35 Burst results for "Darwin"

There Is No Will in Academia to Rethink Darwinism

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:55 min | 3 weeks ago

There Is No Will in Academia to Rethink Darwinism

"You think that's That there is an openness out there in the academy to rethinking. Darwin fundamentally because you you go back in the book and you talk about with some of his earlier critics yes. A lot of that was just dispensed with eventually. And then we've gotten onto the star when his juggernaut is an opening in these days to to rethink this or to be more critical of it. I would very much doubt it to be candid with you. I don't think that somebody in my position without biological credentials would would be able to hack it where people fall more higher up in the biological hierarchy have written some of things before under not been able to penetrate Armagh this dublin. Need arm on the biologist way. Otherwise that's what i think so it strikes me that anytime one is not in a discipline. They seem to have a freedom that those in the discipline don't have in other words. Those in the discipline say one who is not a ten biologists in academy can write down the subject and so in a way. people outside the field can can with the freedom can think across disciplines and so they bring a perspective to it that people deep in the field often. Don't have david berlin ski in someone else who's written brilliantly on. He's also an agnostic. And you have as you put it any skin in the game you can look at it more freely without fear of triggering your colleagues in the department so to

Darwin Dublin David Berlin
Darwin Used Charm to Blunt Academic Attacks on Natural Selection

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | 3 weeks ago

Darwin Used Charm to Blunt Academic Attacks on Natural Selection

"Darwin we if you look at the sepia tinted photographs of darwin. You see him as a roberson victorian gentleman that you would have to watch appeasement jews with in reality. He seems to be a very sociable probable person. He seems to inspire an. I don't use this word like he. Did he inspired a lot of brotherly love from his surra surrounding. And i feel that they did not want to tread on his toes. By saying we think you'll theory of natural selection will not fly. They try to trim their responses to him because they love in a fraternal sense. And they want. They wanted to help him And this is surprising. I wish i could inspire so much lovers. Charles darwin it would. It would help me a lot socially and professionally my life but anyway he. He extorted extent he made people blunck's their attacks on him because he was such a job when fellow. I think so you think that I mean in the book. You say beware. You've been fooled. In other words that that darwin through his social graces and and through his the way he wrote He basically as i think you said dulled the criticisms and enable this theory which as far as you're concerned has no actual scientific backing enable it to go forward through the decades so that those opposed to stump theistic solution grabbed it and said we have to make this work even though it has problems. There's nothing better and then you say that. What does it matter whether there's any thing better. Either this works or

Darwin Roberson Blunck Charles Darwin
Author Neil Thomas: Darwinism Has Stolen the Birthright of Christians

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Author Neil Thomas: Darwinism Has Stolen the Birthright of Christians

"Talking to the author of a new book terrific book. it's called taking leave of darwin. The author is my guest. Neil thomas neil thomas. You said earlier that you started out your an academic writing subject of german languages literature and other european literature. Now you found yourself a leaping into the world of darwin and you said that you remember the british rationalist association. Is that what it's called. Yes yes so. I sent you and your colleagues. There are mostly either agnostics or atheists and and not. Yes dave yes. I've i've described myself as an nonstick waving. What does the result of my findings but yes okay so true enough so you don't come to the subject from the point of your faith you just come to it as a free thinker as it were d- do you find as you as you get into the subject that darwin is so generally accepted in the world In the academy that anybody who questions him immediately becomes You know looked at In in a strange way or were did. Didn't you care about that. It doesn't affect me. Some since i am no a retiree of independent means. You know it. It really is irrelevant to me. But i do understand the people in the biological world of acadamy our threatened by all sorts of things including dismissal I've heard on the grapevine. I if they if they fall out of line with with with with with darwin's thinking yes yes half the about that but more. So i i think that no. I'm not a person of faith but my my wife is. I'm many friends who are peop- people faith and i do feel bad for them because i feel it in the way. This hold adult wenden bandwagon as has tempted to Ask robbed them of this virtual earth ri- to imply that their own instincts wrong that they should they should foresake any i. Any theistic interpretation. The idea of god. And mike nichols wrong. Wrong am i do. And i was rather discount allies to real to realize that the anglican church back in two thousand eight had made a public apology to darwin. Well i think that's because i don't know what is approved in syria

Darwin Neil Thomas Neil Thomas British Rationalist Associatio Dave Mike Nichols Anglican Church Syria
Whats Hotel Quarantine Like in Australia?

AFF on AIR Podcast

02:08 min | Last month

Whats Hotel Quarantine Like in Australia?

"The whole story about how you ended up in hertel corentin in itself is really quite unfortunate. Pap how come. You ended up in quarantine. Well originally when i book my flight on didn't have a great big long layover like i ended up with While i was in darwin i ended up. Having my flights changed for different time. I think it was the last change not long before i left. Darwin that gave me a layover of twenty three hours. Twenty five minutes in melbourne. And i thought to myself well. I am not staying in the epo for all that time with that. Thinking of any of the light problem that might occur. I just booked myself into the closest mitchell that could which was the ibis airport motel which is six hundred meters away. And yes. I've just had a look at the on. The map. pins like the ibis budget hotel at melbourne airport is basically within the april precinct. It's a short walk from terminal and it's you know it is the only hotel around albany. Puerto says it's not quiet currently quarantined. I tell us it would have been the only option for an overnight stop but queensland consider that to be entering carpet hotspot. Yes and i didn't really a look should have done more research before i left because i didn't attempt to fill in the queensland boorda pass until i actually arrived in melvin so that was when my panic started when i was in the hotel and sort of read started to read the instructions and that you know have i transited through a hot spot and i thought well. Currently melvin is a hot spot. It wasn't went. Ibew the tickets and another thing that i thought was a beat. We'd was that. Why would virgin have put me on a flight that went via from darwin to melbourne. Full that long and then debris brisbane. The next day knowing that melbourne was out spot.

Hertel Corentin Ibis Airport Motel Darwin Melbourne Airport Melbourne Boorda Mitchell Melvin Albany Puerto Queensland Virgin Brisbane
What Do You Know About the Galapagos Islands?

Ghost Town

01:49 min | 2 months ago

What Do You Know About the Galapagos Islands?

"Do you know about the galapagos islands. Probably that it's a remote island in the pacific ocean but it played a hand in the works of charles. Darwin the theory of evolution. But that's not all that makes the island unique it's the backdrop for one of the most bizarre murder mysteries which includes poly-amorous fake teeth. Giant tortoises and murder. Today we're gonna talk about the galapagos affair so the human history of the glucose islands doesn't begin with charles darwin really though his visit in eighteen. Thirty five definitely. Put the islands on the map will literally put it on the map. Us whalers and pirates were already. they're hunting giant galapagos tortoises. These tortoises were actually very humongous. Very slow think like thousands of pounds and could live for years in the hold of a ship providing fresh meat on long. Voyages flurry an island in the galapagos. Has the most human activity and it's the only island with a fresh water supply in eighteen twenty. All the giant tortoises were killed on the island. When crew members of the ill fading whaling vessel essex torched it for no apparent reason after the essex left a sperm whale sunk their ship. So there you go for months. The sailors drifted helplessly in lifeboats sunburn. Starving before turning to cannibalism to survive. They drew straws to see who became food for the rest and then they do another straw to decide who would kill that person of the twenty crew. Only eight survived. They were found off the coast of south america. Insane and knowing that human bones their story inspired herman melville's novel moby dick. You may have heard of it all this to say that there is a what is thought of as an island curse the curse of the giant tortoise a creature that back when they were still around could according to those who interacted with it. Read the dirty secrets of the minds of visitors to the

Galapagos Islands Pacific Ocean Charles Darwin Darwin Charles Essex United States Herman Melville Moby Dick South America
Kiermaier Ends Combined No-Hit Bid, Rays Top Red Sox 1-0

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

Kiermaier Ends Combined No-Hit Bid, Rays Top Red Sox 1-0

"Two hits were it not for the races Manuel Margot scored on a wild pitch in the bottom of the ninth to complete their one nothing win over the red Sox Margot rapped a two out single stole second and went to third on a throwing error by catcher Christian Vazquez before coming home with the winning run Josh Taylor Darwin's in Hernandez combined to no hit here today until Kevin here Myers one out double in the eighth he was he was lights out he was he was really good have had as pictures work in and you know that's the best we we've seen of him and then he did a great job to park at that it was pulled with two outs in the seventh after throwing one hundred pitches Boston manages four hits against Tampa Bay I'm Dave Ferrie

Manuel Margot Christian Vazquez Josh Taylor Darwin Margot Red Sox Hernandez Myers Kevin Boston Tampa Bay Dave Ferrie
Frequent Flyer Points & FBT  AIR061

AFF on AIR Podcast

01:56 min | 4 months ago

Frequent Flyer Points & FBT AIR061

"And sadly we've had yet another reminded this week that the pandemic is not over yet. With melvin backing lockdown for seven days as a result most is trillion states territories except new south wales as well as new zealand have re imposed border restrictions on travellers from melvin from victoria. Despite this domestic travel in australia overrule has recovered pretty well and infect over the past fortnight all of the majors trillion airlines have announced even more new domestic flight routes from august qantas will had direct flights from adelaide to townsville cans and hide as well as sydney and know when to townsville and gold coast quotas will also resume its own flights from sydney to larou- From march next year adding a second option of and jetstar in addition quotas will soon be flying more airbus dahlan during the peak upcoming dry-season qantas will fly three cities from sydney and brisbane dow up to twice a day. And once a day from melvin stone and that means that. If you're flying from darwin to sydney oh been on one of those overnight red eye flights for business class he might get a life flatbed qantas also upgraded one of its daily sydney to perth. Flights to a boeing seven. Eight seven from this week. The seven eight seven has forty to lie flat business class seats that a normally used on international long haul flights and the planes are also fitted with premium economy cabin now qantas point be selling the premium economy seats so instead they going to be available to select for free as long as they're still available by gold platinum and platinum one frequent flyers. So that's nice little upgrade if you flying on q. f. six four five from sydney to perth or q. F. six eight from perth to sydney this week also the launch of quotas embraer one ninety flights operated by alliance. Eight lines on the adelaide. Alice springs at darwin and adelaide routes and if member goes by the handle of fly doc was on the inaugural flight from adelaide alice springs and they described as perfectly adequate.

Sydney Qantas Melvin Townsville Dahlan Melvin Stone New South Wales Adelaide Jetstar Perth Gold Coast New Zealand Victoria Australia Brisbane Darwin Boeing Alice Springs Adelaide Alice Springs
 Famed Darwin's Arch Collapses Due to Erosion in Galapagos Islands

WBZ Morning News

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

Famed Darwin's Arch Collapses Due to Erosion in Galapagos Islands

"Famous rock Formation is going topless, a giant piece of a famous natural rock formations 600 miles off the coast of the Galapagos Islands has fallen into the Pacific Ocean. Tourists on a boat excursion witness the top of Darwin's arch collapsing. Ecuadorian environmental officials blame natural erosion. The structure made of stone is less than a mile from Darwin Island, named after the British scientists who developed his theory on evolution and natural selection after he visited there in 18 35, members of the diving travel industry have already renamed the structure the pillars

Galapagos Islands Darwin Island Pacific Ocean Darwin
"darwin" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

06:40 min | 5 months ago

"darwin" Discussed on The Science Show

"And i think that's the reason we've become so fixated on the idea that there's one parent in the house. A this theory grew up in the fifties and sixties when perhaps chart actually being very available in the second world war when all the member of a war but when men came back the wall nurseries closed and suddenly psychologists began saying. And of course you can do a conspiracy theory here to psychologists began saying well. You have to stay at home with your baby mothers. Otherwise they'll grow up unhappy all twisted or something talking about home. Of course y'all sledding better nine my selected on south coast of new south wales and having a semi rural situation here as look out the window we have had months of being able to interact with vast numbers of different species where i am in fact. We're terribly worried about trying to understand the behavior of the blue tongue lizard. Who's down a hole in the lawn and different examples of visit. Keep coming out. There's more than one down there. We thought there was solitary. What's going on and similarly with any number we've got about twenty different species of birds. Turn up and i just wonder how. Why is it that human beings seem to have an almost unlimited bio phileas in other words love of any number of creatures we just keen on one or two things. Most people are birds most people have dogs etc but we love almost the lot. Is there an explanation for that. Biofilm world what are nights question one of the things. I got out of detainees that he did see nature. If you like as a kind of theatre of agency. I call it you know. Everything is interdependent dependent on everything else and not necessarily in a competitive way. He believed cooperation. And as you said sometimes it's natural selection takes arrest and intermittent but yet she folded the highest form of civilized. Behavior was marked by our attention to animals. Implants are care of animals and plants. He said that if you look at the peak of civilization that would be when we not only take care of the halton the named and the blind and all the people that we care for who are human but we also care for animals and he actually with his wife. Emma initiated a campaign against the use of steel traps by in large states. Because he thought they were inhumane so he really did think that we were capable of an should identify with many different species. I'm not sure it went to plants. I know he sums had about plums that when he saw seeds which didn't behave as he wanted them to experiment. He called them little demons. The obviously did identify negatively even with seeds and plants. But your book is am i right. One of the very first to write about the psychology as pioneered by darwin. And if so why such a long neglect. Yes i wouldn't have written. It is being another one. Called darwin psychology. Oh which dealt with the idea. That domin was a psychologist. I i wouldn't have written it but it was sort of exciting discovering the nobody osa britain had like. I'm being a psychology for years. It was discovered like discovering new room in my house. And we'll have to explain that it. No one else has written. Well i think i would probably talk about the affair with the gene. I think that when what we call them on the synthesis when the gene i'd view of evolution came out in the nineteen forties. Darwin was rather reconstructed as someone who was congenial to that theory and anything. That wasn't continued to that. Theory dropped from view and so for example. One of the obvious differences between the dahlan. I find in his books in the that i learned about it. University is. I was used to be told that. He viewed organisms as passive objects which were at the mercy of either genes or environment whereas in fact as i say he stresses the agency of organisms events where individual variation comes from. Fats what actually powers the struggle for survival and. That's what powers adaptive radiation so. I think also. The academics aren't literary. They're not interested in reading whole books. They go in with a hypothesis. They look for a quote. They find it because darwin says seventy different things which contradict they find a quote and they go off the happy whereas if you try to read the whole book is light reading dickens. You have to have some time. Yes indeed and he got a few things wrong. Of course he was wrong about some aspect of women's brains and so on and similarly with the races vehicle of the times but having done this my final question really is even though it's not the subject directly of your book. What do you think of darwin psychology. This young man who went out and his brain was so flexible. Richard dawkins thinks he's an absolute auto because he was so sensitive to what was going on he really did look and think and then he retired. He hid in some ways in kent. Well i found him a very good companion for the six or seven years. I was reading him. Richard dawkins is right. He is an extraordinarily sensitive observer and he carried on doing that when he went into seclusion in kate and his psychology is really interesting is a different direction. I think it's more solidly grounded in biology than a present forms of psychology or even evolutionary psychology. because he had such a stable basis from which to work. And so i really applaud in my. I mean of course. There's things that one criticizes you mentioned. But i wish that people would read him. The point of my book is two point. People back to darwin and say we'll just think about what he did. Don't just cherry pick the quotation which happens to your point of view you are actually finding quite a challenging read and his stress on agency and our reading of agency in our reading of other people reading agency and so on their thorough quite complicated ideas. But then you and. I think it's quite fun to find somebody who everybody thinks is an old man with white beard. Who's stuck in victorian times is actually becoming more contemporary. I think both in biology and psychology ben bradlee at charleston university in bathurst where he's professor emeritus of psychology. His book published in the strategy. This week by oxford university. Press is called darwin psychology..

