35 Burst results for "Dartmouth College"

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:46 min | Last month

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I guess today's facilitators foot. Who is an associate professor of business administration at a tough school of business dartmouth college. She conducts soliciting international tweet and he destination. Thank you. it's great to be here. Yes thanks to believe this island. One billion people From twenty eighteen new perspectives on the decline of. Us manufacturing employment I haven't looked at this type of data for a while. i would understand the so. Let's begin the two charts in there The first one is about employment. And i see vaccine employment was sort of going in and out would trend delivered nineteenth seventy or so and this seems to have Stagnated at that point that flatlined flora while And then allowed. Looks like nineteen ninety. Eight things. rapidly fell in terms of employment. But the chart on the need is about real that you add and they'd have known and manufacturing bullets show an upward plan. So how do you hope you compute reevaluate. So that's a great question Real value added means that we take away changes in prices rate how prices over time and in the manufacturing sector we do it Differentially across industries so some industries might have prices falling more than others and that could be part of what drives real output and it turns out that in manufacturing that is true. And and when it'd be ls another agencies. Try to come up with real output so taking into account Changes in price. They do something Sometimes called these price regressions or returned to look at the attributes of the actual goods. And so something. Part of what's driving the growth in real value added in. Us manufacturing is that Things like semiconductors have gotten much much better have gotten much higher quality. Think about the computer used use in the seventies versus the laptop. You can use today or even just your watch. Those have gotten so much faster. They're able to do a lot more and so when they talk about real value added they mean in terms of not just the number of computers. But also how much can they do. What's their quality. How fast are they. And so when we say real. That's what we're we're taking into account and it turns out that computering electronics is one of the big sectors driving dot real value added growth. That you see in the bottom panel. Interestingly enough it's also one of the sectors that has very rapidly declining employment so actually declining employment prices have been declining It manufactured goods especially computers in the clinic. so how. how do you look at quantity adjustment to get. The value added seems really comments for semiconductors fairly straightforward in got they really know can measure how fast they are and so they know how many transistors they're on chip they know how much output effective real output. That chip is going to produce. And so i think for those Is fairly straightforward. But even without there. There is discussion and debate among economists is. So what's the right deflator. And perhaps were overseeing. Our real value added growth somewhat..

school of business dartmouth c Us
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:36 min | Last month

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from science policy economics and technology. My name is jill eappen. We talk with wolves leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis the most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable.

Study: Rates of Anxiety and Depression Among College Students Continue to Soar

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:11 min | 4 months ago

Study: Rates of Anxiety and Depression Among College Students Continue to Soar

"Story out of lebanon new hampshire which includes the dartmouth college very high end college. That did a study on some of their own students that found that two hundred and seventeen students were tracked when they entered the school as freshmen in two thousand seventeen in the hopes of understanding how they behave students stress levels rise and fall usually in tandem with midterm and final exams but since the onset of the pandemic quote unquote rates of depression and anxiety have soared and show no signs of coming down. Said andrew campbell researcher and computer science professor. The research points to how the public health crisis they say is affecting young people and raises questions about what will be done to support them a group that struggled disproportionately with mental health issues for years before the pandemic set in the question is how long will they stay like. This said the researcher. The findings also added a growing body of research that or to a growing body of research that indicate the effects of the corona virus have extended beyond physical health and safety particularly as people deal with social isolation grief unemployment and uncertainty about the future.

Dartmouth College Very High En Lebanon New Hampshire Andrew Campbell Anxiety Depression
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:51 min | 7 months ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"They don't leave any evidence of they don't contain any evidence of how they formed or at least not very much evidence. So if you look at if you look at galaxies we have the equivalent of the fossil record galaxies and people actually call it galactic archaeology where me stars old stars. The ones that formed early in the universe are still there. In galaxies they formed and so you can look at our milky way and you can look at the ages of all the different stars and actually piece together its history whereas for For black holes. Black holes are the simplest vixen. The universe the only properties. They have are A mess a spin and maybe an electric charge but they actually Astrophysical black we don't have any charge to the So that's not very much information. So if michael formed and all you can observe it it's massive spin you don't really know and most of the time by the way. Spain is hard to measure. How fast rotating most of the time you can only measure their mess How exactly where that came from is really hard to say. So what by the time you get to more nearby to us. In the universe at later cosmic times that the history of black holes mostly erased. And we don't have any way of telling whether they started out as a Hundred dollar mass object or a ten thousand dollar matt's object so one of the best ways to observe this is to actually watch those systems growing in the first place but yeah so so a of complications that tend to one hundred solar masses. He sort of know how that help does foam about nine thousand solar hundred masters a multiple contractors has discussed and then the gap between these two in other complication to right. Do we know how the intermediate size do they exist. That's another million dollar question. I don't i really don't think we know there's been a lot of a lot of exciting work on this and there have been a number of candidates but I think you know..

million dollar Spain dollar ten thousand dollar two first place one one hundred solar masses about nine thousand solar hund
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:52 min | 7 months ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So that's you know exactly how that works and new the black holes grow and when when are they mostly eating and when does this feedback instead sort have a big impact on the star formation is still a big area of both theoretical and observational inquiry into the week beacon not answer this question right is is a supermassive brad. Colin necessarily condition four galaxy formation answered. That question yet. that's that's a great question. I think it depends on the mass of the galaxy. We definitely know that there are lower mass galaxies and some you know perfectly spiral galaxy that only have a disk. They don't have a little bulge material in the center. There are definitely some of those where people have done very very deep observations looking for the gravitational signature of ohlund there and have not found one. And so i think. I think it's fair to say that. Some galaxies can definitely form without a massive black hole at the center. What is true. Couldn't they then extend that to say the like you said you. How imblack Could grow over time By by pulling materials so if you're finding galaxies become a black hole couldn't be done reasonably assume that the galaxies full full of even well. Yes i think it's interesting. So i think that in any reasonable scenario once the black hole. Start getting pretty massive. They pretty much have to have a galaxy around them because the the supply material that's going into the into the black hole is also forming stars. And there's so there's gotta be some symbiosis there once they start getting pretty massive but it's a really interesting question and this gets to sort of some of the really exciting stuff for the future. There's a really interesting question about what happens in the very early universe. So i mentioned This problem that if you look at the most massive black holes there wasn't enough time in the universe for them to form from a small black hole and we know about the way when we ask how black holes originate. we know. there's for sure one way they can happen..

Colin both one way one ohlund
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:46 min | 7 months ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You can be pretty sure that you know you're looking at In the in the visible light. If you can see so you have a one of these obscure things like a quasar in the visible light if there's a lot of very very blue light corresponding to the hot sort of hundred thousand degree emission from the disk material right around the black hole that looks a lot different than stars because stars You know the hottest stars can get our several times less Less net so you have or at least a few times less than that so you have that particular kind of temperature signature tells you something in visible light you can also see talked about the Gas it being a fluorescent lamp turns out this really hot disc produces a different set of emission lines of different Different elements in the gas. Actually fluorescence differently depending on whether they are lit up by a black hole this very hot disc of material around a black hole or by stars. And so that's that's another way of telling the difference And then the one the we've been using is in the infrared has to do with again temperature and it's the temperature of the dust so typically Stars form inside of dusty clouds in the heat up that dust to particular temperature and that radiates but also there's this dusty material in this tourists in this other stuff around the black hole in active galactic nucleus and that's getting blasted by this radiation from right around the black hole and that it's up to a higher temperature thousands of degrees as opposed to Tens or hundreds of degrees And so once you get two thousand degrees again. The the sort of typical shape of the colors in infrared look different and we have we therefore have ways of trying to look at those colors in a piece things apart but the real trick comes when you try to model the whole thing all once you date from xrays you today from the optical and infrared and you try to kind of make a coherent picture of the whole spectrum as it.

