35 Burst results for "Dartmouth"

Loss and damage: Fight over human harm, huge climate costs

AP News Radio

01:01 min | Last month

Loss and damage: Fight over human harm, huge climate costs

"More than 100 world leaders will gather in Egypt this month for climate talks and much of the discussions are expected to be making some of the world's biggest polluters pay for destruction caused by climate change This summer's floods in Pakistan put one third of the country underwater causing $40 billion in damage a study calculated that climate change increased Pakistan's flood causing rain by up to 50% Dartmouth climate researcher just in mankind says it's a group of highly developed high income countries that have brought this problem to the world The cost of it are disproportionately being endured by low income countries in the global south And that is a massive injustice and massive inequity Europe's leaders and president Joe Biden are calling for fossil fuel companies to pay a windfall profits tax that along with aid from rich nations would go to countries victimized by past pollution I'm Donna water

Pakistan Egypt Dartmouth Joe Biden Europe Donna
"dartmouth" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

03:01 min | 2 months ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Non medical professional, so I could also see that a lot of very often you go back to a doctor about something you do a follow-up, being able to actually review what happened last time. How unique that is, you know, I know personally I've been in meeting with physicians and I pull out Evernote and I'll take some notes and then I'll refer back to that. But that's very low fidelity. Totally. Information because I'm not taking that many notes. I'm trying to be engaged in the conversation. I'm asking follow-up. So the most are very sparse. If you're doing a follow-up a month three weeks, or even three months later, I mean, it's very hard to remember all the contexts that you had in that meeting. Yeah, absolutely. There's good research at a Dartmouth that suggests that people forget up to 80% of what they've heard from a medical professional. Seems low. Forget more. There's just something about health conversations. I think already we don't remember the details it's so difficult. But something about health related conversations. If you get a new diagnosis, for example. I think you go somewhere else as soon as you as soon as you heard that. And what comes next goes in one ear and out the next. So there are these two sides of the coin that we think solving for makes this mainstream. We'll make this something that where the first question anybody asks each other is like who's going to bring a bridge into this conversation me or you? And solving for the patient's side, we think is totally aligned with the best intentions of a value based healthcare system that really wants people to remember, understand, follow through being healthy. And we also know that the same kind of technology that can create a differentiated souped up transcript that we were talking about for the consumer side can create a summary for the provider's side for doctors and nurses because one of the things that's getting in their way of really spending the time and focusing on the patients in front of them is all of the clerical work that lies in the middle. There's documentation, there's box checking, there's electronic medical work record workflows that has been there's really great studies that have been published in reputable journals like jama that suggest that the majority of people's time actually is spent in the system checking boxes as opposed to face to face with the patient. So how do we use this technology to actually flip that script? And that's what we're after here with this enterprise kind of solution is finding a way to really help people focus on the conversation, the quality of the conversation, the patient who's in front of them, knowing that this same technology is going to be able to automate a lot of that clerical work, create the document draft for them. Put it inside the medical record. And give them the ability to actually send those summaries, those next steps to their patient..

Dartmouth
Explaining Buckley's 'Radical Conservatism'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:07 min | 3 months ago

Explaining Buckley's 'Radical Conservatism'

"One of the key exhibits in this case is a quotation attributed to me. In fact, said by me, I take full credit for it. Evidently in nickel hammer's book and it's brought up in an interview that nickel hammer does with political, here's the quote, conservatives need to be, quote, philosophically conservative, but temperamentally radical. And Nicole hemmer uses this to say that here's danesh, he's not a real, well, he might be conservative in a sense, but he is radicalizing conservatism. Now, if Nicole had more paid more attention to my speeches and books in which I talk about this, she would know, and this is kind of a mark of the sloppiness of leftist scholarship these days. She would know that this idea of being philosophically conservative, but temperamentally radical actually comes from William F. Buckley. I was a student a Dartmouth, in which Buckley came to speak. And Buckley raised a very interesting conundrum, an interesting puzzle. He said that conservatism is about conserving, conserving, hanging on, holding on to things that are good and true and beautiful. And in a sense, protecting and perpetuating the best things about a society. But Buckley said, what if you are on a campus and I think he was thinking of Dartmouth but he could apply to his own Alma mater Yale, where the prevailing ethos, the prevailing principles, the ruling authorities, the whole culture, is left wing is liberal. What do you do then? And Buckley's point was, do you just conserve that? You just, you just say that we are going to conserve whatever exists no matter how degraded and debased and horrible it is no. Buckley's point isn't that case you can't be a conservative in the old sense. The old conservative could just look at society and go, I like the way things are going. I'm going to try to make sure they continue going this way for as long as possible. But when things are going very badly and the whole structure of society is awry, Buckley's point is what is the conservative to do. And Buckley's solution was, well, you have to stop being conservative in a sense.

Nickel Hammer Buckley Nicole Hemmer Danesh Dartmouth Alma Mater Yale William F. Buckley Nicole
Why Dinesh Just Trended on Twitter

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:27 min | 5 months ago

Why Dinesh Just Trended on Twitter

"So yesterday I'm scrolling through Twitter and I noticed trending on Twitter. Number one, dinesh. I'm like, could it be a different than that? I'm not aware I've done anything trend worthy. And in fact, I called W I go, hey, listen, I'm trending on Twitter. She goes, oh no. Because usually usually far in some bad side, it means I've gone really close to the line and done something a little bit questionable. Debbie goes, it means you poke the bear, yeah. Evidently, I poke the bear. Well, now obviously I'm really happy when I was trending with the movie. 2000 meals was trending for a while. The national trending, the Souza was trending and all of that, of course, had a kind of purpose to it. But sometimes I'm trending for no evidence purpose. So this was the case yesterday. Well, here's how it started. You have this guy Richard ojeda. And he goes, a few think 2000 meals is valid. You may be part of the poorly educated. So this is kind of what got me and I'm like, well, okay, you know, if you consider the movie to be something that is made by an appealing to the poorly educated, let's compare credentials. So here's my tweet. Let's compare your educational credentials to mine. And now I'm laying it on here, obviously. Ivy League graduate from Dartmouth policy analyst at the Reagan White House, research scholar at AEI and the Hoover institution at Stanford, author of more than a dozen highly acclaimed bestselling books, and then my punchline. Now you go. Let's see how your credentials dead silence from the guy, but evidently it kind of, you know, it poked the bear, the left gets all stirred up and so on and so first of all, well, this is one of the nicer responses, which is hey dinesh, I may disagree with you on many things, but your background is undeniably accomplished. He goes, my issue is never your education. It's rather your slavish commitment to your worldview that ab initio, meaning from the beginning, excludes anything contradictory to your position. So he's implying I'm some sort of a dogmatist who's so close minded. I can't see the other side. Now I think if you listen to this podcast, you can see that first of all, my interests are pretty wide. I'm very often reading ideas at a completely different than mine. Even in my Christian apologetics, I read extensively the atheist. I don't just mean Christopher Hitchens and Dawkins. I read Nietzsche, I had been schopenhauer. I need Hume. And I quote all these guys in my work. So the idea, so I reply to this guy and I say I wish you knew me a little better 'cause I don't do

Twitter Dinesh Richard Ojeda Reagan White House Souza Debbie Hoover Institution AEI Ivy League Dartmouth Stanford Christopher Hitchens Dawkins Nietzsche Hume
Wall Street Observer Brandon Gill Joins Dinesh to Talk 'Woke Activism'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:09 min | 5 months ago