Richard dawkins six Darwin ben bradlee seven years oxford university Emma one parent one bathurst two point both second world war This week nineteen forties two things darwin psychology new south wales darwin dickens
"darwin" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

06:53 min | 5 months ago

"darwin" Discussed on The Science Show

"This is the sign shown aren in. Its forty sixth year by the way charles dominant had his legendary work on the origin of species published in eighteen fifty nine. There have been scores of books on the great man's work but none so far on psychology. It seems till this week and it's author is professor. Benjamin bradley from charles sturt university in bathurst professor. I assume it's the animals. Psychology not darwin's owned. That's exactly right. I think we do learn something about psychology. Because he's work with so much a part of him. And i think his project develop an approach to psychology was very much part of his overall project. But you're right. I'm not doing a psychoanalysis. The man charles. Darwin will in some ways. This is surprising. Talking about darwin himself because when he went out to galapagos something like twenty three and we have a reputation of someone who's clicking clicking beetles collecting all sorts of different creatures inches. You name it and looking at anatomy and therefore looking connections like that but behavior. How much did he sit there and watch these animals wonder about what we're doing. That's a very good question on the galapagos island. He was posed questions which made him think about behavior. So the adaptive radiation of those finches which depends on all sorts of different diets including big nuts and bloodsuckers and tool users who picks spines from cactuses and spear lavi. I think that must have made him think about behavior. And so he was prime day when he came back and began thinking about evolution to include that any scheme of things. And this one. Nice story that i -member enjoying. There's a kind of bird called a scissor beak which hasn't weird bill anatomy including a very big loa bill. And he only understood by watching them fish at dusk where they plow the water with their big bottom bill and so have it and structure always went together with him after that and thirty years after the galapagos he wrote about emotions in animals and the whole point about those emotions is not simply a robot with a kind of collection of different reactions to things. Oh there's fear let's run away. Oh i'm hungry. Let's go looks. He was talking about an emotional learn something they could change their thinking. Yes. that's right. His research on animals even simple animals like earthworms links there purposive movements plants. Even plants had purposive movements for darwin. We've intelligence and even instinct. He always had a little dose of judgment in instinct so when it came to facial expressions one of the foci of my book is on the agency of all living things and how that actually contributes to either lucien as well but certainly central to his psychology so purpose for action. Purposeful movement is his focus but with facial expressions the intelligence is actually in the observer of the facial expression the facial expression itself. He called purposeless so the meaning. Come from how it is perceived other animals all human beings interesting. You mentioned plants just now. How could plant have a psychology. Good one is nowadays. You do see talk about the would wide web and all sorts of plant intelligence but he studied climbing plants particularly and also the roots of things like cabbages and beans and he used to set them problems like the radical. The i root of cabbage seed goes down into the earth it's gio tropic and he used to sit in problems by putting glass in their way and so on so forth and he watched them and he came to the conclusion sort of problem solved so he didn't quite get the point of saying that they were intelligent but he did propose that in their route and growing tips. There was something like a brain so he got close now. Let's leap straight from plants to people and work of our respective partners. My partner dr. Jon newby did film and catalyst the catalyst that involved your wife and looking babies now. The babies are considered to be pretty well little automatons until they're about two or three two if they go three if their boys now if you just watch these creatures sees babies in group together signals. You don't really notice unless you're looking for them. What have you and your wife in fact. This is in your book. Found about the way these babies interact. The thing they do is that they're able to both respond to and engage with more than montalva the baby at once so we put three or four babies together in a group about the age of eight months. And one of the things we've done is if you measure where three babies are looking. You can predict whether fourth one we'll look and so they're obviously clocking everyone in the group and this is very hard to explain. According to the dominant theory which assumes that human sociability is built on a one to one basis. Which is the prototype is mother and baby or parent and baby so yes. That was really a curly. Finding we couldn't find an easy way of explaining that and darwin. I discovered after doing this. He actually can explain. That partly attracted me to run the ball. What do you say well. He makes a big distinction in his work between animals who aren't social animals who are social and eaten plumps social like this autumn grasses and he says they evolve in different ways social a non-social animals and crucial concept for him is mutually social animals. Help others other members of their group and in the human case he believed that the big step towards making us human beings was when we began living in groups so we didn't just have to adapt to the physical environment. A primary thing was adopting the social environment. And yet he says at one point in the centre man that it would be more important for a child to relate to all the members of the group than to its mother because the mother might die and if it had good links to the rest of the group then it would survive in fact the group was interacting with them. Far more than then perhaps happens. Now yes well. That's true. And i think that's the reason we've become so fixated on the idea that there's one parent in the house. A this theory grew up in the fifties and sixties when perhaps chart.

Benjamin bradley three babies dr. one parent four babies eight months charles charles sturt university Darwin forty sixth year both twenty three three fifty nine this week earth fourth one one one point Jon newby
"darwin" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

05:33 min | 7 months ago

"darwin" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"To start improving your photography today. The second voyage of the beagle was one of the most profound in the history of science. Originally the ship was set out on a two year expedition to improve nautical maps around south america with the independence of argentina and chile and the opening of trade with these countries. The british needed proper maps for their ships. What are the big components of the expedition was determining the longitude of various places around south america. They took twenty two clocks with them. Which is how they would measure longitude briefly talked about this on my history of timekeeping episode. And i'll probably do a future episode on longitude and how that problem was solved. One of the passengers on the ship was a young twenty two year. Old named charles darwin. He was on the ship in the role of a naturalist. Antibiotics as the captain of the ship thought it would be useful to have such a person on board the two year voyage of the beagle turned into a five year voyage. The initial investigation of the waters around south america expanded into visiting many of the islands in the pacific new zealand. Australia and eventually circumnavigating the globe during expedition. Darwin actually spent three of the five years on land taking notes finding fossils and making observations about zoology. He encountered along the way the result of his observations was on the origin of species. Perhaps the most revolutionary book in the history of biology. The book was published in eighteen. Fifty nine twenty three years after the beagle completed its journey however before he published that he published something else as part of the expedition. The british navy asked darwin to investigate and map coral atolls. The navy had a vested interest in knowing more about atolls given the threat they pose to ships. F holes are circular islands made up of sand and ringed with coral reefs. Coral reefs are extremely dangerous to ships especially wouldn't ships. They often lie. Just below the waterline and can devastate wouldn't schiphol's and they would often appear out of nowhere. In the middle of the ocean. During the voyage and in between the study of birds and other wildlife darwin made observations and maps of all of the coral reefs encountered. His maps of atolls. Were really good. Many ocean offers have commented on how they could still be used today as they were so accurate. Darwin noticed that there were roughly three types of coral reefs. Fringing reefs barrier reefs and atolls fringe reefs are where coral is right next to the beach. You could literally step or swim. Not far from the beach and coral would be right there. Many of the reefs in the caribbean are fringe reeves. A barrier reef is similar in composition to a fringe reef. but they're further out from shore. There are some sort of space between the reef and the mainland. A barrier reef can sometimes surrounded island with a lagoon inside. Finally there are atolls as i mentioned tolls tend to be roughly circular in shape within islands. They don't stick out much over the water and usually have a high point of no more than a meter above sea level. Fun fact there are four countries in the world that are made entirely of coral atolls. The maldives the marshall islands. Kiribati darwin's ideas were published in the paper in eighteen forty two titled the structure and distribution of coral reefs being the first part of the geology of the voyage of the beagle under the command of captain fitzroy royal navy during the years. Eighteen thirty to eighteen thirty six. That was quite a mouthful for a title. Darwin notice that there seems to be a progression in the way that reefs formed around islands. Let's take for example the hawaiian islands which was not visited by darwin on his voyage. But it makes for a good example. The big island doesn't have much..

Darwin south america Australia charles darwin twenty two clocks second voyage twenty two year three chile argentina five years four countries two year voyage one first part two year expedition today five year voyage pacific new zealand british
Fault Tolerant Distributed Gradient Descent

Data Skeptic

06:36 min | 7 months ago

Fault Tolerant Distributed Gradient Descent

"Hello my name is native. And i'm a computer scientist. Gay as opposed to grow researcher at ebay university switzerland. I work on distributed computations. Specifically i work on. Algorithms concerning distribution optimization disrupted consensus and distributed collaborations systems soi robotics and online voting and in this particular eighty of research. I mainly focus on darwin's by indeed for owners many avi considered networks. There's some of the notes in the networks are militias adversarial or they're just forty. And how does this affect the oral fixation off the elegant now. This is something that's interesting to me in my engineering part of the brain working for big company. I'd say well we can control all of our nodes about some rogue employees or something. But i guess outside of a company the world really runs on bigger systems. How common are these sort of peer to peer distributed problems in people's everyday lives definitely. I made for example. Just consider our current situation which is the ongoing pandemic. Let's see your these. Scooby trackers right you have these scored trackers on your phones than you. Are gary these records with the sword these strikers in vancouver you go in close proximity to someone else that say who might annette it or who might in recent history being tested positive so this gives you a notification. Hey you know you gaming on equity this person and he was the best positive so you may want to take some precautions. Analysts say based on these kind of trackers companies and government started building policies. Just imagine how difficult it would be if someone starts messing around for example. Let's say be Falsely claimed themselves as high-risk saying that. I just hires Ever i'm a Is also is that would discreet Rice appear to be systems are already there used is just a v are naively ignoring the fact that some of the notes in the systems be malicious authority. Fonte just like internet. You have millions of notes on the net not everything. Not everything is on the cloud on server controlled by big or big komen administration. They are so many of these notes that are spreading misinformation they have destroying to disrupt the internet for example you might have heard of. Thanks like jamming attacks Jammed the settlers despite sandy query. So you know these kinds of notes vais fairly common in our everyday use in suggests we get to hear them band. There's a big disaster. Or there's an actual big down of these systems when i started learning about distributed computing and of course it was called big data at the time. One of the first examples is term frequencies so in a lot of documents you the percentage of times you see something that often gets labeled as embarrassingly parallel because you just want to frequency. You need the numerator divided by the denominator and it's easy to divide that problem up and rejoin it but not. Every problem is so embarrassingly easy to solve. What about your specific research into gradient descent. What makes that one hard to do in a distributed fashion. You had distributed Any one this networks to be useful to the specific problem. Let's say that you are trying to solve for example as you just mentioned either. You're trying to get the frequency of a border from documents spent on the internet or let's take a step forward but apps you are trying to build some kind of image classified so different notes on the have different data sets. Let's say images of their dogs. And you want to use these images of dogs neck so many images of those who could be a very strong image classic fire for dogs something that would dismantle the human ability declassified at all so you wanna less this complicated Now designing image classified using all these distribution data said on the internet different notes having different data points. It's quite complicated even when you have all the data points at one body a machine. It's a headline. more of the. The sets are divided in different machines so to ensure that comes like these like machine learning run smoothly when certain nodes in the network militias spinal challenging not descending. It's very interesting to study. How these types can be done. Smoothly on gedeon descent is specific That is by far the was algorithm used from sheet lending pieces and what happens ingredient descent. Is you have these different. Data sets distributed on different notes. Therefore defend nodes have different loss functions. Now what we are trying to do now in this district. Setting is minimized the aggregate of all these functions are loss functions. Now when you're doing this by nature the most commonly use angry gradients design. Because it's naturally distributed many obligingly send it just reduces at the gradients of loss functions in each round. Or so if you're learning and gordon to when you're adding these gradients together some notes are not going to provide you ladies of los angeles. They may be forty. May be broadway. You re totally incorrect. Greediest maybe designed maliciously innovate to move you. words solution. that famous day goes data points. They may favor. Let's say dogs of a burglary or some other panels notions. Maybe they want to completely rendered the classification problem useless. They want to maybe instead of dog. Trained you the classify so as you can see ensuring that is reputed gradient descent runs smoothly at least within some reasonable dominates in residents of such Notes is of practically at this point vendor. You have all this The algorithms training using data sets coming from all sorts of people on it.