Tens two thousand degrees thousands of degrees hundreds of degrees hundred thousand degree today one a few times these
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:40 min | 7 months ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Yes so two. Different things so The first idea Find a sentence divine so these are aegean's potentially obscured by by dustin gas But you can see them. In infrared i would imagine that not that he luminous in other invisible trade but he doesn't have an intimate and and you expect Because the infrared intensity you expect x ray intensity through but you don't see the rays from that And then you're saying if you stack that the x ray pictures so to speak You can actually recognize what's at the center so so this. This appears to be sort of a good way to test your hypothesis. Yes absolutely so it that the x rays are a good way of of confirming that. We We have a growing black holes there but also these these stacking techniques were also. If you're getting it also help. Test is other hypothesis about the the flickering variability. Because what that tells you is that Must or there should be a whole bunch of galaxies whose augean luminosity are kind of just below the threshold of being able to detect them in the observation ship that we have. But if you add everything together then you can see the signatures of that and indeed. There's actually been some great work by a number of groups some of them working in The very deep observations with the chandra x ray observatory like the chandra deep field. South the cosmos Observatory cosmos field. Excuse me where they take in you know. Very deep observations of a small patch of sky and then statistically done this kind of work and asking. Is there this residual blackhawk growth in there that we did not detect is individual sources. And lately there's been really cool work from this. Basically all of this is now Both confirming but also kind of adopting this this particular picture that i was talking about about the broad distribution of accretion rates in the kind of the flickering savior and they find really neat relationships between things like The star formation raid the massive stars and in particular the morphology of the galaxy whether it's like a dense compact thing or something that's more spread out and how fast the black holes are growing on average and so the the stacking technique has become really powerful in Trying to push forward this this whole picture yet..

two Both first idea chandra
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:16 min | 7 months ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Then we're that we're growing. We're basically just like the ones where the locals were growing. And i'm paper. Made the like we sort of made the observation and there was a lot of evidence by many other groups That we kind of put together for this. The black holes probably when they turn on and start growing they. Maybe don't stay on for that wrong. And actually maybe they rather than just turning on and off like a light bowl maybe slicker all over the place. And sometimes they're hundred times growing one hundred rapidly and sometimes they're going thousand times less rapidly and they go over many orders of magnitude in terms of how how much they grow and they can do that in millions of years which for the time scale of galaxies a very short time and so the hypothesis that we said well wait a second. Maybe all galaxies including our milky way galaxy are actually growing their black holes in some relatively well behaved average since. But then it's liquoring all over the place because of a lot of complex physics that happens around the black hole itself where you know you have this radiation that we talked about before they can drive material out if it if it suddenly gets to luminous or you know the gas flows in can get on stable in all kinds of things can happen that will cause the black hole growth rate to vary a lot and so we. Maybe we're thinking about this all wrong that you wouldn't actually expect there to be a difference between the black holes the galaxy that are growing within the ones that are not because i actually all of them maybe at least ones that have a gas supply that the black hole can actually eat all of them on average doing that and in fact in our own milky way we see evidence for remnant structures. They're these big bubbles high energy material above and below the milky way called the fermi bubbles. That may have been actually produced by an outburst From the black hole on the order of millions of years ago. And there's actually evidence even more recent outbreaks than that that were kind of a smaller scale ones So we you know. I think now that picture is interesting. We've been moving towards it in the field for a long time until two thousand thirteen fourteen But now that that's sort of statistical picture where you have to treat this as a Really look at the whole distribution of growth rates because you can't these time-scales long enough to know astronomer can sit there and watch a galaxy and watch it's Black blackhawk growth rate vary on. You know on the scale that it would be for a million years. Do see a handful of and this is an exciting new discovery. A handful of objects that do change in their growth rates on something like years of timescales Which is not expected. These are winner. Call changing look objects and they're very exciting area of research but in general you wouldn't expect to actually be able to watch a single system go through this whole cycle and so what we need to do is instead and getting into the future. Prospects is to observe a lot. A lot of galaxies measure the accretion rates a lot of galaxies. And then use that to to meet statistically understand. what is that distribution. And how does that match into what we would expect from these statistical models of by so if i descend is going to be line you hypothesis actually makes it Eat makes you find. It makes intuitive sense. So are you saying that black core grew is sort of more uniform battle blackhawks have found. It's not like they're feeding and they're going to sleep and they come back on There is a process that and be more universally defined But the date of the picking up..

millions of years ago millions of years hundred times thousand times one hundred fourteen a million years single system two thousand second a thirteen
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:01 min | 7 months ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Open for debate. You know based on just address your first point. It is true if we look around in basically every large galaxy around us and we look down right at the center and look at how stars moving around in the center of the galaxy. And there's several different techniques we use to do that They also of them show evidence of a supermassive bio but in the vast majority of cases. They're not they're not creating material until they're not very luminous rights of we can't see the the life from them but as we look farther back in cosmic time if we look at objects that are farther away and so it's taken light longer to reach us. We see more and more of these eighty end. These active galactic nuclei that are These black holes. That are getting off light as they are growing. So it's definitely true that the ethic of the growth of black holes is not today. Actually the epic of the growth of galaxies is not today either. Galaxies tend to be forming stars at quite a low rate right now compared to how they did earlier in the universe But if we look at when the universe was a half as current ager third if its current age Then there was a lot more of this black hole growth activity that we see in the surveys of galaxies. The we do however the question of what came first the black hole or the galaxy is still very much open to debate and there are still a whole bunch of different theories that posit certain interactions between the growth of the black hole in the growth of the galaxy. And i really don't think that's that's totally settled yet. So we we see well. I don't think anyone to date has found a true solitary quasar by itself. The the we know does not have some kind of a galaxy around it and that of course it'd be a smoking gun for the earliest growth of black holes. The fact that maybe black holes lead this process but there's a lot of new potential observations that will help us tease this out. I'm not only from direct observation perspective but also in a statistical sense by observing the very first galaxies in the universe was less than two billion years old and serving very looking for evidence of the very first growing blackhall as well. Yes oh as you do back Do you have any evidence of Sort of sort of tests and his his size observation So look you know. Just a billion from in years from the obama something that really large galaxies at that time or small so. This is a really interesting question..

today first point third first galaxies less than two billion years ol first eighty end obama a billion
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:59 min | 7 months ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"It's really difficult right Do we have a mathematical way to say You know if the if you see this space. This is the most likely shapes. Yes we do There's there's a lot of interesting things you can do to reconstruct the galaxy. And which is the sort of motion of a galaxy as aware and even for nearby things we can actually even take very high resolution images. Allow us to result down to those internal structures. That i was talking about like this tourists and so the way. That works is a in particular by looking at doppler shifts. So if you have a that is mostly. Ed john to you and then you will generally see if it has especially if it has some kind of coherent rotation but you can actually tell this. Even if that's the motion is a little bit more mixed up one side. You'll see the material generally moving away from you which manifests as a redshift of the light. These and on the other side you see coming towards you in there will be a blue shift and so you can tell how inclined an object is by the spatial distribution of these these wretched and blue chips. So something's perfectly face on. Does any richardson blue chips at all. And if something's totally at john and you see The strongest possible. Richardson blue chips. And that that is correlated of course with the shape like a if you look at a spiral galaxy like the milky way. If you look at it right john. It kind of looks like thin line with a bulge in the middle assert fried egg sideways. But if you if you looking at face on of course looks round in anywhere in between looks kind of like a An ellipse as it works oval and by looking at both that large-scale shape and also the and blue chips that you observed from taking spectroscopy of these galaxies. You can work out their their inclination angle reasonably well but it's not a super precise business and a good example is My own group. It has done some Observations using the southern african large telescope of one of the most famous nearby growing black holes a system called nbc ten sixty eight and we were trying to model the the actual emission that we saw from this thing And one of the things we needed to know his inclination and this is one of the very best studied objects like it's super close. It's very easy to get good data from it. But even then there was actually a significant uncertainty and degeneracy in what they inclination is so you can. You can partly get there but these systems are kinda complicated into your limited into how well you really can precisely do it..

