court ruled on this date. In Ninety seven that Pala Jones can pursue her sexual harassment lawsuit against President Clinton while he was still in office. Michael Forty sentenced to twelve years in prison and fined two hundred thousand dollars for failing to warrant authorities about the Oklahoma City bombing. That took place on this date. In Nineteen Ninety eight in two thousand one members of the Islamist separatist group Abu Save seize twenty hostages from an a fluid island resort on Palawan in the Philippines in two thousand and one. The hostage crisis would not be resolved until June. Two thousand to Barack Obama. The first present visit Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park back in two thousand sixteen. He met the surviving members of the nineteen forty five atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Passing away on this date in history. The man behind believe it or not Robert Ripley. Also Jeffrey. The father of added Actually a Jeff Conway from taxi and Gregg Allman of the allman brothers band. I'll passing away on this date. Cornelius Vanderbilt the entrepreneur born on this date in seventeen ninety four the composer of the battle hymn of the republic. Julia Wardhaugh also wild bill. Hickok Dashiell Hammett the man behind Sam Spade and Nick North and Charles Dashiell Hammett born on this date former Vice President Hubert Humphrey actor Vincent Price. The man behind the CAINE mutiny. The winds of War and Warren Remembrance. Herbert Hermann woke who passed away last year at the age of one hundred and three and actor Christopher Lee.

Hickok Dashiell Hammett Barack Obama President Clinton Gregg Allman Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park Pala Jones Robert Ripley Supreme Court Michael Forty Hiroshima Warren Remembrance Herbert Hermann Cornelius Vanderbilt Vice President harassment Palawan Oklahoma City Philippines Hubert Humphrey Julia Wardhaugh
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

08:46 min | 2 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"I'm interviewing Owen said Stephen Heo and how are you doing today on really well? Molly I'm really. Well how are you? I'm doing great. I'm very excited for this interview. I've been looking forward to it also and I wanted to tell you right upfront. Just how much I appreciate. What you're doing what you're doing for readers what you're doing for riders. What you're doing for literature. I think it's a really fine thing you're doing and I've listened to some of your previous podcasts. On immensely impressed with your interviews. Thank you so much that is so sweet and I actually feel like is like now the compliment section of the show. I wanted to thank you for writing your book. The big man's daughter because it was so so good and I love all the books that I read for this law these authors. I'm having on but I have never had a book that I could not put down show like or I could go or that I could at least go okay. I'm going to set this down. I'M GONNA come back to it because it was so good as what happens most of the time but this one it just had so many twists and turns. It was so beautifully written. I could not stop until I finished. Thank you so much I appreciate. That means the world coming. I'm so glad well thank you. okay so. Can you tell me about some of the things that you've written well? I've written some books under another name. I believe that a mystery for today. I think that would be kind of fun. Previous to the big man's daughter a winfred. Stephen is the author of a book called Hamid unwritten that was published in two thousand thirteen and and that addressed the very famous mystery writer. Dashiell Hammett the Maltese Falcon. Hammett's own story had to do with. He'd been he'd been a detective before becoming a detective writer and became a detective writer in the nineteen twenties. E He revolutionized the form of mysteries by bringing about the hard boiled detectives became less about genteel murders in a drawing room and more vowed the kind of real crime that occurs out in the world and that was that was fairly new trump stand. We take for granted now but haven't was central in developing that and mastering it and was a really great writer at all. Levels is classical is multi Falcon and Hamid unwritten deals with the thirty years in Hammett's lives in which he was blocked as a writer was unable to Reich from nineteen thirty five hundred thirty four until his death in nineteen sixty ads. So I thought well it's kind of interesting what happens about that. How does the writer become blocked like that? And I was able to bring in some of the some of the characters from his own past some of the shady characters that might be familiar to some readers in his own passed an offer. A sort of explanation. How that might be an the end. In the meantime to create a new myth about this statuette the diagonal timeless statuette that everyone's trying to acquire killing each other times in order to acquire. What's the real story behind that? What's the story behind that? And so that was the book Hamid Unwritten and one of the things that I was aware of as I was writing. That book was that was that there was a character who was kind of missing character who was mentioned briefly but whose stories the one story. That doesn't Plows she's characters kind of left hanging and that character was a seventeen year old girl who was a very much kind of a victim of her circumstances in that she had been raised her entire life by this criminal con man and his side kids and so fascinated fascinated me for a long time as to what might have happened to her after her criminal and his criminal side. Cakes are dispatched at the end of the Maltese Falcon. And so so. It was that question in my mind. What happened to this girl? How does she go on? She's got she's kind of learn some skills as con artist but her heart is a little bit more pure than Than her father or the professionals with whom she spent all of her youth. And so what happens to her in this in this new world where she suddenly abandoned has to make her way on her own is resolved to not fall into the same trap that her father and the others fell into by pursuing. This this guy. This Black Falcons statuette which is supposed to be so powerful invaluable and yet despite her resolve to not do it circumstances arise so that ultimately she is she finds herself going after the bird also and It's very much about who she wants to be who. She wishes she could be the clarity. That comes to her over the course of the story in the midst of some real adventurous crime kind of incidents throughout for the two books kind of run together hammered on. Reagan and now the new ones the big man's daughter. Yeah I noticed that Dashiell Hammett well Sam Hamid in this one was actually also in the big man's daughter and I was like my mind was loan because I was I was in the middle of I was like two pages left of the book and so I was doing research you for this show and on your website I saw like Oh will your. It's about Daschle. Hennion like wait so just looking at your website. It felt like I was uncovering the mystery of like what was happening and that was really fun. I think that's great. I think it is really fun. He asked me a dashiell. Hammett's real name was Sam actually and when he was still working as a private investigator San Francisco the real one real Hamid. He was known as Sam Hammam. His name was Samuel Daschle Ham. And then when he began writing that's when he started to go by the name. Dash Your Dash and most of the people that knew him in his detective days. He was Sam so got was really fun to write about to be able mix in that character with or to mix in the real author with some of the people that I imagined. Inspired is Turkey's yeah that was so cool So which of the books would you recommend reading I? Well you know the they both stand alone. The both really do are in some ways. I don't think I don't think of the big man's daughter as a sequel per se. You know they both revolve around this black bird. Statuette carved long ago that everybody wants to get their hands on their two very different kinds of books. But I think that since big man's daughters is coming out now in some ways it's a more straight for its twists as you as you discovered. It's got some serious twists and turns along the way. But it's a stephen at that is so a little bit more straightforward than a written. So I feel like maybe the big man's daughter even though it's the new book the second bowl the big man's daughter might be the better place to start and and then hammered unwritten. That's the way I am going with it and I'm very excited Do you think that you will ever continue the Story About Daschle? Hannah do you think you'll ever write another book about the Falcon you know? I'll tell you what I hadn't planned on it. I had I hadn't really planned on it but it's funny because when you've written two books that are there again. They're not once not a sequel to the other but they both revolve around.

Dashiell Hammett Sam Hamid writer Samuel Daschle Maltese Falcon Hamid Unwritten Stephen Heo Sam Hammam Molly Owen Sam Turkey Hannah Reagan Reich San Francisco investigator
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Podcast 42

Podcast 42

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Podcast 42

"News I know. She's are fully artists for tonight because we are doing another old timey radio play. This one is Sam Speight. Show who SAM spade. Show the blood money caper and this was originally recorded or released on September. Twenty ninth nineteen forty six separated the name and the date. I saw that I didn't call it the SAM spade. Show the bloody the blood money caper date. I like flooding money caper days. The last couple of one of these. That's happened if you're familiar. It took him four episodes firm to take that job away from us on the fan. Like everything else. So if you're not familiar with what we're doing tonight what we've done is this is a real radio play that Took place in nineteen forty six. We have divvied up randomly the parts and we've assigned each part a random quirk that we've picked out of a fishbowl but before we get into all that fun nonsense let's open up. Jails beer cooler media all right. We all think this is some familiar. Jail says it's not it's not because this one is from cigar city during the last time we did it it was from Funky Buddha. It was part of their mixologist series. So but we're doing another Margarita. Goza are. We sure that was part of their mixologist. Yes yeah I know there was one part of the mix elegy series. Yeah it was the one before the White Sangria because there was a watermelon beer. We did and it was terrible. I don't think it was even a goes up. It was watermelon sour. I believe I don't know you. You can always look on our website like I could've before we started this but I didn't because we have all the beers listed by all the episode. Trust that I everything I ever drank. I can't believe they trust me like that for the record. I never really trusted you. I just wanted to try the beer like cigar city. I'm in edging with city. One I like the can though do you like to do. It's got the Margarita. And they're the lime. The salt goes and flamingos. Yeah informing goes. I love. I love how they do their can't it's always got a little hint to Florida in their little little nicer background. How will you save can because I was going to rate it really low but I'll read it medium now. It's a three right okay with that. So how a rate the beers is we rate them. One through six based on six pack one being the worst six being the best this makes sense to everybody in the world except for one lone Canadian in Kissimmee. Who's now practicing social distancing? But he's been practicing that for twenty six years now so the rest of the world catching up. No Yeah. That was a stinker. Apparently I'm laughing trying to do the math. Only twenty six years social for first eight years. Yeah I don't know how old he is. Foul methane hold on. He was social for his first twelve years. Because I'm just GonNa Guess these thirty six you know. He's the same age as me. You know. I mean if if I'd say a little more than Sabrina are Laurie Age. They all can't be winners or as young as me but right now on this show this guy in the world this is Sam Spade. The blood money caper and the hair raising adventures of Sam Spade. Detective brought to you by the makers of wild route cream oil for the heya. Oh I always forget. I got a while before my car so I can laugh at all these quirks until I I always forget so I would like to do this in the middle of the show but these will be unedited and all the sound effects will be done by US or mainly Laura Laura Turns Laura for sound effects. Hey ally half the sound sound. Like good luck guys makes it even fully ordered holy? Holy whatever you say fully I say folio so speaking of sound effects bring bring bring. Bring Click. Wait a minute. Why did we bring in making those picking up? Okay Sam Spade Detective Agency Hetero Coochie Coochie Loo- i- it's me coach go. You're so cute. Sammy the spade his it over. Who was behind the battle drummer? Easter beat? I'm so glad you picked that I gave you. Do you have gas? Do you need me to put you over my shoulder. You're you're back. Well I'll tell you about it when I get there. What a day even had a fight with I guess you could call it a mommy. Everyone knows you like anyone woman. You're not this one sweet buns. Sharpen a couple pencil sweetheart but not you. You don't handle the pencils sharpened one end. Those are only for adults. I'll be right over to dictate my report on the blood money caper Dashiell Hammett America's leading detective fiction writer and.