Ebay University Komen Administration Darwin Switzerland Annette Gary Vancouver Gedeon Rice Gordon Los Angeles
Take a Trip To the Island of Crete

Travel with Rick Steves

04:33 min | 7 months ago

Take a Trip To the Island of Crete

"Let's start today's show with a look at what you can find when you visit the largest of the greek islands crete. It's where the earliest advanced civilizations in europe were found more than four thousand years ago. We're joined by greek travel. Experts david and anastacia guy tanu. Our conversation was recorded prior to the covid. Pandemic closures david. How're cretans. The people who live on crete different from greeks and their outlook. I don't think there's a proud of person to be found in greece than creighton. Credence are extremely proud of their long history. There island and they're wonderful food. The people from crete really see themselves as being a little bit different to the people from the greek mainland anesthesia. When you think of the pride of crete people and the traditions. How does that survive in their dress. In the way the look when we travel there you can find that still worn by older people in the largest cities bad. You find it definitely in out in the country and in small villages and the further up you go on the mountains the more you find that and you have this. Very particular scoff. That they were on their head. It's black of course and usually there is also big moustache underneath definitely because that's Masculine thing and they have a black shirt in. They have brown trousers. That up. The very distinct and to create and usually black boots and i was struck when i went to crete that these traditions survive more there than elsewhere in europe. I mean everything's becoming modern in the same issue travel around more and more but increased. You do find those traditions alive David i was an increase just last june and having been there for a while i was wondering with ride. See some of these things like the old britches and the long boots and the the coach but to my great surprise they have not disappeared in fact they've now become trendy and symbols for the young symbols for the young. Would that be. Is that sort of an expression of independence. I think it's because they see themselves different and they wanted to let people know that they're proud of their traditions. There's lot of guns returned. There used to be synonymous with crate guns. But you see less of these days although when you go walking plenty of cartridges from the hunting season is that right what would they be hunting farm firm and anything that moves birds. Rabbits has if you're an athens. How easy is it to get down to create. It couldn't be more simple because there's Boats that do the trip overnight. And there's lots of lights with a gna so let's see you got five days crete. What would you do david. If you're helping me plan my very if going have five days. I would stick to the north and i would stick to iraq leo which is the capital and access point fo the famous minoan palace of knossos. And then i would go across honey. Which is the second city on crete. And it's just a beautiful Old venetian city from honey. Can't you go up to the top of the mountain in hike down the gorge of samaria. Have you ever had that. yes i have. what's it like. well you have a very long descend and the beginning. It's in kilometers about four kilometers to go down. You just go down a winding backing back inbound down and then you move through the gorge. But they're really beautiful spots at that gorge in you meet people. There are people there. There is once goal the gate in the result shepherd they who knows of course every guide and every person who goes often through that gorge unusually. He has cheese. And if you know you can well he can bring some other stuff out as well and you see. Also a lot of the very unique flora and fauna of crete and the. Raise your liking usually. You're uc wild ibex. That they have their only on crete and has a very funny name. Actually it's called click critically. Can i xe david. If i remember correctly the tourist generally catch a minibus or something up for the almost like at sunrise and then they walk switch backing down then. They have a long hike along the river with little places to swim along the way they reach a very very narrow part in the gorge where you can almost stretch your arms out and touch either of the sheer cliffs and then at the bottom you have a beautiful remote beach and boat waiting to take you to the next town from where you catch the shuttle bus back to your home. Base is still basically the routine that is still the routine la. They have come up with an alternative for the lazy person who does not want to do the whole walk. You can take a boat to. I think it's really the base of the gorge and you can do what they say. The gorge short way. When you simply walk up to the iron gates and walk back again undone to all the other stuff okay. So there is for the quick tourist and for the person wants to spend a little more

Greek Islands Crete Anastacia Guy Tanu David Crete Europe Creighton Famous Minoan Palace Of Knosso Greece Athens Samaria Iraq LA
Australia will lift weekly caps on international arrivals in an effort to get stranded citizens home

AFF on AIR Podcast

04:39 min | 8 months ago

Australia will lift weekly caps on international arrivals in an effort to get stranded citizens home

"Be back but first. Let's begin with a roundup of the latest airline and frequent flyer news from the past fortnight and fiscally moist ustralian states will restore their international arrival caps to pre-january levels from monday. The fifteenth of february following a decision at yesterday's national cabinet meeting but western australia will retain its reduced arrival cap of just five hundred twelve passengers per week until further notice as perf emerged yesterday from its five day. Covid nineteen lockdown from the fifteenth of february new south. Wales will again double number of passengers at takes per week to just over three thousand queensland will restore its capacity from five hundred to a thousand a week and victoria will increase slightly as well as the stralia. The increase in rival caps is welcome news of course for the many trillion. Still desperately trying to return home from overseas but even with lost months capacity increase out the howard springs facility near darwin. The new arrival caps as of february are still below the old caps that were in place before January when the government temporarily half those caps in in many of the states prior to lost month's reduction australia had the capacity to accept around six thousand nine hundred weekly arrivals overseas including three the howard springs facility. The number right now is about four thousand five hundred fifty per week and this will increase from the fifteenth of february to around six thousand. Eight hundred weekly arrivals which is still just below what it was a ago. The government recently said that around thirty six thousand trillions currently registered with dave fat as being stuck overseas and this number has been repeated many times in the media as representing the number of australians. Trying to return but the tree number is likely far haya as many of the papal trying to come to his trail. You have not registered with fat qantas will wet lease up to fourteen embraer. One hundred ninety regional jets from alliance airlines for the next three years qantas plans to take delivery of. Its first three least jets in june this year for use on routes between adelaide. Alice springs and darwin the jets will be crewed by alliance airlines pilots and flight attendants but flights will be marketed by qantas in have accused flight. Number corner says that the nineties which have ten business class seats and four economy seats are the right size for flights between some of australia's regional centers and smaller capital cities. Lie ellen routes like alice springs to adelaide while also offering a great range. Then qantas links. Boeing seven one seven. The nineties can fly for up to five hours. Singapore airlines full service regional subsidiary silkair has been merged into the singapore airlines brand. Singapore airlines will gradually take over service on suk's existing routes starting with flights between singapore and pikit from the fourth of march. Nine of silk as boeing seven three seven eight hundred will eventually be transferred to the parent company and although the merger has been finalized at the moment with many of the airlines. Flights grounded covid nineteen. This was already planned a well before the pandemic began soak it has been a full service. Regional airline since it began operations in nineteen ninety-two but it had been viewed by some as the poor cousin of singapore airlines singapore airlines is now addressing some of these concerns by reupholstering. The seats on its silkair planes. It will also introduce a singapore airlines dining experience on regional flights including book the cook in business clause and on routes over five hours saute skew is fascinating business clause including on routes like hands to singapore which was previously so k. Route these seven three seven flights will also now be stopped by singapore airlines trained cabin crew wearing these singapore airlines uniform. And chris whoa in-flight entertainment will be available to stream on passengers. I devices these flights will also now be part of the star alliance which is great news for frequent flyers with star alliance partner airlines. He previously got no benefits when they were put onto a silkair flight. Although there's no change velocity members because velocity already made a upon of both silkair and singapore airlines qatar airways emirates and cathay pacific are among the latest group of airlines to provide a second year of t. Status extensions to their frequent flyers. Almost every airline gave as you probably know. Twelve months status extension to top team embassy in two thousand and twenty g to the covid nineteen pandemic and the associated travel restrictions which made it difficult for people to retain this status otherwise. But it's now quite clear that the travel restrictions and get lost in some form for longer than one year and so many airlines on out. Granting a second year of status extensions all existing silver gold and

Howard Springs Facility Qantas National Cabinet Dave Fat Silkair Darwin Singapore Airlines Singapore Adelaide Singapore Airlines Brand Western Australia Pikit Haya Australia Queensland Wales Singapore Airlines Singapore A Victoria Alice Springs
Johnson and Johnson says single-shot COVID-19 vaccine is 85 percent effective

Bloomberg Businessweek

06:39 min | 8 months ago

Johnson and Johnson says single-shot COVID-19 vaccine is 85 percent effective

"What's going on. When it comes to Cove in 19, and more specifically, Pursuit for more vaccines because we've got some big news from J and J Today. In fact, it's our top story on the Bloomberg In the past hour, Johnson and Johnson's one shot vaccine generating strong protection Against covered 19. They did him a large late stage trials, raising hopes that it can rapidly reshape US stumbling immunization campaign. We know the role. It has been really tough, but you've been pointing to the numbers preventing 66% Moderate to severe cases of covert 19, according to the company. Particularly effective stopping severe disease is preventing 85% of severe infections and 100% of hospitalizations and deaths. That's the number you've been focusing on. And it's a big one. All right, let's bring in our guest post op pulls his vice chairman of the executive committee, a change a also chief scientific officer at J and J and he joins us on the phone or actions should say Zoom. From New Brunswick, New Jersey. We also do want to welcome our Bloomberg TV audience. Who is joining who are joining us at this time? Um, Paul, it is so nice to have you here with us. First of all, Thank you so much and welcome. Talk to us about the findings. There's some difference statistics in terms of the efficacy. What is it that we need to zero and in on and what's really the most significant your view? So we did a very large study of 45,000 people in the US South America in Latin America in a totally different environment, where now huge transmission but also many variants or presence, and what we saw is that in the high in the severe disease We got a very high protection 85% against severe disease as well as 100% for death and hospitalization, and that across the entire study, including the South African study, and why is that important? That's 6000 people in South Africa, and we found that 90% of this train spread inside African strains, and we got even a better we got from 89% perfection in South Africa against the severe disease that 100% against hospitalization and other begins percent against that, so that shows that the vaccine is applications in in severe disease. Smell us against significant new strains. Given the results of this study, do you expect new and even more powerful variants to emerge in the future? Yeah, we have to stay very vigilant. There's so much fire a virus replication in the world. And now new vaccines being used and the virus is following the Darwin principles. The fittest survive, and they will take over as in in that race, And so you will see probably more variants. But strong immunity, antibody immunity and so immunity probably can overcome that. But we have to stay very vigilant and we have been able to do that with a single does, and I think that is going to be very effective in faster allowed as we are making a billion dollars in the course of the year. Well, let's talk about that. Because when you talked with our David Westin last fall, Paul, that's exactly what you talked about A billion doses you anticipated for 2021. So that's a real number. You expect it And can you give us an idea? That billion dose roll out. What does it look like over the next few months? So at the moment we are, we are setting up many of manufacturing plants in late stage. We are getting approval from different regulators in the world on that, so it's in full upscaling. And as we will deliver a billion over the year, it will be region by region, country by country. We work with the government to discuss on how much will be available when it will come in equivocator, but we are confident that we will be able to make Provide a billion in the course of the year. But what does that mean that? I mean, obviously, you've got get the emergency approval. So give me an idea of what the timeline is. I think we're all kind of Fixated on getting the vaccine so that our life can get back to normal. So what does the emergency approval process look like? And then when you actually anticipate getting vaccines into arms, and then at what rate Them so we will submit a filing next week. So we know that the data now for three days, we We worked on it that we finalized. That's what we published today. Next week will submit And then the FDA and Emma will have to do their work. The European fella to use a U. S agency will start their work and most likely towards the end of February will have an advisory panel bending of course decision off the FDA and then we'll see getting approval. Emergency use approve. Full and then in March will be able to start living vaccine. So you think a realistic timeline for us to actually receive Johnson and Johnson single dose vaccine would be March? It will start in the month of March, but they're also with US government. We have made an agreement over this off for several for 400 million vaccines to start with, I will keep up to that agreement to be able to deliver that. I'm wondering how you see this shot being used in the context of this is you call Pandemic Recovery tool kit, you know, especially fitting in with the Amarna vaccines that we see from during a and Fizer As well. The rollout of those has has been really tough here in the United States. There's been a lot of speed bumps, but you don't have to keep this one at a temperature for very, very cold temperature for a significant period of time. I mean, they're a lot of differences here. How do you see the rollout working in the context of these other vaccines? Well, it's it your point of the right thing. It's a single dose. So it one shot. You get this protection starting day 14 and and if you know, mature, said 28 even lot longer, so that goes fast. And then it It has to do it Celsius, which is normal refrigeration temperature for stability for three months so we can distribute in the country at normal refrigeration, which allows to get fractionated almost in every health care center pharmacy in a very simple way s O and that that will help and the single shot combined with that. And a high efficacy poor for severe disease. That hospitalization can have a very important effect. In addition, very short, very clean safety profile we have. We have not observed serious adverse events. No, an electric shock so further to be evaluated by the regulators. But that will also be an attractive feature with the very favorable safety profile. So that means that people who perhaps have not been in who had been advised against getting Marnie vaccine, This could be an option for them. Be an option, but it will be determined by the authorities who will get access first as this is emergency use application. It's ah, it will be distributed by the government. Hey,

Severe Disease Johnson David Westin South Africa Paul New Brunswick United States Bloomberg Latin America South America New Jersey J FDA U. Emma
Interview With Dustin Marks, A Former Crossroader

Gangland Wire

05:01 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Dustin Marks, A Former Crossroader

"Welcome all you are. Tappers out there today Have our friend mob museum blogger larry. Henry and larry also is a regular blogger for the casino industry at www dot. Casino dot org. You might wanna check lessons website. Www dot destined marks dot com. You can find his book cheating black. Jackie may learn something. Maybe can go out and win a whole bunch of money at blackjack. Is that lose it like i do. Welcome destined welcome. Thanks larry good to have you here. Great to be here gary thanks. Hi dustin looking forward to it so it'll be fun so dustin you're a crush rotor. I- learned that term on your website that a gaming cheat in the casino industry is called a crossroad. Her now are you a crossroad. Are you a magician. You started out as a magician. Ombo but i'm retired crossroad. And i just don't do the magic across rivers. A person who specializes in cheating. The legal casinos and i was mainly doing the crossroad in las vegas nevada and nevada but mainly grace and this was back in the knits so destined. You got your start as magician. Tell me a little bit about how you got your start as a magician amid just come to you. Natural ngop just growled to cartridge or actually My father took me to see an amateur medicines front of the family as just seven years old. And he's older provenance sixties. Now didn't move very well but the mad at those cards in his hand he became young again and it just looked like magic to me out. Flip right then and there. So did you start like plan with decks of cards and learn how to shuffle them. Fancy and manipulate them and hold them own. Yeah but back then. There is no youtube or even videos library and get magic and try to figure out how to do the card tricks. Manipulations have maze. All your friends with your card tricks. Yeah of course yes very young so my audience besides my parents. Yeah really did you continue on as a young man. Did you try to earn a living as a magician and always happy who is more of a hobby than i went to college when he's throwing clinton fraternity had all the active members. Think i could read their minds. Wouldn't mess with me as much nagging. Little shows and stuff and i got really really interested in magic and i started buying books now over mateen nineteen twenty and i started realize all the best card meant that mainly to card magic lived in las vegas nevada and these were just magician. Jimmy ripple michelson. All hairs garo list goes on and on so. That's what really made me move to las vegas nevada back in nineteen eighty-three to learn more about magic. And i guess there's a lot of work for magic axe would imagine out there interesting. So how did you want you got out there. Did you immediately think these cartridge If i can manipulate the cars. Could i then go in. Earn electra. money at the casinos by manipulating cards. Not immediately there was are still going is called. Jerry darwin's magic. They started in the seventies. So i found out about it. Eighty-three took there's no internet took me about couple of months track down. We're in the hill net. A finally found worthing. Matinee met at that time wednesday night. Starting at nine pm so remember walking in there the first night in there i see allen akard i see paul hairs i see jimmy group all naser. All names familiar with. Is i their books back in the mid west room from and they were very friendly they welcomed me and showed me stuff so in about nine then months went from like ten percent. The ninety percent is studying with the best world. Wow really exciting for somebody never met anybody in the magic field per say what would be an example of something that they taught you. That was like to me would look like magic. Where would be an example of a lot of it was principles more than the actual moves. How not to look guilty. When you're doing a move out of being natural how to use misdirection. You can't catch anything if your attention is over here. And i'm doing something over there. That's the whole concept. Not just for magic but for now cheating at the game of blackjack any game so is managed. Somebody's attention interesting. Really really interesting. And then of course it showed me moves at one even both shad stuff. They were working on so it was really a fantastic education.