Wall Street Observer Brandon Gill Joins Dinesh to Talk 'Woke Activism'

"Guys, I'm really happy to welcome to the podcast my son in law, Brandon Gil, Brandon's the founder of D.C. inquirer dot com. By the way, if you haven't seen a D.C. inquirer UI RER dot com, it's a quickly growing conservative news out outlet. He's originally a rancher from West Texas, a graduate of Dartmouth. That's where he met Danielle, my daughter, and he's a former Wall Street analyst who can follow his political commentary and follow him on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, also get her true social. He's at real Brandon Gil. Hey Brandon, good to see you. Thanks for coming on the podcast. I thought I talked to you a little bit about Wall Street. You've been an insider and an observer. Of Wall Street. And you were telling me about a kind of new activism that's emerging on Wall Street. Allied with the left, it's a kind of almost awoke wall streetism. Talk a little bit about what are some of the signs of that. And then we can talk about how it became that way. All right, well, first of all, thanks for having me on the show, dinesh. Always good to talk to you. As you mentioned, I grew up on a cattle ranch in West Texas. And I had always kind of been intrigued by Wall Street. It's an area where there's a certain sort of sort of meritocratic purity to investing, or at least what I thought was how the investing world worked. Typically, you think of investing as you analyze a company, you analyze its fundamental business prospects, you estimate its future cash flow. And then come up with what you think that means that stock or business should be trading at currently. Once I got to Wall Street, I found this sort of new investing framework that was starting to really gain steam. You hear people talking in the news or in investing communities about things like DE and I diversity equity and inclusion or ESG, which stands for environmental social governance. And these are sort of extra economic criteria that investment firms or asset managers will think about when analyzing what companies they should invest

Brandon Gil D.C. Brandon West Texas Dartmouth Instagram Danielle Dinesh Twitter Facebook
"dartmouth" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

07:34 min | 7 months ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Military So it's an active military base I think that's important to point out to Nick estes research by Preston McBride at Dartmouth And Dartmouth college has suggested as many as 40,000 Native American children died at government run boarding schools around the U.S. This report is saying 500 Can you talk more about this discrepancy Yeah I think in the press briefing by the department of interior yesterday it was pointed out by Deb haaland as well as assistant secretary Brian Nuland that this was a preliminary report And that they've identified over 53 marked or unmarked grave sites at these various offers of boarding schools and non reservation boarding schools And I think it's a really delicate matter because for example the Rapid City Indian school which is in Rapid City South Dakota The burial sites are actually within the community itself There have been housing projects that have been built over the burial sites And a lot of people are reluctant to identify them publicly because of the history of grave robbing at a lot of these sites And so I think what Preston is saying is very true that this is an undercount because it's an initial survey of these specific grave sites But I think as this investigation goes underway and more documents become available for the public we're going to see those numbers continue to rise And it's very tragic I think it's important to point out that this initiative began last June when several hundred native children's graves were found in Canada but where the headlines now about all the surveys that a lot of these First Nations are doing at these sites in the numbers are in the thousands right now But it's not making headlines I think it's important to pay attention to this as it unfolds and to really listen to a lot of the native elders as well as the native researchers who have been doing this historically This isn't new news to us We don't have a definitive number All we have is the common experience of the boarding school system as it has affected every single American Indian in this country Are your do you have reservations about the report And in fact it's true the interior department report said they expect to find thousands if not tens of thousands of deaths But you're talking about a report that was released by the interior department and worked on by the bureau of Indian affairs within that which actually ran the whole boarding school system But the new development of courses Deb haaland is in charge the first Native American cabinet member in U.S. history Yeah I think it's important to point out that Deb haaland is I think she's been in this position for just over a year now and one year is in the face of a century and a half of genocidal Indian policy isn't that much when we think about how these how history unfolds But also I think it's important to point out that the perpetrator of this crime against humanity is now going to be the adjudicator of justice so to speak And there were questions of deaf Holland's office yesterday about what reparations will look like on behalf of tribes They're modeling their truth and reconciliation process off of the Canadian model But it's important to point out that the Canadian truth and reconciliation commission only came about because of a class action lawsuit on behalf of residential school survivors And I would say that the department of interior has a poor track record in terms of adjudicating and accounting for its own crimes We can look at the cool bell settlement which happened in 2000 11 the Banker eloise co bell shows from the blackfoot nation She did a forensic audit of the United States and found that the federal government had mismanaged a $176 billion of Indian individual Indian monies The department of interior awarded itself because we're still considered wards of the government $3.5 billion Almost pennies on the dollar of what she had accounted for in terms of damages that we were awarded And so it's no coincidence that DM people are in the same department that manages wildlife and federal lands We have heard earlier in the broadcast that the department of interior is kind of going back on this federal leasing program But it's not just the question of Indian boarding schools Because Indian boarding schools were one facet of a larger process of dispossession and theft of indigenous people's lands and resources because the Indian boarding school system was actually using treaty annuities and federal and federal funds that was meant for Indian education for this genocidal process And this money was gained through the selling of our land to white settlers It was also gained through the dispossession of those lands by the federal government itself And so there's a lot of accounting to be done here And the report itself identifies 39,000 boxes of materials that the federal government has I think it's about 9 over 9 million pages of documents that need to be reviewed And so allocating just $7 million to this investigative process over a century and a half of genocidal policies is kind of a drop in the bucket and what needs to happen And I think it is important to point out that there is a representative Sri stavis who's a Democrat from Kansas and also from an indigenous nation herself Has a bill that's going through Congress right now That will open up I think more federal money for an investigative process that will look not only into the federal Indian boarding school system but also look into the role of faith groups specifically the Catholic Church and its role in these genocidal educational policies Well we will certainly continue to follow all of this But Nick estes before we end I wanted to ask you about Leonard peltier the 77 year old and a snabe Lakota Native American activist who's been in prison for 46 years for a crime he says he did not commit Leonard peltier was a member of the American Indian movement convicted and involvement in the killing of two FBI agents and a shootout on the pine ridge reservation in South Dakota in 1975 His arrest and trial marred by prosecutorial misconduct withheld evidence coerced and fabricated eyewitness testimony and more And this international's long cold hemo political personal In late April Hawaii senator Brian schatz asked attorney general Merrick Garland about Kohl's to grant peltier.

department of interior Deb haaland Nick estes Preston McBride Dartmouth And Dartmouth colleg Brian Nuland Rapid City Indian school bureau of Indian affairs Native American cabinet U.S. Canadian truth and reconciliat Rapid City Banker eloise co bell South Dakota Preston federal government Canada
Who Is 'First Casualty' Author Toby Harnden?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:45 min | 8 months ago

Who Is 'First Casualty' Author Toby Harnden?