Ed john Richardson richardson one both one side john southern african things nbc ten sixty eight
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:56 min | 7 months ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Holes in galaxies and covid grew over cosmic time. He's cutting the chair of nasa as physics off the cosmos program analysis tube and has been engaged in the planning planning of multiple future nasa space. Obselete things that the ryan hijo. Thanks very much nice to be here. Yeah thanks for doing this. So i went to one of your Ordered papers Complex of conversation. So you're twenty. Thirteen paper a black Ability and the star formation augean connection do all stars on galaxies host and eighty n It defect of gallic active galactic nucleus vade oblivion observe connection between star formation and blackhawk christian next organic surveys. Recent studies have reported relatively weak coalitions between observed augean at the properties of aegean hose which has indicated inc imply that there's a connection between agm activity and star formation. So i guess by using the luminosity proxy for activity is that the year. Yeah that's right so the The way we know how black holes grow over cosmic time so we have a big black hole in our own milky way galaxy an optical A star.

twenty Thirteen paper nasa one hijo christian oblivion
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:47 min | 7 months ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Welcome to Shondaland

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:19 min | 8 months ago

Welcome to Shondaland

"Tonight. We're talking about shonda rhimes. Who is like she's a total boss. Queen television absolutely all right so first. We'll talk a little bit about shonda. So shonda rhimes was born in chicago. Illinois in january nineteen seventy. She was the youngest of six children. Her mother vero was a college professor and her father. Eilly was a university administrator. And she'd said that she exhibited an early affinity for storytelling early on in her life. She attended marin catholic high school and served as a hospital volunteer which inspired an interest in hospital environments. She majored in english. And film studies at dartmouth college and she graduated in nineteen ninety-one at dartmouth the black underground theatre association. She divided her time between directing and performing in student productions and also writing fiction and after college. She moved to san francisco and worked in advertising but she moved to los angeles a little bit after that to stubby screening at the university of southern california. She was ranked top of her class at usc. And she earned the gary rosenberg writing fellowship. She obtained a master of fine arts degree from the. Us's school of cinematic arts. And while at usc rimes was hired as an intern by debra martin chase who was prominent black producer she also worked at denzel washington's company monday entertainment so after she graduated rimes was actually an unemployed script writer in hollywood and to make ends meet. She worked various jobs including as an office administrator. And then a counselor at a job center during this period rhymes worked as a research director documentary. Hank aaron chasing the dream which won the nineteen ninety-five peabody award. One thousand nine hundred. Eighty eight rhymes made a short film called blossoms. Unveils which starred. Jada pinkett smith and jeffrey rate. This is actually only credit as a film director. So that's nineteen ninety eight short film blossoms unveils new line cinema purchased a feature. Script of hers It ended up not being produced at that time but she received an assignment shortly thereafter to co write the hbo movie introducing dorothy dandridge in nineteen ninety nine which earned numerous awards further star. Halle berry. get out. I didn't realize that she colorado so interesting. Oh wait till you hear the the plethora of things that she's worked on. Oh no after grad school rhymes sold her first screenplay called human seeking same about an older black woman looking for love in the personal ads. And that film wasn't produced. But you have heard of her next project in two thousand and one rhymes wrote the debut film of pop singer. Britney spears the starring zoe saldana and taryn. Manning crossroads everybody. I didn't know that she wrote that. Get out up saying. I feel like it's been really it was really panned by the next but maybe for them. Okay no sometimes. It's it's sometimes you just want a nice story about friendship road trimming going on a road trip and having a nice time and may be hitting up a karaoke joint. Heck yeah and singing. I love rock and roll. That's all i'm saying is that maybe it's for them. I think lauren has actually seen crossroads. I have felt you know. She wrote that and then the next thing that she worked on in two thousand four was the sequel to the princess. Diaries called the princess diaries. Two royal engagement. Get out. yeah. I didn't realize that she was so like a dummy. I just assumed like shonda rhimes right out. The gate was grey's anatomy but apparently she was introduced are obsolete reduce. So she's working on all these film things in two thousand three. She actually wrote her first tv pilot. Abc it was about young female war correspondents but the network. Turn it down. You know what they didn't turn down ask project. So here's where sean hillen comes in sean. Billion is the name of rhymes production company shine million and its logo also referred to the shows that she has produced an also to rimes herself. So when we say shaun d land. It's like interchangeably sean. And her production company. Yeah and like the. Because i do remember like i think it was. Abc or nbc. I forgot what what channel she's on but it was. They were like girl a sorry But it was like thursday nights. Is sean the land. Because it was like it was like back to back to back to back shadowland shows. We'll talk about that. You have a basically they. They tried to rebrand thursdays. Like tgi. T thank goodness thursday because that its native shot in the land. I mean people are gonna watch no matter what they didn't need to need hype it up so The name shawn lane was stylized as capital s shonda capital l. Land one word from two thousand five to two thousand sixteen but since two thousand sixteen is all stylize lower case everything is lower case. It's always very recognizable font so you might often see in print as actually all lower case letters.

Shonda Rhimes University Of Southern Califor Eilly Marin Catholic High School Rimes Black Underground Theatre Asso Gary Rosenberg Debra Martin Chase Jeffrey Rate Shonda Vero Dartmouth College Peabody Award Dartmouth Jada Pinkett Smith Hank Aaron Dorothy Dandridge Illinois Chicago Halle Berry
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:17 min | 11 months ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike. Yesterday's purposes dina russkies. Who is professor of philosophy and chair of the cognitive science program affiliate of the department of psychological and brain sciences at dartmouth college dukla russkies Interest light intersection of philosophy neuroscience. I didn't philosophy of mind. Philosophy of science and ethics. He has gold book with the steven. Moore's it primer on criminal law in neuroscience. The committee glad to be here. Thanks for inviting me. Yeah thanks for doing this. So i would start with one of your papers. Wide liberty studies. Don't pose a threat to free will invite you say benjamin Controversial papers on the new basis of action and the relation between action and conscious intention cab dominated discussions off defects that neuro scientific understanding get have for our conception of ourselves as free and responsible agents before we get into it except his benjamin He was a neuroscientist Working at believe at ucsf and his primary work that has concerned philosophers was done in the eighties and he made certain claims about the relevance of that work for free will let have been accepted very widely and very uncritically for the most part and Filtered down into public conception of the problem. And i think that people have just deeply misunderstood the relevance of his work questions about free will so so free will to get the definition of for Of bill is the ability And you're talking about here but it could be applied to animals. That's what i would imagine. But the ability of human to do two things as he or she wants right is is this destination that certainly wouldn't be the philosophical definition But let's just say it is the ability of humans to Act in a way that is Self generated and yes i think in accordance with their intentions and You know.

dina russkies department of psychological an dartmouth college benjamin Mike steven Moore ucsf
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Is one thing but somebody using if process to do you know, uh, typically manipulators another. At that is really what you're trying to detect. Yes. Very much so. and. So so in conclusion gene autry working on some extensions of this I can see lot of applications of this. As we get into this. Election time. Extensions. Yeah. Working at a couple of extensions. One in particular says. Let's see if we can really automate the argument. And the whole notion of the argumentation was also looking at says it you know, how can I? Better. Measure or better understand the structure of the arguments themselves. Ah. What's relevant? What's not and this is this is the reason we do that. Then a very simple very simple idea is this is that if I know the structure, I, know the impact of the argument on the structure that if we know that whether a particular argument is true or false. That tells us something very easy potentially where the say something state newsroom. This this is work in progress. This is one of our hypotheses going forward, but I think it's something that you know Bear, lot of fruit just at least based on some of our initial stuff. sounds fascinating. They could be I wonder bb already working on the set could be a graphical to route percent that structure puts right right. Yep So, so you could you know even a human could visually see. What that yes. I completely agree That's while things that we've been discussing a lot on. It'd be really great that you throbs Yup that's an obvious deception. This doesn't look right. A rohrschack test for deception. Anisa there there's a lot of set nowadays So. Yeah. This has been great Jean thanks so much for spending time with me. No. Thank you. Fun Yeah good likely to switch. Thank you very much also. Good luck. Thank you. bye-bye..

gene autry Bear Jean
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday's professor Eugene Sandoz who's a professor of engineering and Computer Science Dartmouth College. don't decide on artificial intelligence in sex with eight years of. Cognition human factors in mathematics? His current focus on computational intent dynamic human behavior and decision making. With an emphasis on learning ORLEAN LINEAR and emergent behaviors and explainable AOI. presente surprised his work with the goal of bedroom standing Kobe both as individuals, and our society can best leverage knowledge through I do. World for societal good. He Sa- fellow off the a s typically. Bill Continue. Thank you. I wanted to start with one of your books from two thousand, six I've lucidly models for opponent intent opponent into fencing. this was published in two thousand six. And you say that technically the characteristics and behaviors of once adversely is essential for Says it any competitive activities such as in sports business or warfare? And I guess you can add politics to it now gene. Obviously once enemies bell understood that actions can then be better anticipated at counted and to do. So the key is to capture our intentions. Are you WanNa talk a bit about that to set the stage for You know talking about so much states are on. Shore. So when I talk about intentions here, this is really trying to understand what Dr Behaviors, what drives, people's decisions on what drives their actions, and it's also an essential part explaining that. I mean, you know one way one easy examples united just having a discussion here. Our we start off that discussion there's all sorts of implicit handshake. So to speak up US understand each other's intentions in context with is without that you know when you ask a question. I may answer from somewhere very strange if I don't know your intentions. Oh, you know this this applies also on the adversary side because obviously if you can understand them anticipate them. Dan I'll help you better work out what the appropriate future actions for yourself are. And so COUPLE OF MODELS In the paper One of them is called the be D, I believe desire intention model. by Bartman. and you save intentions viewed as partial plans committed by an intelligent entity.

professor of engineering Dan Computer Science Dartmouth Col Eugene Sandoz professor Kobe Mike Bill bell Bartman.
"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

"Reuben know things take over 19 women may find their place in the workforce more at risk, A Dartmouth College economist tells The New York Times. With many daycare and schools closed. Working moms may end up being forced to make a choice to stay home if they haven't already been laid off. And a director of a charity serving disadvantage. Women in England says the pandemic will take women 10 years back in the

Dartmouth College Reuben The New York Times Director England
Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

"The pandemic could hit working moms worse than Dad. CBS's Mira Reuben reports, a Dartmouth College economist tells The New York Times. With many daycare and schools closed. Working moms may end up being forced to make a choice to stay home if they haven't already been laid off and a director of a charity serving disadvantage. Women in England says the pandemic will take women 10 years back in the workplace.