Larry Nevada Gary Thanks Dustin Las Vegas Jimmy Ripple Michelson Jackie Henry Jerry Darwin Allen Akard Paul Hairs Youtube Clinton Jimmy
Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

PODSHIP EARTH

09:33 min | 8 months ago

Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

"Berta. Volt from more than one. Hundred and fifty million years ago and then explosively diversified culminating in more than ten thousand species distributed worldwide. Today are human. Relationship to beds is complex to seen as spirit messengers of the gods and at the same time. We took the wild red jungle fowl. From india and selectively bred into domesticated chickens the now farmed in cages feathers have been used for thousands of years and indigenous headpieces and at the same time but has like parrots and parakeets a kept as pets bird poop called guana was used as the first fertilize of modern agriculture. And charles darwin study of galapagos finches was to the formulation of evolution. Buds are all around us. We are closer to bed than any other wild animals birds. I literally and figuratively are canaries in the coal mine. Their wellbeing is our wellbeing threats to buds range from habitat loss including logging climate change industrial farming with pesticides invasive species and even cats. These will had a devastating impact on the bird populations of the us and canada. Which in just the last fifty years have declined by. Three billion birds danton insane. Thirty percent of all birds gone. Three billion pez of wings have vanished ever across our continent from sea to shining sea. Luckily birds have strong allies in their corner. There an estimated sixty million active bird watches in the us alone and with the pandemic shutting down so much of our country. We have flocking to bird watching like never before everything from bird feeders. To binoculars have been in short supply and this year the birding app e bird collected more sightings in a single day the was admitted during the first two and a half years of the apps existence. I must admit coming late to the bird-watching pardee. But thanks to dr meredith williams. That's about to change. I'm lucky enough to work with meredith every day in her role. Running one of the most important and complex agencies in california governor. The department of toxic substance control. Dr williams received two undergraduate degree from yale and a doctorate in physics from north carolina. State university meredith then worked and silicon valley fortune. Five hundred companies in the technology consumer product and chemical sectors meredith left the private sector to follow her passion for wetlands and birds and led the san francisco estuary institute as we'll hear. Meredith journey is about so much more than her resume. Meredith nine meet apt get ready for my maiden watching invention merit so we're about to go hopefully bed watching what. What do we need to bring with us while like what. What's what's in the bird watching backpack almost nothing. Which is great binoculars. Of course are your starting point. So i hope you have some inaugurals. I know you were looking for some recently. You gave me some good advice. But i get any but we all kind of professional but what just like you would have an extra pair. Do thought so. It's in the office but we could stop on the way out of town. Not of that sound. No we should. We should yeah. You just kind of out now. Okay okay so you got the binoculars. How do you if you're starting out. It's surprising how good have gotten very affordable these days so i mean it's still a lot to invest but ask a bird watcher. They might have an extra pair. That's the first place you might wanna try like them. What do you well. first of. All there are lots of different kinds of birdwatchers in terms of some people. Want to count every burden get really long list. And they track every single birthday they see. It's about the numbers of the that very unique bird and they chase vagrant birds that fly in unusually and they're rushing off to see that bird so there those kind of bird watchers I'm a bird watcher. Just watch one bird for a long time. I liked bird behavior. just i'm just fascinated by them. And i think they're beautiful so i could just end up watching one bird for for quite a while you can just take it. In at whatever level you want in terms of the variety birds that you could see and how you would just experience them and enjoy them. So and i think the only way to find that out is to bert. Watch a little and see what grabs you What you do sounds really peaceful. The first thing that sounds the first thing sounds more. Like in england as a whole breed of people go train spotters and i always kind of identified them with bird watchers. Like it's really about. How many things. You've you've been able to capture and less about the bird the thing that you'll doing just sounds like being a peaceful will watching another animal even the people who are energized. That way unless they're doing a big day which would be a day when they map it out to see as many birds as they can. In a single day they're not necessarily rushing around even they are going to have moments of really enjoying a bird and even somebody like me chased around golden gate park looking for a rare warbler. That's very rarely in san francisco. There's an amiability amongst birdwatchers is really camaraderie. People are so nice. There's always somebody better in terms of being a better bird watcher. Meaning they either can identify birds better or you know they just have a lot of experience for the a little bit about. The ecology and people are so happy to share their information. That it's really wonderful. That's one of the things i like about it. And it tends to be every now and then you get into group and there'll be somebody who's a little loud but by and large the the folks are really kind of it's easy to get in a groove with with birdwatchers and settled and gopher along stroll and see some great birds. But what's there everywhere that it's a it's a big i mean like it huge movement and it's growing apparently it's one of the fastest growing outdoor activities. There is it's it is just kind of crazy places where i been going for ten years and cues to be just me and five or six friends maybe and now parking lot and i think the pandemic has made it even more so where a lot of people. That's how they wanna get outdoors or they've they've just kind of discovering it because they know it is one of the only ways to be outdoors so i think it's going to continue to grow which i think is great because then more people are connected to the natural world which obviously makes them care about it more. How did you get into meredith like what. What was your journey into bed watching. I mean i liked birds always in the yard growing up in ohio. You know the robbins and the blue jays. There was a hill in town. And i used to ride my bike up in the hill early in the morning and i would always see birdwatchers and i said when i'm old air quotes. I'm going to bird watch. And i kind of that seed was planted but i didn't really bird-watching until my three say in my thirties. I started volunteering for the san francisco. Bay national wildlife refuges. That you know are on the perimeter of the bay. You know them well getting restored a lot of them Back to title harsh. And i when i volunteered i would be doing everything from pulling out. Invasive plants to building shells but there are always birds around and i just became more and more and more fascinated with the birds invested in binoculars and just started creeping in. You join the audubon society and suddenly you're getting news about different outings and the next thing you know you're you're pretty far in foreign now. I'm foreign. I'm not pretty far and have taken a couple bird vacations. Which i think says that. I'm pretty far in. But what do those entail. The longest trip i took was to go to brazil to the pantanal. Which is a very large wetland like the mecca of bud watching their many mecca. It is a mecca over the course of two weeks. We just went out every morning. We get up before sunrise. Be moving by six o'clock at the latest. Usually more like five thirty and we went to a place that's called the parrot crater a giant sinkhole. And it's all a lot of parents live down in the sinkhole. And so you look down. A new parrots lying around in a simple it was tremendous and we ended up seen two hundred different species of birds there along with some giant giant eaters river otter is and it was quite a trip but the birds were spectacular.

Guana Meredith Dr Meredith Williams Department Of Toxic Substance Dr Williams San Francisco Estuary Institut Meredith Journey Berta Danton Charles Darwin Pardee United States India State University North Carolina Canada Bert Golden Gate Park
"darwin" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:44 min | 9 months ago

"darwin" Discussed on Science Friction

"Yes sir dra okay. All over the world spotted another one. Sorry wearies leash. She'll need gone. I have devoted much time to a class of plants that seem to have reversed the regular order of nature and like avengers of kingdom have turned upon animals incarcerating and finally killing them whether the plants are really hungry and entrapped the animals for food or whether it is only an example of the wanton destructiveness of nature. I leave the reader to judge. Mary treat eighteen eighty five throughout history. The gripe botanical artists have often been women but were many of them infect scientists to just without the endorsement of the botanical establishment which often shunned or ignored them. The paintbrush deemed more appropriate tool for a lady than a microscope. I guess botany has always been an interesting one. Because i suppose that the study of flowers and plants historically was maybe seen as a bit more of a suitable pursuit for the women feminine because of flowers and that sort of thing but still it still also quite mild eliminated. I guess in terms of the scholars in that field throughout history. Well one determined woman on a farm in weight belt western. Australia defied the odds and changed. How the world sore australia's incredible carnivorous plants and listen to artists. So with laura skates of botanical scientist doing her phd on carnivorous plants. Right now i am taking you down a bush trial in pursuit of his story. Oh is that it. Oh cute so this is actually one of the climbing ones. That i was just talking about so you sixty centimeters long and it's just spreading out of an embankment. He and a lot more of them seem to have caught prey on this one. I think it might be dresser. Menzies the i ultra ceramic grant though draw sarah makram throw or the bridal rainbow with its little sunlight sticky leaves hence the name sanju. It was a man. English naturalist biologist charles darwin n-i-l-l-a-s who is a first credited with helping us understand that coniferous plants lived off flesh. Here's particularly interested in dresser. There's a european species coatdress harare folio which he did a lot of his experiments on so he would put different things on the leaves like for example. He would put a piece of sand orbit of gloss and not really see any reaction. But if you put something like little piece of aig or some meat juices suddenly the plant would have reaction to that and the tentacles would start to wrap around. So what he basically showed is that these plants are reacting to substances that have not to general protein in them so so the plants i almost instantaneously they know not that'd be the descend concrete that <hes>. Cheese like an eight that. Yeah exactly so you know. They don't waste any energy wrapping around something. That's not going to be nutritious. They instead wraparound when it's going to be something that will give them a good boost. Trajan i mean even in my phd. Thesis i go right back to dahlan's original studies and some of his original thoughts and ideas of things that with testing to this day and so he really liked the groundwork for the foundation. Full kind of verse plant research but one american woman was on the case of carnivorous plants. Around the same time as darwin. I will give you my observations on draw surra which seemed to have escaped the notice of botanists and she's struck up a correspondence with darwin in a series of letters from eighteen. Seventy one four years before he got to publishing his influential book on insect diverse plants. I had two or three species of these pretty plants growing for window ornaments and soon saw the deal on. The folio was a fly trap of considerable power when it comes to congress plants. One of the women that i kind of came across in my studies was married trait and i came across her. Because he in allen's book insectivores plants. There was a little footnote. That talked about what mary trait had done to contribute to that particular chapter and i thought wow. Who's mrs trait. I want to find out more about him.

sir dra sarah makram dahlan charles darwin australia darwin mary trait Diem adam Menzies Mary curbs laura harare Trajan Professor gray aig Mrs mary Mary bush congress
The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia

Science Friction

04:44 min | 9 months ago

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia

"Yes sir dra okay. All over the world spotted another one. Sorry wearies leash. She'll need gone. I have devoted much time to a class of plants that seem to have reversed the regular order of nature and like avengers of kingdom have turned upon animals incarcerating and finally killing them whether the plants are really hungry and entrapped the animals for food or whether it is only an example of the wanton destructiveness of nature. I leave the reader to judge. Mary treat eighteen eighty five throughout history. The gripe botanical artists have often been women but were many of them infect scientists to just without the endorsement of the botanical establishment which often shunned or ignored them. The paintbrush deemed more appropriate tool for a lady than a microscope. I guess botany has always been an interesting one. Because i suppose that the study of flowers and plants historically was maybe seen as a bit more of a suitable pursuit for the women feminine because of flowers and that sort of thing but still it still also quite mild eliminated. I guess in terms of the scholars in that field throughout history. Well one determined woman on a farm in weight belt western. Australia defied the odds and changed. How the world sore australia's incredible carnivorous plants and listen to artists. So with laura skates of botanical scientist doing her phd on carnivorous plants. Right now i am taking you down a bush trial in pursuit of his story. Oh is that it. Oh cute so this is actually one of the climbing ones. That i was just talking about so you sixty centimeters long and it's just spreading out of an embankment. He and a lot more of them seem to have caught prey on this one. I think it might be dresser. Menzies the i ultra ceramic grant though draw sarah makram throw or the bridal rainbow with its little sunlight sticky leaves hence the name sanju. It was a man. English naturalist biologist charles darwin n-i-l-l-a-s who is a first credited with helping us understand that coniferous plants lived off flesh. Here's particularly interested in dresser. There's a european species coatdress harare folio which he did a lot of his experiments on so he would put different things on the leaves like for example. He would put a piece of sand orbit of gloss and not really see any reaction. But if you put something like little piece of aig or some meat juices suddenly the plant would have reaction to that and the tentacles would start to wrap around. So what he basically showed is that these plants are reacting to substances that have not to general protein in them so so the plants i almost instantaneously they know not that'd be the descend concrete that Cheese like an eight that. Yeah exactly so you know. They don't waste any energy wrapping around something. That's not going to be nutritious. They instead wraparound when it's going to be something that will give them a good boost. Trajan i mean even in my phd. Thesis i go right back to dahlan's original studies and some of his original thoughts and ideas of things that with testing to this day and so he really liked the groundwork for the foundation. Full kind of verse plant research but one american woman was on the case of carnivorous plants. Around the same time as darwin. I will give you my observations on draw surra which seemed to have escaped the notice of botanists and she's struck up a correspondence with darwin in a series of letters from eighteen. Seventy one four years before he got to publishing his influential book on insect diverse plants. I had two or three species of these pretty plants growing for window ornaments and soon saw the deal on. The folio was a fly trap of considerable power when it comes to congress plants. One of the women that i kind of came across in my studies was married trait and i came across her. Because he in allen's book insectivores plants. There was a little footnote. That talked about what mary trait had done to contribute to that particular chapter and i thought wow. Who's mrs trait. I want to find out more about him.