SAM spade Sam Speight US Dashiell Hammett America Funky Buddha Kissimmee Florida Laura Laura Laurie Age writer Sammy Sabrina
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

11:54 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"You can link up to Dahlia Schweitzer at coast to coast, AM dot com. We're talking about L A private is in particular. But also the idea of detective fiction and, and, and how important is to have mysteries. And I think that, that, that's this. I d I think, especially as we get around summer all these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies, and that flicks and, you know, all on every platform, digital or broadcast, there's always a. A strong sector of mysteries and whether they're nonfiction mysteries or, you know, the, the detective type or whether they're dismissed as in general, you know, I think this it speaks we love. I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with her eyes or experience, in our Monday-night lives. Would he think I actually agree with you one hundred percent and that it's interesting 'cause I didn't think of the connection before, but the that fit in with the book that I'm working on now which deals with haunted home and Jomon television, where I think it's also the same kind of thing where it's just fascination with what's behind the curtain. Yeah. It almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see, touch, or feel it almost seems. I mean that's what you think. It's just that's it. That's all there is to life what we can experience in the sort of day to day, sensory thing if that's all that there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that just means that you have the lack of imagination like a hundred. Right. So I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we, we miss used the term all the time. We talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, you know, we don't know the answer to them. But it's that pursuit of trying to always find something that perhaps, nobody else's experienced before, and being able, as you say, to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which. Exposes that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was for sure existed. And I think we are drawn to that. We have must've been, you know, it's like hard wired into us as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think it's also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before. I think it's this, it's something that secret from the majority. Right. And so we want to I five people love conspiracy theory. I think people give all kind of fascinated if there's like there's a small group of people who know something, you wanna know what that is right? All part of the same mentally so going back to the idea of the detective so Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And, and for the great Bogart leader representation on film, but that having Humphrey Bogart playing in a Daschle Hammett novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean he kind of pulls out off although I think the original. Some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits, didn't fit right in there was there was that, but then later on with the Jim Thompson, who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the Noir writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer that the other thing that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were both marxists. They were both communists. And what we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the alternate, outsider, they, and they were secret communists. They weren't telling anybody that they were communists, and that was informing this idea of, of always wanting to expose. America. And I think that's an interesting idea because otherwise, we think of those detectives as sort of consummate American lone wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. No, I think you made a good point earlier with the fact that the sheriff analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establishment, which he's not, and I think, also to go back to the March thing. A lot of these private eyes are not capitalists. You know. Right. Not sent. They're also not exactly American. Yeah. They were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these ITO Banaba lease companies. And they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever. And they were repulsed by that. And they were this idea of the common man, sort of the depression era common. Man, you know, they were they were for the, the waitress that was working for tips, and they were all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale, and they almost had sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things. But frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal in the end they never. They. Expenses. Right. They weren't looking to get rich off of it. But back to the sheriff thing, and I don't wanna come down to hard on it because I think there are aspects of it that are like that. But then the other piece to it is in the gym Thompson, one of his most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story. The famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer that's killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself, and that so perfect for what, you know, how new are evolved into into Pulp Fiction, right? And you, you have quick on that in LA confidential where that police chief is the one who's doing all the I think all the corruption drug dealing and all that. Right. Or for that matter. Chinatown. Right. In the same way. I it's always that it sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs under the rock, you know, that if they, they find the rebel to pry the rock back and show, what had been there, all along. And all you saw him to that point was the, the garden, you know, stepping stone through a beautiful world, but you pull up those rocks in the garden, it's not as pretty when you pull the rock back and that goes back to the fatty, arbuckle in Hollywood. And this idea that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know, you, you pull back the screen and you've got all those talk roaches running around, and I think also with the, the private detective, one of the analogies that I make is like a sweater where you have, you know, a little people yard out and you're like that, and then suddenly, you've unravelled the whole sweater, so it always starts off, where the private is hired to investigate. You know, a potential blackmailer or. Missing daughter. Whatever it's very confined kind of case. And then, of course, one starts digging into it. It ends up being the labyrinth where, you know, politicians are involved. There's a massive web pornographer always become, as you said like you think I'm just looking for that one bug. Did that one bug wonder the rock lift up the rock, and then, you know, fifty cockroaches? Right. And those cockroaches are the police chief. The Bishop, you know, the right, all these, it's, it's so corrupt that it's like so it's almost it's almost like you wanna say put the rock back the rock back you don't even want to target. Imagine that, that all of the structures of society, are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned, the black Dahlia earlier, and obviously, you have a connection in your in your name. So what do you think of that story all these years later, we still have yet to solve that mystery? And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think interesting that it never sort of officially got close. I always kind of got the impression that it was George hotel, right? You didn't. You don't feel like I mean you're more true crime. No, no, no. I agree with the hotels theory. Yeah. So I I always thought like a kinda got solved and what I run is I live around the corner from that house. Do you really and that was what I moved into my apartment? That was not something. I mean it was not like logistically plan thing. But yeah, I walked by that house. Multiple times a day with my dog and is just as creepy as you would think. Yeah. At beautiful at the same time, right? I couldn't. I mean I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive real life, LA mysteries, who that are often than imitated in these novels, where they take sort of, like, the, you know, the archetype of the, of the real LA mystery stories, which are the ones that you think capture the spirit of the city, the most, I honestly feel I mean, I know we've kinda covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe and the black Dahlia murders were really kind of pivotal because of what they like, you know, because of the, the women who died, and they were so beautiful and it was shrouded in mystery. And you know, even though. Oh, people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose. There are a lot of different theories. And so, I think it was it was never kind of conclusively laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dahlia, and I think this idea of these actresses, who are then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me those two kind of tragic figures really exemplified the worst of Hollywood, you know, that these girls come to LA, you know, to be to be star to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dead at their prime kind of thing. But that's interesting. You mentioned those two because a lot of ways they those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career, she had tried and had yet to get any success really as an actress, or perform even though that's why she came out to LA, and then Marilyn Monroe who was the best known actress in America at that time. And so you have those two sides of the, you know, not famous famous both have to do with women both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the.

LA Hollywood Marilyn Monroe Dahlia Schweitzer Jim Thompson America Humphrey Bogart Jomon writer Dashiell Hammett ITO Banaba murder principal George hotel Pulp Fiction arbuckle Daschle Hammett Sam Spade
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

11:54 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Can link up to Dalia Schweitzer at coast to coast, AM dot com. We're talking about L A private is particular, but also the idea of detective fiction and, and, and how important it is to have mysteries. And I think that, that, that's this idea, I think, especially as we get around summer. All these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies, and debt flicks. And, you know, all on every platform, digital or broadcast, there's always a strong sector of mysteries and whether they're non nonfiction mysteries. Or, you know, the, the detective type or whether they're dismissed as in general, you know, I think this is it's speaks we love. I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with our eyes or experience in our mundane lives, would he think? I actually with you a hundred percent and I that I didn't think of the connection before, but that fit in with the book that I'm working on now which deals with haunted, home and Jomon television, where I think it's also the same kind of thing where it's fascination with what's behind the curtain. Yeah. It almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see touch feel it almost seems. I mean, if that's what you think it's just that's it. That's all there is to life what we can experience, you know, in the sort of day to day, sensory thing if that's all that there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that, just means you have the lack of imagination. Like a hundred. Right. So is it? I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we, we miss used the term all the time. We talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, you know, we don't know the answer to them. But it's that pursuit of trying to always find something that perhaps, nobody else's experienced before, and being able, as you say, to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which exposes that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was, I sure existed. And I think we are drawn to that. We have must've been, you know, it's like hard wired into us as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think it's also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before I think it's this, it's something that secret from the majority. Right. And so we want to five people love conspiracy theory. I think people are all kind of fascinated. If there's like there's a small group of people know something, you wanna know what that is. Right. And part of the same mentally. Going back to the idea of the detective so Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And, and for the great Bogart later representation on film. But that, you know, having Humphrey Bogart playing additional Hammett novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean he kind of pulls out off although I think the original. Some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits didn't fit. Right. You know, there was there was that, but then later on with the Jim Thompson, who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the Noir writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer that the other thing that they that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were both marxists. They were both communists, and what we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the alternate, outsider, they and they were secret communists. They weren't telling anybody that they were communists, and that was informing this idea of, of, of always wanting to expose America. And I think that's an interesting idea because otherwise, we think of those detectives sort of consummate American load wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. I think you made a good point earlier with the fact that the share of analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establishment, which he's not, and I think also to go back to the March this thing, a lot of the private eyes are not capitalist. You know, right. They're also not exactly Americans. Yeah. They were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these, you know, been up Elise and companies, and they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever. And they were repulsed by that. And they were this idea of the common man, sort of the depression era common. Man, you know, they were they were for the, the waitress that was working for tips, and they were all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale. And they almost had that sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things. But frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal in the end they never. They. Today expenses. Right. They weren't looking to get rich off of it. But back to the sheriff thing, I don't wanna come down too hard on that because I think there are aspects of it that are like that. But then the other piece to it is in the Jim Thompson, one of his most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story. The famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself, and that so perfect for what, you know, how new are evolved into into Pulp Fiction, right? And you, you have twins on that in LA confidential where that police chief is the one who's doing all the I think all the corruption. And all that, right. Or for that matter. Chinatown. In the same way. I it's always that it's sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs under the rock, you know that if they, they, they find the racial to pry the rock back and show, what had been there, all along. All you saw to that point, was the, the garden, you know, stepping stone through a beautiful world, but you pull up those rocks in the garden, it's not as pretty when you pull the rock back was back to the fatty, arbuckle in Hollywood. And if I did that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know, you, you pull back the screen and you've got all those roaches running around, and I think also with the, the private detective, one of the analogies that I make is, it's like a sweater where you have, you know, a little people, you aren't if you're out, you're like that. And then suddenly you've unravelled the whole wetter, so it always starts off, where the private is hired to investigate, you know. With Henschel blackmailer or missing daughter. Whatever it's very confined, kind of case, and then, of course, once he starts digging into it. It ends up being this labyrinth where, you know, politicians are involved. There's a mass web pornographer always become as you said. Like you think I'm just looking for that one bug. Did that one bug wonder the rock lift up the rock? And then it's, you know fifty cockroaches. Right. And those cockroaches are the police chief the Bishop, you know, the right, all these, it's so corrupt that it's like, so it's, it's almost it's almost like you want to say put the rock back put the rock back. You don't even want to hard to imagine that, that all of the structures of society, are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned, the black Dahlia earlier, and obviously, you have a connection in your in your name. So what do you think of that story all these years later, we still have yet to solve that mystery? And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think interesting that it never sort of officially got close. I always kind of got the impression that it was George hotel, right? You didn't. You don't feel like I mean you're more true crime tissue. No, no, no. I agree with the hotels theory. Yeah. So I always felt like a kinda got solved. And what I run a as I live around the corner from that house. Do you really? And that was what I moved into my apartment. That was not something. I mean it was not like a logistically plan thing. But yeah, I walked by that house. Multiple times a day with my dog and is just as creepy as you would think. Yeah. Beautiful at the same time. Right. I mean it's couldn't. I mean I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive real life, LA mysteries, who that are often than imitated in these novels, where they take sort of, like, the, you know, the archetype of the, of the real LA mystery stories, which are the ones that you? You think capture the spirit of the city the most. I honestly feel I mean, I know we kind of covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe. The black Dahlia murders were really kind of his little because of what they like, you know, because of the, the women who died, and they were so beautiful, and it was shrouded in this mystery. And, you know, even though people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose. There are a lot of different theories. And so, I think it was it was never conclusively laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dalia. And I think this idea of the actresses who are then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me, though, to kind of tragic figures, really exemplified the worst of Hollywood. You know that the girls come to LA, you know, to be to be star to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dead at their prime kind of thing. But that's interesting that you mentioned those two because a lot of ways those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career she had tried and head yet to get any success really as an actress, or perform even though that's why she came out to LA, and then Marilyn Monroe who was, you know, the best known actress in America at that time. And so you have those two sides of the, you know, not famous famous both have to do with women both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the.