"Before we get into these amazing stories, Mike span, David Tyson, John walker lind, who is Toby Honda. Tell us about what you did in the British armed forces and your life as a journalist before you became an author. Yes, well, you know, we share a somewhat similar accent as listeners and viewers will detect. You still got yours. Our minds kind of rubbing off a little bit, but I don't know. I'm worried. I'm worried about mind getting a little bit Americanized. But I trust yeah, you're a bit soggy in the middle of the Atlantic somewhere. Yeah, I mean the ace. So yeah, I'm 56 years old, I was born in 66. My father was in the navy. We moved around, we sort of ended up in Manchester, industrial city in the northwest. You don't have a mancunian accent. I think the Royal Navy actually did for the mancunian accent, which was pretty skin deep anyway. But you know, I sort of, you know, I wanted to follow in my father's footstep, I guess there's so many sort of young men do. And I also wanted to get out of Manchester and see the world and it just seemed like a very kind of insular sort of small sort of place. And so all that teenage angst was just channeled towards working hard to get out. And so I got a sponsorship from the I joined the navy at 18. Went to Dartmouth, which is the Britannia royal naval college, kind of the equivalent of the U.S. naval academy at Annapolis, but not really because it's more basic officers training. It's like santas is shorter. Yeah, that's right. I mean, I was there for less than a year. And I threw the navy I got a sponsorship to Oxford to study modern history, so I went off whilst serving naval officer, although I barely wore the uniform for those years apart from a few months sailing around sort of Hong Kong and the far east and Australia. So I had some good times. Yes, exactly. So I was serving naval officer for three years at college and then graduated from college and was pitched in to a career. Which I enjoyed immensely, but you know, it was after the Falklands War, which was 1982, I was joining and supplying to join just sort of join the Falklands actually, age 16. But I missed that. I was stationed in Scotland for the Gulf War, tried very hard to get involved. They managed to that's a long way away from Iraq. I know. They managed to win it without meeting my services. And I remember my boss at the time said, listen to, we don't worry about it. There's going to be plenty of time for medals. And I remember thinking, no, there won't. And of course I left after ten years of service without a single

Mike Span David Tyson John Walker Lind Toby Honda Navy Manchester Britannia Royal Naval College Royal Navy Atlantic U.S. Naval Academy Dartmouth Annapolis Oxford Far East Hong Kong Falklands Australia Gulf War Scotland Iraq
Why America Is at the 'Abyss of Infinite Insanity' With Dr. Gad Saad

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 9 months ago

Why America Is at the 'Abyss of Infinite Insanity' With Dr. Gad Saad

"With us right now is one of my favorite guests. He's a lot of fun. Gad sad is the Professor of marketing at concordia university and former holder of concordia university research chair in evolutionary behavioral sciences. He has held the visiting associate professorships of Cornell University Dartmouth college and University of California Irvine. And he also has a phenomenal book that he has authored called the parasitic mind, and he is one of the most articulate and effective opponents of wokeism and the moral decay that is occurring in the west. Professor sad, welcome back to the Charlie Kirk show. So nice to be with you, sir. So I think it would be helpful, doctor for you to kind of introduce the thesis behind your book, the parasitic mind. A lot of our audience is new and it has been a while since we've had a conversation. Reintroduce kind of the argument you make in that book. And why you've believed that these parasites, otherwise known as kind of the woke variants, are so dangerous to western society. Right, so I face two great wars in my life. The first great war was growing up in Lebanon when the Civil War began, and that allowed me to see the dangers of identity politics because everything in Lebanon is viewed through the prism of your religious identity. And then the second great war that I faced was the one the war that was being waged on reason, science, logic, common sense that we saw on university campuses. I've now been a professor for almost 30 years. And so I wanted to write a book that documented all of these dreadful ideas which I refer to as idea pathogens, postmodernism, radical feminism, cultural relativism, the fear of using biology to explain human affairs. So all of these idea pathogens have correspond human minds, leading us to the abyss of infinite lunacy. And so I wanted to explain first the pandemic of the human mind of the viruses of the human mind and then to hopefully offer inoculation a vaccine against these dreadful

Concordia University Cornell University Dartmouth C Charlie Kirk GAD Lebanon
COVID-stricken mom reunites with baby 2 months after birth

AP News Radio

01:30 min | 10 months ago

COVID-stricken mom reunites with baby 2 months after birth

"A twenty year old New Hampshire woman has reunited with her new baby after fighting for her life against covert nineteen for two months on Ben Thomas with the story you see that make a me too moment Brandi milliner says her daughter mackenzie Keller was diagnosed with covert nineteen in late November rushed to the hospital four days later where she had a C. section and placed in intensive care he was intubated very long hard road or we didn't know if she was going to recover kept under sedation Keller spent forty seven days having your blood pump through a machine that removes carbon dioxide finally on February third she met her son Zachary for the first time telling Elliot Thompson there is a big Karen Maloney a nurse at the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center says they see a lot of difficult often tragic stories in the I see you when we get one like this where somebody has made such an amazing recovery and gets to meet their child for the first time it's it's a real special one for us Keller wasn't vaccinated against covert nineteen when she got sick wanting to wait until after she gave birth doctors tell her she'll have to wait a couple more weeks now she's undergoing physical therapy as she regains her ability to walk it's still a little difficult I still get my heart race still raises a little bit meanwhile her mother Brandi milliner says never give up hope no matter why did this happen every single day and she's ours I'm Ben Thomas

Brandi Milliner Mackenzie Keller Ben Thomas Elliot Thompson Karen Maloney Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Ce Keller New Hampshire Zachary
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Is a Complete Misnomer

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:26 min | 11 months ago

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Is a Complete Misnomer

"The ACLU continues to give ongoing proof that it is no longer a civil rights or a civil liberties organization. It's a misnomer, the American civil liberties union is this some kind of a joke. Well, in the past it really wasn't a joke. I remember thinking back to my Dartmouth Dave, there were times when the college administration would do things to us and we would go running to the ACLU. Now we did not have a high degree of confidence that the ACLU would come and back us. And we knew that if they did back us, they would say things like, oh, well, these are right-wing extremists, but you know what even right wing extremists have the right to free speech. So, but despite the hemming and hawing, we had this belief that the ACLU being a civil liberties organization would feel some moral pressure to take our side because we were being what? Well, deprived of our civil liberties. And the ACLU on these issues. On civil liberties issues was by and large, pretty sound. In fact, ACLU took a quite extreme position defending free speech when they defended the Nazis marching in Skokie, famous case. And the ACLU has now flipped. They've gone from being pro free speech to being anti free speech. They've gone from being a pro free assembly to being anti free assembly, essentially one by one, they're giving up on all of our civil

Aclu Dartmouth Dave Skokie Assembly
Supreme Court Will Consider Challenge to Affirmative Action in College Admissions

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:09 min | 11 months ago

Supreme Court Will Consider Challenge to Affirmative Action in College Admissions

"There's some very good news on affirmative action, the Supreme Court has decided to take a huge case. This is the Harvard and university of North Carolina to companion cases that deal with the same issue. And what is the issue? The issue is this. Should universities, this is particularly selective and elite universities, but it applies to a large number of university. Should universities be able to admit, black and Hispanic students who have vastly weaker academic preparation, vastly lower grades, vastly lower standardized test scores vastly lower extracurricular skills and should universities be nevertheless and we're talking here not just about private, but state universities. Should they be able to actively discriminate on the basis of race and admit week or black and Hispanic students while turning away stronger white and Asian American students, this has been going on for 40 years. And we're not talking about some people when they think about affirmative action they spout the kind of conventional nonsense about, well, we're talking about equally match candidates. And we're talking about someone giving someone a no. We're actually not talking about that. We're talking about people who are completely different in terms of their academic preparation, sometimes one cognitive gap of one, two, even three years. And I can say this is someone who has sort of witnessed the sufferer of action in action I saw it all around me a Dartmouth. And affirmative action was upheld in the bakke case. And then it was sort of reaffirmed in the case called grew versus bollinger, which was 2003. So for decades now, universities have been allowed to do this and universities do it under the pretext of diversity. We need a diverse student body. Now, this diversity business is a complete sham, because in fact, universities have become much less diverse. At least much less diverse than the one kind of diversity that matters in academia, namely diversity of interests and ideas and philosophies and thoughts. The kind of diversity that should matter in a college, that diversity is gone