Sir Dra Sarah Makram Australia Menzies Mary Charles Darwin Dahlan Laura Harare Bush AIG Trajan Darwin Mary Trait Congress Allen
A wild and whimsical world of flesh-eating plants

Science Friction

05:11 min | 9 months ago

A wild and whimsical world of flesh-eating plants

"Pretty much up ended all of our lives before covid nineteen. I got to travel to the perth hills in search of some beautiful flesh-eating beings so it's a warm dry day in calamander national park with bright blue sky above yellow worth crunchy underfoot the yellowish shrub. Whole yes we go. Yes laura and i are looking for something special in the bush it's tiny but shawnee and so it should catch season dawn. These the ninetieth be baltimore. Rare impression. s- potential specimens not. Oh that's a tremendous one. So this is Dresser a guy again tia and it's named because it's pretty giant. He's that's about fifty sixty centimeters high. Yeah and it's like a little mini. trae it is. Yeah like these are. Actually the leaves the plan. Yeah so the the flowers are up the very top here. Just in bad i think at the moment but the leaves are they do look like a flower bill. Little son to me and so it's a little pad that is surrounded by sticky hairs and what you'll notice it on some of them. The sticky has wrapped around into the center and now Can you see the little sort of bug remains in the middle there and then others are out ready to catch something new so hi. My name's lois gates. And i'm a botanist from western australia. And i'm doing my phd on plants but this young botanist has an alter-ego floor escapes. Yes so that's my twitter and instagram. Flora 'cause laura and i'm all about plants so more than that laura aka florus gates is all about plots that ate flesh. We always tend to kind of chris. Plante picked it up these sort of managing monsters aliens from outer space it. It goes out. If got dave the little shop of horrors that sort of thing or a new car and killed but it even goes back much earlier than that. It's not for the greater glory of science. I just want us to survive. Even a botanist said there was the story of a gemini explorer in the madagascan john. Google is it a plant coming across this atrocious cannibal tree central nervous system which had these serpent like branches which captured a woman and coiled. Its branches around and around. There is actually the atrocious kind of betray or if anyone's going to find it maybe that just not come back all that don't usually pull themselves out of the ground chase you. He sees the depiction of this atrocious tree. It looks so much like a dresser in the way that it's those separate like branches the sticky glands dresser and the way that they wrap around and coil around the pool. Woman is the same way that these dresser wrap around the insect pry. But yeah they. They always get painted as these vicious preaches. I do tend to notice that. A lot of the time the victims in these stories Women don't like that aspect. Yeah there's a whole gender story to be talked about here. I think definitely. And i mean often when we talk about verse plants. We often hear about charles. Darwin because dow indeed right the first scientific book all about kind of verse. Plants gave the first scientific evidence that they are actually able to capture and digest insect prey. But there's been a lot of amazing women who have also contributed to converse plant science and our understanding of ecology throughout history and. I'm really interested in their stories as well. And so am i this week. We are in wnba which incredibly is home to up to a third of the world's converse plant species. I wanna find out why that eason have. I've managed to survive in such an intense environment and knicks. Week got totally caught up in a saga full of twists and turns and tendrils about the life of just one congresswoman. We're gonna venture from hilltop home of an internationally renowned joola share. He wanted the all the glory for himself. I really can't go into the mind of charles gardner but he said he did. Not mother might lot very difficult for him. We'll head deep into the heart of a magnificent end museum for plants. So we're entering a quarantined area. Okay hidden on stays now.

Perth Hills Calamander National Park Lois Gates Laura Aka Florus Gates Laura Trae Dresser Plante Baltimore Instagram Western Australia Bush Dave Twitter Chris Google John Darwin DOW
Wednesday 23 December

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:48 min | 9 months ago

Wednesday 23 December

"Later today lufthansa cargo flight from frankfurt will touchdown doncaster sheffield airport bringing of food supplies to forestall shortages caused by the recent severing of land and sea trade routes between the uk and europe with jew recognition that this is more to do with covid nineteen than brexit. There is something piquant about britain entering the last week of its transition period reliance on a reverse of the berlin airlift. The uk's present difficulties due to a new and highly infectious variant of covid nineteen heavily concentrated in london and the southeast on joined with more by monaco. Twenty fours health and science correspondent dr. Chris chris this or something like to be expected because all viruses mutate. Don't they indeed covid nineteen already has once or twice at least before andrew say actually the uk's victim of its own success in this because we do as jones san accurately said have a world class in fact one of the best in the world screening systems set up to detect precisely this sort of thing. It's called coke. Uk their job is to scrutinize genomes of corona viruses collected from patients who are diagnosed with the disease so far. They've looked through the genetic codes of more than one hundred and sixty thousand viral sequences. They're all being to find things precisely like this and of course then we. We say we found one this and then the whole world says we don't want you of course they don't want us all the all the virus but not surprisingly just to cautionary stage but yes It it's likely that this sort of thing is a bit of an inevitability and it may well be it's farther afield. Things like farther afield than anyone knows yet because they just haven't detected e. Yeah so what do we know about this mutation will. It's not a single mutation. It's a variant the calling it variant because rather than just a mutant which is one genetic change. This one's actually got a constellation of genetic changes there are seventeen independent genetic differences in this new variant that seems to confer opponent the ability to spread a bit better and they're peppered throughout the genetic code of the virus they affect v aspects of how the virus works but there's a big cluster of these changes all centered on what's called the essel spike protein. Which is the key part of the virus. That's all of these out coats that it uses to infect ourselves and so this is why researchers think that it may be more transmissible. Something has changed in the way the virus behaves in terms of its its ability to engage with our cells its ability to penetrate and jack cells and then cause disease and then spread to another person We don't know exactly how it's doing that yet. And we don't know for sure that it really is more transmissible but based on the numbers that we're seeing the the epidemiology the pattern of spread. It seems like a likely reasonable supposition. Is it possible that this variation is a response to the measures that we have undertaken to defeat it is is the virus adapting to survive ovar adapt to survive. And that's really what charles darwin point out. And that was his big breakthrough his grand unified theory of biology. If you like that everything responds in a dynamic way. All the time to pressure applied from its environment and where we think. This may have arisen. This new variant is actually in the blood of an individual or individuals with poorly functioning immune systems because individuals. Who don't have a good immune response to the virus. Tend to hang onto the virus fa- longer. They have a chronic infection with the virus. And this means that as their immune system limps along trying to control it the virus is getting a chance to see inner workings of the immune response and it can see where the chinks in our alma and therefore it can adapt and shift in that direction a bid to take advantage of those changes to cling onto survival in that person. Now if that person then transmits a virus which has adapted in this way it's basically passing on a more weaponized or more tooled up version of the virus. The reason that such as a putting forward this hypothesis is because when we have treated patients and documented what happens in them when they have an impaired immune system for various reasons. Were genetic reasons. There are also acquired reasons why people's immune systems might not work very. Well they've seen very similar changes happening in the viruses in those people to this variant that circulating suggesting that it may will be homegrown as it were and borne out of the fact that some people can't can't fight it off as well as efficiently giving the varsity insight into how our immune system works and enabling it to adapt accordingly. I mean we have talked before about the fact that it's not in the interests of viruses whose only interest eads the perpetuation replication. It's not necessarily in the interest of any virus. To kill its hosts. Is it possible that viruses variation to become more transmissible but perhaps less deadly. Well we don't know at the moment and That's one of the key questions that people are going to want to be asking. It's a relatively new discovery first appeared as a blip on the radar of kochi uk. The consortium that founded back in september and the cases them were just a few and far between become a lot more common sense obviously rising to one in four cases in november perhaps as many as sixty percent of cases in december in some parts of the country that means that we've now got the chance to see firsthand in greater detail in greater numbers. What is impact on people is and so people will be asking this very question this thing if it does transmit more efficiently which it appears it does does it as we believe not cause such severe disease or cause any more severe disease than the standard parent from which its rose the moment it doesn't look like it translates into getting more severe disease. It doesn't look like it's currently beyond the reach of the protection conferred by the immune response In response to the vaccine but we don't know that crucial question has it surrendered some of its violence. In order to optimize. In this way time will tell you partially answered what. I'm sure is now the key question because the the glimmer of optimism in which we have all been basking these last few weeks is the approval and roll out of the vaccine. Several hundred thousand people here in the uk have already received at least the first injection. Is it possible that nineteen could mutate or very this quickly Out of the reach of the vaccine. Matt hancock rishaad everybody when he made the announcement last week about the discovery of this new variant. That it didn't look like it would be able to sidestep the immune response conferred by the vaccine the experiments to prove that that is the case. Though are still ongoing. Thankfully they're very easy experiments to do. And that's what porton down will currently be investigating. And i would hope that they will provide that reassurance. Quite soon the way you go about this is you. Grow the virus in the lab and that's actually very easy to do and you add to it samples of the antibodies that a person makes when they're vaccinated and if the antibodies still work against the variant. And you do this with samples across the country. Then you can say these neutralize this virus even though it's the variant and therefore these people will be protected if they have the vaccine. So that's that's kind of what we're waiting for now to to see that data. It's very easy the experiments to go to do them properly though. That will give us reassurance to answer that question what the future holds. Though we don't know and that's why some researches saying this could be a stepping stone on the part of the virus towards a more comprehensive ability to sidestep our immune response including the response to the vaccine and for that. It's a sort of shot across out immunological bowels. We have to keep it onto surveillance. Keep searchlight trained upon it so that we can see where it's moving anticipate is next. Move and try to head off

UK Doncaster Sheffield Airport Chris Chris Jones San Lufthansa Frankfurt Monaco Coke Berlin Britain Charles Darwin Andrew Europe London Kochi Matt Hancock Porton
"darwin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

03:03 min | 9 months ago

"darwin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Introductory note a sketch of darwin's life and some indication of the importance of his work have been given in the addition of the origin of species published in the harvard classics. The text of the present volume shows without further comment. The nature of darwin's labors and their results on this momentous voyage. A few sentences gathered from his autobiography will however throws some additional light upon the more personal aspects of the expedition. The voyage of the beagle has been by far the most important event in my life and has determined my whole career. I have always felt that. I owe to the voyage. The first real training or education of my mind. I was led to attend closely to several branches of natural history and thus my powers of observation were improved though they were always fairly developed. The above various special studies were however of no importance compared with the habit of energetic industry and of concentrated attention to whatever. I was engaged in which i then acquired everything about which i thought or read was made to bear directly on what i had seen or was likely to see and this habit of mind was continued during the five years of the voyage. I feel sure that it was this training. Which has enabled me to do whatever i have done. In science looking backwards. I can now perceive how my love for science gradually preponderant over every other taste during the first two years. My old passion for shooting survived and nearly full force. And i shot myself all the birds and animals for my collection by gradually. I gave up my gun. More and more and finally altogether to my servant as shooting interfered with my work more especially with making out the geological structure of a country i discovered though unconsciously and insensible way that the pleasure of observing and reasoning was a much higher one than that of skill and sport as far as i can judge of myself i worked the utmost during the voyage from the mere pleasure of investigation and from my strong desire to add a few facts to the great mass of facts in natural science. Let i was also ambitious to take a place. Among scientific men whether more ambitious or less so than most of my fellow workers i can form no opinion from life and letters part one pages sixty one to sixty five even if the journal of the voyage were not one of the most interesting and informative books this statement by its author of the importance of the expedition in making his later epoch making generalizations would give it a distinctive place in the literature of science. But it's amazing wealth of information and it's unconsciously painted picture of disinterested zeal in the search for scientific truth have made it for intrinsic reasons classic in it's kind..

harvard classics darwin
"darwin" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

02:20 min | 10 months ago

"darwin" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"About what what you're saying would you seem to be saying is that I mean not only did. Darwin removed the need for a mind designing these things. But that somehow the the wonderful trick that evolution pulls off is to give things purposes without directly looking into the future right without directly having foresighted works in the present moment but in such a way that usefulness in the future comes along for the ride yes so he darwin got rid of the idea that what's a purpose in creation that evolution was working toward some future goal but he created a process that Created beings like you and i that interact with their environments in purposive ways so the evolutionary process itself doesn't have any purpose directional end but it creates meaningful beings that purposively in their environment. I mean maybe we can Make them more precise or maybe something. That is just hard to make precise. I mean when do when can we point to something that an organism is doing and saying this is a purpose for this Aspect of the organism or this this action that the organism takes so if one of its past actions is responsible for so now now it specifically not from the organism but from The genetic fixed If one of the effects of a particular genetic text is responsible for that text Copied and being present today than it is. Those affects the takes that account for the present presence of the gene. So we have genes that caused hotch the pump which circulate. Tom oxygen to the tissues of the body. That is a function in the past. I'm organisms have survived because a functional hot that distribute oxygen and so it's the past functioning of bihar that explains the presence today of genes produce functional hearts. Twenty twenty is almost over. And it's already reshaped how we work. Businesses across the globe are challenged. Be their most efficient..