LA Hollywood Marilyn Monroe Jim Thompson Humphrey Bogart Dashiell Hammett America Dalia Schweitzer Jomon writer murder Elise principal George hotel Pulp Fiction Henschel arbuckle Sam Spade the Noir
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

14:41 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"You can link up to Dahlia Schweitzer at coast to coast, AM dot com. We're talking about L A private is particular, but also the, the idea of detective fiction and, and, and how important is to have mysteries. I think that, that, that's this. I d I think especially as we get around summer all these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies, and debt flicks. And, you know, all on every platform, digital or broadcast, there's always a strong sector of mysteries and whether they're nonfiction mysteries or, you know, the, the detective type or whether they're just mysteries in general. You know, I think this it's we love. I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with her eyes or experience in our mundane lives. Would he think I actually agree with you one hundred percent? And I that. It's interesting 'cause I didn't think of the connection before, but that fits in with the book of them working on now which deals with haunted home in Jilin television, where I think it's all the same kind of thing, where as fascination with what's behind the curtain. Yeah. It almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see touch feel it almost seems. I mean, if that's what you think it's just that's it. That's all there is to life what we can experience in the sort of day, day, sensory thing if that's all that there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that just means that you have the lack of imagination. Like one hundred. Right. So is it? I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we miss used the term all the time we talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, you know, we don't know the answer to them. But it's that pursuit of trying to always find something that n- perhaps, nobody else's experienced before, and being able, as you say, to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which exposes that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was for sure existed, and I think we are drawn to that. We have must have been you know, it's like hardwired into as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think it's also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before. I think it's this, it's something that secret from the majority. Right. And so we want to I five people love conspiracy theory, I think people were always kind of fascinated. If there's like there's a small group of people who knows something, you wanna know what that is right? And part of the same metality so going back to the idea of the detective so Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And, and for the great Bogart leader representation on film. But that, you know, having Humphrey Bogart playing Dashiell Hammett novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean, he of polls that off, although I think the original some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more. More of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits didn't fit. Right. You know, there was there was that, but then later on with Jim Thompson, who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the Noir writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer of that. The other thing that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were both marxists. They were both communists, and what we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the ultimate outsider they and they were secret communists. They weren't killing anybody that they were communists, that was informing this idea of, of, of always wanting to expose. America. And I think that's an interesting idea because otherwise, we think of those detectives as sort of consummate American lone wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. No. I think he made a good point earlier with the fact that the sheriff analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establishment, which is not. And I think also to go back to the March thing, a lot of the private eyes are not capitalist. You know, right. They're also not exactly. In american. Yeah. There were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these Benepe Elise and companies, and they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever, and they were repulsed by that. And they were, you know, this idea of the common man is sort of the depression era common. Man, you know, they were they were for the, the waitress was working for tips, and they were all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale, and they almost had sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things. But frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal in the end they never. They. Twenty dollars a day, plus expenses. Right. They weren't looking to get rich off of it. But back to the sheriff thing, I, I don't wanna come down too hard on it, because I think there are aspects of it that are like that. But then the other piece to it is in the Jim Thompson, one of his most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story. The famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer that's killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself, and that's so perfect for what, you know, how new are evolved into into Pulp Fiction, right? And you, you have twist on that in L A confidential where the police chief is the one who's doing all the all the, the corruption drug dealing, and all that, right? Or for that matter. Chinatown. In the same way. I it's always that it's sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs onto the rock, you know, that if they find the rebel to pry the rock back and show, what had been there, all along. And all you saw him to that point was the, the garden, you know, stepping through a beautiful world. But you pull up those rocks in the garden, it's not as pretty when you pull the rock back goes back to the feds are bungle at Hollywood. And this ID that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know, you, you pull back the screen and you've got all the talk roaches running around, and I think also with the private detective, one of the analogies that I make is it's like a sweater where you have, you know, a little people yarns out and you're like me. That. And then suddenly, you've unravel, the whole letter so it always starts off where the private is hired to investigate. You know, a potential blackmailer or missing daughter. Whatever it's very confined, kind of case, and then, of course, once he starts digging into it. It ends up being labyrinth where, you know, politicians are involved. There's a massive web pornographer always become, as you said. Like you think I'll just looking for that one bug. Did that one bug wonder the rock lift up the rock? And then it's, you know, fifty cockroaches in those cockroaches are the police chief the Bishop, you know, the right all these, it's, it's so corrupt that it's like so it's almost it's almost like you want to say put the rock back, but the rock back, you don't even know. It's hard to imagine that, that all of the structures of society, are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned, the black Dahlia earlier, and obviously, you have a connection in your in your. Name. So what do you think of that? All these years later, we still have yet to solve that mystery. And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think interesting that it never sort of officially got close. I always hind gothi impression that it was George hotel. Right. You didn't. You don't feel like I mean you're more true crime. Sure. No, no. No. I agree with the hotels theory. So I always felt like it kind of got Sol. And what's ironic is I live around the corner from that house. Do you really and that was what I moved into my apartment? That was not something. I mean it was not like logistically plant thing. Yeah. I walked by that house. Multiple times a day with my dog and is just as creepy as you would think. Yeah. Beautiful at the same time, right? I couldn't. I mean I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive real life, LA mysteries, who that are often than imitated in these novels where they take sort of, like, you know, the archetype of the, of the real LA mystery stories, which are the ones that you think capture the spirit of the city, the most, I honestly feel I mean, I know we kind of covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe and the black Dahlia murders were really kind of pivotal because of what they like you know, because of the women who died, and they were so beautiful and it was shrouded in mystery. And, you know, even though people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose there. Different theories. And so, I think it was never conclusively laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dahlia. And I think this idea of these actresses who were then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me, those to kind of tragic figures, really exemplified the worst of Hollywood, you know, that girls come to LA, you know, to be to be a star to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dead at their prime kind of thing. But that's interesting. You mentioned those too, because a lot of ways those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career, she had tried and had yet to get any success really as an actress or performer, even though that's why she came out to LA. And then Marilyn Monroe who was, you know, the best known actress in America at that time. And so you have those two sides of the not famous famous both have to do with women both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the men with whom they associated if we go with the Marilyn Monroe Marilyn Monroe's death was related to, you know, Bobby Kennedy or the Kennedy family, or whatever, what is your theory on Marilyn Monroe, by the way, and, and her death, I will tell you that on my bucket list is to write a book on Marilyn Monroe. One of the things that I will get to eventually I just haven't quite figured out how to approach, it still sort of massive, the thing that fascinates me the most about Marilyn Monroe. And this is why because you were saying that, you know, she's an example of an actress who has achieved success, the, the role that Marilyn Monroe always wanted to play. You know what it is? First lady lady. Macbeth. Oh, really? Wow. I know. So she got she really got kind of pigeonholed into Beckford of blonde Bimbo, persona, totally 'cause that's what made the studios money and she was desperate to get out of it. And she couldn't and that's part of the reasons why she was so unhappy. And there's a moment in the mystic where I forget what the male characters but he's got a. A picture of Marilyn Monroe up in, like, Glock the Marilyn Monroe's. The accurate. Playing the character is next to him. And she said something like you know that he says, oh, it's nobody. Yeah. A little meta joke. Exactly. And then, you know, her character seven year it didn't even have a name. She was like, I think he was like the tomatoes upstairs, something like that. She played these roles that were so demeaning. And that's one of the things that intrigued me I think she like they have. There's coal mystique Brown Maryland about the fact that she was really difficult to work way. And one of my theory again, this is, you know, be explored in the future is the only difficult to work with when she was being forced to do what she didn't wanna do. So like when she was working for some like hot Billy wilder. She played this role that kind of demeaning and there's, there's a scene. It's been awhile since I was doing the research, but there's a scene where there was one line that she, she forget it. And the my theory is, she didn't like the way that Billy wilder wanted hurt and deliver that line. And so she kept, quote unquote for getting the line so much that they actually I printed out the, the line, and they tasted inside of a drawer. And she was supposed to like open the drawer, and then literally just read the line off. And I remember how many they get that stupid line until eventually Billy wilder gave up and the line was filmed the way that she wanted to say, so I don't just because there's so many layers of sort of mystique and story and myth and whatever, but I always keep going back to the fact that Marilyn Monroe really wanted to play lady. Macbeth. And not allowed to which is, which is interesting because it took a lot of it took a lot of juice from anybody in Hollywood probably deduce Shakespeare, which Hollywood was not interested in producing a lot of because it probably wasn't going to do well at the box office. But I would think you would think Maryland row as Lady Macbeth in a movie would actually have worked really well..

Marilyn Monroe Hollywood Dashiell Hammett Jim Thompson LA Lady Macbeth Dahlia Schweitzer Billy wilder Jilin America Maryland Humphrey Bogart writer Pulp Fiction George hotel principal murder Beckford
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