Mira Reuben Dartmouth College CBS Director The New York Times England
"dartmouth college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pennsylvania at Dartmouth College California institute of technology to name a few I now have kids who would never have considered low school seriously before even if I would have put them on their list but now the kids are like maybe I have a shot maybe it is possible for me she says her students give admissions test scores outsized power helped along by a society that's obsessed with competition I think that's so unfortunate when you have just one tiny in my mind insignificant factor that is making a decision about what their dreams are it's not just students and educators that are taking note of the growing number of colleges de emphasizing these tests other universities are watching and learning we saw the writing on the wall that's Kristine Harper who oversees admissions at the university of Kentucky she says she's long talked about being test flexible giving students the option to submit their scores and the pandemic offered the school a way to do that at a minimum for next year and perhaps beyond going to be an interesting year this whole year has been an interesting year why stop now the school hasn't made a formal announcement yet they're hoping to let students know the details by mid July Arbor says there's just no way in the midst of this pandemic to hold up strict testing standards even for prospective students that squeezed in a test in March before the shutdown they were taking this exam when everything was changing around them tests are stressful to begin with but then when everybody is like my sports are canceled what's going to happen that just adds another layer for now the emphasis will be on expanding a holistic review of applicants where a number of factors including leadership and grades contribute to admission the question for many admissions offices are the other elements of the application also free of bias there is a healthy growing skepticism about standardized test scores but there's a way in which that sort of over cells how we do they are in a selective admissions process Andrew who is an expert in educational testing at Harvard and he says it's important to remember that one of the reasons standardized testing in college admissions came about in the first place was an attempt to make fair comparisons because other measures of college admissions grades essays extracurricular activities they can be rife with inequities and the more we we put on one thing maybe a GPA or an essay the more at risk of that is to manipulation and inflation once you realize that they care about this one thing we game it we we we try as hard as we can to inflate that one things such that it no longer actually indicates what I'm capable of doing who says just because we're rethinking these admissions tests it doesn't mean we've rooted out inequities in our pathways to higher education Elissa Nadworny NPR news this is NPR news in the next segment NPR's Noel king is going to talk to author Sam Lansky about Lansky's novel entitled broken people get set in LA and weaves together themes of isolation body image and addiction among gay men that interview is just ahead on morning edition on KQ weedy we have a peninsula problem we go to one of one in San Mateo and check it out with the Joe McConnell a broken vehicle on one of one in San Mateo northbound.

Pennsylvania Dartmouth College California i
How to read those unemployment numbers

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:04 min | 1 year ago

How to read those unemployment numbers

"Los Angeles. I'm Kai Ryssdal. It is the twenty first of May today as always to have you along everybody and we begin on Thursday. I think. Actually this is the eighth or ninth Thursday in a row with yet another staggering report on people filing for unemployment benefits in this economy. Two point four million people this week down yes from a week ago but still basically the entire population of Houston Texas. Now which need to know though. Is that those weekly unemployment claims. Come in two varieties marketplace's Nancy Marshall Genzer gets us going with the difference between the two and why that difference matters initial jobless claims are how many new people file for unemployment benefits in a week. Continuing claims measured the total number of workers on unemployment. Erica gration the former head of the Bureau of Labor. Statistics says think of it like a bathtub. The initial claims is how much water is flowing into the bathtub and the continuing claims is how much water is in the bathtub. Each numbers important Chris. Rupp key chief. Financial economist at the Global Financial Group G follows both well. That's why God gave us to do. Is You have to watch both that. Rookie says when he wants to tease out underlying trends that continuing claims numbers more important. Because the minute the total number of people receiving unemployment starts to come down. That's the key signal that the labor markets improving the continuing jobless claims numbers will play a key role in whether the post corona virus recovery. Looks like the or you. Meaning the economy improves quickly. Or is flatter like an L. Dartmouth College Economists Patricia Anderson will be watching that if the continuing claim start falling. Fairly rapidly than. That's good signs that we might be more. U shaped than l-shaped Anderson says if the continuing jobless claims just keep plodding along at about the same rate. That's not a sign that we're really turning the corner. I'm Nancy Marshall Genzer for marketplace

Nancy Marshall Genzer Patricia Anderson Kai Ryssdal Los Angeles Bureau Of Labor Erica Gration Global Financial Group G Houston Rupp Texas L. Dartmouth College Chris
Don't Try To Be Great

The Next Right Thing

06:27 min | 1 year ago

Don't Try To Be Great

"In his book. Based on a commencement speech he gave at Dartmouth College in twenty eleven. Charles Wheel tells a story about how he was once a guest on a news program hosted by Chicago journalist Phil Ponts now the show is filmed live. So of course if you mess up or say something you regret there are no do overs. They're only hundreds of thousands of pairs of eyes watching. You do whatever it is you did or say whatever it is you said polished or not just before airtime Charles the writer recalls how. He was feeling right before. He said he was nervous. Self-conscious in hoping to impress in that very moment fill. The host leaned over with just thirty seconds to live and said these words. Charles never forgot. Don't try to be great. Just be solid. The book is called ten and a half things. No commencement speaker has ever said and in it. Charles Leland writes this. That simple advice had a profound effect. Because I knew I could be solid. That was within my control. I could just talk about what I know. I could answer questions candidly. I could have a fun and interesting conversation with other guests. I might have some fun. Equips I might not. Phil's advice was liberating because it removed the pressure to deliver what I wasn't certain I could deliver and it made me better at doing what I knew I could again. The book is called ten and a half things. No commencement speaker has ever said and don't try to be great. Is thing ten and a half like many of you? I've been thinking a lot about this class of twenty twenty both like I said the high school graduates college graduates to in addition to all of the end of year events. This graduating classes either missing out on her having to modify because of the pandemic the truth remains they're still graduating. They are moving into the world of grownups and the expectations in this world can be while extreme to say the very least. This world is filled with people who are trying to be great in the same way. I hope doing the next great thing is a kind of phrase for graduates to hold onto. I think Philpott he gave to Charles. Leland seems like a relief as well. Don't try to be great. Just be solid. It's not the message we usually hear after all the phrase is greatest of all time not solid est of all time or does that even mean to be solid years ago. I listened to an interview with author Philly Anderson who by the way is also a real life dear friend of ours here. North Carolina but in the interview Phil shared about his thirty year. Friendship with author and priest Brennan Manning in that interview Phil says this about Brennan Guy who's famous for what he has to say yet. What I remember most about him was how he sat and listened. He touched my life with his kindness. To fill. Brennan was solid. Another story comes to mind about Brennan himself one that he told his book souvenirs of solitude and it was about how years ago after a difficult phone call he had. He left his home. He was distracted and he had an appointment. That day. To give a talk to the inmates of Trenton State prison when he stood up there in front of the inmates he had been distracted. Like I said right before. He got up there so without stopping to think about his surroundings. His first words of greeting to the inmates were well. It's nice to see so many of you here when I read that statement. I tip my head back and laughed out loud all by myself mainly though I recognized how Brennan responded to his own words he wrote. I'm frequently not inform on top or in control. This is part of my poverty. As a human being and self acceptance without self concern simply expresses a reality he writes an impoverished spirit prevents the poor man from becoming a tyrant to himself. Brand was not anxious shocked or even much concerned about this misstep in front of the inmates. Instead he had a light heart about it if he had been trying to be great that day. This mistake would have crushed him instead. He showed up solid which meant there was room to make a mistake and to move on without crumbling. We try to great. We risk becoming a tyrant to ourselves when things don't go the way planned one final quote and then I'll be done Dallas. Willard writes about the misunderstood phrase that we find in the Bible about dying to self he says in this is a quote when we see people dominated by their lust for glory or insisting that there will be done we will be in a position where we can be very firm in not cooperating with them even if their loved ones when we live in the shepherd sufficiency and died to ourselves. We become the most firmly established people in the world. That quote is from his book. Life Without lack the most firmly established people in the world so class of twenty twenty. Don't try to be great. Just be solid. Be Solid in the way you live in your house until the next phase begins in the way you hang out with your family your choice to laugh instead of roll your eyes in the way you choose to listen to your younger siblings. Who will miss you more than they can possibly say. Or put into words be solid with how you enter into your next experience not like a tourist who watches from behind a camera lund's and insists all of your usual comforts are close at hand and not like an expert who thinks she's supposed to know everything as best you can enter into your new situation ready to be fully present and engaged when you can and free to withdraw when it's necessary be solid enough to be boring if you're trying to be great you might not notice the people and the margins your neighbors who are working twice as hard for half as much. If you're trying to be great you might be tempted to bend the truth to get ahead. So just be solid honest simple and you