Harvard And University Of Nort Supreme Court Dartmouth Bollinger
"dartmouth" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on WTOP

"On the WTO p.m. Hit 6 28 Traffic and weather on the 8th Jack Taylor's in the traffic center A lot more equipment running in Rockville Montgomery county two 70 going southbound main line after shady grove before 28 crash reportedly may involve a pedestrian left half of the roadway tied up stay right to get by There had also been a little heavy traffic and you got out of Frederick moving into her ban a passing 80 the pace improved after one O 9 Top side of the beltway getting a little heavier now New Hampshire towards Georgia interloop still looks good college park all the way down to the Wilson bridge without delay Wayne avenue in Silver Spring eastbound between Dartmouth avenue and Dale drive it's a water main break There you've got just the right lane getting by Troubles in the district north at the southbound rock creek Parkway near Pennsylvania avenue crash taking away the left lane It also in northwest canal road reservoir we've got dark traffic signals we should have direction on scene and hopefully Cruz trying to affect repairs The trouble had been they actually overnight crash on reservoir road between canal road and Macarthur boulevard There's a down pole and because of that Pepco remains on scene and that road remains closed Now you will find in Virginia we've got some delays 95 north Dale City going into woodbridge reportedly after lord and we may have had a vehicle fire not causing a huge delay but hopefully out of the roadway and out 66 headed west as you headed after 28 in Centreville there was a wreck along the right side of the roadway eastbound there had been some debris between reportedly between 29 and 28 along the right half of the roadway Apparently we had some what was left of a ladder the debris is along the right side of the roadway Route one and Alexandria southbound down your buckman road We'd had reports of erect down there as well Now update on the rails metro silver and blue line expect residual delays to franconia Springfield and wheelie rest in east from an earlier chain malfunction at Largo town center on the orange line They're no longer single tracking but residual delays continue following an earlier animal on the tracks outside Chevrolet Ridg your home of unwanted pests turn to home Paramount pest control call today for a free inspection 8 8 8 8 8 8 home or visit home Paramount dot com Jack Taylor WTP traffic And the forecast now with Lauren ricketts Temperatures low 50s today and we'll have a gradual increase in cloud cover as we continue through the date with The Rain shower later on tonight to just after midnight.

Jack Taylor Wilson bridge north Dale City Rockville WTO Montgomery county Frederick Pepco New Hampshire Georgia Cruz woodbridge Pennsylvania Centreville Largo town center Virginia Ridg Alexandria Springfield Lauren ricketts
"dartmouth" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"But that's a story for a different day. Well, August 24th, 2016, actually. Now we're caught up with episodes 41 B and C we'll do a brief recap on the next time we tell the story from arthurian legends, but we're probably not going to redo it. I linked it in the show notes though. If you'd like to support the show, there's still a membership thing on the site for like one 40th the price of 10 mL of human blood that you can buy online for research purposes or a very convincing Halloween costume. You can get extra episodes and ad free versions of this show that are not human blood. Check out support, Dartmouth.

Dartmouth
"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I guess today's facilitators foot. Who is an associate professor of business administration at a tough school of business dartmouth college. She conducts soliciting international tweet and he destination. Thank you. it's great to be here. Yes thanks to believe this island. One billion people From twenty eighteen new perspectives on the decline of. Us manufacturing employment I haven't looked at this type of data for a while. i would understand the so. Let's begin the two charts in there The first one is about employment. And i see vaccine employment was sort of going in and out would trend delivered nineteenth seventy or so and this seems to have Stagnated at that point that flatlined flora while And then allowed. Looks like nineteen ninety. Eight things. rapidly fell in terms of employment. But the chart on the need is about real that you add and they'd have known and manufacturing bullets show an upward plan. So how do you hope you compute reevaluate. So that's a great question Real value added means that we take away changes in prices rate how prices over time and in the manufacturing sector we do it Differentially across industries so some industries might have prices falling more than others and that could be part of what drives real output and it turns out that in manufacturing that is true. And and when it'd be ls another agencies. Try to come up with real output so taking into account Changes in price. They do something Sometimes called these price regressions or returned to look at the attributes of the actual goods. And so something. Part of what's driving the growth in real value added in. Us manufacturing is that Things like semiconductors have gotten much much better have gotten much higher quality. Think about the computer used use in the seventies versus the laptop. You can use today or even just your watch. Those have gotten so much faster. They're able to do a lot more and so when they talk about real value added they mean in terms of not just the number of computers. But also how much can they do. What's their quality. How fast are they. And so when we say real. That's what we're we're taking into account and it turns out that computering electronics is one of the big sectors driving dot real value added growth. That you see in the bottom panel. Interestingly enough it's also one of the sectors that has very rapidly declining employment so actually declining employment prices have been declining It manufactured goods especially computers in the clinic. so how. how do you look at quantity adjustment to get. The value added seems really comments for semiconductors fairly straightforward in got they really know can measure how fast they are and so they know how many transistors they're on chip they know how much output effective real output. That chip is going to produce. And so i think for those Is fairly straightforward. But even without there. There is discussion and debate among economists is. So what's the right deflator. And perhaps were overseeing. Our real value added growth somewhat..

school of business dartmouth c Us
"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from science policy economics and technology. My name is jill eappen. We talk with wolves leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis the most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable.

"dartmouth" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"In Dartmouth over the weekend. WBZ sherry Small as details was pretty mild, the whole day. I thought they were just a feedbag costs happened to me. One of them is really strange that wind gusts Lily Chamberlain is referring to came Sunday morning shortly after 10 a.m. a big enough, Gus to take down a huge tree right onto her home in Dartmouth had two trunks and one trunk went onto the road and took out the power line and The other Trump came on to my house. No one was injured, even though a big branch crashed through the ceiling of her daughter's bedroom she had left for college just the day before. Fortunately, she wasn't in there and remember Lily, describing it as a tree with two trunks. Well, it used to have three trunks. That was before she lived there. My neighbors had there was a third trunk that came down on their house and their cars 13 years ago. Yeah, that tree has had an impact. So to speak. Sherry, Small WBC, Boston's NewsRadio In Tennessee. Search crews are trying to make their way through tangles of debris. What's left of homes that was all left behind from record breaking rainfall and floods. CBS's Jim Carcela tells us at least a dozen people are still missing more than 20 people died and nearly as many are missing after epic flooding in Humphreys County, Tennessee, about an hour north west of Nashville. Charles Lambert has lost his home belongings in his car, blood waterwheel scare You 70 year old and never been scared of nothing. He had little time to act when they came to us. They told us you got to go and I pulled or bowled up where you in parts of the area got 17 inches of rain, a new rainfall record for the state of Tennessee Krystle, a CBS News And who fell into assaults Pile in Newington, New Hampshire, rescued this afternoon fire officials telling WBZ NewsRadio the man fell into that giant salt pile.

