33 Burst results for "Darin"

Darin Hoover Reflects on the Anniversary of the Fall of Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Darin Hoover Reflects on the Anniversary of the Fall of Afghanistan

"It has been just over a year. Since the disgraceful withdrawal from Bagram from Afghanistan, it's been a year and a week. Since 13 of our servicemen and women were murdered by ISIS, and this administration that is responsible for those deaths had this to say about that anniversary play cut. Let me start with this. Many of us here at the department and across the government and millions of Americans in Afghanistan are mindful of today's meaning as the 20 yearlong U.S. Military mission in Afghanistan ended nearly one year ago. Ending the longest war in American history was never going to be easy. But one year later, we are in a stronger position as a country because of the president's decision. Better able to focus on the threats and challenges, but also the opportunities of today. Opportunities challenges, better positioned. It's all fabulous. I know 13 families that would beg to differ and we are honored to have with us the father of one of those who was lost staff sergeant Taylor, Hoover, welcome, mister Darren Hoover, to America first. Thank you, Sebastian, I appreciate it. So I know you can't easily share in words what the last year has been like. But will you just talk to us? Have the 13 families come together or have you mourn separately? Is there a community of the 13 lost service men and women in the last year? Yeah. We've got a Facebook messenger group that is just the parents, we're able to connect that way, we do keep in touch for the most part with everybody. It's been a rough year when we had to lean on each other and lean on the gold star families and having the support and love from literally across this world has been nothing short of amazing.

Afghanistan Bagram Isis Sergeant Taylor Mister Darren Hoover America Hoover Sebastian Facebook
Emily Jashinsky's One-Woman War Against TikTok

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Emily Jashinsky's One-Woman War Against TikTok

"Back with the culture beat portfolio holder. I like that. At the federalist, the dot com, she's Emily yoshiyuki. I'm gonna have to challenge her now. I'm watching a clip of his on her Twitter feed. Where you have glasses on. Is this fake news? Is this what you do on television? Do you put you put on those fake Charlie trappin and glasses? Because you're not wearing them right now. Are you Emily? No, I need them to read a teleprompter. So anytime I have three to tell, I'm nearsighted. So anytime I have three dollars. All right, so she's reading a teleprompter. Now we know these are the hard questions. These are the hard penetrating questions we ask here on America first. All right, let's talk about the reason we actually got you on the show. It's this piece you did for the federalist. Your single woman war, you are waging against TikTok, which is absolutely superb. Why is this such a problem? And tell our list is across the nation. What is TikTok's elections center Emily? It's unbelievable how under the radar the election senator election center is flying right now because TikTok a lot of people know is owned by a very powerful, very, very big Chinese company named ByteDance, which also owns and operates the Chinese version of TikTok. Well, they've been trying really hard to prove to American consumers that our data is going through Oracle. They've partnered with Oracle throughout all American data into the cloud and make sure that Oracle audits the algorithms so that this app, which is basically the most popular app in the country that an average teenager spends hours a day on is being sort of controlled by the Chinese Communist Party. But of course, by Chinese law, any time the Chinese Communist Party would come to ByteDance and ask for the data, they would have to give up access to it. There are a number of people a new Forbes report showed there are plenty of people that work at ByteDance on TikTok. They have TikTok in their portfolio who are currently or formerly have worked for state media in China. Our own Justice Department found that there were some a 130 members of the Chinese Communist Party working for ByteDance in 2020. And so this massively powerful network that our teenagers are spending hours of time on, it could well be tweaked by the CCP players of the long game in the CCP to get us very addicted because it's a very addictive product

Emily Yoshiyuki Charlie Trappin Senator Election Center Bytedance Oracle CCP Emily Twitter America Justice Department China
The Federalist's Emily Jashinsky on Shifts in Media Culture