Darwin darwin Tom oxygen bihar
As President-Elect Joe Biden Doubles Down On Calls For Unity, Supporters Have Doubts

All Things Considered

03:55 min | 10 months ago

As President-Elect Joe Biden Doubles Down On Calls For Unity, Supporters Have Doubts

"Calls for unity and healing. But as NPR's Toby a. Smith reports, many of his own supporters are having a hard time letting bygones be bygones. He's been saying it since his first speech as president elect, Biden implored everyone to put away the harsh rhetoric give each other a chance and end what he calls this grim era of demonization in America. So that's a wonderful sentiment. It's probably a really sweet pipe dream. Abby Gold 59 year old Democrat from Arizona thinks it may be generations before the rancor subsides enough for any real rapprochement. We're not gonna have any healing until the public at large words to have a nice cup of shut up before they say whatever is on their minds, hoping to help many around the nation are ramping up trainings for cross the aisle conversations. Julie Bowler is with a group called Braver Angels, which runs red blue workshops that aim for common ground and civil discourse. When you have the experience yourself of feeling a little opening a little less frantic rejection, Then you've learned at least that it is possible for some of that softening toe happen, and it's a humanizing process. Enrollment is way up this fall, but Bowler concedes it may be a self selecting crowd that's open to dialogue. There are plenty who would be hard to convince, including 64 year Old New Yorker, Darwin, Bush. When he sees bridging the gap with die hard trump supporters as a bridge too far. This is not an alternate viewpoint. This is racism, Hate lying demagoguery, sociopath, E. What else can I say? Bad people? Capital B. A. D. I will not sit in table with them. I will not have a conversation with them. Nor what Elizabeth and Tracy Murphy, an interracial couple in Georgia, who say they've been harassed, even spit at by people they believe were fueled by the president's divisive rhetoric. For any fence mending, Tracy Murphy says Trump supporters would have to straight up admit that they made a mistake and apologized. It's their turn to extend the olive branch. They're the ones who messed up everything. It's not my job to fix it. You know, is a funny thing that the person who was the victim always has the end of being the bigger person. But many on the right are just is adamant that they're the ones Odin apology by what they see as radical socialists threatening American values. Virginia Republican Katherine Schoonover says she's all for bipartisan cooperation. But she calls Democratic calls for unity. Disingenuous. I don't know how you go from telling everybody that they're all secret Nazi fascists, bigoted, racist people. And then you're going to say, But now let's come together. It's just ridiculous coming from the Democrats now and especially, she says sin. She believes the claims even though there's no evidence, backing them up that the Democrats stole the election. It's shocking, and I think that if if the Democrats try to ram this down of race throats, you have a real problem. It's exactly why Darryl Dwayne, a 51 year old Biden supporter from Washington, D. C has been echoing Biden's calls for unity and imploring his friends, too. Not dig in their heels. Unfortunately, that's a recipe for civil war. But so far, Dwayne says, he's not made a lot of headway. I've gotten in trouble for it. I've gotten called nasty names for being Kumbaya. Same with 58 year old New York Democrat Vincent Downing, who's with a group of humanists calling for more cross the aisle, empathy and understanding. Even though Trump supporters may dehumanize him. He says he won't stoop to the same level. But Downing says it's challenging as he put it. He also tends to think like any good lefty would When I just think I'm right. Right. Right. Right.

Tracy Murphy Abby Gold Julie Bowler Braver Angels Biden Toby NPR Katherine Schoonover Bowler Smith Arizona Darwin America Donald Trump Bush Elizabeth Darryl Dwayne
"darwin" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

09:29 min | 1 year ago

"darwin" Discussed on Science Talk

"Charles. Darwin was born born on this date in eighteen zero nine. So we'll talk a bit about evolution on this episode but in the fun and unexpected way I wanna know what killed these triples. I haven't figured Out What keeps them alive yet. We won't be talking to Kirker McCoy but we will chat with Mohammad Noor. He's a biologist at Duke University specializing in genetics and evolution solution. And he's the author of the two thousand eighteen book live long and evolve. What Star Trek can teach us about evolution? Genetics and life on other worlds worlds paperback edition coming out on February twenty fifth. I spoke to Muhammad Noor by phone. I'm going to read a line from your book chapter five because I think a lot of people are going to go right to chapter five probably true so here we go given inter species. Mating is uncommon on earth. It appears unusually common among the humanoid species depicted in the various star trek six series indeed attraction to members of other humanoid species does not seem noticeably weaker in any of the five series than attraction to members of one's own species. Obviously a lot of that has to do with the fact that they're all human actors in various stages of makeup But this this is always always something that has intrigued me. I don't WANNA say bothered. Although sometimes it's bothered me. I mean people are the just having sex with other species on earth. This is really frowned upon. So let's let's talk about that. What's going on on on the various star Trek series in terms of inter species mating? Yeah so it's interesting. The way the Star Trek series depicted. It's probably no different from say like they. They make it as though different species are no different from human ethnic groups or something like that where you know who this person is slightly exotic and therefore attractive. And that's that's not what you expected perspective. You're looking at and actually different species right. I mean if we go to the zoo and we see a chimpanzee. We're not attracted to it any more attractive to us and that is really really the correct analogy of versus ethnic group Inter Inter mating or Intermarriage or you know because those are all human beings homo sapiens. But we're talking about even further distantly related collusion airily. Probably we're dealing with say a Klingon and a human being. Oh yeah so it depends on exactly where Klingons all these come. I'm from how ridiculous that actually is right and you get into that. In other parts of the book about explanations legitimate scientific explanations for why why these various humanoid species are similar. But but we can go back to that later. I want to talk more about the Inter species mating inter species mating. US Not so crazy if you if you assume that Rather than being like human chipping analogies. Didn't seem Indiana Tall. So it does. Those things are not independent of each other and and when I was going to college it was assumed that there was absolutely no meeting between neanderthals Paul's and Homo Sapiens. That resulted in US carrying any neanderthal. DNA and that's been shown to be completely wrong in the last decade. That's correct that's correct and not only that not only neanderthal. Also this other ancient hominy which is no longer alive called we also not necessarily everybody but certainly some humans. Carrie sometimes a fairly sizable fraction of the genome inside them. And then you probably remember. This study came out which found a fossil that was exactly happy Antonio and figured out executive the mother must have been in the Android Hall in the properties in Houston so they were in a ring with each other laws with us which is a mind blowing doing a study in that to have found that. Individual fossilized sample is just asked you know the odds odds are just astronomical. Well unless unless it turns out that there are a lot more those line around that we just haven't found yet exactly maybe there was a lot of interbreeding between all L. Indonesia Veneta at some point. Now that doesn't necessarily mean that there was a lot everywhere with everybody but maybe there was some populations where that was fairly. So let's assume that these humanoid species on Star Trek are able to on on all the Star Trek series and the movies are able to injure breed to the extent that they can have either a most likely infertile offspring. Or even you have a couple of examples bulls where they apparently have fertile offspring. And you have a nice. You have a really nice table in the book that shows all the examples that we have from the the various series of the offspring and who which one was the mother which one was the father It's really a fascinating kind of thing that they got into on the series and and you actually look at it probably much more deeply than any of the writers did when they were concocting yeah. I'm sure that's true. Actually that was one of the things I was most excited about when I was just starting to work on this book project was looking to see if there was any pattern looking at the hybrids across all this bs I purposely didn't do it and so near the end of the book and near the when I was writing the book because it helped me maintain my enthusiasm for the entire project. It was so excited to get to that point. See Is there a pattern. Do we see in excess of female surviving hybrid offspring very happy that there's actually. Oh yes right which which is what you would expect scientifically but not but but is has to be just a an accident a doubt the writers ensures it's an accident one friend of mine suggested that maybe in some sense especially for the fertility they said well people tend associated fertility with female which is kind of silly. It's like a fertile female with a sterile. Male GonNa do anything but maybe for that reason they tended to have a few more of the females males. But Yeah I'm sure you're right that it was just a coincidence now assuming that there is a relatively close degree of genetic similarity Between among all these humanoid species he's We see I mean the most obvious example on earth is the mule and but we also have you have a picture in the book of Zanchi which which is a zebra donkey. Mix these interspecies made star Trek. The ones that are Not just recreational They could under the right. Circumstances produce offspring who themselves could then go on to have children exactly so in that sense security analogous to human anders all case where some bulk in DNA gets into the human gene pool. So that's that's really interesting and you're in the book you you spend a lot of time going back and forth between the show and the reality so we can learn a lot ought about Hybridization and and how it's Not that uncommon. I mean it's exceptionally common among plants. But it's not not that uncommon among even animals. It depends on how you count common. If you count the fraction of species where at least one individual is known to reduce it at at least twenty to resolve and others and then it's yes very common but on a per individual basis. It's almost never that common. So it's not like for example like among humans even with say the human the case we know there's some DNA that got through you know from them into our gene pool. But it's unlikely that just you know humans neanderthal. Just interbred really. neely probably was a very small fraction. That actually did that. But it would count towards in terms of the counselors humans neanderthals dude into yes check right and one of the biggest barriers to breeding is the desire or lack thereof to do it right. I mean as you say in the book you walk outside and you see squirrels and birds and and insects and if you're not Rather deranged you who have no real interest in getting together with a squirrel northern with US right exactly I really the book is so enjoyable. And especially if you are a star Trek Fan but even if you're not a star trek fan it's a terrific terrific introduction to some basic issues in biology. Oh thank you. That was my hope honestly with the book I mean. I've hopes that people understand when they see this book on the shelf is it's it's not an analysis of Star Trek. It's supposed to be an introduction to genetics and pollution. And it's only leveraging star Trek just as a means for getting into the subject not not as the primary focus and you actually taught a class at Duke related to not specifically to star Trek but Getting biological concepts across via science fiction. That's right my colleague. Standing I had a spring.

Star Trek US Duke University Muhammad Noor Kirker McCoy Mohammad Noor Charles. Darwin Indiana L. Indonesia Veneta Duke Carrie Paul Zanchi Houston Android Hall neely Antonio executive
"darwin" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"darwin" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Courage. Darwin to explore. They're pretty cool that a freed slave was highly influential in pushing Darwin towards his discovery. The theory of evolution other students. Expose young Darwin to the latest continental sciences in Edinburgh, the university attracted English dissenters, who are banned from graduating, the Anglican universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and it student societies. Darwin heard these free thinkers argued animals shared elements of all the human mental faculties, which is, you know. Heresy time one, one talk, Darwin heard on the mind being the product of material brain was officially censored, in England, considered subversive in the socially conservative decades. Following the French revolution Darwin. Also met Robert Edmund grant, and Edinburgh expert on sea sponges Graham became Darwin's mentor teaching about the growth in relationships of primitive rain invertebrates, which Graham believed held the key to unlocking the mystery surrounding the origin of more complex creatures Darwin encouraged attack with a larger questions of life to a study of invertebrates quality began to make his own observations, and his dad didn't like it on eighteen twenty eight twenty one year old Darwin learning a lot in boroughs rich intellectual environment, but he wasn't studying. What are you supposed to according to his dad medicine? He loathed anatomy, pre chloroform surgery. Sickened him and his dad started worrying that Darwin was wasting his life, and he's going to end up becoming some aimless naturalist. And he switched him to Christ's college Cambridge Darwin was now educated to being Anglican, gentlemen. He received a general. Sized medical bachelor of arts degree in eighteen thirty one while at Cambridge Darwin was showing the conservative side of botany.

Cambridge Darwin Edinburgh Anglican universities of Oxfor Cambridge Robert Edmund grant Graham Christ England eighteen twenty eight twenty o
"darwin" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"darwin" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"But only one of those facts is true. The rest of us have to figure out other by deduction or wild guess, which one is true fact, if we get it, right? We get a hang buck. If we don't then Sam gets the Hank book Sam hit me with your facts. So Charles Darwin wrote on the origin of species putting a bunch of other books to a bunch of other wacky ideas in it that you don't hear about as much. So which one of these is a book, he wrote one a book about parasitic insects peppered with musings on the existence of God, a book about why people have eyebrows and blush or a book about how Robert Fitzroy the captain of HMS. Beagle was a giant idiot. Ooh. I thought I thought he heard his buddy. Well, this is after the fact so those are the three books that Darwin might have written. Gimme summarized versions of the mall, parasitic insects in God eyebrows. Unblushing or Robert Fitzroy's in idiot. I know that he was into all kinds of weird animal stuff. But I in my experience he doesn't muse a lot about God. He tends to avoid the topic. In fact, when the the intro that are the outer like, the last lines of on the origin of species that I read to you. That was the original addition out tro, and then the all subsequent additions had extra words in it to say not breathed into existence, but breathed by the creator into existence who the change Darwin dead because a lot of people got mad because he said just like it it occurred. Whereas people were like it occurred goodbye God. Like, we know how it occurred. Darwin already the stuff you're saying is not making super comfortable like to not even mention in the knee is fine by God. And then he later expressed regret that he did that. So it doesn't tend to one at talk. A lot publicly about God. But I could be wrong. Definitely don't know as much of an earlier Darwin as you, but it seems weird to me for him to trash cap, Robert. Yeah, it's really doesn't a whole book. Maybe it wasn't chat book, you know. It's just like a blog posts, basically. Like could be his log from me, then he trashed the cap route it, and I think Sam would distill that down to v. I do wonder about eyebrows and blush, if that's just the book about human evolution stuff. Darren also did expression and emotion research. I think he may be shocked people's faces at stretched them in weird angles and directions to Charles Darwin. Maybe I I remember have to look it up after this now because then we'll be ruining the lie. But I think he made exaggerated expressions on people's faces through some sort of pain, and then had people look at them and be like are they bored? Are they scared cited maybe I heard about this. And studied that somehow so that I don't know if you were to whole book about it, though. Or just a study that he did say the second one again, a book about what people have eyebrows and blush Beth is like a lot of that's a look for the things was that just a part of the book because descent of man talks a lot of wall stuff. Answer the question. Were they blushing while they were electrocuted? All right. Somebody somebody go. I don't wanna go. I I think it's I think it's number two. Yeah. Eyebrow brush blushing. Yeah. I'm gonna go with that can sex and God, I know it's parasitic insects. And God, you know, it is like. Think it's wrong in case. Maybe I screwed up because it is definitely the blushing and ever. I was so confident never mind that the third book Darwin wrote was the expression of the emotions in man and animals, he's studied animal faces and human faces and was like all humans animals, express certain emotions in very similar ways. And then he came up with the idea that no matter your culture there certain emotions that every human expresses the same way, which people do not like, not pro pry, racism reasons. I would imagine. Sure. And then he declared that at the end of the book that blushing was the weirdest thing and the most human thing, and like no other nothing else blushed except people. I don't think you really like tried to guess why?.