Brennan Manning Phil Ponts Charles Charles Leland Dartmouth College Charles Wheel Writer North Carolina Chicago Philly Anderson Trenton State Lund Philpott Willard Dallas
Mainframes: Timesharing

Command Line Heroes

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Mainframes: Timesharing

"You can't tell g story without telling Dartmouth College Story. Dartmouth was really the Institution Matt. Handed time sharing to Ge as both use of those computers and as a way of doing business dartmouth at a very young mathematics department in the late fifty s and early nineteen sixties and several of the faculty including John. Kennedy and Thomas Kurtz had experienced in computing and saw computing as a way to attract really bright math and science students to the college by Nineteen. Sixty two you. They were ready to propose time sharing to the National Science Foundation to get funding to actually build a campus wide and eventually New England Wide Computing Network. That was efficient for the user. They really thought that computing would be a necessary skill for their students in the coming decades. And they saw time sharing as the form of computing that would enable all of their students to gain computing experience and that was revolutionary. That was something that was really not done anywhere else. At the time even at a place like mit which also implemented time sharing or Carnegie Mellon the users were primarily the scientists and engineers whereas at Dartmouth which was a liberal arts college. The users were nearly all of the student bodies have regardless of area of study or previous experience. When Kennedy and Kurtz who were the math professor's leading this project review proposals and really it was the two twenty five in combination with the data net. Thirty that. They saw the way to implement time sharing. They knew the two twenty five would quickly be upgraded. There were already plans for the two thirty five but it was really that combination of the Dana Net. Thirty which could be used to sort of stop the clocks so to speak and enable communications between users and the mainframe to twenty five or to thirty five that the Dartmouth people sort of latched onto in the early nineteen sixty s mainframe. Computers are so expensive that G. E. TO twenty-five computer cost about two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Actually as delegation from DARTMOUTH WENT TO G in Phoenix hoping to create a partnership with G. E. saying we the faculty and students. Dr Will Create this time sharing system for you if you give us a two twenty five an Edina net thirty for free. Ge declined that offer but they did give the college a substantial discount. I believe it was a sixty percent discount on the machines. General Electric delivered the two twenty five and the data at thirty two dartmouth in March of nineteen sixty four and two undergraduate students acquired responsibility for actually programming and implementing time sharing using those two computers. Their names were John. Itchy and Michael Bush so Jon. Hagey acquired responsibility for the two twenty five and Michael. Bush had programming ownership on the demon at thirty so they had to figure out how to make their respective machines communicate with each other and they took ownership of those responsibilities in not the machines were known as McGee and Bush and the young men were known as two twenty five and thirty. The two of them took this terribly. Personally it wasn't John's machine and Mike's Machine it was John and Mike who were not responding and they would stand at opposite ends of the room and yell at each other at the top of their voices so I think that's the soul of that machine as these two college students who are so immersed in their enthusiasm for making time sharing work that they become the machines and their personal efforts actually enable literally hundreds of thousands of not millions of other students to access competing in the nineteen sixty s via basic time sharing once it was implemented and New Hampshire those students. Some of them actually went to explain what they had done to the GE engineers and very soon after that GE started marketing time sharing as best and a feature of its computers. Ge sells off. Its ME frame. Business in one thousand nine hundred seventy but it retains its time sharing business for at least another decade well into the nineteen eighties and continues to provide time sharing service to individuals and businesses around the world Over the course of several

Dartmouth Dartmouth College Story General Electric John Michael Bush Kennedy Thomas Kurtz New England Wide Computing Net Dana Net Carnegie Mellon National Science Foundation New Hampshire Professor G. E. Edina Mike Phoenix Mcgee
Peak Misery And The Happiness Curve

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:36 min | 1 year ago

Peak Misery And The Happiness Curve

"Okay. Why don't we start with your name? And what you you David. blanchflower professor of economics at Dartmouth College and there was a period there. Were you served on the Bank of England. Yes in two thousand six. Six Golden Brown called me up and said Don. I wanted you to go to the Bank of England I said Oh okay And I want you to come to the really seriously. Ah So so. Monetary policy clearly is one of your specialties. How did you get into the sort of world of happiness and and in midlife crises? So what does the Central Bank you care about Central Bank as Aboud interest rates inflation unemployment growth. But they're into people don't care about that they care about how it impacts their wellbeing so I started to think about ultimately What impacts impacts their wellbeing so I actually have a paper? Brian Look at Tommy. Inflation and unemployment impact people's happiness so in a sense those things are intermediate goods. What we really do care about a people's happiness so I go to it and then I started to realize the patterns in the data while guests here high unemployment high I am happiness is absolutely right and so what I found was one of the big results from this is a one percentage point increase in unemployment has a big effect on people's happiness? So that's some of the stuff that I've been doing like really basic question is I mean obviously I know how we measure unemployment but how how did you go about measuring wellbeing. Like how do you measure happiness. Feels like that would have been a challenge at the start of this research absolutely So it turns out that there are many many many many many surveys around the world that actually ask people directly. How happy are you so sometimes they say in literally how happy I you on a scale of one to ten? How satisfied with your life? I you so these schools. Well the first thing. Is that the patterns in these data. When you ask this you pretty much get the same results? Every time most people are pretty happy very few people very unhappy and the same fluid ounces occur on it but I think what what you you would say. Why does this matter when it turns out? This is currently with things so happy people heal faster they live longer healthier so you you are are in the world of central banking. You get interested in happiness and well-being And then in two thousand seven you you release this. The sort of paper a had a huge impact on a lot of people. So can you kind of sort of set the scene. Two thousand seven. What was that paper? I started to work with number colleagues leagues on trying to think about these patterns. In happiness data and three things stood out the first one we just talked about that unemployment impacts it impacts happiness being married impacts it but one of the things we saw very easily so in the data was that happiness is high. When you're a young is high when you're old but this trough in the middle so this this you shake so this is what drove it? I'm particularly interested in deepening case. Talk about deaths of despair and particularly we seem a crisis in America suicides especially in drug poisoning deaths amongst the prime age in particular not prime age less educated folk. And there's that issue around the world so that's so that was really kind of the starting point I've done this study of one hundred thirty the two countries and what I find when average all together in advanced countries The the the the deer. If you like the low point of this happiness it is forty seven and when you do it for developing countries that got nine hundred five developing countries that do before very similar about forty eight point six so around forty eight That seems to be right. And what's interesting over the last couple of weeks. I've been talking a lot about lots of people. Call me and tweet it to me and and so on and said wow that really fits my life. So you've you've talked about this a little bit but I'd love to get like really specific. So what is it that that is causing. I do think I mean like what is it about I guess it was at forty seven point to you What is it what is going on that? That's making people unhappy at that age. Well I think if you look back. I'm a professor so I've lots of young people I teach these young folks And then they left home when they come through the university and they suddenly realize there's more than one way to cook an egg but all of that is pretty dumb tough especially these days where student loans and having to try and buy a house. What are you going to do with all of that stuff? This is really hard but I mean in the sense. What's interesting about it is this phenomena phenomenon appears to be true everywhere? It's not unique to Germany Japan the US and Canada African countries. You see it in Latin America seating Thailand highland so I think it's something that's the people the people are experiencing and then eventually I think eventually I think what happens is people get real. I mean some of the work have written said when you get to meet fifty you your aspiration start to become real when I was talking to you. You're in the Florida mangroves and yes and you write fishing right and that day you caught a fish right the was it again. It was a it was a twenty eight inch twenty pound redfish toward and and you so you sent me this picture. It's a picture of just for listeners. Out There WanNA picture You're just beaming. You still have your security. I have to say this professor blanchflower so We publish this article Ray and it goes on the web and twitter being witter. I had somebody are- tweet at me. And they said this. How are we supposed to trust any of this switch? Flower guys work when he blatantly lies about fishing that Royd ride nowhere near twenty pounds eight to ten pounds so any respond here. I mean I mean the question. It doesn't really rely the size of the faith. which is what I said relies on the fact that I looked awfully happy? You happy. You're on the you're on the upward swing of your happiness curve. We're on yes I've come to see my action sir. My son having a wedding party. Today's Louisiana but your children bring you joy. The grandkids life life improves.