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:38 min | 3 weeks ago

The Federalist's Emily Jashinsky on Shifts in Media Culture

"Think that any of this is going to change? I mean, Brian stelter is now flipping burgers somewhere. Cuomo is declared himself a free agent on social media despite the fact that nobody actually wants to hire him. Have you seen any trend any signals since you have the culture beat of the federalists that media culture is waking up or is it just the most woke of the woke are losing, but the institutions like CNN are still going to go down with the ship? The business model here is really an interesting aspect of that conversation because on the surface you do see some moves like at CNN, the new guy there, Chris licht, who took over for Jack Zucker, wants to make CNN the sort of global neutral brand again that's doing serious hard hitting foreign reporting. That's why stelter's out the window. That's why I didn't do it doesn't do Twitter doesn't really believe in Twitter for journalists and is trying to make all of these moves to reign in the coverage to tell his anchors to stop using the big lie, but it's not working. And the dynamic is so interesting because I think there are some older, more sober voices who lived through the old media period and have seen the transition and are horrified by it, but it's kind of too late because they've let it in the door. And they've let it in the door at a time when our media ecosystem is totally splintering. So The Old Guard is less powerful than it ever has been and people can cluster in these niches. The wine moms can watch Don lemon and lap it up and Stephen Colbert, but you know, you used to have Johnny Carson's writers sitting in Manhattan every night thinking, what is going to make America laugh? And that's why he was number one. And he was

Brian Stelter CNN Chris Licht Jack Zucker Stelter Cuomo Twitter Old Guard Don Lemon Stephen Colbert Johnny Carson Manhattan America
Biden Unleashes a 'Nonsensical Word Salad' and Gets Called Out

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Biden Unleashes a 'Nonsensical Word Salad' and Gets Called Out

"Emily yasinsky. Emily, welcome back to America first. Thanks so much for having me, stab. Just don't call me sir like you did in the break because then I'm going to terminate this interview very, very rapidly. Emily. I learned that lesson the hard way. Okay, good. Let's have some fun. Let's talk about why don't seem to be such a positive real American media. This popped up on my social media feed yesterday and he's from Australia and my producer mister G when I sent it to him, he said, how come I've never seen a Montage like this on Fox News? This is Sky News Australia cut ten play cut. This week the world got a frightening inside into what happens when you unleash the president without notes and auto cue or someone screaming instructions in his ear. You get this nonsensical word salad. Tell me how you do that. I understand it. It's clear in space. You're accurate. But how and making the case of the freedom Manhattan, what do you do to other than to sort of embarrass men and getting into the end of the argument and voting the right way? On this issue. Okay, we also saw president Joe Biden and deliver this rousing and totally coherent message to rally the troops for the midterms. If we elect two more senators, we keep the Democrats. We're going to get a lot of unfinished business. We're going to get done. Just in case you missed that, he said if we elect two more senators, we keep the house and Democrats. We're going to get a lot of unfinished business. We're going to get done, okay? Why do we have to wait for Australians to give us great little packages like that, Emily? Yeah, and they spared no mercy. I mean, it's unbelievable. And that's what journalists exist do to hold powerful people to account. And so it is rather sad that our own media, which could fill up prime time every single day basically on a daily basis with the nonsensical things that Joe Biden has said. And they probably should, by the way, because he's the leader of the free world. He's the leader of our country at the very least you'd think this would matter to voters, but we see very, very little of it.

Emily Yasinsky Emily Australia Fox News Joe Biden America Manhattan
GOP Trump critic Rep. Adam Kinzinger won't seek reelection

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 11 months ago

GOP Trump critic Rep. Adam Kinzinger won't seek reelection

"Another of Donald trump's Republican critic says he will not seek re election Illinois congressman Adam Kinzinger has been increasingly critical of the G. O. P. since the capital attack by the former president's backers and defied party leaders by joining the house panel investigating the riot after eight years in Congress can singer says in a Twitter video it's time to move on though he's also hinted at future political plans as a country we must unplug from the mis truths we've been fed considers an ounce men came after Illinois Democrats redrew congressional maps putting him in a heavily Republican district where his trump bashing would have been hard to overcome in a primary against incumbent trump supporter Darin lahood Sager mag ani Washington

Adam Kinzinger G. O. P. Donald Trump Illinois Congress Twitter Darin Lahood Sager Ani Washington
Rep. Madison Cawthorn Discusses Stuart Scheller's Release From the Brig