15:38 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KGO 810

"You can link up to Dahlia Schweitzer at coast to coast, AM dot com. We're talking about LA private is. In particular. But also the idea of detective fiction and, and, and how important it is to have mysteries. And I think that, that, that's this idea, I think, especially as we get around summer. All these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies and net flicks, and, you know, all on every platform, digital or broadcast, there's always a. A strong sector of mysteries and whether they're nonfiction mysteries or, you know, the, the detective type or whether they're dismissed, as in general, I think this, it's we, I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with her eyes or experience in our Monday in lives. What do you think I actually with you one hundred percent and I that? It's been good. I didn't think of the connection before, but that fit in with the book that I'm working on now which deals with haunted home in Jomon television, where I think it's also the same kind of thing where it's just fascination with what's behind the curtain. Yeah. It almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see touch feel it almost seems. I mean, if that's what you think it's just that's it. That's all there is to life what we can experience in the sort of day to day, sensory thing if that's all that there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that just means that you have the lack of imagination. Like one hundred. Right. I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we miss used the term all the time. We talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, you know, we don't know the answer to them. But it's that pursuit of trying to always find something that n- perhaps, nobody else's experienced before, and being able, as you say, to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which. Exposes that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was for sure existed. Then I think we are drawn to that. We have must have been you know, it's like hard wired into us as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think it's also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before I think it's this, it's something that secret from the majority. Right. And so we want to five people love conspiracy theory. I think people are all kind of fascinated. If there's like there's a small group of people know something, you wanna know what that is right. And all part of the same mentality. So going back to the idea of the detective so Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And, and for the great Bogart lead representation on film, but that having Humphrey Bogart playing Daschle Hammett novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean he kind of pulls that off. Although I think the original. Some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits, didn't fit right in there was there was that, but then later on with the Jim Thompson, who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the new our writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer that the other thing that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were both marxists. They were both communists. What we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the alternate, outsider, they, and they were secret communists. They weren't killing anybody that they were communists. And that was informing this idea of, of, of always wanting to expose. America. And I think that's an interesting idea. Because otherwise, we think of those detectives as sort of consummate American load wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. No. And I think you made a good point earlier with the fact that the sheriff analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establishment, which he's not, and I think also to go back to the March this thing, a lot of these private eyes are not capitalist. You know. Right. That they're also not exactly American. Yeah. They were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these banana police and companies, and they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever. And they were repulsed by that. And they were this idea that common man, the sort of the depression era common. Man, you know, they were they were for the, the waitress that was working for tips and they. They were for all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale. And they almost had that sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things. But frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal. In the end they never. Twenty dollars a day, plus expenses. Right. They weren't looking to get rich off of it. But back to the sheriff thing, I, I don't wanna come down too hard on because I think there are aspects of it that are like that. But then the other piece to it is in the Jim Thompson, one of his most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer that's killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself and that so perfect for what, you know, how new are evolved into into Pulp Fiction. Right. And you, you have on that in L A confidential where that police chief is the one who's doing all the all the corruption drug doing and all that. Right. Or for that matter. Chinatown. Yeah. In the same way, it's always that it sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs under the rock, you know, that if they find the to pry the rock back and show, what had been there, all along. And all you saw to that point, was the, the garden, you know, stepping stone through a beautiful world. But you pull up those rocks in the garden, it's not as pretty when you pull the rock back and that goes back to the fatty, arbuckle in Hollywood. And this idea that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know you pull back the screen and you've got all those roaches running around, and I think also with the, the private detective, one of the analogies that I make is like a sweater where you have, you know, a little piece of yarn sticking out and you're like that. And then suddenly, you've unravelled the whole sweater, so it always starts off where the private is hired to investigate. You know a. Potential blackmailer or missing daughter. Whatever it's very consigned kind of case. And then, of course, one starts digging into it ends up being this laboratory where, you know, politicians are involved, there's a massive web pornographer. It always becomes, as you said like you think I'm just looking for that one bug. That one bug wonder the rock lift up the rock, and then, you know, fifty cockroaches. Right. And those cockroaches are the police chief the Bishop, the right. I saw all these so corrupt that it's like so it's almost it's almost like you wanna say put the rock back the rock back you don't even want to imagine that, that all of the structures in society are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned, the black Dahlia earlier, and obviously, you have a connection in your in your name. So what do you think of that all these years later, we still have yet to solve that mystery? And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think interesting that it never sort of officially got close. I always kind of got the impression that it was George hotel, right? You didn't. You don't feel like I mean you're more true crime. No, no, no. I agree with the hotels theory. Yeah. So I I always felt like a kind of got solved and what I run is I live around the corner from that house. Do you really and that was what I moved into my apartment? That was not something. I mean it was not like logistically plan thing. Yeah. I walked by that house. Multiple times a day with my dog and is just as creepy as you would think. Yeah, beautiful at the same time. Right. I mean it's just couldn't. I mean I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive real life, LA mysteries? That are often then imitated in these novels where they take sort of, like, you know, the archetype of the, of the real LA mystery stories, which are. Are the ones that you think captured the spirit of the city, the most, I honestly feel I mean, I know we've kinda covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe and the black Dahlia murders were really kind of pivotal because of what they like because of the, the women who died, and they were so beautiful and it was shrouded in mystery. And, you know, even though people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose. There are a lot of different theories. And so, I think it was it was never conclusively laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dahlia. And so I think this idea of the actresses, who are then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me those two kind of tragic figures really exemplified the worst of Hollywood, you know, that girls. Come to LA, you know, to be to be a star to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dead at their prime kind of thing. But that's interesting that you mention those too, because a lot of ways those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career, she had tried and had yet to get any success really as an actress, or perform even though that's why she came out to LA, and then Marilyn Monroe who was the best known actress in America at that time. So you have those two sides of the not famous famous both have to do with women both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the men with whom they associated if we go with the Marilyn Monroe narrow Monroe's death was related to Bobby Kennedy or the Kennedy family, or whatever what is your theory on Marilyn Monroe, by the way, and, and her death, I will tell you that on my bucket list. Is to write a book on Marilyn Monroe. One of those things that I will get to eventually. I just haven't quite figured out how do approach it, it still sort of massive. But the thing that fascinates me the most about Marilyn Monroe. And this is why interesting because you were saying that, you know, she's an example of an accurate, who has achieved success, the, the role that Marilyn Monroe always wanted to play. You know what it is? First lady Lady Macbeth really. Yeah. Wow. I know. So she got she really got kind of pigeonholed into that sort of blonde Bimbo, persona, totally 'cause that's what made the studios money, and she was desperate to get out of it, and she put it and that's part of the reasons why she was so unhappy. And there's a moment in the midst, where I forget, what the male characters, but he's got a picture of Marilyn Monroe up like blocker the Marilyn Monroe's. The accurate. Wrote playing the character is next to him. And she says something like you know that. And he says, oh, it's nobody. Yeah. Little meta joke. Exactly. And then, you know, her character seven year it didn't even have a name. He was like, I think the tomato upstairs or something like that. She, she played these roles that were so demeaning. And that's one of the things that trait me I think she like they have. There's this whole mystique Brown Maryland about that. She was really difficult to work way. And one of my theory, again, this has to be explored in the future is the only difficult to work with when she was being forced to do what she didn't want to do so like when she was working for some like hot, Billy wilder. She played this role that kind of demeaning and there's, there's a scene. It's been awhile since I was doing the research about this. But there's a scene where there was one line. She kept forget it. And the my theory is, she didn't like the way that Billy wilder wanted her to deliver that line. And so she kept, quote unquote, forgetting the line so much that they actually I printed out the, the line, and they take it inside of a drawer. And she was. Like open the drawer, and then literally just read the line off. And I can't remember how many takes they did that super line until eventually Billy wilder gave up and the line was filmed the way that she wanted to say. So I don't think there's so many layers of sort of mystique and story and myth and whatever, but I always keep going back to the fact that Marilyn Monroe really wanted to play lady mecca. Yeah. And. Not allowed to which is, which is interesting because it took a lot of it took a lot of juice from anybody in Hollywood probably deduce Shakespeare, which Hollywood was not interested in producing a lot of because it probably wasn't gonna do well at the box office. But I would think you would think Maryland row as Lady Macbeth in a movie would actually have worked really well..

Marilyn Monroe LA Hollywood Jim Thompson Dahlia Schweitzer Billy wilder Lady Macbeth America Maryland murder Jomon Dashiell Hammett Humphrey Bogart writer Pulp Fiction George hotel principal Monroe arbuckle
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

12:10 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on WTVN

"Can link up to Dalia Schweitzer at coast to coast, a m dot com. We're talking about L A private is in particular, but also into the idea of detective fiction and, and, and how important is to have mysteries. And I think that, that, that's this idea, I think, especially as we get around summer. All these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies, and debt flicks. And, you know, all on every platform, digital broadcast, there's always a. Strong sector of mysteries and whether they're nonfiction mysteries or, you know, the, the detective type or whether they're just mysteries in general, you know, I think this is it speaks we love. I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with our eyes or experience in our mundane lives. What do you think? I actually with you a hundred percent and that. Can I didn't think of the connection before, but that fit in with the book that I'm working on now which deals with haunted, homes, and Jomon television, where I think it's also the same kind of thing where it's fascination with what's behind the curtain. Yeah. Almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see touch feel it almost seems. I mean, if that's what you think it's just that's it. That's all there is to life what we can experience, you know, sort of day to day, sensory thing if that's all there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that just means that you have the lack of imagination. Like one hundred. Right. So is it? I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we, we miss used the term all the time. You know we talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, you know, we don't know the answer to them. But it's that pursuit of trying to always find something that n- perhaps, nobody else's experienced before, and being able, as you say, to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which exposes that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was for sure existed, and I think we are drawn to that. We have must've been, you know, it's like hardwired into as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think it's also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before. I think it's this, it's something that secret from the majority. Right. And so we want to. People love conspiracy theory. I think people give all kind of fascinated if there's like there's a small group of people who knows something, you wanna know what that is right. All part of the same mentality. So going back to the idea of the detective so Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And, and for the great Bogart leader representation on film. But that, you know, having Humphrey Bogart playing Daschle Hammett novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean, he kind of pulls that off, although I think the original some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits, didn't fit right in there was there was that, but then later on with the Jim Thompson, who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the Noir writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer that the other thing that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were. Both marxists. They were both communists. What we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the alternate, outsider, they, and they were secret communists. They weren't killing anybody that they were communists. And that was informing this idea of, of, of always wanting to expose America. And I think that's an interesting idea because otherwise, we think of those detectives as sort of consummate American lone wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. You made a good point earlier with the fact that the sheriff analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establishments, which he's not, and I think, also to go back to the March thing. A lot of these private eyes are not capitalist. Right. They're also not exactly American. Yeah. They were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these Banawa police and companies, and they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever, and they were repulsed by that. And they were this idea of the common man, sort of the depression era common. Man, you know, they were they, they were for the, the waitress that was working for tips, and they were for all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale, and they almost had sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things, but frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal in the end they never. They. Expenses. Right. Looking to get rich off of it, but back to the sheriff thing, I and I don't wanna come down too hard on it, because I think there are aspects of it that are like that. But then the other piece to it is in the gym Thompson, one of his most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story. The famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer that's killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself, and that so perfect for what, you know, how new are know evolved into into Pulp Fiction. Right. And you twist from that in LA confidential where that police chief is the one who's doing all the I think all the corruption. All that, right. Or for that matter. Chinatown. Right. In that same way. I it's always that it's sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs under the rock, you know that if they, they find the to the rock back and show, what had been there, all along. And all you saw them to that point, was the, the garden, you know, stepping through a beautiful world. But you pull up those rocks in the garden, it's not as pretty when you pull the rock back. Goes back to the fatty arbuckle in Hollywood. And this idea that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know, you, you pull back the screen and you've got all those cockroaches running around, and I think also with the, the private detective, one of the analogies that I make is like a sweater where you have, you know, a little piece of yarn sticking out, and you're like me. That. And then suddenly, you've unravelled the whole sweater. So it always starts off where the private is hired to investigate. You know, a potential blackmailer or missing daughter. Whatever. Dairy confined kind of case. And then, of course, one starts digging into it. It ends up being this labyrinth where, you know, politicians are involved. There's a massive web pornographer always become, as you said like you think I'm just looking for that one bug. Did that one bug under the rock lift up the rock, and then, you know, fifty cockroaches? Right. And those cockroaches are the police chief. The Bishop, you know, the right, all these, it's, it's so corrupt that it's like so it's almost it's also you want to say put the rock back put the rock back. You don't even want to hard to imagine that, that all of the structures in society are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned, the black Dahlia earlier, and obviously, you have a connection in your in your name. So what do you think of that story all these years later, we still have yet to solve that mystery? And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think interesting that it's never sort of officially got close. I always kind of got the impression that it was George hotel, right? You didn't. You don't feel like you're more true crime. No, no, no. I agree with the hotels theory. Yeah. So I always felt like a kind of got Sol and what I run a is I live around the corner from that house. Do you really and that was what I moved into my apartment? That was not something. I mean it was not like logistically plan thing. But yeah, I walked by that house. Multiple times a day with my dog and is just as creepy as you would think. Yeah. Beautiful at the same time. Right. I mean, it's couldn't I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive real life, LA mysteries, who that are often than imitated in these novels, where they take sort of, like, the, you know, the archetype of the, of the real LA mystery stories, which are the ones that you? You think capture the spirit of the city the most. I feel I mean I know kind of covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe. And the black Dahlia murders were really kind of pivotal because of what they like, because of the women who died, and they were so beautiful and it was shrouded in this mystery. And, you know, even though people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose. There are a lot of different theories. And so, I think it was it was never kind of Chris lucidly laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dahlia, and I think this idea of these actresses, who are then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me those two kind of tragic thing here is really exemplified the worst of Hollywood. You know that the girls come to LA, you know, to be to be a star to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dead at their prime kind of thing. But that's interesting that you mentioned those two because a lot of ways those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career, she had tried and had yet to get any success really as an actress, or perform even though that's why she came out to LA, and then Marilyn Monroe who was the best known actress in America at that time. And so you have those two sides of the, you know, not famous famous both have to do with women both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the men with whom they associated if we go with the Marilyn Monroe, Maryland rose death was related to Bobby Kennedy or the Kennedy family or whatever, what is your theory on Marilyn Monroe, by the way, and, and her death..