Bank Of England Professor Dartmouth College Professor Of Economics Golden Brown Brian Look David. DON Royd America Louisiana Latin America Twitter Florida Thailand Witter Germany Canada
United States Can't Arbitrarily Impose Tariffs, Despite Mnuchin's Threats

Marketplace

01:45 min | 1 year ago

United States Can't Arbitrarily Impose Tariffs, Despite Mnuchin's Threats

"All right so the second piece of that mission quote the deserves a second look is the bit where he said the United States is going to arbitrarily imposed tariffs which is not the way it works marketplace a dealers on that one despite what the treasury secretary said in Davos this administration can't arbitrarily imposed taxes on whatever it wants the imposition of tariffs on any foreign goods for national security reasons falls under section two thirty two of the trade expansion act there is a procedure for going through section two thirty two and claiming national security that's Emily Blanchard she's an economics professor at Dartmouth College she says the argument the trump administration put forward back in may of last year was unprecedented in US trade policy that automobiles our national security issue because they are important for the US economy and US economic security is part of the broader national security the administration produced a report on why auto imports threaten national security but the White House has refused to release the report to Congress saying it would limit the administration's ability to negotiate further trade deals with Europe Japan and others Jamie Butters at automotive news says in theory he could see national security claims for auto imports if we imported all of our vehicles and we didn't have the ability to manufacture vehicles anymore than we would be at a disadvantage from a defense standpoint but he says that's a tough line to walk given how globally inter twined the auto industry has become an Emily Blanchard Dartmouth says that's exactly why any auto terrace would hurt American workers kind of ripple up and down the supply chain to parts producers and then to to further parts purchasers in alternately to the people buying those cars the American consumer I'm a dealer for market

United States Davos Emily Blanchard Dartmouth College White House Congress Europe Japan Jamie Butters Emily Blanchard Dartmouth
We have a deal, folks

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:27 min | 2 years ago

We have a deal, folks

"Ladies and gentlemen we have a deal what exactly the. US MCA is going to be from American public media. This is marketplace in Los Angeles. I'm Kai Ryssdal is Tuesday today. The tenth of December is always to have you along everybody. This was quite a day I mean yes sure that other story very big news but to those for whom the economy is our concern also so big. After a couple of days rumors house. Democrats announce this morning they have come to terms with the trump administration on the new NAFTA The US Mexico Canada agreement by name. It's been a bit more than a year since the deal was originally signed so on the theory that perhaps the details have faded from memory. Marketplace's Merrill Sagarra has this refresher fresher one of the long standing. Criticisms of NAFTA is that destroyed a lot of US manufacturing jobs. The treaty allowed Mexico to export products to the US. duty-free but wages are lower in Mexico. Doug Irwin teaches economics at Dartmouth college or what happened after that allow. US companies moved their assembly implants to Mexico so if you lost assembly jobs the original version of the US MCA tried to address that problem. It required Mexico to protect workers right to unionize and to increase wages for at least some Mexican Auto Workers Democrats wanted more than that. One thing was for Mexico to promise that conditions would improve establish Florida's messy as teaches government at Cornell but another thing was for those conditions to truly improve for the government to monitor conditions in factories. To make sure that whatever new regulations were in place would also be enforced. He says Democrats proposed that the US should be allowed to send inspectors turn into Mexican factories. Mexico said no but in this new version of the deal Mexico did agree to allow panel of experts to make sure it's following the rules. It's not clear exactly how that will work. You know it'll be interesting to see what exactly under which conditions these panels can be convened and who brings these cases another sticking point for Democrats the original deal would have given pharmaceutical companies ten years to exclusively make certain kinds of drugs. Christopher Sands is a senior research professor at Johns Hopkins so it means ten years in which generic copies cannot be made of drug. I think a lot of Democrats. The House saw this as really over the top especially since drug prices have been on the rise that part of the US is gone. Now and Democrats have also added some environmental rules. I'm Maryelle Cigar for marketplace. Honestly the first thing. I thought of this morning when I heard the news was apple's specifically glee Washington state apples from the Yakima Valley. My first reaction was a little bit of relief. Mostly that seems like we've cleared that a hurdle. That's Patrick. Smith are apple in hops farmer up in the North West the hurdle of course being no free trade agreement with Canada and Mexico his two biggest export markets for the apple industry here in Washington state. It was tens of millions of dollars of exports that were lost in the twenty eighteen crop. Not only because of the possibility of no more Nafta but also because of retaliatory tariffs from Canada and Mexico that sent his exports down thirty percent last year. Getting a deal. That would kind of clear all that out of the way and go back to some sort of stated normalcy is is really good the thing for us a state of normalcy under the US MCA no tariffs on his apple. Exports to Mexico and Canada. Just like under NAFTA but we're not making any big decisions really on the basis of US MCA or anything. We're still kind of in wait and see mode in cautiously optimistic for For improvements in in trade relations Patrick Smith up at the family farm loftus ranches in Washington. State still going. Maybe a couple of months before this thing is done by the way. See also that other big story in the news today that sucking all the air out of Washington

Mexico United States Nafta Canada Apple Washington State Patrick Smith Kai Ryssdal Los Angeles Washington Doug Irwin Merrill Sagarra Dartmouth College Johns Hopkins Cornell Christopher Sands Florida Yakima Valley
What's in the U.S.-Mexico-Canada deal, the new NAFTA

Marketplace

01:14 min | 2 years ago

What's in the U.S.-Mexico-Canada deal, the new NAFTA

"After a couple days rumors house Democrats announced this morning they have come to terms with the trump administration on the new nafta the U. S. Mexico Canada agreement by name a bit more than a year since the deal was originally signed to show on the theory that perhaps the details have faded from memory market place Mart else together has this refresh one of the long standing criticism of nafta is that it destroyed a lot of US manufacturing jobs the treaty allowed Mexico to export products to the US duty free but wages are lower in Mexico Doug Irwin teaches economics at Dartmouth College so what happened on the masters that allow US companies move their assembly plants to Mexico so would be less lost assembly jobs the original version of the U. S. MCA tried to address that problem it required Mexico to protect workers right to unionize and to increase wages for at least some Mexican auto workers Democrats wanted more than that one thing was for Mexico to promise that conditions would improve Gustavo Flores my CS teaches government a Cornell but another thing was for those conditions to truly improve for the government to monitor conditions in factories to make sure that the whatever we're new regulations one place would also be

Nafta United States Mexico Doug Irwin Dartmouth College U. S. Mca Gustavo Flores Cornell U. S. Mexico Canada Place Mart
STEMinists: Mae Carol Jemison