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:28 min | 1 year ago

Rep. Madison Cawthorn Discusses Stuart Scheller's Release From the Brig

"Let's go to north carolina's eleventh congressional district to welcome. I believe he may be the youngest congressman on capitol hill madison cawthorn. Welcome to america. I have great being on with your brother. Anything it starts out with america. I you know. I love it. That's the reason why we call it. America first not the said gawker show. Okay i asked you in the break. We have this update the breaking news that they have released. A colonel shelling from shallow from the brig you have spoken to his legal team just a few moments ago so tell us the latest out. What what Do listeners across the nation. Needs to know. I talked to several organizations that are involved with colonel sheller. And what's ridiculous is. This is a man who stood up and criticize The boss withdrawal from afghanistan that left thirteen servicemembers dead. And because he stood up to this incompetence he was forced to have a mental health screening and then sebastian he has been stuck in solitary confinement in campbell. Jim it's terrible but right now he's going to be heading to a court martial very soon. It's going to be closed doors so you can take that on. Its surface for that how it's going to be Probably a gag order going to come down And you know even as a member of congress. I can't even go in there to try. And defend him it's it's ridiculous the amount of obscurity the biden administrations wanting to have in this

Capitol Hill Madison Cawthorn America Colonel Sheller North Carolina Afghanistan Sebastian Campbell JIM Congress Biden
John Solomon: January 6 Commission Chairman Once Sympathized With Black Secessionist Group

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:59 min | 1 year ago

John Solomon: January 6 Commission Chairman Once Sympathized With Black Secessionist Group

"Back with john. Solomon you've got to listen. It's going up in ten minutes. The latest podcast from john solomon reports with president trump. follow him at j solomon reports and bookmark. justin used dot com. You sent me earlier today. An unbelievable i don't know how many man-hours this took you to research. But we tell us about this story. Hubris adjust the news dot com about the chairman of the quote unquote insurrection investigative committee. Yeah absolutely while for months weeks now. We've seen bennie thompson. The democratic congressman from mississippi on television sympathizing with the police officers were injured on january six during the capitol right and denouncing an event that he has repeatedly called and insurrection. Fifty years ago. He was on the opposite side of an insurrection. This movement back in nineteen seventy one. When a group known as the republic of new afrika was making waves throughout mississippi. Why because the fbi was closely watching as it was trying to put together a movement to take if necessary by force land from people in mississippi louisiana georgia south carolina and alabama and create a separate nation on us l. called the republic of new afrika. So you know just to be explicit here. Ethnic separatists in america. That's yes they actually wrote their own declaration of independence. They renounced their citizenship in a meeting monitored by the fbi they engaged in multiple conflicts with police. Officers usually doing something Waffle like stopping car for traffic incident or executing a search warrant three times members of the are group killed a police officer in the early seventies and bennie thompson. Then a young alderman from a tiny town called bolton mississippi then known as bg times. Not even known as benny. He spoke out in favor of this

John Solomon President Trump J Solomon Republic Of New Afrika Bennie Thompson Mississippi Solomon Justin FBI John Louisiana South Carolina Alabama Georgia America Bg Times Bolton Benny
Journalist John Solomon Discusses Biden's China Weakness With Donald Trump

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:01 min | 1 year ago

Journalist John Solomon Discusses Biden's China Weakness With Donald Trump

"We are joined every week by one of the few journalists left in america. He is the creator. The editor in chief of just the news dot com. You can follow him at a john. Solomon reports jay solomon on jay solomon reports on twitter and his podcast is john solomon reports. And i think you've had a very special guest. Who wasn't john yes. President trump was just on my podcasts. A few moments ago. Just finish up the interview before he came into the studio here and he he talked about china and taiwan and that taiwan would not happy enduring. The intimidation is undergoing now if he were president blamed it on the weakness of joe biden is foreign policy failures and really laced into the justice department for announcing last night. It was opening investigations into parents. Who can school boards over critical race. Theory saying that you would think in america parents would say over their children's education what they're being taught but the left doesn't think that's

Jay Solomon John Solomon President Trump Taiwan John Solomon America Twitter Joe Biden China Justice Department
Paul Anka Recalls His Time Working With the Rat Pack

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Paul Anka Recalls His Time Working With the Rat Pack