LA Marilyn Monroe Hollywood Jim Thompson America Dalia Schweitzer Humphrey Bogart Jomon writer Dashiell Hammett murder Banawa Maryland Bobby Kennedy Chris principal George hotel Pulp Fiction arbuckle
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

15:42 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"You can link up to Dahlia Schweitzer at coast to coast, AM dot com. We're talking about L A private is. In particular. But also the idea of detective fiction and how important is to have mysteries. And I think that, that, that's this. I d I think, especially as we get around summer all these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies, and debt flicks, and all on every platform, digital or broadcast. There's always a strong sector of mysteries and whether they're nonfiction mysteries or, you know, the detective type or whether they're dismissed as in general. I think this speaks we love. I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with our eyes or experience in our Monday-night lives. What do you think? I actually with one hundred percents. And I that if anything 'cause I didn't think of the connection before, but that in with the book that I'm working on now which feels with haunted homes, and Jomon television, where I think it's also the same kind of thing whereas fascination with what behind the curtain. Yeah. It almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see touch feel it almost seems. I mean, if that's what you think it's just that's it. That's all there is to life what we can experience in the sort of day to day, sensory thing if that's all that there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that just means that you have lack of imagination. Like one hundred right. So I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we miss used the term all the time. We talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, we don't know the answer to them. But it's that pursuit of trying to always find something that perhaps, nobody else's experienced before being able, as you say, to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which. Exposes that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was for sure existed. And I think we are drawn to that. We have must have been you know, it's like hardwired into as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think it's also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before. I think it's, it's something that secrets from the majority. Right. And so we want to five people love conspiracy theory. I think people people are all kind of fascinated. If there's like there's a small group of people who know something, you wanna know what that is right? All part of the same mentality. So going back to the idea of the detective Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And for the great Bogart leader representation on film, but that having Humphrey Bogart playing additional Hammett. Novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean he kind of pulls that off. Although I think the original. Some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits didn't fit. Right. You know there was there was that, but then later on with the Jim Thompson. Who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the Noir writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer that the other thing that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were both marxists. They were both communists, and what we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the alternate, outsider, they and they were secret communists. They weren't killing anybody that they were communists, that was informing this idea of, of, of always wanting to expose. America. And I think that's an interesting idea because otherwise, we think of those detectives as sort of consummate American load wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. No. And I think you made a good point earlier with the fact that the share of analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establish fans which he's not. And I think also to go back to the March thing. A lot of these private eyes are not capitalist. Right. They're also not exactly American. Yeah. They were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these been up Elise and companies, and they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever. And they were repulsed by that. And they were this idea of the common man is sort of the depression era common man. You know, they were they were for the, the waitress was working for tips, and they were all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale, and they almost had sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things. But frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal. In the end they never. Twenty dollars a day, plus expenses. Right. They weren't they weren't looking to get rich off of it. But back to the sheriff thing, I, I don't wanna come down to hard because I think there are aspects of it that are like that. But then the other piece to it is in the Jim Thompson, one of his most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story. The famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer that's killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself, and that so perfect for what, you know, how new are evolved into into Pulp Fiction. Right. And you have. Quick on that in L A confidential where that police chief is the one who's doing all the I think all the corruption. Doing and all that, right. Or for that matter. Chinatown. In the same way, I it's always that it's sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs under the rock, you know, that if they find the able to pry the rock back and show, what had been there, all along. And all you saw to that point, was the, the garden, you know, stepping through a beautiful world. But you pull up those rocks in the garden, it's not as pretty when you pull the rock back and that goes back to the fatty, arbuckle in Hollywood. And this ID that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know you pulled back the screen and you've got all the roaches running around, and I think also with the private detective, one of the analogies that I make is like a sweater where you have, you know, a little piece of yards out and you're like that. And then suddenly, you've unravelled the whole sweater. So it always starts off where the private is hired to investigate, you know. A potential blackmailer or missing daughter. Whatever it's very confined kind of case. And then, of course, one starts digging into it. It ends up being this labyrinth where, you know, politicians are involved. There's a massive web pornographer always become that you said, like you think under flicking for that one bug. Did that one bug under the rock lift up the rock, and then, you know, fifty cockroaches? Right. And those cockroaches are the police chief the Bishop. You know, the right all these. So corrupt that it's like so it's almost it's over. So you want to say put the rock back put the right back. You don't even want to imagine that, that all of the structures of society, are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned, the black Dahlia earlier, and obviously, you have a connection in your in your name. So what do you think of that all these years later, we still have yet to solve that mystery? And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think interesting that it never sort of officially got close. I always kind of got the impression that it was George hotel, right? You didn't. You don't feel like I mean you're more true crimes. No, no, no. I agree with the hotels theory. Yeah. So I always felt like it kind of got solved and what I run a is. I live around the corner from that house. Oh, do you really? And that was what I moved into my apartment. That was not something. I mean it was not like logistically plans thing, but yeah, I walked by that house. Multiple times a day with my dog and is just as creepy think. Yeah, beautiful at the same time, right? I mean I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive, real life, LA mysteries, that are often than imitated in these novels, where they take, you know, the archetype of the, of the real LA mystery stories, which are the ones that you think captured the spirit of the city, the most, I honestly feel I mean, I know kind of covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe. And the black Dahlia murders were really kind of has it all because of what they like, you know, because of the, the women who died, and they were so beautiful, and it was shrouded in mystery. And, you know, even though people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose. There are a lot of different theories. And so, I think it was never kind of critic, lucidly laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dahlia. And so I think this idea of these actresses who are then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me, those to kind of tragic figures, really exemplified the worst of Hollywood, you know, that these girls come to LA, you know, to be to be a star to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dad at their prime kind of things. But that's usually you mentioned those two because a lot of ways those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career, she had tried and had yet to get any success really as an actress or performer, even though that's why she came out to LA. And then Marilyn Monroe who was the best known actress in America at that time. So you have those two sides of the not famous famous both have to do with women. Both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the men with whom they associated if we go with the Marilyn Monroe, Maryland rose death was related to Bobby Kennedy or the Kennedy family, or whatever, what is your theory on Marilyn Monroe, by the way, and, and her death, I will tell you that on my bucket list. Is to write a book on Marilyn Monroe. One of those things that I will get to eventually. I just haven't quite figured out how do approach, it still sort of Matheny, but the thing that fascinates me the most about Marilyn Monroe, and this is why think interesting because he was saying that she, she's an example of an actress who has achieved success, the, the role that Marilyn Monroe always wanted to play. You know what it is? First lady lady. Macbeth. Oh, really? Yeah. Wow. I know. So she got she really got kind of pigeonholed into Bedford of blonde Bimbo, persona, totally 'cause that's what made the studios money and change was desperate to get out of it. And she couldn't and that's part of the reasons why she was so unhappy. And there's a moment in the mystic where I forget, what the male characters, but he's got a picture of Marilyn Monroe up and like his locker the Maryland in Rozina the accurate. Monroe. Playing the character is next to him. And she said something like, you know, oh that and he says, oh, it's nobody. Yeah. A little better joke. Exactly. And then, you know, her character seven year edge didn't even have a name. She was like, I think was like the tomatoes mup- stairs or something like that. So keep she played the role that we're so demeaning. And that's one of the things that intrigued me I think she, like they had, there's this whole mystique Brown Maryland about the fact that she was really difficult to work way. And one of my theory again, it's, you know, could be explored in the future in. She was only difficult to work with when she was being forced to do what she didn't wanna do so like she was working for some like hot, Billy wilder. She played this role that kind of demeaning and there's, there's a Spain. It's been awhile since I was doing the research about this. But there's a scene where there was one line that she she kept. Forget it. And my theory is, she didn't like the way that Billy wilder wanted her to deliver that line. And so she kept, quote unquote, forgetting the lines so much that they actually I print it out the, the line, and they take it inside of a drawer. And so she was so like open the drawer, and then literally just screamed the line off, and I can't remember how many takes they that super line until eventually Billy wilder gave up and the line was filmed the way that she wanted to say. So I don't think there's so many layers of sort of mystique and story and myth and whatever, but I always keep going back to the fact that Marilyn Monroe really wanted to play lady. Macbeth. And not allowed to which is, which is interesting because it took a lot of it took a lot of juice from anybody in Hollywood probably do Shakespeare, which Hollywood was not interested in producing a lot of because it probably wasn't going to do well at the box office. But I would think you would think Maryland Monroe, as Lady Macbeth in a movie would actually have worked really well. I mean it definitely would have gotten attention..

Marilyn Monroe Hollywood Jim Thompson LA Lady Macbeth Dahlia Schweitzer Billy wilder America Maryland Jomon Spain Humphrey Bogart Dashiell Hammett writer murder Elise Pulp Fiction George hotel
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

11:54 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Can link up to Dahlia Schweitzer at coast to coast, AM dot com. We're talking about LA private is in particular, but also into the idea of detective fiction and, and, and how important it is to have mysteries. And I think that, that, that's the Cy DEA I think, especially as we get around summer all these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies, and debt flicks. And, you know, all on every platform, digital or broadcast, there's always a. A strong sector of mysteries and whether they're nonfiction mysteries or, you know, the, the detective type or whether they're dismissed as in general. I think this is it speaks. We lo I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with her eyes or experience in our Monday in lives. What do you think I actually agree with you one hundred percent? And I that it's, it's interesting 'cause I didn't think of the connection before, but the that fit in with the book that I'm working on now which deals with haunted homes, and Jomon television, where I think it's also the same kind of thing whereas fascination with what's behind the curtain. Yeah. It almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see touch feel it almost seems. I mean, if that's what you think it's just that's it. That's all there is to life what we can experience in the sort of day to day, sensory thing if that's all there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that just means that you have the lack of imagination like one hundred. Right. So I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we, we miss used the term all the time. We talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, you know, we don't know the answer to them. But it's that pursuit of trying to always find something that perhaps, nobody else's experienced before, and being able that you say to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which. Exposes that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was for sure. Existed. And I think we are drawn to that. We have must have been you know, it's like hard wired into us as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think it's also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before. I think it's, it's something that secret from the majority. Right. And so we want to five people love conspiracy theory. I think people give all the kind of fascinated if there's like there's a small group of people who know something, you wanna know what that is right? All part of the same metality so going back to the idea of the detective so Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And, and for the great Bogart leader representation on film. But that, you know, having Humphrey Bogart playing Daschle Hammett novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean he kind of pulls that off. Although I think the original. Some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits, didn't fit right in there was there was that, but then later on with the Jim Thompson, who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the Noir writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer of that. The other thing that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were both marxists. They were both communists. What we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the alternate, outsider, they, and they were secret communists. They weren't telling anybody that they were communists, and that was informing this idea of, of, of always wanting to expose America. And I think that's an interesting idea because otherwise, we think of those detectives as sort of consummate American lone wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. No. And I think you made a good point earlier with the fact that the sheriff analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establishment, which he's not, and I think, also to go back to the March thing. A lot of these private eyes are not capitalist. You know, right there, also not exactly American. Yeah. They were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these either have been up Elise and companies, and they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever. And they were repulsed by that. And they were, you know, this idea of the common man is sort of the depression era common. Man. You know, they were they were for the, the waitress is working for tips, and they were for all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale, and they almost had sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things, but frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal in the end they never. You know they. Dollars a day, plus expenses. Right. They weren't looking to get rich off of it. But back to the sheriff thing, I, I don't wanna come down to hard on it, because I think there are aspects of it that are like that. But then the other piece to it is in the Jim Thompson, one of his most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story. The famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer that's killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself, and that so perfect for what, you know, how new are of evolved into into Pulp Fiction, right? And you, you have like twist on that in LA confidential where the police chief is the one who's doing all the I think all the corruption and all that. Right. Or for that matter. Chinatown. Right. In the same way. I it's always that it's sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs under the rock, you know, that if they find the racial to pry the rock back and show, what had been there, all along. And all you saw him to that point was the, the garden, you know, stepping stone through a beautiful world, but you pull up those rocks in the garden, it's not as pretty when you pull the rock, BAC goes back to the fatty, arbuckle and Hollywood. And this idea that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know, you, you pull back the screen and you've got all those roaches running around, and I think also with the, the private detective one of the analogies that I make is. It's like a sweater where you have, you know, a little people yarn sticking out, and you're like that, and then suddenly you've unravelled, the whole wetter, so it always starts off, where the private is hired to investigate. You know, a potential blackmailer or. Or missing daughter. Whatever it's very confined kind of case. And then, of course, one starts digging into it ends up being this laboratory where, you know, politicians are involved. There's a massive web pornographer always become, as you said, like you think I'm just looking for that one bug that one bug wonder the rock lift up the rock, and then it's, you know, fifty cockroaches. Right. And those cockroaches are the police chief the Bishop, you know, the right, I saw if so, corrupt that it's like so it's almost it's also you want to say put the rock back put the rock back. You don't even want to hard to imagine that, that all of the structures of society, are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned, the black Dahlia earlier, and obviously, you have a connection in your in your name. So what do you think of that story all these years later, we still have yet to solve that mystery? And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think it's interesting that it never sort of officially got slows. I always kind of got the impression that it was George hotel, right? You didn't. You don't feel like I mean you're more true crime. No, no, no. I agree with the hotels theory. Yeah. So I, I always felt like a kind of got Sol's and what I run is I live around the corner from that house. Do you really and that was what I moved into my apartment? That was not something. I mean it was not like logistically plan thing. Yeah, I walked by that house. Multiple times a day with my dog and is just as creepy as you would think. Yeah at beautiful at the same time. Right. I mean it's like I couldn't I mean, I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive real life, LA mysteries, who that are often than imitated in these novels where they take sort of, like you know, as the archetype of the of the real LA mystery stories, which are the ones that you? Think captured the spirit of the city, the most, I honestly feel I mean, I know kind of covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe. And the black Dahlia murders were really kind of pivotal because of what they like because of the, the women who died, and they were so beautiful and it was shrouded in mystery. And, you know, even though people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose. There are a lot of different theories. And so, I think it was it was never kind of conclusively laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dahlia, and I think this idea of these actresses, who are then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me those two kind of tragic figures really exemplified the worst of Hollywood, you know, that these girls come to LA, you know, to be to be star to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dead at their prime kind of thing. But that's interesting that you mentioned those two because a lot of ways they those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career, she had tried and had yet to get any success really as an actress or performer, even though that's why she came out to LA. And then Marilyn Monroe who was the best known actress in America at that time. And so you have those two sides of the not famous famous both have to do with women both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the.