Charles Darwin Robert Fitzroy Sam HMS Darren Unblushing Hank Beth
"darwin" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"darwin" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"There is grandeur in this view powers breathed into one or into a few while this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravitation from so simple a beginning as our planet. Kept spinning I propose, discreet, mystery finally solved endless forms, most beautiful have been and are being evolved. That was my pation my poem out application of the last lines of on the origin of species by Charles Darwin. The subject of our of our guests today is going to review the actual lines. There's grandeur in this view of life with its several powers having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one. And that whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity from so simple, beginning endless forms, most beautiful and most wonderful have been and are being evolved that book a little thick in some places, but that is spot on ending. I like these better. He's a little punch up. Yeah. Well, it's been a while. You know, we talk a little different. Now have new words and stuff. Sara. What's Charles Darwin? He's a man was was a man. Biologist and best known for his contributions to Evelyn, you might know him for national selection. That's like the big idea. I'm talking to the podcast audience. You might know him for abuse such as natural selection. Because finches process through which things happen the understanding of biology. Yeah. Those areas hits. Cuts cuts. There's some there's some great moments like that. There's a really good seen in. I think voyage of the beagle. Where he is trying to learn how to use a slingshot till I catch a animal, and he just like cut catches himself and falls off. He also eight basically every animal he found. He was a big food guy a club where they all the animals. I think so. Yeah. So he would like find animals study them be like, I gotta take a snack just in case. But all the barnacles three the barnacles that doesn't I don't know. Go to work can open barnacle ahead. Somebody do it for them. Yeah. His wife was very wealthy married. Just traipse around the globe looking at weird animals that was before the marriage. I think yeah, I think so I think he got onto the HMO Spiegel because they needed an extra person. I feel like he was just like, I'm an actress to be a scientist at this time, you had to be some degree of rich yet when I read was that they needed somebody to be the captain's friend, and they usually like that person to be the captain's friend also have a skill. So they tried to get other people the gum on the boat, and nobody wanted to do it. And then eventually, they really cool. You do it. He's like, okay. And also he was on paid. I think for his thing. Sure. His see why you would be paid. For that. I guess I mate comes from. Yeah. Must be. That's why they called my first mate. Captains are so lonely. Hard to be in charge. Which one of you wants to be my friend. I'm in Georgia the company, and I need one of you just sign up to be on my boat all the time. Yeah. You can also do naturalist stuff. If you want collect beetles and such sounds hired. We have to do that part. It is like day like helped me take care of Oran and play board games with me that sounds. All right perfect. So happy I think everybody roughly knows Charles Darwin was, but there are lots of things that we don't know about Charles Darwin, which we're going to get to in this podcast. I feel like I know a lot. But I anticipate all of you surprised me today. So don't let me down a so it's time to start that off you guys ready to signs fact me well Sam is here for. He is brought three science facts for the rest of us for education and enjoyment..

Charles Darwin Evelyn Oran scientist Spiegel Sam Georgia
"darwin" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"darwin" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Darwin's. Sports flash. All right cat. Lots of college basketball's March madness kicking into full gear. Next week. Other team has punch their ticket already today in the America east championship the Vermont catamounts took on last year Cinderella, you MBC that'll do it catamounts. Awesome last year here at home. Thousand nineteen. That is Justin Kutcher Westwood One. On the call Vermont wins at sixty six forty nine. They're going to the dance. Anthony lamb finishing with a game. High twenty eight points and UNBC became the first sixteen seat ever to defeat a one c last year won't have a chance to repeat the feat this year and of other conference chairman action going on plenty of games. Halftime of the Ivy league semi-final Penn and Harvard Harvard with a thirty six thirty four lead big ten. Semifinals could watch right now on CBS Michigan state on top of Wisconsin twenty-seven twelve seven minutes to go first half SEC semi-final, Florida twenty four twenty two advantage on Auburn eight ten semis. Rhode island. Doubling up saying Bonnie's twenty four twelve six minutes to go first half and the final a trip to the dance on the line Norfolk state with a sixteen fourteen advantage on North Carolina central seven minutes remaining in the first half their one early NBA game going on right now is scoring affair one minutes ago until halftime the Celtics a sixty eight. Fifty nine lead on the hawks. Marcus smart, ten points, seven assists in the early going later. The warriors it on the thunder Golden State trying to win consecutive games for the first time since mid-february hockey games going on right now the blues the one nothing lead on the penguins. Ten minutes ago. I period the islanders and Red Wings. Nodded at one seven minutes to go in the first period in Detroit. NFL news and investigation underway into an alleged battery involving juvenile at the home of chiefs star whiteout tyreek hill Casey has acknowledged that investigation involving hills taking place, but no charges have been filed golf third round play Players Championship co-leaders, Tommy Fleetwood and ROY McElroy t often an hour. They're tied at the top twelve under documents Yama sixty six seven hundred overall Tiger Woods all the way back at even par for the tournament. Darwin's? Look, this is Jim Rome. Join me in the jungle weekdays noon eastern, nine Pacific on CBS sports radio. Some companies companies try.

Vermont Jim Rome Harvard Harvard basketball Justin Kutcher UNBC Anthony lamb CBS Rhode island Marcus smart Detroit chairman America Tommy Fleetwood Michigan Yama NBA NFL
"darwin" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

The Good News Podcast

07:15 min | 3 years ago

"darwin" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

"Welcome to the good news podcast. I'm your host Colleen during the other host meal. And for those who listen Lewis us daily like you should, uh, today is Charles Darwin's birthday. Yeah, Charles Darwin, revolutionize science, his theory of evolution was based on careful observation of birds and other wildlife in places like the Galapagos Islands. And this EPA said is fully prepared to acknowledge just that. But first, a couple of administration things in case you for God, we're here to share with you All the Sonic joy, good news and delightful moments we can find and here's some bad things that aren't going to happen today. Australia will not revert back to being a prison island in humankind, won't be destroyed by an alien super virus as mentioned earlier is Charles Darwin's birthday. I'm here. Yeah, And to celebrate, We're going to hear from two young women, scientists and warehouse the Galapagos producer Vera Nikolai copra is our guide. I'm very meek and this is Maury may numbered as many could was in a meal a so a they keep link loan Murray crews. HUD Amelio grew up in Ecuador's capital Qito But she always loved being out in nature. When I look at pictures of myself, when I was little, I always see like I have a really happy Fazlur now outside I don't know, maybe a associated with spending time with my family. My dad, Then I could just run and I will pick up stuff from the ground and I just really love the outdoors. I was pretty much the same way I brought my mom home tadpoles caterpillars earthworms and eventually a PHD in ecology and evolution Maher is getting hers now from the University of Missouri Saint Louis. And she's doing fieldwork in the one place. I think every a college. Just wants to go ever since I knew I wanted to be a biologists. I wanted to come to the Galapagos Islands. That was my goal in my dream to. But they're not easy to get to. The Galapagos Islands are in the Pacific six hundred miles west of Ecuador from St. Louis. It took me two days three flights, a ferry ride in 45 minutes in a pickup truck to get their Charles Darwin took a ship, the HMS Spiegel. He was only twenty six when he visited the Galapagos about Maris age. What he saw changed his life and the history of science. Most of the wildlife that lives on these volcanic mounds his found nowhere else in the world. Giant tortoises Marina Guan guavas. And those little Sparrow like birds known as Darwin's finches. Mari first made it to the Galapagos five years ago. She's back again studying a kind of malaria that's infecting birds here in Hawaii. Avian malaria has driven many native bird species to extinction. That hasn't happened in the Galapagos But Mari and other scientists are trying to gauge the threat. It's five thirty in the morning and just barely starting to get light in the sky meeting. The researchers who are going to be setting up some missed nets to catch him. Birds wants to set another mess. Next look sort of like volleyball nets, but around twice as high in reaching almost to the ground. There mesh is nearly invisible. The birds fly right into it and get snagged. Murray in the others were quickly to untangle them. When you have a burning your Hannatised really want warm in soft and you can feel it Sweeney, fast heartbeat. In Jesus, no, that you holding something really fragile. Each bird gets weighed and measured. This one's Forty-five Graham Murray or one of her helpers takes us small blood sample to tests later for malaria. Then they released the bird again, this They don't want it said it at goal. Low led a Guna somewhat, go when allow Papua New Guinea kicking. Nina Samoa OSCE go speaks Motoo along with pigeon an English among the many languages in her country. Papua-New Guinea. It's an island nation just north of Australia. Samoa met Mari in Graduate School in St. Louis. She's in the Galapagos trying to help solve a different piece of the avian malaria puzzle. Which species of mosquito is transmitting the parasite from burn two bird just before dusk similar sets out her traps. The thing about Chapin mosquitoes, as you have to think like a mosquito female mosquitoes, There are the ones that bite and can spread disease like to lay their eggs in stagnant water. So Samoa mixes up a smelly brew for her traps. Every time employees would act. In my mind, I'm like Intelink mosquitoes. Please calm competently. Kinship with cheetah's it them. In the morning seriously, every time food smells good rate. Actually, it smells like rancid Jim socks, The smellier the water, The more mosquitoes She'll get and be able to dissect working with a microscope, delicate tools and very steady hands shield chop off their tiny heads and extract their salivary glands to look for the malaria parasite. Samoa has stared at so many mosquitoes, so close up. She started to appreciate them, especially as species called 80s Agip di it's one of the most beautiful things I've ever seen. It's covered in his black and white bans all over its legs. A lower its abdomen, its face. And Yeah, the first time I say it And they microscope, I kinda fell in love. away This is a Moa says, her parents encouraged her to get an education and pursue a career in science. But she says, most people in Papua New Guinea hold strongly to traditional beliefs and gender roles, and just growing up in looking around and seen the opportunity said, was given to Meal's rather than females that set of place and aggression in me. Good aggression at told me that he Why do males always have to get chosen over females for Samoa becoming a scientist started out as a way to prove herself, but eventually became more than that. I realized it. No Science was something that I really wanted to do once she gets her PHD Samoa wants to return to Papua New Guinea to help protect wildlife there. And she hopes to be a role model and train a new generation of female scientists. Empower young girls empower women and tell him, You know, if if I can come from a country like Papua New Guinea come in, do research in a place like Galapagos in study. It it institution like my University, Then you can do it to her friend Mari plants to keep doing research in her home country of Ecuador, maybe in the Galapagos Islands.

Galapagos Islands Galapagos Charles Darwin Samoa malaria Galapagos But Mari Mari Avian malaria Papua New Guinea Ecuador Australia St. Louis Nina Samoa OSCE Graham Murray Guinea Colleen EPA Lewis
"darwin" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

The Good News Podcast

07:15 min | 3 years ago

"darwin" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

"Welcome to the good news podcast. I'm your host Colleen during the other host meal. And for those who listen with us daily like you should, uh, today is Charles Darwin's birthday. Yeah, Charles Darwin, revolutionize science, his theory of evolution was based on careful observation of birds and other wildlife in places like the Galapagos Islands. And this EPA said is fully prepared to acknowledge just that. But first, a couple of administration things in case you for God, we're here to share with you All the Sonic joy, good news and delightful moments we can find and here's some bad things that aren't going to happen today. Australia will not revert back to being a prison island in humankind, won't be destroyed by an alien super virus as mentioned earlier is Charles Darwin's birthday. I'm here. Yeah, And to celebrate, We're going to hear from two young women, scientists and warehouse the Galapagos producer Vera Nikolai copra is our guide. I'm very meek and this is Maury may numbered as many could was in a meal a so a they keep link loan Murray crews. HUD Amelio grew up in Ecuador's capital Qito But she always loved being out in nature. When I look at pictures of myself, when I was little, I always see like I have a really happy Fazlur now outside I don't know, maybe a associated with spending time with my family. My dad, Then I could just run and I will pick up stuff from the ground and I just really love the outdoors. I was pretty much the same way I brought my mom home tadpoles caterpillars earthworms and eventually a PHD in ecology and evolution Maher is getting hers now from the University of Missouri Saint Louis. And she's doing fieldwork in the one place. I think every a college. Just wants to go ever since I knew I wanted to be a biologists. I wanted to come to the Galapagos Islands. That was my goal in my dream to. But they're not easy to get to. The Galapagos Islands are in the Pacific six hundred miles west of Ecuador from St. Louis. It took me two days three flights, a ferry ride in 45 minutes in a pickup truck to get their Charles Darwin took a ship, the HMS Spiegel. He was only twenty six when he visited the Galapagos about Maris age. What he saw changed his life and the history of science. Most of the wildlife that lives on these volcanic mounds his found nowhere else in the world. Giant tortoises Marina Guan guavas. And those little Sparrow like birds known as Darwin's finches. Mari first made it to the Galapagos five years ago. She's back again studying a kind of malaria that's infecting birds here in Hawaii. Avian malaria has driven many native bird species to extinction. That hasn't happened in the Galapagos But Mari and other scientists are trying to gauge the threat. It's five thirty in the morning and just barely starting to get light in the sky meeting. The researchers who are going to be setting up some missed nets to catch him. Birds wants to set another mess. Next look sort of like volleyball nets, but around twice as high in reaching almost to the ground. There mesh is nearly invisible. The birds fly right into it and get snagged. Murray in the others were quickly to untangle them. When you have a burning your Hannatised really want warm in soft and you can feel it Sweeney, fast heartbeat. In Jesus, no, that you holding something really fragile. Each bird gets weighed, measured. This one's Forty-five Graham Murray or one of her helpers takes us small blood sample to tests later for malaria. Then they released the bird again, this They don't want it said it at goal. Low led a Guna somewhat, go when allow Papua New Guinea kicking. Nina Samoa OSCE go speaks Motoo along with pigeon an English among the many languages in her country. Papua-New Guinea. It's an island nation just north of Australia. Samoa met Mari in Graduate School in St. Louis. She's in the Galapagos trying to help solve a different piece of the avian malaria puzzle. Which species of mosquito is transmitting the parasite from burn two bird just before dusk similar sets out her traps. The thing about Chapin mosquitoes, as you have to think like a mosquito female mosquitoes, There are the ones that bite and can spread disease like to lay their eggs in stagnant water. So Samoa mixes up a smelly brew for her traps. Every time employees would act. In my mind, I'm like Intelink mosquitoes. Please calm competently. Kinship with cheetah's it them. In the morning seriously, every time food smells good rate. Actually, it smells like rancid Jim socks, The smellier the water, The more mosquitoes She'll get and be able to dissect working with a microscope, delicate tools and very steady hands shield chop off their tiny heads and extract their salivary glands to look for the malaria parasite. Samoa has stared at so many mosquitoes, so close up. She started to appreciate them, especially as species called 80s Agip di it's one of the most beautiful things I've ever seen. It's covered in his black and white bans all over its legs. A lower its abdomen, its face. And Yeah, the first time I say it And they microscope, I kinda fell in love. away This is a Moa says, her parents encouraged her to get an education and pursue a career in science. But she says, most people in Papua New Guinea hold strongly to traditional beliefs and gender roles, and just growing up in looking around and seen the opportunity said, was given to Meal's rather than females that set of place and aggression in me. Good aggression at told me that he Why do males always have to get chosen over females for Samoa becoming a scientist started out as a way to prove herself, but eventually became more than that. I realized it. No Science was something that I really wanted to do once she gets her PHD Samoa wants to return to Papua New Guinea to help protect wildlife there. And she hopes to be a role model and train a new generation of female scientists. Empower young girls empower women and tell him, You know, if if I can come from a country like Papua New Guinea come in, do research in a place like Galapagos in study. It it institution like my University, Then you can do it to her friend Mari plants to keep doing research in her home country of Ecuador, maybe in the Galapagos Islands.