Jim Carcela Lily Chamberlain Charles Lambert Dartmouth CBS Sunday morning Sherry Trump Tennessee Lily 17 inches one trunk two trunks this afternoon CBS News three trunks Newington, New Hampshire more than 20 people Humphreys County, Tennessee third trunk
Study: Rates of Anxiety and Depression Among College Students Continue to Soar

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Study: Rates of Anxiety and Depression Among College Students Continue to Soar

"Story out of lebanon new hampshire which includes the dartmouth college very high end college. That did a study on some of their own students that found that two hundred and seventeen students were tracked when they entered the school as freshmen in two thousand seventeen in the hopes of understanding how they behave students stress levels rise and fall usually in tandem with midterm and final exams but since the onset of the pandemic quote unquote rates of depression and anxiety have soared and show no signs of coming down. Said andrew campbell researcher and computer science professor. The research points to how the public health crisis they say is affecting young people and raises questions about what will be done to support them a group that struggled disproportionately with mental health issues for years before the pandemic set in the question is how long will they stay like. This said the researcher. The findings also added a growing body of research that or to a growing body of research that indicate the effects of the corona virus have extended beyond physical health and safety particularly as people deal with social isolation grief unemployment and uncertainty about the future.

Dartmouth College Very High En Lebanon New Hampshire Andrew Campbell Anxiety Depression
"dartmouth" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Some groups are not happy with the bill. They're also frustrated that it does not allocate any new funding for the ape community. More than 100, Asian and LGBT Q. Organizations actually opposed this bill, saying it does not do enough to help other marginalized groups. But there is agreement that this is a critical first step with more than 6600 anti Asian hate incidents reported since March, 2020 the Open 19 Hate Crimes Act passed the house 3 64 to 60 to pass the Senate overwhelmingly with 94 in favor and one against President Jo Bonnin has terminated the Department of Homeland Security's ice contract with the Bristol County Sheriff's Office. They're ordering ice to stop using a detention center in North Dartmouth, saying it is no longer needed. It comes after a federal probe into alleged mistreatment of immigrant detainees. The stem from an original investigation, and ABI Attorney General Maura Healey. Massachusetts congressional delegation of plotted the decision in a joint statement saying the closure was a victory for detainees and their families. The remaining detainees will be transferred elsewhere. We have reached out to Bristol County Sheriff Tom Hunch in for comment. Keep it here for more on this developing story. President Bannon has changed his tone. With Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as the fighting goes on between Israeli forces and Hamas militants. The president, in his latest conversation with Netanyahu demanded a de escalation immediately. ABC is Mary Bruce says progressive members of Congress are introducing a bill now regarding U S A. To Israel. We're seeing several members of the president's own party, introducing this resolution to to try and block the sale of $700 million worth of weapons to Israel. They argue that the US is selling this weaponry without placing any conditions on the human rights of Palestinians. It is just a symbolic measure. It certainly underscores the kind of push back the president's getting from his own party. Is they demand to take a tougher stance here? The fighting went on overnight. Palestinians say some 230 people have now died, including roughly 69 Children. Israeli forces say Hamas has launched more than 4000 rockets into their region and so far killed a dozen Israelis Governor Charlie Baker, making his views known on the conflict, Baker's saying on Twitter that he stands with Israel in defense of security and peace. He also said he's praying For an end to the bloodshed. Understands puts him at odds with the public statements is a Massachusetts lawmakers like Congresswoman I Anna Presley, who said, We cannot stand idly by and allow the occupation and oppression of the Palestinian people to continue. The House has approved a measure that would establish a congressional commission looking into the siege and the capital January six. The bill is expected to have an uphill battle in the U. S. Senate. ABC is Rachel Scott says 35. House Republicans broke ranks to approve it. But Democrats are outraged. More did not support it. Bipartisan negotiations were ongoing. For months, Republican Congressman John Can't co leading the charge for his party, The American people expect Congress put partisanship aside for the sake of our homeland Security and Democrats cave to Republican demands. A 10 member panel evenly split between both parties with bipartisan agreement for subpoenas and some have suggested leader McCarthy, who called Donald Trump during the capital siege and begged the president to tell his supporters to go home could be called to testify and ABC news investigation as looking at police diversity. And they looked at census data to compile this and what they found is that police officers in most metro areas of the nation, we're not as diverse as the communities in which they serve. In metro areas where people of color make up at least half of police. Black people were arrested on only two times the rate of whites. And coming up. Next we'll take you to a farm on the North Shore feeding those who need it. Most. Boston's original.

Rachel Scott Mary Bruce Donald Trump North Dartmouth March, 2020 $700 million Netanyahu Baker January six Open 19 Hate Crimes Act Democrats Congress McCarthy Hamas Bristol County Sheriff's Offic ABC North Shore Boston Department of Homeland Securit 94
US Ends Use of 2 Immigration Jails Accused of Mistreatment

WBZ Midday News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

US Ends Use of 2 Immigration Jails Accused of Mistreatment

"Jo Bonnin has terminated the Department of Homeland Security's ice contract with the Bristol County Sheriff's Office. They're ordering ice to stop using a detention center in North Dartmouth, saying it is no longer needed. It comes after a federal probe into alleged mistreatment of immigrant detainees. The stem from an original investigation, and ABI Attorney General Maura Healey. Massachusetts congressional delegation of plotted the decision in a joint statement saying the closure was a victory for detainees and their families. The

Jo Bonnin Bristol County Sheriff's Offic Department Of Homeland Securit North Dartmouth Abi Attorney General Maura Hea Massachusetts
Using AI to Improve Health Behaviors with Ravi Komatireddy, of Motiv Health Inc.

Outcomes Rocket

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Using AI to Improve Health Behaviors with Ravi Komatireddy, of Motiv Health Inc.

"Today i have the privilege of hosting dr ravi kamata ready. He's Digital health entrepreneur. Who is currently the founder and ceo of motive health inc a startup passionately focused on using human and ai. Coaches for health behavior change. He is an internal medicine physician. Who trained at dartmouth hitchcock medical center and the university of california san diego. Additionally he was the first and i h wireless digital health scholar at the scripps translational science institute and west health institute where he earned a masters in clinical translation investigation previously. He co founded and served. As the chief medical officer of two funded digital health startups numata inc. A big data. Ai healthcare company focused on creating the world's largest medical graph database which was eventually acquired by google and reflection health inc digital medicine avatar lead gamified virtual physical therapy solution using motion tracking cameras in the home. He also received i grant from nasa flight opportunities program to advance research in digital health and human spaceflight. That's pretty cool. And the work that he's doing is really cool at motive health so i'm excited to have him on the podcast. Welcome robert thanks. Thanks so much for having me you know when you list that stuff off it sounds like a lot and i think about it like wow. That is a lot. I don't have time for all that. Well you know a lot of people that do great things ravi are usually the ones that do the majority of them and i say if you want something done. Give it to the busiest person you now. That's that's definitely a lifestyle that have adopted. Well thank you very much for having me on. Be glad to talk about what everyone talk about absolutely so before we go there robbie. I definitely want to learn about health and listeners. Definitely learn about it. Talk to us a little bit about. What inspires your work and healthcare. Honestly i can tell you the line about you know we should make everyone feel better and not be sick and stuff like that but if i had to drill it down to what really inspires me about it because those things are true. The truth is it's about human performance. I'm just fascinated by what people can achieve when they work together on things and i'm talking in let's just if we zoom out for go to like everything from pyramids to highways vaccines landing on the moon. This is like no aliens didn't build that stuff right this is people so it's people coming together rallying around a common goals a pretty amazing thing and you can get some amazing things done without right. You can explore the universe. You can figure out how to solve really complicated problems. So that's only possible. Would you have people