LA Marilyn Monroe Jim Thompson Hollywood Dahlia Schweitzer America Humphrey Bogart Jomon Dashiell Hammett murder writer Pulp Fiction Elise principal George hotel arbuckle Daschle Hammett Sol Sam Spade
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

11:54 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"You can link up to Dahlia Schweitzer at coast to coast, AM dot com. We're talking about L A private is in particular, but also into the idea of detective fiction and, and, and how important it is to have mysteries. And I think that, that, that's this idea, I think, especially as we get around summer all these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies, and debt flicks. And, you know, all on every platform, digital or broadcast, there's always a, a strong sector of mysteries and whether they're nonfiction mysteries or, you know, the, the detective type or whether they're dismissed, as in general, you know, I think this is it speaks we love. I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with our eyes or experience in our mundane lives. What do you think? I actually agree with you one hundred percent and that it's it's been 'cause I didn't think of the connection before, but that fit in with the book that I'm working on now which deals with haunted, homes, and Jomon television, where I think it's also the same kind of thing where it's fascination with what's behind the curtain. Yeah. It almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see, touch, or feel it almost seems. I mean that's what you think. It's just that's it. That's all there is to life what we can experience, you know, in the sort of day to day, sensory thing if that's all that there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that just means that you have the lack of imagination like one hundred right. So I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we, we miss used the term all the time. We talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, you know, we just don't know the answer to them. But it's that pursuit of trying to always find something that perhaps, nobody else's experienced before, and being able that you say to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which. Exposes something that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was for sure existed. And I think we are drawn to that. We have must've been it's like hardwired into as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before. I think it's this, it's something that secrets from the majority. Right. And so we want to I five people love conspiracy theory. I think people give all kind of fascinated if there's like there's a small group of people who know something, you wanna know what that is right? All part of the same mentally so going back to the idea of the detective so Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And, and for the great Bogart leader, representation on film, but that, you know, having Humphrey Bogart playing in additional Hammett. Novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean he kind of pulls that off. Although I think the original. Some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits, didn't fit right in there was there was that, but then later on with the Jim Thompson, who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the Noir writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer that the other thing that, that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were both marxists. They were both communists. And what we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the alternate, outsider, they, and they were secret communists. They weren't telling anybody that they are communists. And that was informing this idea of, of, of always wanting to expose. America. And I think that's an interesting idea because otherwise, we think of those detectives as sort of consummate American lone wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. I think you made a good point earlier with the fact that the sheriff analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establishment, which he's not, and I think also to go back to the March this thing, a lot of these private eyes are not capitalists. You know, right, there, also not exactly. Yeah. They were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these ITO Banaba lease and companies. And they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever. And they were repulsed by that. And they were know this idea of the common man is sort of the depression era common. Man. You know, they were they were for the, the waitress that was working for tips, and they were all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale, and they almost had sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things. But frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal in the end they never. They didn't even expenses, right? They weren't looking to get rich off of it. But back to the sheriff thing, I, I don't wanna come down too hard on it, because I think there are aspects of it that are like that, but then the other piece to it is in the Jim Thompson one of. His most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story. The famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer that's killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself, and that so perfect for what, you know, how new are evolved into into Pulp Fiction, right? And you you have tweets on that in LA confidential where that police chief is the one who's doing all the I think all the corruption drug dealing and all that. Right. Or for that matter. Chinatown. It in the same way. I it's always that it sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs under the rock, you know, that if they finally able to pry the rock back and show, what had been there all along. And all you saw him to that point was the, the garden, you know, stepping stone through a beautiful world, but you pull up those rocks in the garden. It's not as pretty when you pull the rock back. Goes back to the fatty arbuckle and Hollywood and this, I did that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know, you, you pull back the screen and you've got all the talk roaches running around, and I think also with the, the private detective, one of the analogies that I make is like a sweater where you have, you know, a little piece of yarn. If you're out, you're like me. That. And then suddenly, you've unravelled the whole sweater. So it always starts off where the private is hired to investigate. You know, a potential blackmailer or missing daughter. Whatever it's very confined, kind of case, and then, of course, one he starts digging into it. Ends up being this labyrinth where, you know, politicians are involved. There's a massive web pornographer always become, as you said. Like you think I'm just looking for that one bug. Did that one bug wonder the rock lift up the rock, and then, you know, fifty cockroaches? Right. And those cockroaches are the police chief the Bishop, you know, the right, all these, it's, it's so corrupt that it's like so it's almost it's over. You want to say put the rock back the rock back, you don't even want to target. Imagine that, that all of the structures of society, are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned the black? Dahlia earlier and obviously, you have a connection in your in your name. So what do you think of that story all these years later, we still have yet to solve that mystery? And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think it's interesting that it never sort of officially got close. I always kind of got the impression that it was George hotel, right? You didn't eat, don't feel like I mean you're more true crime fiction. No, no. I agree with the hotels theory. Yeah. So I, I always felt like a kinda got Sol and what I run is I live around the corner from that house. Do you really and that was what I moved into my apartment? That was not something. I mean it was not like logistically plan thing. But yeah, I walked by that house. Multiple times a day with my dog and is just as creepy as you would think. Yeah at beautiful at the same time. Right. I mean it's I couldn't. I mean I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive real life, LA mysteries, who that are often than imitated in these novels, where they take sort of, like, the, you know, the archetype of the, of the real LA mystery stories, which are the ones that you? Think captured the spirit of the city, the most, I honestly feel I mean, I know kinda covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe and the black Dahlia murders were really kind of pivotal because of what they like you know, because of the, the women who died, and they were so beautiful and it was shrouded in mystery. And, you know, even though people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose. There are a lot of different theories. And so, I think it was it was never kind of conclusively laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dahlia, and I think this idea of these actresses, who are then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me those two kind of tragic figures really exemplified the worst of Hollywood, you know, that these girls come to LA. You know to be to be hard to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dead at their prime kind of thing. But that's interesting. You mentioned those two because a lot of ways they those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career, she had tried and had yet to get any success really as an actress or performer, even though that's why she came out to LA. And then Marilyn Monroe who was the best known actress in America at that time. And so you have those two sides of the, you know, not famous famous both have to do with women both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the.

LA Dahlia Schweitzer Marilyn Monroe Jim Thompson Hollywood America Humphrey Bogart Dashiell Hammett Jomon writer murder ITO Banaba Pulp Fiction principal George hotel arbuckle Sam Spade the Noir
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