Galapagos Islands Galapagos Charles Darwin Samoa malaria Galapagos But Mari Mari Avian malaria Papua New Guinea Ecuador Australia St. Louis Nina Samoa OSCE Graham Murray Guinea Colleen EPA Papua
"darwin" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

The Good News Podcast

07:15 min | 3 years ago

"darwin" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

"Welcome to the good news podcast. I'm your host Colleen during the other host meal. And for those who listen with us daily like you should, uh, today is Charles Darwin's birthday. Yeah, Charles Darwin, revolutionize science, his theory of evolution was based on careful observation of birds and other wildlife in places like the Galapagos Islands. And this EPA said is fully prepared to acknowledge just that. But first, a couple of administration things in case you for God, we're here to share with you All the Sonic joy, good news and delightful moments we can find and here's some bad things that aren't going to happen today. Australia will not revert back to being a prison island in humankind, won't be destroyed by an alien super virus as mentioned earlier is Charles Darwin's birthday. I'm here. Yeah, And to celebrate, We're going to hear from two young women, scientists and warehouse the Galapagos producer Vera Nikolai copra is our guide. I'm very meek and this is Maury may numbered as many could was in a meal a so a they keep link loan Murray crews. HUD Amelio grew up in Ecuador's capital Qito But she always loved being out in nature. When I look at pictures of myself, when I was little, I always see like I have a really happy Fazlur now outside I don't know, maybe a associated with spending time with my family. My dad, Then I could just run and I will pick up stuff from the ground and I just really love the outdoors. I was pretty much the same way I brought my mom home tadpoles caterpillars earthworms and eventually a PHD in ecology and evolution Maher is getting hers now from the University of Missouri Saint Louis. And she's doing fieldwork in the one place. I think every a college. Just wants to go ever since I knew I wanted to be a biologists. I wanted to come to the Galapagos Islands. That was my goal in my dream to. But they're not easy to get to. The Galapagos Islands are in the Pacific six hundred miles west of Ecuador from St. Louis. It took me two days three flights, a ferry ride in 45 minutes in a pickup truck to get their Charles Darwin took a ship, the HMS Spiegel. He was only twenty six when he visited the Galapagos about Maris age. What he saw changed his life and the history of science. Most of the wildlife that lives on these volcanic mounds his found nowhere else in the world. Giant tortoises Marina Guan guavas. And those little Sparrow like birds known as Darwin's finches. Mari first made it to the Galapagos five years ago. She's back again studying a kind of malaria that's infecting birds here in Hawaii. Avian malaria has driven many native bird species to extinction. That hasn't happened in the Galapagos But Mari and other scientists are trying to gauge the threat. It's five thirty in the morning and just barely starting to get light in the sky meeting. The researchers who are going to be setting up some missed nets to catch him. Birds wants to set another mess. Next look sort of like volleyball nets, but around twice as high in reaching almost to the ground. There mesh is nearly invisible. The birds fly right into it and get snagged. Murray in the others were quickly to untangle them. When you have a burning your Hannatised really want warm in soft and you can feel it Sweeney, fast heartbeat. In Jesus, no, that you holding something really fragile. Each bird gets weighed, measured. This one's Forty-five Graham Murray or one of her helpers takes us small blood sample to tests later for malaria. Then they released the bird again, this They don't want it said it at goal. Low led a Guna somewhat, go when allow Papua New Guinea kicking. Nina Samoa OSCE go speaks Motoo along with pigeon an English among the many languages in her country. Papua-New Guinea. It's an island nation just north of Australia. Samoa met Mari in Graduate School in St. Louis. She's in the Galapagos trying to help solve a different piece of the avian malaria puzzle. Which species of mosquito is transmitting the parasite from burn two bird just before dusk similar sets out her traps. The thing about Chapin mosquitoes, as you have to think like a mosquito female mosquitoes, There are the ones that bite and can spread disease like to lay their eggs in stagnant water. So Samoa mixes up a smelly brew for her traps. Every time employees would act. In my mind, I'm like Intelink mosquitoes. Please calm competently. Kinship with cheetah's it them. In the morning seriously, every time food smells good rate. Actually, it smells like rancid Jim socks, The smellier the water, The more mosquitoes She'll get and be able to dissect working with a microscope, delicate tools and very steady hands shield chop off their tiny heads and extract their salivary glands to look for the malaria parasite. Samoa has stared at so many mosquitoes, so close up. She started to appreciate them, especially as species called 80s Agip di it's one of the most beautiful things I've ever seen. It's covered in his black and white bans all over its legs. A lower its abdomen, its face. And Yeah, the first time I say it And they microscope, I kinda fell in love. away This is a Moa says, her parents encouraged her to get an education and pursue a career in science. But she says, most people in Papua New Guinea hold strongly to traditional beliefs and gender roles, and just growing up in looking around and seen the opportunity said, was given to Meal's rather than females that set of place and aggression in me. Good aggression at told me that he Why do males always have to get chosen over females for Samoa becoming a scientist started out as a way to prove herself, but eventually became more than that. I realized it. No Science was something that I really wanted to do once she gets her PHD Samoa wants to return to Papua New Guinea to help protect wildlife there. And she hopes to be a role model and train a new generation of female scientists. Empower young girls empower women and tell him, You know, if if I can come from a country like Papua New Guinea come in, do research in a place like Galapagos in study. It it institution like my University, Then you can do it to her friend Mari plants to keep doing research in her home country of Ecuador, maybe in the Galapagos Islands.

Galapagos Islands Galapagos Charles Darwin Samoa malaria Galapagos But Mari Mari Avian malaria Papua New Guinea Ecuador Australia St. Louis Nina Samoa OSCE Graham Murray Guinea Colleen EPA Papua
"darwin" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

The Good News Podcast

07:15 min | 3 years ago

"darwin" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

"Welcome to the good news podcast. I'm your host Colleen during the other host meal. And for those who listen with us daily like you should, uh, today is Charles Darwin's birthday. Yeah, Charles Darwin, revolutionize science, his theory of evolution was based on careful observation of birds and other wildlife in places like the Galapagos Islands. And this EPA said is fully prepared to acknowledge just that. But first, a couple of administration things in case you for God, we're here to share with you All the Sonic joy, good news and delightful moments we can find and here's some bad things that aren't going to happen today. Australia will not revert back to being a prison island in humankind, won't be destroyed by an alien super virus as mentioned earlier is Charles Darwin's birthday. I'm here. Yeah, And to celebrate, We're going to hear from two young women, scientists and warehouse the Galapagos producer Vera Nikolai copra is our guide. I'm very meek and this is Maury may numbered as many could was in a meal a so a they keep link loan Murray crews. HUD Amelio grew up in Ecuador's capital Qito But she always loved being out in nature. When I look at pictures of myself, when I was little, I always see like I have a really happy Fazlur now outside I don't know, maybe a associated with spending time with my family. My dad, Then I could just run and I will pick up stuff from the ground and I just really love the outdoors. I was pretty much the same way I brought my mom home tadpoles caterpillars earthworms and eventually a PHD in ecology and evolution Maher is getting hers now from the University of Missouri Saint Louis. And she's doing fieldwork in the one place. I think every a college. Just wants to go ever since I knew I wanted to be a biologists. I wanted to come to the Galapagos Islands. That was my goal in my dream to. But they're not easy to get to. The Galapagos Islands are in the Pacific six hundred miles west of Ecuador from St. Louis. It took me two days three flights, a ferry ride in 45 minutes in a pickup truck to get their Charles Darwin took a ship, the HMS Spiegel. He was only twenty six when he visited the Galapagos about Maris age. What he saw changed his life and the history of science. Most of the wildlife that lives on these volcanic mounds his found nowhere else in the world. Giant tortoises Marina Guan guavas. And those little Sparrow like birds known as Darwin's finches. Mari first made it to the Galapagos five years ago. She's back again studying a kind of malaria that's infecting birds here in Hawaii. Avian malaria has driven many native bird species to extinction. That hasn't happened in the Galapagos But Mari and other scientists are trying to gauge the threat. It's five thirty in the morning and just barely starting to get light in the sky meeting. The researchers who are going to be setting up some missed nets to catch him. Birds wants to set another mess. Next look sort of like volleyball nets, but around twice as high in reaching almost to the ground. There mesh is nearly invisible. The birds fly right into it and get snagged. Murray in the others were quickly to untangle them. When you have a burning your Hannatised really want warm in soft and you can feel it Sweeney, fast heartbeat. In Jesus, no, that you holding something really fragile. Each bird gets weighed, measured. This one's Forty-five Graham Murray or one of her helpers takes us small blood sample to tests later for malaria. Then they released the bird again, this They don't want it said it at goal. Low led a Guna somewhat, go when allow Papua New Guinea kicking. Nina Samoa OSCE go speaks Motoo along with pigeon an English among the many languages in her country. Papua-New Guinea. It's an island nation just north of Australia. Samoa met Mari in Graduate School in St. Louis. She's in the Galapagos trying to help solve a different piece of the avian malaria puzzle. Which species of mosquito is transmitting the parasite from burn two bird just before dusk similar sets out her traps. The thing about Chapin mosquitoes, as you have to think like a mosquito female mosquitoes, There are the ones that bite and can spread disease like to lay their eggs in stagnant water. So Samoa mixes up a smelly brew for her traps. Every time employees would act. In my mind, I'm like Intelink mosquitoes. Please calm competently. Kinship with cheetah's it them. In the morning seriously, every time food smells good rate. Actually, it smells like rancid Jim socks, The smellier the water, The more mosquitoes She'll get and be able to dissect working with a microscope, delicate tools and very steady hands shield chop off their tiny heads and extract their salivary glands to look for the malaria parasite. Samoa has stared at so many mosquitoes, so close up. She started to appreciate them, especially as species called 80s Agip di it's one of the most beautiful things I've ever seen. It's covered in his black and white bans all over its legs. A lower its abdomen, its face. And Yeah, the first time I say it And they microscope, I kinda fell in love. away This is a Moa says, her parents encouraged her to get an education and pursue a career in science. But she says, most people in Papua New Guinea hold strongly to traditional beliefs and gender roles, and just growing up in looking around and seen the opportunity said, was given to Meal's rather than females that set of place and aggression in me. Good aggression at told me that he Why do males always have to get chosen over females for Samoa becoming a scientist started out as a way to prove herself, but eventually became more than that. I realized it. No Science was something that I really wanted to do once she gets her PHD Samoa wants to return to Papua New Guinea to help protect wildlife there. And she hopes to be a role model and train a new generation of female scientists. Empower young girls empower women and tell him, You know, if if I can come from a country like Papua New Guinea come in, do research in a place like Galapagos in study. It it institution like my University, Then you can do it to her friend Mari plants to keep doing research in her home country of Ecuador, maybe in the Galapagos Islands.

Galapagos Islands Galapagos Charles Darwin Samoa malaria Galapagos But Mari Mari Avian malaria Papua New Guinea Ecuador Australia St. Louis Nina Samoa OSCE Graham Murray Guinea Colleen EPA Papua
"darwin" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

Last Podcast on the Left

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"darwin" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

"The darwin award goes to yeah snell was joined in these plans by a former clansman named luis beam beam was one of the earliest proponents of a strategy called leaderless resistant seemingly i wrote anarchist's cookbook kind of the idea is that just anybody is now a part of the revolution of they just say they are it's an isis company like a key idea to where he basically all just pop up in full terrorist cells and you're all serving when gigantic concept isis has a very specific focus with these people they they speak with such broad strokes that it's a huge collective they can get us wake net though they have a fairly specific pope focusing on so of course it is the i mean the specific polk focus is the overthrow of the government i mean much like isis the it just like isis the whole focus is the destruction of western civilization they pretty much isis and these white supremacist groups have pretty much the same goal daily will be friend they would be very much not at the end that and you know the views of christianity an the extremeright and end sharia law similarities it's almost like all terrorists are the fucking saying well they don't believe that the us government represents western civilisation properly so that's what they so it's like this no no he's he's writing some things that they would run by jewish coat unquote could balls and it's enforced by black people admit they're they're trying to do white genocide of trying to get rid of the white race which is like we're gibbs dow grachev of doing it themselves blowing themselves up with a homemade rocketlauncher leaderless resistance pretty much it's small groups of people that are all invested in a cause and they engage in terroristic acts of their own volition without taking orders from a higher power and if they don't take orders from a higher power and if they're operating almost randomly than that means that there's a much lower chance of them getting caught them for the entire operation is carried out like you know that's one of the reasons why of these isis attacks have been so difficult.

snell darwin us
"darwin" Discussed on Start the Week

Start the Week

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"darwin" Discussed on Start the Week

"But we also need spiritual soulful poetic silas and yet you you'll quite critical of what you can of kornacki signs signs as a joke bandwagon barrels and smells yes i'd i am i i think that there's been a tendency to think you've got to sell science by making it fun unlucky it's actually quite hard in but his but it's worth it and it's poetic it's aesthetically appealing that's what i would that and that's the way i would switch the teaching of science liban angles scientists announced into this sense of spirituality also comes with solving a puzzle is this is a sense of explained it i've got there that's what science will give you an explanation you seeing you observe something and or you make the pieces fit together if you tell someone hey this bit of masses fun naval the loads no fund it was you would just say it he would need to say that his phone so i think he just say that speaks for itself were you well toward tonics in terms of signs i didn't really understand darwinism darwin richards books are didn't understand the motive chemistry behind that until i read really and others as an adult the as a child yeah i think i well i was someone who i'd like to mathematically my light numbers and the school i went to was encouraged we old school at teaching times table something which i as i was very good at and so i responded because i was told i was good at it so well that was good for me it was terrible for the rest of the glass because everyone else was told they were good at it so i think nina you're looking at the one success from club on terms of science kathy were told over here that the store creationism in american education is not correct and is there a big problem over the teaching of darwin american school particular primary schools.

silas darwin richards darwin american school