Dr Ravi Kamata Motive Health Inc Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Ce Scripps Translational Science West Health Institute Numata Inc. Robert Thanks University Of California San Diego Nasa Ravi Google Robbie
"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So that's you know exactly how that works and new the black holes grow and when when are they mostly eating and when does this feedback instead sort have a big impact on the star formation is still a big area of both theoretical and observational inquiry into the week beacon not answer this question right is is a supermassive brad. Colin necessarily condition four galaxy formation answered. That question yet. that's that's a great question. I think it depends on the mass of the galaxy. We definitely know that there are lower mass galaxies and some you know perfectly spiral galaxy that only have a disk. They don't have a little bulge material in the center. There are definitely some of those where people have done very very deep observations looking for the gravitational signature of ohlund there and have not found one. And so i think. I think it's fair to say that. Some galaxies can definitely form without a massive black hole at the center. What is true. Couldn't they then extend that to say the like you said you. How imblack Could grow over time By by pulling materials so if you're finding galaxies become a black hole couldn't be done reasonably assume that the galaxies full full of even well. Yes i think it's interesting. So i think that in any reasonable scenario once the black hole. Start getting pretty massive. They pretty much have to have a galaxy around them because the the supply material that's going into the into the black hole is also forming stars. And there's so there's gotta be some symbiosis there once they start getting pretty massive but it's a really interesting question and this gets to sort of some of the really exciting stuff for the future. There's a really interesting question about what happens in the very early universe. So i mentioned This problem that if you look at the most massive black holes there wasn't enough time in the universe for them to form from a small black hole and we know about the way when we ask how black holes originate. we know. there's for sure one way they can happen..

Colin both one way one ohlund
"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Ryan. You're talking about agents active galactic nucleus and the Ability that them what that implies want might be causing them perhaps dustin gas another other aspects Off the galaxy and. You're doing not work in this area to peace doubt Through twelve region saw Types of radiation from galaxies. You have another paper Close nic evolution of supermassive black holes a view into the next two decades Used discoveries made over the last twenty years by tundra. Xm newton surveys in conjunction that martinez lengthy making inspect pacific date available in the same seals have significantly change the view author soka massive black colin galaxy connection as we discussed little bit. There's a chicken and egg problem here gains list. And he's all that. It's still unclear how it happened right. So so what are sort of the best Cottoned understanding of the connection between supermassive black hole in the galaxy. This is the the sort million dollar question by the. This is what we all want to know I think our best understanding of this connection the simplest one is in a lotta ways also least interesting one but but it gives us a kind of gr- starting point to begin with which is that we have a good sense of how galaxies form in the universe they formed through the collapse of cosmic structures so the regions in the very early universe. That are the densest they've form into these big halos of dark matter that you may have heard about. And then he inside these dark matter structures the The galaxy form and the processes that caused galaxies to form in particular ones. That make them grow quickly are also things that can fun. A lot of Material down to the center of the galaxy and causal blackhall to grow relatively rapid rate as well and so the is sort of more gravity. You had the more gas you have the more black. The more. the black holes will grow on average That's not a super enlightening picture. But basically tells you that the bigger black holes the bigger galaxies. Excuse me have bigger black holes in them because there's this just overall connection in the bigger things grew early in the universe and they they grew rapidly in the universe That is a bit simplistic. -til yes that the blackhawks trump right. That's right there's more material and more gravity as well which helps pull that material down in towards the center of the of the galaxy..

Ryan trump million dollar next two decades twelve last twenty years blackhawks newton
"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You can be pretty sure that you know you're looking at In the in the visible light. If you can see so you have a one of these obscure things like a quasar in the visible light if there's a lot of very very blue light corresponding to the hot sort of hundred thousand degree emission from the disk material right around the black hole that looks a lot different than stars because stars You know the hottest stars can get our several times less Less net so you have or at least a few times less than that so you have that particular kind of temperature signature tells you something in visible light you can also see talked about the Gas it being a fluorescent lamp turns out this really hot disc produces a different set of emission lines of different Different elements in the gas. Actually fluorescence differently depending on whether they are lit up by a black hole this very hot disc of material around a black hole or by stars. And so that's that's another way of telling the difference And then the one the we've been using is in the infrared has to do with again temperature and it's the temperature of the dust so typically Stars form inside of dusty clouds in the heat up that dust to particular temperature and that radiates but also there's this dusty material in this tourists in this other stuff around the black hole in active galactic nucleus and that's getting blasted by this radiation from right around the black hole and that it's up to a higher temperature thousands of degrees as opposed to Tens or hundreds of degrees And so once you get two thousand degrees again. The the sort of typical shape of the colors in infrared look different and we have we therefore have ways of trying to look at those colors in a piece things apart but the real trick comes when you try to model the whole thing all once you date from xrays you today from the optical and infrared and you try to kind of make a coherent picture of the whole spectrum as it.

Tens two thousand degrees thousands of degrees hundreds of degrees hundred thousand degree today one a few times these
"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"It is really cuteness unnecessary because gas dust. That's moving so you might pick up flickering and other things but that is just sort of the perspective problem is that yeah so it's interesting to buy a season volk here that make it hard for us to see the whole picture. See exactly right the we is when we take our picture. We have two problems one is that we are observing its galaxy very specific time. Which is the time that it's light is reaching us. And we're observing it from a very specific orientation we Which is where the earth is. We can't fly over the top of the look down on it from a different direction. And so the timescale one is issue about all of this flickering that i described in that you know what you see is in terms of how growing right now may not be a good indicator how long it's been growing over the last ten million years or something but there's also the issue of them being hidden behind gas and dust and this is kind of related but also a little bit distinct and it gets back to the question you asked earlier about the About what happens when you look at one of these things and john when you're looking through gas and dust a lot of the signatures that we would normally expect to see like ultraviolet radiation optical radiation and even some kind of infrared radiation those all get absorbed by the gas and the dust and other signatures like meeting for red or radio or hard. X ray emission are things that actually penetrate us hard xrays energy x rays. When we you know take a Take an x ray of your hand or same thing and so Those can penetrate through this obscuring gas and dust and actually piecing that altogether turns out to be quite a lot more complicated than than you might expect. And so there probably. I think there are the latest inclusion in one of my graduate students as just obvious to paper though when you were referring to Guilt about this is that we think there's actually a large population of these really quite heavily buried augean that we know about before in the end so the early week. Where didn't have incontrovertible evidence that those objects are really were growing black holes and so yeah the in order to piece together the whole picture people talk about doing cosmic census right where we're trying to actually add up all the black hole growth because we wanted to wear ultimately the black holes came from. You have to think about it. Both in terms of how things change with time and also how things change depending on the configuration. The orientation of the material and and that Both of those are things. Were continually making progress on the that you mentioned. Just now the the modise and people large populace of luminous augean lacking Detections.