11:54 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KTOK

"You can link up to Dalia Schweitzer at coast to coast, AM dot com. We're talking about L A private is in particular, but also the, the idea of detective fiction and, and, and how important it is to have mysteries. And I think that, that, that's this idea, I think, especially as we get around summer. All these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies, and debt flicks. And, you know, all on every platform, digital or broadcast, there's always a, a strong sector of mysteries and whether they're nonfiction mysteries or, you know, the, the detective type or whether they're dismissed, as in general, you know, I think this is it speaks we love. I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with our eyes or experience in our Monday-night lives. What do you think? I actually with you a hundred percent and that it's been 'cause I didn't think of the connection before, but that with the book that I'm working on now which deals with haunted, homes, and Jomon television, where I think it's also the same kind of thing where it's just fascination with what's behind the curtain. Yeah, it almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see, touch, or feel it almost seems. I mean, that's what you think it's just that's it. That's all there is to life what we can experience in the sort of day to day, sensory thing if that's all that there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that just means that you have the lack of imagination like one hundred right. So I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we, we miss used the term all the time. We talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, you know, we don't know the answer to them. But it's that pursuit of trying to always find something that perhaps, nobody else's experienced before, and being able that you say to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which. Exposes that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was for sure existed. And I think we are drawn to that. We have must've been, you know, it's like hard wired into us as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think it's also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before. I think it's this, it's something that secret from the majority. Right. And so we want to I five people love conspiracy theory. I think people are all kind of fascinated if there's like there's a small group of people who know something, you wanna know what that is right? All part of the same mentally so going back to the idea of the detective so Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And, and for the great Bogart leader representation on film, but that having Humphrey Bogart playing Daschle Hammett novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean he kind of pulls that off. Although I think the original. Some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits, didn't fit right in there was there was that, but then later on with the Jim Thompson, who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the Noir writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer that the, the other thing that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were both marxists. They were both communists. And what we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the alternate, outsider, they, and they were secret communists. They weren't killing anybody that they were communists. And that was informing this idea of, of, of always wanting to expose. America. And I think that's an interesting idea because otherwise, we think of those detectives as sort of consummate American lone wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. No. I think you made a good point earlier with the fact that the sheriff analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establishment, which he's not, and I think also to go back to the March this thing, a lot of these private eyes are not capitalist. You know, right, there, also not exactly that Americans. Yeah. They were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these Banaba leasing and companies, and they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever. And they were repulsed by that. And they were you this idea of the common man, sort of the depression era common. Man, you know, they were they were for the, the waitress that was working for tips, and they were all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale, and they almost had sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things, but frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal in the end they never. They. Dollars a day, plus expenses. Right. They weren't looking to get rich off of it. But back to the sheriff thing, I, I don't wanna come down to hard on it, because I think there are aspects of it that are like that. But then the other piece to it is in the Jim Thompson, one of his most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story. The famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer that's killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself, and that so perfect for what, you know, how new are of the evolved into into Pulp Fiction, right? And you, you have twist on that in LA confidential where that police chief is the one who's doing all the I think all the corruption drug dealing and all that, right. Or for that matter Chinatown. Yeah. In the same way, I it's always that it's sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs under the rock, you know, that if they find the rebel the pri- the rock back and show, what had been there, all along. All you saw into that point was the, the garden, you know, stepping stone through a beautiful world, but you pull up those rocks in the garden. It's not as pretty when you pull the rock back and that goes back to the fatty are bungle in Hollywood in this area that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know you pull back the screen and you've got all those roaches running around, and I think also with the, the private detective, one of the analogies that I make is it's like a sweater where you have, you know, a little people yard out and you're like me. That. And then suddenly, you've unravelled the whole sweater. So it always starts off where the private is hired to investigate. You know, a potential blackmailer or missing daughter. Whatever it's dairy confined, kind of case, and then, of course, one starts digging into it. It ends up being this labyrinth where, you know, politicians are involved. There's a massive web pornographer or always become, as you said, like you think I'm just looking for that one bugs did that one bug under the rock lift up the rock, and then, you know, fifty cockroaches. Right. And those cockroaches are the police chief the Bishop, you know, the right, all these, it's, it's so corrupt that it's like so it's almost it's also you want to say put the rock back put the rock back. You don't even wanna tired of magin that, that all of the structures of society are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned the black? Dahlia earlier and you have a connection in your in your name. So what do you think of that story all these years later, we still have yet to solve that mystery? And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think interesting that it never sort of officially got close. I always kind of got the impression that it was George hotel, right? You didn't. You don't feel like I mean you're more true crimes. No. No, no. I agree with the hotel theory. Yeah. Yeah. So I I always felt like a kinda got solved and what I run is I live around the corner from that house. Do you really and that was what I moved into my apartment? That was not something. I mean it was not like logistically plan thing. But yeah, I walked by that house. Multiple times a day with my dog and is just as creepy as you would think. Yeah. Beautiful at the same time. Right. I mean I couldn't I mean I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive real life, LA mysteries, who that are often than imitated in these novels where they take sort of, like, you know, the archetype of the butt of the real LA mystery stories, which are. The ones that you think capture the spirit of the city the most. I honestly feel I mean, I know we've kinda covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe. And the black Dahlia murders were really kind of his at all because of what they like because of the, the women who died, and they were so beautiful and it was shrouded in this mystery. And, you know, even though people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose. There are a lot of different theories. And so, I think it was it was never kind of conclusively laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dalia, and I think this idea of these actresses, who are then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me those two kind of tragic figures really exemplified the worst of Hollywood. You know that the girls come to LA, you know, to be to be star to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dead at their prime kind of thing. But that's interesting that you mentioned those two because a lot of ways they those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career, she had tried and had yet to get any success really as an actress or performer, even though that's why she came out to LA. And then Marilyn Monroe who was, you know, the best known actress in America at that time. And so you have those two sides of the, you know, not famous famous both have to do with women both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the.

LA Marilyn Monroe Hollywood Jim Thompson America Dalia Schweitzer Humphrey Bogart Jomon writer Dashiell Hammett murder George hotel Banaba Dahlia principal Pulp Fiction Daschle Hammett Sam Spade
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

11:54 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Up to Dalia Schweitzer at coast to coast, AM dot com. We're talking about L A private is in particular, but also into the idea of detective fiction and, and, and how important it is to have mysteries. And I think that, that, that's this. I d I think especially as we get around summer all these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies, and debt flicks. And, you know, all on every platform, digital or broadcast, there's always a. A strong sector of mysteries and whether they're nonfiction mysteries or, you know, the, the detective type or whether they're dismissed, as in general, you know, I think this is it speaks we love. I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with our eyes or experience in our mundane lives, would he think I actually agree with you one hundred percent and that it's interesting 'cause I didn't think of the connection before, but the that fit in with the book that I'm working on now which deals with haunted, home and Jomon television, where I think it's also the same kind of thing where it's just fascination with what's behind the curtain. Yeah. It almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see touch her feel it almost seems, I mean that's where you think it's just that's it. That's all there is to life what we can experience in the sort of day to day, sensory thing if that's all there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that just means that you have the lack of imagination like a hundred. Right. So is it? I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we, we miss used the term all the time. We talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, you know, we don't know the answer to them. But it's at pursuit of trying to always find something that perhaps, nobody else's experienced before, and being able that you say to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which. Exposes that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was for sure. Existed. And I think we are drawn to that. We have must've been, you know, it's like hardwired into us as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before I think it's this, it's something that secret from the majority. Right. And so we want to I five people love conspiracy theory. I think people give all kind of fascinated if there's like there's a small group of people who know something, you wanna know what that is right? All part of the same mentally so going back to the idea of the detective so Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And, and for the great Bogart leader representation on film. But that, you know, having Humphrey Bogart playing Daschle Hammett novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean he kinda pulls that off. Although I think the original. Some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits didn't fit. Right. You know, there was there was that, but then later on with the Jim Thompson, who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the Noir writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer. The other thing that, that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were both marxists. They were both communists. And what we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the alternate, outsider, they, and they were secret communists. They weren't telling anybody that they are communists. And that was informing this idea of, of, of always wanting to expose. America. And I think that's an interesting idea because otherwise, we think of those detectives as sort of consummate American lone wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. No. I think you made a good point earlier with the fact that the sheriff analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establishment, which he's not, and I think also to go back to the March this thing, a lot of these private eyes are not capitalist. You know. Right. Not sent. They're also not exactly American. Yeah. They were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these ITO Banaba police and companies. And they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever, and they were repulsed by that. And they were, you know, this idea of the common man, sort of the depression era, common, man, you know, they were they were for the, the waitress that was working for tips, and they were for all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale, and they almost had sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things, but frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal. In the end they never get twenty dollars a day, plus expenses. Right. They weren't looking to get rich off of it. But back to the sheriff thing, I, I don't wanna come down to hard on it, because I think there are aspects of it that are like that. But then the other piece to it is in the Jim Thompson, one of. His most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story. The famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer that's killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself, and that so perfect for what, you know, how new are of evolved into into Pulp Fiction, right? And you, you have twists on that in LA confidential where that police chief is the one who's doing all the I think all the corruption drug dealing and all that, right. Or for that matter Chinatown. In the same way. I it's always that it's sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs under the rock, you know, that if they find the rebel to pry the rock back and show, what had been there, all along. All you saw them to that point, was the, the garden, you know, stepping stone through a beautiful world, but you pull up those rocks in the garden, it's not as pretty when you pull the rock back and that goes back to the fatty, arbuckle in Hollywood. And this idea that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know, you, you pulled back the screen and you've got all those roaches running around, and I think also with the private detective, one of the analogies that I make is like a sweater where you have, you know, a little people yard out and you're like that, and then suddenly, you've unravelled the whole sweater. So it always starts off where the private is hired to investigate, you know. A potential blackmailer or missing daughter. Whatever it's very confined kind of case. And then, of course, one starts digging into it. It ends up being the labyrinth where, you know, politicians are involved. There's a massive web pornographer always become, as you said like you think I'm just looking for that one bug. Did that one bug wonder the raw lift up the rock, and then, you know, fifty cockroaches? Right. And those cockroaches are the police chief the Bishop, you know, the right, all these, it's, it's so corrupt that it's like so it's almost it's also you want to say, put the rock back, the rock back, you don't even want to hard to imagine that, that all of the structures of society are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned, the black Dahlia earlier, and obviously, you have a connection in your in your name. So what do you think of that story all these years later we? Still have yet to solve that mystery. And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think it's interesting that it never sort of officially got close. I always kind of got the impression that it was George hotel, right? You didn't. You don't feel like I mean you're more true crime. I don't know. I agree with the hotel theory. Yeah. Yeah. So I I always felt like it kinda got solved and what I run is I live around the corner from that house. Oh, do you really? And that was what I moved into my apartment. That was not something. I mean it was not like logistically plan thing. But yeah, I walked by that house. Multiple times day with my dog and is just as creepy as you would think. Yeah, beautiful at the same time. Right. I mean it's I couldn't. I mean I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but the so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive real life, LA mysteries, who that are often than imitated in these novels where they take sort of, like that, you know, the archetype of the butt of the real LA mystery stories, which are? The ones that you think captured the spirit of the city the most. I honestly feel I mean, I know we kind of covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe. And the black Dahlia murders were really kind of pivotal because of what they like know because of the, the women who died, and they were so beautiful and it was shrouded in mystery. And, you know, even though people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose. There are a lot of different theories. And so, I think it was it was never conclusively laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dahlia. And so I think this idea of these actresses who are then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me those two kind of tragic figures really exemplified the worst of Hollywood, you know, that these girls come to LA, you know, to be to be star to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dead at their prime kind of thing. But that's interesting that you mentioned those two because a lot of ways they those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career, she had tried and had yet to get any success really as an actress or performer, even though that's why she came out to LA. And then Marilyn Monroe who was, you know, the best known actress in America at that time. And so you have those two sides of the, you know, not famous famous both have to do with women both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the.

LA Marilyn Monroe Hollywood Jim Thompson America Humphrey Bogart Dalia Schweitzer Jomon writer Dashiell Hammett murder George hotel ITO Banaba principal Pulp Fiction arbuckle Daschle Hammett Sam Spade
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