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:07 min | 2 years ago

STEMinists: Mae Carol Jemison

"To space and she's also a physician volunteer entrepreneur and teacher. Let's talk about the multitalented Mae Carol Jemison they may Carol Jemison was born in Decatur Alabama on October Seventeenth Nineteen fifty-six. She's the youngest of three siblings and she was three her. Her family moved to Chicago. May's parents maintenance worker at an elementary schoolteacher always encouraged her curiosity and desire to be a scientist in one interview may set her parents were the best scientists. She knew because they were always asking questions. mm-hmm. May herself was inquisitive from an early age. She spent much of her time in her school library. Reading about astronomy and other sciences by the time may was in highschool. She'd already decided to pursue a career in biomedical engineering. She received the national achievement scholarship for Stanford University and left home for college when she was just sixteen years old at Stanford may studied chemical engineering and African American can studies she also participated in dance and feeder and served as the head of the universities Black Student Union in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven she completed pleaded her degree at Stanford and enrolled in Cornell University's medical school she studied and worked abroad in Cuba Kenya and Thailand after Cornell now she worked as a general practitioner before serving in the Peace Corps in Sierra Leone and Liberia when may return to the US. She went back to work as a general zero practitioner but it wasn't long before she decided to take a shot at a childhood dream. The space shuttle Challenger's five astronauts sleeping now in nineteen eighty three may watch to sally ride became the first American woman in space but as the Challenger climbed today carried American woman astronaut astronaut Sally Ride into space and into history may was inspired decided to apply to NASA's astronaut program she was selected as one of only fifteen candidates out of more than two thousand applicants may join the Astronaut Corps in nineteen eighty seven and after drew extensive training took her historic flight on September Twelfth Nineteen ninety-two ever lower the locker visors world twelve good luck on conviction that bill on the past x Ray in the visible lending at our planet earth in the neck copies. Thanks on that day. She became the first black woman in space she traveled on the space shuttle. Endeavor or three three two one booster ignition and liftoff of space shuttle Endeavour on twenty-first-century mission placing Earth back on the Mac doc may was the mission specialist of the journey. She conducted bone cell research as well as experiments on weightlessness and motion sickness. The Group of seven seven astronauts took one hundred twenty six orbits around the Earth and the mission lasted eight days after as time and space she left NASA in March of nineteen ninety-three she went on to teach environmental studies at Dartmouth College and founded her own company called the Jemison group you a technology consulting firm that seeks to incorporate solutions to social issues in the design of Engineering and science projects. She's a vocal local advocate for greater inclusion of women and people of Color in stem and she's also an advocate for comprehensive science education for kids. She contributes to efforts provided dance technology to schools worldwide. We all need to be stim- literate just to work our way through the day we need to be stim- litter may has also also taken over leadership of the one hundred year starship program the program which was originally established by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency works to develop means for traveling beyond the solar system within the next one hundred years. It's aims to benefit many people on Earth as possible along the way in case. You weren't impressed enough already a leave you with some parting fun facts about the Amazing Mae Carol Jemison final frontier she she speaks three languages other than her native English Japanese Russian and Spike Ely voyages of starship enterprise. She also appeared appeared on Star Trek the next generation making her the first real space goer to play a character on the iconic show boldly go where no man has gone before. You're all science. All space exploration everything we do in the world is about imagination in using your creativity to expand beyond your the Obama join us next time for the story of another

Mae Carol Jemison Sally Ride Amazing Mae Carol Jemison Nasa Stanford University Jemison Group Alabama Astronaut Corps Decatur Peace Corps Scientist Chicago Barack Obama Mission Specialist Liberia Dartmouth College Spike Ely Universities Black Student Uni Defense Advanced Research Proj
Brexit Is The Latest Blow To The British Pound, Once A Symbol Of Economic Might

Morning Edition

05:02 min | 2 years ago

Brexit Is The Latest Blow To The British Pound, Once A Symbol Of Economic Might

"It's been some time since Britain's empire extended around the world but the British pound long a symbol of Britain's global power is still a source of great pride in the country over the years though the pound has lost a lot of its luster and the turmoil surrounding brexit has hurt its stature even more you Jim zarroli in the late nineteen nineties Europe embarked on a radical experiment it got rid of Italy's lira Germany's Deutsche mark and the French Frank among others and replace them with a single monetary unit the euro only one major country refused to get on board Britain here is then chancellor of the exchequer Gordon brown we will not seek membership of the single currency on first January nineteen ninety nine the decision was driven by much more than economics the pound also known as the quit or sterling is a rich cultural symbol a powerful reminder of the past glory of the British Empire I'll notes have been adorned with some of the most illustrious figures in British history Shakespeare Dickens and Darwin today people such as Jacquelyn Cup for a pharmacist's assistant in London say giving up the pound is almost unthinkable I think it's because it is so you know you've got an old school friend to turn everything now talk about the talent and it's part of our kind of culture really I think anything that you try to replace it with it wouldn't did the talking I think the pound is encrusted with centuries of British tradition one pound was long week will take two hundred and forty pence it bewildered tourists in nineteen seventy one the government decided to simplify things one pound would now be worth one hundred pence it took some getting used to even students had to take classes in the new money how many new pen if you guys have in one house for new my mom doesn't like the fifty pence I today's twelve to make sure they're not the singer Max Bygraves even put out a song of through all the changes the pound has long symbolized Britain's economic might at one time the pound was used to buy and spend all over the world it paid for roads in Africa and railroads in India it financed cotton fields in the American south Neil Ferguson is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the author of the history of money if you go back to the nineteenth century the British pounds occupied the place in the global economy that the US dollar does today but as Britain's power wind so did the pound the government tried to stem the decline after the second World War travelers were barred from taking pounds out of the country you can take a holiday business alarms and travelers checks but not more than five pounds in studying those efforts like these not withstanding written over the years would have trouble controlling the pounds volatility the Ferguson remembers living through it my childhood was in some ways scarred by periodic sterling crises I think they were my introduction to economics as a boy growing up in Britain in nineteen ninety two came what was perhaps the worst crisis of all it was known as black Wednesday deep pocketed investors led by George Soros made enormous bets against the pound and the whole world watched as the pound collapsed the most dramatic turn in government if not extract you for twenty five years was forced on the prime minister and chancellor by the overwhelming pressure upon billions of being sold in the far next change mark Soros was said to have made a billion dollars in just one day since then the pound has only lost more ground today it's worth just a dollar twenty a fourth of what it was worth almost a century ago one big culprit lately has been brexit Britain's decision three years ago to leave the European Union sent the pound tumbling the government's chronic inability to come up with an exit plan has driven it even lower David Blanchflower is an economist at Dartmouth College the chaos that sits around a possible no deal brexit is scaring the markets and so the pound is folding steadily Blanchflower says the pound could soon be worth one dollar in the history of the pound that's never happened today the British pound with all its glorious tradition indoors but like the empire itself it's not quite what it used to be Jim zarroli NPR news New York

Britain One Pound Twenty Five Years Billion Dollars Five Pounds Three Years One Dollar One Day
Marcelo Gleiser Wins Templeton Prize For Quest To Confront 'Mystery Of Who We Are'

Dennis Prager

02:37 min | 2 years ago

Marcelo Gleiser Wins Templeton Prize For Quest To Confront 'Mystery Of Who We Are'

"The annual Templeton prize which recognizes outstanding contributions to quote, affirming. Life's spiritual dimension unquote was awarded today today. Wow. Today to Brazilian Marcelo. A theoretical physicist. My field theoretical physics. The the reason it's by feel is that I I know physics, theoretically, I don't know any physics or theoretical physics. But theoretically, I know it if you radical physicists dedicated to demonstrating, science and religion are not enemies. He's a physics chemistry. Professor who's specializations include cosmology, sixty year old glacier was born in Rio de Janeiro has been in the United States nineteen eighty six. Ooh, that's a long time and agnostic. He does not believe in God. But refuses to write off the possibility of God's existence completely. Atheism is inconsistent with the scientific method licensor told a f p on phones past Monday from Dartmouth College. The New Hampshire university where he has taught since nineteen ninety one atheism is a belief in Non-belief. So you category deny something you have no evidence against. I'll keep an open mind because I understand that human knowledge is limited. He added. Then I go down to the end of the column for glacier. Who grew up in Rio's Jewish community. Religion is not just about believing in God provides a sense of identity and community at least half of the world's population. Is that way he said it's extremely arrogant from scientists to come down from the ivory towers and make these declarations without understanding the social importance of belief systems. When you hear very famous scientists making pronouncements like cosmology has explained the origin of the universe and the whole and we don't need God anymore. That's complete nonsense. Because we have not explained the origin of the universe at

Rio De Janeiro Brazilian Marcelo Old Glacier Templeton Dartmouth College RIO Physicist Non-Belief New Hampshire University United States Professor Sixty Year
U.S. trade deficit hits 10-year high in 2018 on record imports