two problems earth Both one week last ten million graduate students these years
"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Then we're that we're growing. We're basically just like the ones where the locals were growing. And i'm paper. Made the like we sort of made the observation and there was a lot of evidence by many other groups That we kind of put together for this. The black holes probably when they turn on and start growing they. Maybe don't stay on for that wrong. And actually maybe they rather than just turning on and off like a light bowl maybe slicker all over the place. And sometimes they're hundred times growing one hundred rapidly and sometimes they're going thousand times less rapidly and they go over many orders of magnitude in terms of how how much they grow and they can do that in millions of years which for the time scale of galaxies a very short time and so the hypothesis that we said well wait a second. Maybe all galaxies including our milky way galaxy are actually growing their black holes in some relatively well behaved average since. But then it's liquoring all over the place because of a lot of complex physics that happens around the black hole itself where you know you have this radiation that we talked about before they can drive material out if it if it suddenly gets to luminous or you know the gas flows in can get on stable in all kinds of things can happen that will cause the black hole growth rate to vary a lot and so we. Maybe we're thinking about this all wrong that you wouldn't actually expect there to be a difference between the black holes the galaxy that are growing within the ones that are not because i actually all of them maybe at least ones that have a gas supply that the black hole can actually eat all of them on average doing that and in fact in our own milky way we see evidence for remnant structures. They're these big bubbles high energy material above and below the milky way called the fermi bubbles. That may have been actually produced by an outburst From the black hole on the order of millions of years ago. And there's actually evidence even more recent outbreaks than that that were kind of a smaller scale ones So we you know. I think now that picture is interesting. We've been moving towards it in the field for a long time until two thousand thirteen fourteen But now that that's sort of statistical picture where you have to treat this as a Really look at the whole distribution of growth rates because you can't these time-scales long enough to know astronomer can sit there and watch a galaxy and watch it's Black blackhawk growth rate vary on. You know on the scale that it would be for a million years. Do see a handful of and this is an exciting new discovery. A handful of objects that do change in their growth rates on something like years of timescales Which is not expected. These are winner. Call changing look objects and they're very exciting area of research but in general you wouldn't expect to actually be able to watch a single system go through this whole cycle and so what we need to do is instead and getting into the future. Prospects is to observe a lot. A lot of galaxies measure the accretion rates a lot of galaxies. And then use that to to meet statistically understand. what is that distribution. And how does that match into what we would expect from these statistical models of by so if i descend is going to be line you hypothesis actually makes it Eat makes you find. It makes intuitive sense. So are you saying that black core grew is sort of more uniform battle blackhawks have found. It's not like they're feeding and they're going to sleep and they come back on There is a process that and be more universally defined But the date of the picking up..

millions of years ago millions of years hundred times thousand times one hundred fourteen a million years single system two thousand second a thirteen
"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Really cool activity or inactivity and you settled for white motivation for future deep white extra exotic surveys that can measure the distribution Just rates and you have a recent paper And and you'll hypothesis perhaps become a glance now obscured active galaxy by aegean are powered by the christian of potentially two supermassive black hole at at among the most luminous objects in the universe the huge radiative power of the most easy end cannot be seen by rightly as hidden behind gas and dust And so so this. Is this really a good part of work that is looking at these heavily obscured sources where it's hard to see all that luminosity and so. Yeah that in that twenty thirteen or posing two thousand fourteen We had a we. Were the the argument we were making. There was nuts. Was that when we compute the black hole growth rates using these observed luminosity that we see. We needed to be really careful about how we interpret that because instantaneously. We do expect that if you a black growing right now. Today at a certain rate it probably should be giving officer amount of luminosity. That's ultimately proportional to the amount of mass. It's falling in the problem. Was that people had for a long time. Interpreted that to identify a particular class of galaxies that had these growing black holes in them and ask the question. Why do some black galaxies have these black holes in them. Why are those lack growing and other ones. I look at some other set of galaxies. A and they're not growing and so there have been this this big industry once people started being able to do surveys to detect these things to try to actually find. What is the key about a galaxy that actually makes the black hole grow. And i like to say that the history of that was a history of tantalizing one sigma results where people were expecting to see something but didn't really ever see anything definitive in other words the galaxies that didn't have black holes..

Today twenty thirteen two supermassive black hole two thousand fourteen one sigma christian
"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Very combination so in general when you look In the very early universe the galaxies are relatively small most of them in terms of the number of stars that they have but we do see rare cases where the galaxies are starting to get reasonably large meaning that they must have out formed starts very very rapidly to get that big over a relatively small amount of time But even more so and this is sort of getting at this point about which objects for him i. We also see black holes. That are very massive Even i think the winner now is around. Seven hundred million years after the big bang is the must be sort of earliest massive black hole. We see and the way we can tell. The mass of those objects is actually gets into this whole question about inclination and doppler shifts. Is if you look at the my call. Extra like a affluent lamp where it emits radiation. It lights up the gas around it and that gas is orbiting around the black hole. And so we'll have some of. It will be traveling very fast in our direction. Another summit will be traveling very fast in the other direction at. So you get this observable doppler shift in the in the light that you see and how massive the black hole is determines how fast that stuff is moving. And so it tells the if you see a broader emission line. Which is the sort of radiation at a particular wavelength for example that submitted by hydrogen. That we see the broader the doppler. Shift the larger the shift towards blue and red due to these losses. That tells you that there's more gravity and therefore there must be a more massive object there and we see objects well in excess of a billion solar masses. So that's you know two hundred times more massive than the black hole in the in the milky way less than a billion years after the big bang. The problem there is that we also know that black holes can only grow so fast if they eat material to quickly The best do they eat. As as we mentioned at the very beginning of the radiation they give off as a signature of how fast they're growing and if you So if they're going more rapidly than they give off more radiation but if they give enough radiation that radiation actually has a pressure that can push against the material is falling in and that is larger than the gravitational pull inwards can't grow anymore and so a lot of interplay between how massive black hole is and how fast it can grow the bigger ones and correspondingly grow more quickly. So if you start off small it takes a long time to get big because you have to. You can only grow vast when you're when you're relatively small and then there's a lot of rapid growth read at the end and if you try to work out the statistics of this exponential growth as it were about it. It's interesting that you know in this in these days of covert that have a lot of people obviously have become familiar with the concept of exponential growth. But for those calls something we think about all the time if you'd work it out. There's no real good way for a black hole to start at a reasonable size. The you know the round the massive a star or Even up to one hundred times massive the sun and actually get to this really really large mass In such a short time. So that's a big puzzle And you know there are a lot of potential solutions including forming big black holes from scratch early in the universe But that's that's definitely something that is..

two hundred times one hundred times less than a billion years Seven hundred million years af a billion solar star to
"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Dartmouth mass vaccination site opens outside Boston

WBZ Morning News

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Dartmouth mass vaccination site opens outside Boston

"Today in Dartmouth, a new mass vaccination site is opening up at the old Circuit City building this site like all the others, his appointment only all appointments for today have been booked up. However. Tomorrow you'll be able to book out future appointments at this new site of Dartmouth and for others elsewhere around the state. This Dartmouth site will be operated by curative. They are starting off, hoping to inoculate some 500 people per day, eventually getting up to 2000 per day.