11:54 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on KTRH

"You can link up to Dahlia Schweitzer at coast to coast, AM dot com. We're talking about L A private is in particular, but also the idea of detective fiction, and, and, and how important is to have mysteries. And I think that, that, that's this idea, I think, especially as we get around summer all these books come out, and they'll be more good mystery movies, and debt flicks. And, you know, all on every platform, digital or broadcast, there's always a. A strong sector of mysteries and whether they're nonfiction mysteries or, you know, the, the detective type or whether they're just mysteries in general. You know I think this speaks we love. I think we're dying to think that there's more to life than what we see with her eyes or experience in our mundane lives. What do you think I actually with you one hundred percent and I that it's interesting 'cause I didn't think of the connection before, but the that fit in with the book that I'm working on now which deals with haunted, home and Jomon television, where I think it's also the same kind of thing where it's fascination with what behind the curtain. Yeah. It it almost like if you accept everything in your life, it just what you can see touch feel it almost seems. I mean, if that's what you think it's just that's it. That's all there is to life. What we can experience, you know, in the sort of day, day, sensory thing if that's all there is for you. Sometimes I feel like that, just means you have the lack of imagination like three hundred. Right. So I don't think I'm creating these mysteries. I think there are mysteries that exist. Although we, we miss used the term all the time. We talk about there is. Things are mysterious until they're not, you know, we don't know the answer to them. But it's at pursuit of trying to always find something that perhaps, nobody else's experienced before and being able, as you say, to pull back the curtain or, or put the flashlight on something which exposes that had been there, all along, which up until that moment that exact moment, nobody was for sure existed, and I think we are drawn to that. We have must have been you know, it's like hardwired into as human beings to have to uncover mysteries. I think that makes complete sense, and I think it's also it doesn't have to be something that no one discovered before. I think it's, it's something that secret from the majority. Right. And so we want to I five people love conspiracy theory. I think people give all kind of fascinated if there's like there's a small group of people who know something, you want to know what that is right. And all part of the same mentally so going back to the idea of the detective so Dashiell Hammett responsible for Sam Spade. And, and for the great Bogart lead a representation on film, but that having Humphrey Bogart playing at a Dashiell Hammett novel was pretty pretty perfect casting. I mean he kind of pulls that off. Although I think the original. Some of the descriptions of the original the -tective, he was sort of maybe a little shorter. A little heavier set, like even more of an outsider like didn't look good didn't his suits didn't fit. Right. You know, there was there was that, but then later on with the Jim Thompson, who becomes like the consummate Pulp Fiction writer, as opposed to say the Noir writer, he becomes the Pulp Fiction writer of that. The other thing that those two guys had in common writing these, these stories is that they were both marxists. They were both communists. And what we're saying about the outsider exactly they were the alternate, outsider, they, and they were secret communists. They weren't killing anybody that they are communists. And that, that was informing this idea of, of, of always wanting to expose America. And I think that's an interesting idea because otherwise, we think of those detectives as sort of consummate American lone wolf sheriff types when they weren't really necessarily thought of that by the writers themselves. No. And I think you made a good point earlier with the fact that the sheriff analogy doesn't really work because that implies the detective is somehow, you know, part of the establish fan which he's not. And I think also to go back to the March thing. A lot of the private eyes are not capitalist. You know, right, there, also not exactly Americans. Yeah. They were anti-capitalist because they were looking at these at these es Benepe, Elise companies, and they were seeing these fat cats, lighting their cigars with ten dollar bills, and whatever. And they were repulsed by that. And they were, you know, this idea the common man is sort of the depression era common. Man, you know, they were they were for the, the waitress was working for tips, and they were all the people that were on the low end of the economic scale, and they almost had sort of a deal with the devil to accept money to investigate things, but frequently those detectives never actually took any money you know, they did it for principal in the end they never. They. Twenty dollars a day, plus expenses. Right. They weren't looking to get rich off of it. But back to the sheriff thing, I, I don't wanna come down too hard on that because I think there are aspects of it that are like that. But then the other piece to it is in the Jim Thompson, one of his most famous stories. The killer inside me. There is a sheriff, that's cleaning up the town. He just also happens in, I'm not giving anything away because this is the story. The famous story is the sheriff also happens to be the serial killer that's killing all the people, and he is also the sheriff investigating himself, and that so perfect for what, you know, how new are of evolved into into Pulp Fiction, right? And you, you have quick on that in LA confidential where that police chief is the one who's doing all the all the corruption drug dealing, and all that, right. Or for that matter. Chinatown. In the same way. I it's always that it's sort of that, you know, the, the, the bugs under the rock, you know, that if they, they find the racial to pry the rock back in show, what had been there, all along. All you saw them to that point, was the, the garden, you know, stepping through a beautiful world. But you pull up those rocks in the garden and it's not as pretty when you pull the rock back. Goes back to the fatty arbuckle in Hollywood. And this idea that, you know, Hollywood is so beautiful on the surface. But then, you know, you, you pull back the screen and you've got all those roaches running around, and I think also with the, the private detective, one of the analogies that I make is like a sweater where you have, you know, a little piece of yarn stiffy out, and you're like me. That. And then suddenly, you've unravelled the whole sweater. So it always starts off where the private is hired to investigate. You know, a potential blackmailer or missing daughter. Whatever it's very confined, kind of case, and then, of course, once he starts digging into it. Ends up being the labyrinth where, you know, politicians are involved. There's a massive web pornography for it always becomes, as you said, like you think I'm just looking for that one bug that one bug under the rock lift up the rock, and then, you know, fifty cockroaches. Right. And those cockroaches are the police chief, the Bishop, you know, the right, it's all these, it's, it's so corrupt that it's like, so it's, it's almost it's almost like you want to say put the rock back the rock back. You don't even wanna hard to imagine that, that all of the structures in society are as corrupt as they are made out to be, what do you think you mentioned the black? Dahlia earlier and obviously, you have a connection in your in your name. So what do you think of that story all these years later, we still have yet to solve that mystery? And that's a consummate LA mystery story. I think interesting that it never sort of officially got close. I always kind of got the impression that it was George hotel, right? You didn't. You don't feel like I mean you're more true crime. No, no, no. I agree with the hotels theory. Yeah. So I I always felt like a kind of got solved and what I run is I live around the corner from that house. Do you really and that was what I moved into my apartment? That was not something. I mean it was not like logistically plan thing. But yeah, I walked by that house. Multiple times a day with my dog and is just as creepy as you would think. Yeah. Beautiful at the same time, right? I couldn't. I mean I couldn't imagine living there. Right. The but so what other just outside of the, you know, the text of your book, what are the other sort of definitive real life, LA mysteries, who that are often than imitated in these novels where they take sort of, like you know, as the archetype of the, of the real LA mystery stories, which are the ones that you think captured the spirit of the city, the most, I honestly feel I mean, I know kinda covered it, but I honestly feel like the, the death of Marilyn Monroe and the black Dahlia murders were really kind of pivotal because of what they like, you know, because of the, the women who died, and they were so beautiful and it was shrouded in mystery. And you know, even though. Oh, people say that with Marilyn Monroe was an accidental overdose. There are a lot of different theories. And so, I think it was it was never conclusively laid to rest for a lot of people, which is also what happened with the black Dahlia. And so I think this idea of these actresses who are then somehow destroyed by the Hollywood machine. I feel like at least for me those two kind of tragic figures really exemplified the worst of Hollywood, you know, that these girls come to LA, you know, to be to be hard to be discovered, and then they end up, you know, dead at their prime kind of thing. But that's interesting. You mentioned those two because a lot of ways those to exist, sort of intention with each other. Because the black Dahlia murder was of a woman who had didn't have a career, she had tried and had yet to get any success really as an actress or performer, even though that's why she came out to LA. And then Marilyn Monroe who was the best known actress in America at that time. And so you have those two sides of the, you know, not famous famous both have to do with women both have to do with sexual exploitation. Both have to do with the.

LA Dahlia Schweitzer Hollywood Jim Thompson Marilyn Monroe America Dashiell Hammett Humphrey Bogart Jomon writer Pulp Fiction murder Elise companies principal George hotel arbuckle Sam Spade the Noir
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

Fusion Patrol

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

"Ooh. Yeah. Yeah. Has to be. That's like that's what he does all day. So at least got to do is to go hunt. Vampires you start in the beginning of the day, you make sure your home safe at night, I'm gonna it's perfectly reasonable anyway, who's tally. The you mentioned earlier that there is ten minutes of setting the story up. I gave a brief lurk, but not enough of a look to found a satisfactory answer. I think that in nineteen seventy seventy-two the typical length of a TV episode after you've stripped it of commercials was about fifty minutes if I'm not mistaken. This was very strange in my mind in that you have the the bits where Norlisk calls is publisher. And they talk about how bad it is. Or how I can't do it. You gotta hear these tapes. And now, I gotta talk to you. I gotta talk to you today. So then they have the whole bit where he goes down. And he sits around waiting for lunch and nothing happens. And then he calls, and we Norlisk ignoring and we see then we seem go back, and it's like a week later, the publisher context Norlisk attorney, and he tells the attorney to look into. To it. And so the attorney looks into it, and then the Terni catches up with publisher days later, apparently, you're right to be worried. I found in the whole stuff about writing up and down on the cable car, and and and go into the club. And and and then finally the publisher goes to Norlisk place, and and starts to process now this movie was one hundred seventy two minutes long. So if they could just kill twenty two minutes with the framing stuff, this would effectively be about what one episode of the New Orleans tapes as TV series would be like probably have about the same pacing. You know, what they would have to cut it up under normal normal circumstances, which is another tip off that they're probably going for a pilot that in the big number one in the number two on the tape. But anyway, this one was written issue by William F Nolan. You familiar with him? I don't. I am not Richard Matheson, who did the night stalker was famous TV writer short story, novelist. Concentrated a lot on horror stories he'd written the movie duel, which I think you owe. But yes. Star Trek stories. He's written says, we'll leave if Nolan also a multiple award winning horror SCI fi writer, also Star Trek the twilight zone, he and George Clayton. Johnson did Logan's run. And I mean, the novels on then William Nolan wrote the rest of the novels. He's he's won countless awards. He's won. Are. He's written comedy things. I guess he's got a Sam space series, which is sort of a comedy science fiction detective PI sort of thing. He's done biographies. I know he's gonna buy of Dashiell Hammett out there. So there's there's a connection that popped in my brain. When I was thinking about the the writing. It's like, oh, yeah. He's definitely trying to do the old PI pastiche there with a gun metal sky and all that kind of stuff. I mean, the guy has got a ton of a ton of work behind him. It's not it's not bad. I'm the premise of the story is I grown when they said, oh, the blood's been drained out of the body after admit that that was the one part in the story that that I just really it has to be a blood drain. Traders. Well, it's back tonight. Stocker it's like, it's another blood draining thing, and yes, they had a good reason for it could reason for it from the in universe story kind of which I thought was novel though, I don't need it to survive. I don't need to vibe. It's like I'm have to make this blood body for this demon. I mean, okay. That's that's the kind of weird stuff I can expect. I I appreciate it. It was as ambi- go. It wasn't your standard zombie wasn't your standard vampire it. It had all the marks. I I thought it was a decent premise for this supernatural story. It. 'execution perhaps it was definitely tweet for jump scares Danker..

William F Nolan publisher Norlisk Dashiell Hammett attorney writer Richard Matheson New Orleans Norlisk place Stocker George Clayton Johnson Logan one hundred seventy two minute twenty two minutes fifty minutes ten minutes
"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Mile Hi Radio

Mile Hi Radio

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"dashiell hammett" Discussed on Mile Hi Radio

"The weekly adventure of Dashiell hammett's famous private detective Sam Spade. I didn't wait for the law to arrive who could I went straight back to San Francisco. They were waiting at my office morning. Sam. Found out that McGraw killing Sam chief down at skid beaches Asas cooperate department down there at skipping Squibb based on display ads. Right. They say you caught a bus skid beach. Has a quarter of two in the company of a young woman answering the description of the McGraw they say that do they say they got a statement from that Butler rather opening shot anyway. Butler hired you the girl is wanted hiding out. Why why not? Established as the girl hated the deceased and bickered with him constantly, the doctor and the boy, we're Pat he'll who've been able to place in the murderer no has an item. She worked with an army ordnance during the war in research, subject made a note of that. And I mean land mine anti personnel. One of the report she helped put out on the bouncing Betty. Yeah. Definitely. Hey, how're you doing? Been so lonesome cooped up here all day. Tell or with army ordinance during the war. I don't know I suppose thought it was seminar or something try again. All right. I'll tell you the truth. I had a copy of that report with instructions for the operation of the bouncing Betty desk in my real w doing a thing like that. No. I was proud of. It was the only report I worked on with the general. They got rid of it. I've read it in the fireplaces in as I learned what had killed didn't burn it cutting that they found a rest. Not yet. But he's definitely saying and I have to take the rap for anything. He's done. Well, I guess there's no other way. Tony didn't do it. Sam. I did. I wanna make a concession to me. What happened out the beach? When I knew I was no longer safe anywhere. I realized I had to Tony sake Israelis mind when we arrived back at the house. I looked into the dining room, and I saw Dr McGraw eating. It was my chance to get into his off. And then what the passing that? He was in my room. There was some wire in the tool chest. I knew that always went to tidy up all the doctor was at dinner. So I waited until I saw him come out. And then I went in. Replace the pilots out of sight. And I saw the wastebasket full pay with the perfect hiding place. Didn't take more than five minutes. Say something. I don't know what to say, oh, I'd say. I wish I did. I am sorry..

Sam Spade Dr McGraw Pat Dashiell hammett San Francisco Butler Asas Betty Squibb Tony five minutes