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:34 min | 2 years ago

U.S. trade deficit hits 10-year high in 2018 on record imports

"Is an observation to be made here as we get going with the big picture economic news of the day. Which is of course, this morning's report from the good people at the Commerce Department that our trade deficit, President Trump's favorite economic indicator. You might remember. Anyway, it grew last year to a record six hundred twenty one billion dollars. That is we imported six hundred twenty one billion dollars more stuff goods and services than we sold abroad. Here. Then is the observation that for all of those hard earned American dollars. We send overseas we get stuff in return their goods and services other countries make that we want so we buy them global trade, the often overlooked point, though, is that the trade deficit isn't some kind of profit and loss statement for the American economy report card, and it's not in and of itself a cause for concern. In fact, the trade gap last year was largely. Driven by a strong domestic economy. Marketplace's Tracey Samuelson gets us going. President Trump talks about the trade deficit kind of a lot. We have a trade deficit with almost every country in the we have a massive trade deficit with everybody. But which aging we racked up trillions of dollars in trade deficits, also known as loss we are going to start whittling that down and as fast as possible. So the fact that the trade deficit grew nearly thirteen percent just last year by his own standard. The higher deficit means he's failing. And that we're losing that other countries are taking advantage of us, but Doug Irwin economists. And trade historian at Dartmouth College doesn't actually see it that way, he says it's natural expected even at the trade deficit increased last year in general what we've seen US history is that when we have a booming economy or a growing economy trade deficit tends to either stay the same or grow. Oh, and they tend to strengthen recessions from two thousand eight to two thousand nine the trade deficit fell by nearly half counterintuitive as it may seem the growing trade deficit last year was driven by how strong the US economy was especially relative to big trading partners, like the European Union and China, Catherine man is the global chief economist at Citi group consumers are buying more because they are have higher income because they're strong labor markets, and because they got a little bit of a tax cut that makes them able to consume more. And some of it falls on imports seem thing with business businesses producing because labor markets are tight they got a little bit of a tax cut. So they import intermediate product so that they can produce goods to meet the demand in the domestic economy, and for a communist, this is all very very predictable. They saw this coming a mile away. If the US really wants to reduce the trade deficit it should. Save more says Carl Tannenbaum chief economist at Northern Trust. One of the reasons we have a trade deficit is that on average our consumers spend a lot more of their income than foreigners to saving not as fun as spending. But ten imams says it make households more stable in the long run and reduce the trade deficit. I'm Tracey Samuelson for marketplace. Well, let's put a context on this morning's trade gap. Number reminder that it's the total value of goods and services that we buy and sell overseas, Tracy was talking about goods that has actual tangible stuff that blew out our trade deficit. Well, here's the deal. The interesting part is that we've got a trade surplus in services have for decades now actually of which we sell a bunch overseas

United States President Trump Tracey Samuelson Chief Economist Commerce Department Doug Irwin Dartmouth College Tracy Carl Tannenbaum Citi Group Northern Trust European Union China Six Hundred Twenty One Billion Thirteen Percent
Intimate Hermit Crab Keeps Shell On

60-Second Science

02:30 min | 2 years ago

Intimate Hermit Crab Keeps Shell On

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin. So I never really thought I'd study Pena size, but I sort of stumbled on this topic Mark lider, a biologist at Dartmouth College light travels to Costa Rica to study hermit crabs a species called sina Beata compresses. These land crabs do some interior remodeling of their adopted shells, the extensively hollow them out removing Streit's called spiral cholula to give themselves some extra elbow room. The renovation renders. The shells more precious to their owners and two other covetous crustaceans as well. These more valuable shells, though are also more easily stolen since without the spiral. Kolya Mellon signed the shell to grip onto individuals are pretty liable to have their property snatched from them, particularly when they're engaged in other activities like copulation which requires coming part way out of the shell despite his work in the field. It wasn't until lighter was wandering through Ziam that he noticed something about his favourite crabs the really striking thing. Was that scene? Evita compresses the one who social behavior I've been studying for so many years headed unusually large penis, in fact, bigger than any other species the observation gave him an idea, which he dubbed the private parts for private property hypothesis in a sense, the hypothesis posits that in large private parts can be an adaptation extending amounts sexual reach and thus enabling both him and his partner to remain safely tucked away inside their shells, while they copulate thereby protecting the private property of their shells from being stolen during sex Darwin proposed a similar idea to explain why barnacles which are stuck in one place are so amply Dowd did test his private parts for private property hypothesis light or sized up more than three hundred male museum specimens, including hermit crabs that live on land. And it's see any found that crabs that carried custom coverings head the most impressive Kornel equipment at the same time species that got their shells off the shelf had bigger geared than did crabs that walked around with. Oh, shell at all is results revealed in the Royal Society journal open science, it's intriguing to think that this high posses might have greater generality beyond hermit crabs. But like a hermit crab encountering a humdrum. Shell Lantra says he's going to leave that one alone. For me. I'm much more curious about how forms of animal architecture and remodeling in the environment impact social behavior. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Karen Hopkin Shell Lantra Kolya Mellon Sina Beata Streit Mark Lider Pena Kornel Dartmouth College Costa Rica Royal Society Journal Ziam Partner Dowd Sixty Seconds
"dartmouth college" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"dartmouth college" Discussed on KOMO

"Dartmouth College is praising current and former students suing the school but denied doing nothing to stop sex harassment. Andrea Courtney and six other women said it was so bad in the Dartmouth department of psychological and brain sciences, they like in the behavior of former professors to a twenty-first-century animal house. It was certainly a boys club environment. So. There was a highly centralized culture in the school's first response to the women's lawsuit. Dartmouth acknowledged the misconduct of the three former professors and an unacceptable environment involving alcohol and inappropriate comments in contact but Dartmouth denied failing to protect the students insisting incidents were promptly addressed. Aaron katersky. ABC news, New York. He gained a bit of celebrity from TV's to catch a predator. Now, there's word he surrendered himself to police on Christine's the guy we've watched for years busting suspected child. Molesters Chris Hansen now as a mugshot of his own. He's been charged with bouncing checks and Stamford, Connecticut. Police say he ordered thirteen thousand dollars whether promotional trinkets from Stanford company and paid with a check that bounced when the company gave him a second chance a second bounce check. Cops got involved in Hanson is out on bail with an upcoming court date. Jason Nathanson, ABC news Hollywood from President Trump's mouth to net. Flicks ears the services, Steve Carell is re teaming with the creators of the office for a new. Workplace comedy entitled space force after Mr. Trump's desire for six military branch. This is ABC news. Komo news time, twelve oh. Four. Komo AAA traffic every ten minutes on the fours instruction continues round the Puget Sound area in Seattle. Southbound I five at the I ninety interchange. Two lanes are closed for roadwork till four AM down by joint base..

Dartmouth College ABC Dartmouth department of psycho Aaron katersky Mr. Trump Komo Andrea Courtney Stanford company Steve Carell Chris Hansen Puget Sound harassment Stamford Jason Nathanson New York Connecticut Christine Seattle Hanson
Women Sue Dartmouth College for $70 Million Over Allegedly Sleezey Professors

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:40 sec | 3 years ago

Women Sue Dartmouth College for $70 Million Over Allegedly Sleezey Professors

"Dollars. If your business did not receive your approval letter to get up to two hundred fifty thousand dollars. Call main street business loans approval desk now eight hundred four three oh, seventy five seventy eight hundred four three oh, seventy five seventy eight hundred four three oh, seventy five seventy that's eight hundred four three O seven. Five seven zero always want to be the best. You can be Frankie Boyer show more than a lifestyle show. It's a show about living in today's world. I think something is happening. Franken euthusiasm brings an amazing eclectic mix to the airwaves

Frankie Boyer Franken Euthusiasm Two Hundred Fifty Thousand Dol
U.S. announces sanctions against 17 Saudis over Khashoggi's death

Fresh Air

01:01 min | 3 years ago

U.S. announces sanctions against 17 Saudis over Khashoggi's death

"Saudi prosecutors announced they'll seek the death penalty for five people yet to be identified that it says are responsible for Jamal Khashoggi. Steph. Among those sanctioned by the US are sowed L Kettani, a Royal court adviser and communications director for crown prince, Mohammad bin Salman and Mohammed ELO Taibbi. He was consul general, and is Dan Bulwer kashogi was killed on October. Second. Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia wrapped up its investigation of the killing the top prosecutor says a former deputy intelligence chief plotted the operation to kill the Saudi journalist dispatching a team of fifteen men to Istanbul. The invest. Gatien found. No senior member of the Saudi Royal court was involved in kashogi staff, something Turkish officials dispute. Jackie Northam, NPR news, Washington. A group of seven women in New Hampshire is suing Dartmouth College for allegedly shielding predatory professors a criminal

Saudi Royal Court Saudi Arabia Mohammed Elo Taibbi Jamal Khashoggi Jackie Northam Dan Bulwer Steph Consul General Dartmouth College Mohammad NPR New Hampshire Istanbul Intelligence Chief United States Prosecutor Salman Gatien Director Washington