Old Circuit City Building Dartmouth
Welcome to Shondaland

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

Welcome to Shondaland

"Tonight. We're talking about shonda rhimes. Who is like she's a total boss. Queen television absolutely all right so first. We'll talk a little bit about shonda. So shonda rhimes was born in chicago. Illinois in january nineteen seventy. She was the youngest of six children. Her mother vero was a college professor and her father. Eilly was a university administrator. And she'd said that she exhibited an early affinity for storytelling early on in her life. She attended marin catholic high school and served as a hospital volunteer which inspired an interest in hospital environments. She majored in english. And film studies at dartmouth college and she graduated in nineteen ninety-one at dartmouth the black underground theatre association. She divided her time between directing and performing in student productions and also writing fiction and after college. She moved to san francisco and worked in advertising but she moved to los angeles a little bit after that to stubby screening at the university of southern california. She was ranked top of her class at usc. And she earned the gary rosenberg writing fellowship. She obtained a master of fine arts degree from the. Us's school of cinematic arts. And while at usc rimes was hired as an intern by debra martin chase who was prominent black producer she also worked at denzel washington's company monday entertainment so after she graduated rimes was actually an unemployed script writer in hollywood and to make ends meet. She worked various jobs including as an office administrator. And then a counselor at a job center during this period rhymes worked as a research director documentary. Hank aaron chasing the dream which won the nineteen ninety-five peabody award. One thousand nine hundred. Eighty eight rhymes made a short film called blossoms. Unveils which starred. Jada pinkett smith and jeffrey rate. This is actually only credit as a film director. So that's nineteen ninety eight short film blossoms unveils new line cinema purchased a feature. Script of hers It ended up not being produced at that time but she received an assignment shortly thereafter to co write the hbo movie introducing dorothy dandridge in nineteen ninety nine which earned numerous awards further star. Halle berry. get out. I didn't realize that she colorado so interesting. Oh wait till you hear the the plethora of things that she's worked on. Oh no after grad school rhymes sold her first screenplay called human seeking same about an older black woman looking for love in the personal ads. And that film wasn't produced. But you have heard of her next project in two thousand and one rhymes wrote the debut film of pop singer. Britney spears the starring zoe saldana and taryn. Manning crossroads everybody. I didn't know that she wrote that. Get out up saying. I feel like it's been really it was really panned by the next but maybe for them. Okay no sometimes. It's it's sometimes you just want a nice story about friendship road trimming going on a road trip and having a nice time and may be hitting up a karaoke joint. Heck yeah and singing. I love rock and roll. That's all i'm saying is that maybe it's for them. I think lauren has actually seen crossroads. I have felt you know. She wrote that and then the next thing that she worked on in two thousand four was the sequel to the princess. Diaries called the princess diaries. Two royal engagement. Get out. yeah. I didn't realize that she was so like a dummy. I just assumed like shonda rhimes right out. The gate was grey's anatomy but apparently she was introduced are obsolete reduce. So she's working on all these film things in two thousand three. She actually wrote her first tv pilot. Abc it was about young female war correspondents but the network. Turn it down. You know what they didn't turn down ask project. So here's where sean hillen comes in sean. Billion is the name of rhymes production company shine million and its logo also referred to the shows that she has produced an also to rimes herself. So when we say shaun d land. It's like interchangeably sean. And her production company. Yeah and like the. Because i do remember like i think it was. Abc or nbc. I forgot what what channel she's on but it was. They were like girl a sorry But it was like thursday nights. Is sean the land. Because it was like it was like back to back to back to back shadowland shows. We'll talk about that. You have a basically they. They tried to rebrand thursdays. Like tgi. T thank goodness thursday because that its native shot in the land. I mean people are gonna watch no matter what they didn't need to need hype it up so The name shawn lane was stylized as capital s shonda capital l. Land one word from two thousand five to two thousand sixteen but since two thousand sixteen is all stylize lower case everything is lower case. It's always very recognizable font so you might often see in print as actually all lower case letters.

Shonda Rhimes University Of Southern Califor Eilly Marin Catholic High School Rimes Black Underground Theatre Asso Gary Rosenberg Debra Martin Chase Jeffrey Rate Shonda Vero Dartmouth College Peabody Award Dartmouth Jada Pinkett Smith Hank Aaron Dorothy Dandridge Illinois Chicago Halle Berry
"dartmouth" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"dartmouth" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Share in broadcast. Dartmouth originated works around the globe. Among other improvements. Dartmouth has reached a third of its $75 million fundraising goal for the project. The redesign of what's known as the Hop, which opened in 1962. Marks a new milestone in the Ivy League schools. Decade long, more than $180 million investment in its arts district. What do England business now? Here's Bloomberg's Kim Carrigan. Gamblers from going to the casino, but they're still placing their bets. Online Betting is thriving Bet MGM generated $178 million in revenue last year, and that's expected to double in 2021. There were a lot of room of vacuum cleaners under the Christmas tree this year, Bedford based iRobot reported better than expected fourth quarter results, thanks to the strong sale of room bus, as well as its mopping robot and Akamai Technologies has cut about 2% of its global workforce, or 160 jobs as part of a restructuring. The company says it's business will now be anchored by two newly created business groups. One focused on Internet security and the other focused on edge technology. I'm Bloomberg's Kim Care again with New England BUSINESS on WBZ Boston's News Radio Down Down Wall Street, the S and P 500 down 10 NASDAQ's down 18 The Dow right now losing 124 points to 27 straight ahead of the news at 2 30, the latest on the Impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. Finding great candidates the higher Converium like Well, trying to find a needle in a haystack. Sure you can post.

Kim Carrigan $178 million 124 points Akamai Technologies 160 jobs Dartmouth 2021 1962 iRobot 27 $75 million more than $180 million 2 30 last year 10 Bloomberg 18 this year Ivy League NASDAQ
Boston - 19 Communities Added To List Of  High Risk For Coronavirus In Massachusetts

WBZ Afternoon News

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Boston - 19 Communities Added To List Of High Risk For Coronavirus In Massachusetts

"DPH says they're confirming 509 new cases and 19 more fatalities. They also put out their weekly report tonight. Every Wednesday night. We get this, saying 19 cities and towns have now been added to the list of high risk communities the red zone areas. Only two towns on last week's list were taken off that list. So Holliston and Lynnfield no longer deemed to be high risk. The new communities going on to the Red Zone list include Woburn, Webster, Waltham, Sunderland, Southbridge. Cushion It. Amherst, Brockton, Chelmsford, Dartmouth, Dudley, Holyoke, Southborough, Randolph Hudson, Kingston, Lester. Maldon and Plymouth. So yeah, again about 20 of those communities going on to the States. High risk community list for covert 19 7 48

Holliston DPH Randolph Hudson Southborough Maldon Woburn Southbridge Lynnfield Amherst Holyoke Lester Dudley Brockton Dartmouth Plymouth Kingston Chelmsford Sunderland Waltham Webster
Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

"Reuben know things take over 19 women may find their place in the workforce more at risk, A Dartmouth College economist tells The New York Times. With many daycare and schools closed. Working moms may end up being forced to make a choice to stay home if they haven't already been laid off. And a director of a charity serving disadvantage. Women in England says the pandemic will take women 10 years back in the

Dartmouth College Reuben The New York Times Director England
Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

"The pandemic could hit working moms worse than Dad. CBS's Mira Reuben reports, a Dartmouth College economist tells The New York Times. With many daycare and schools closed. Working moms may end up being forced to make a choice to stay home if they haven't already been laid off and a director of a charity serving disadvantage. Women in England says the pandemic will take women 10 years back in the workplace.

Mira Reuben Dartmouth College CBS Director The New York Times England
Trump administration continues its process of unraveling ties with the WHO

No Agenda

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Trump administration continues its process of unraveling ties with the WHO

"As the US death toll from Kobe nineteen years one hundred, eighty, five, thousand, the trump administration's refusing to join more than one hundred seventy countries in global effort to develop a corona virus vaccine. The administration opposes the effort in part because of the involvement of the World Health Organization public health officials warn the move could leave the United States without access to EVAC seen. The global effort succeeds and US efforts fail Kendall of Dartmouth. School of Medicine said quote just from simple. Risk Management Perspective this is short-sighted

United States World Health Organization Evac Kobe School Of Medicine Dartmouth Kendall