"Paul anka. It's so great to see you. I wanna ask you. You're sitting in front of a zillion gold records Where they happen to be your gold records for the most part of my keble michael jackson elvis presley other artists have been involved with most part a lot of those that are from nineteen fifty seven on. Now you worked with the folks. You you've mentioned. I mean i should mention this upfront. If i were better my job recently you've worked with drake the weekend Michael boob lay andrea bocelli. Olivia newton john. We were talking about your time with sinatra. How did it end up that you were working with what we today. Call the ratpac. No greater fan of dean martin than yours. Truly amazing that you knew these men. Well we have to go back to the beginnings you know the record business and the business that i was in was primarily run by the boys the boys mafia whatever and that was cool. There are great work for we knew what a position was but they ran everything they own the clubs the only record companies etcetera so when i started beginning success for young I realized who was working for. I realized you know how i was to be myself and i started working to copacabana. Which was the testing ground in new york city. I was successful. And i got the word that now that new york went very well. We're sending out to vegas to the boys and you're gonna work in vegas. So what year are we talking about. Big apartment what year we talking about. Fifty eight nine hundred fifty. Started sophie tucker. Which was i guess. My audition did well with her. And then it evolved into the sixties started working sands right from their youngest kid. Never worked there and here. I was with all these guys. Were my idols realizing that. Bobby darin frankie avalon still these kid idols. But we knew this at the end and we realized that we had to evolve survive into something else thus we had these guys that we looked up dean martin sammy and break so i like to sand started working and guys mentored me. They took me in. Because that's making money for them indirectly directly. The boys ran the place and we became very very

Michael Boob Paul Anka Olivia Newton John Andrea Bocelli Elvis Presley Michael Jackson Dean Martin Sinatra Drake Copacabana Vegas Sophie Tucker Bobby Darin Frankie Avalon New York City New York Dean Martin Sammy
Asynchronous Sales Communication With Darin Dawson

Accelerate!

02:44 min | 1 year ago

Asynchronous Sales Communication With Darin Dawson

"Welcome to the show. Thanks great to be back with you. Man it's good to see you. Yeah great to see you again. So i know there's probably not many folks who aren't familiar with bomb but just in case there's any. I'm sure there's plenty. Yeah so we're a platform that we enable human senator communication. We want you to be face to face more often than more people in the way we do that through video so it very simple free to create video send video through any medium. You might use whether it'd be email text messenger linked in social media things like that and you might think well. Don't those platforms already do that. Yes but We enable you to know what's going on on the other side of that communication so we focused most of our time on the recipient experience. And the how your recipient engages with this type of interaction. Did they watch it you know. Do they like it. Can we get more engagement from them. Can comment on it so You know subject just this one way kind of sending something in waiting and wondering maybe at some points depending where you're at in your career. Did they receive it did they. Do they care. We help you to understand that more. Yeah i mean this is sort of interesting idea never wants to call it a synchronous video usage. Here's a. I like to call video messaging just to keep it simple but i think that interesting. I saw them awake. What's happened in twenty twenty and People serve being fatigued by zoom. Wasn't so the effectiveness of videos. They're saying yeah. I i want to interact with with my buyer. Faleh used video but it doesn't need to be live right. I want them to see me. I think i even think that a lot of ways but even before the pandemic we we handcuff the best talents. Maybe of sales people of our customer success people of of maybe ourselves when we just send an email black tax screen and when we know that humans emote they. They have an operation right. I talk with my hands. You can see that if you're watching this the way we communicate often is more verbal than it is burger definitely written we lose even more and so bringing that back and when when i was removed from us absolute ability to be face to face at all. People found this as a way to kind of circumvent the problem but now i think they're finding it now more. It's becoming more of the norm

Faleh
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"Your dad not your parent not your therapist. Well say is this. If you're telling me that Plus i think there's a lot of i state that i think there's a lot of studies after the neurologically is not healthy for kids to smoke weed. When they're in their teenagers it stunts their psychological growth emotional growth the way they manage adversity stress. Like if there are automatically taught that okay. You're stressed out. You can go ahead and just a bong hit. You'll be okay like second. Teach him for the rest of their lives. But i say it very practically to them in a way they can understand. I said. listen if you're smoking pot every day and you're getting good grades relationships with your parents or good. You're holding a job if you have a job. You're not getting into trouble. You're feeling good about yourself. Look yourself in the mirror. Be happy in a see where i'm going with us. I'm not gonna tell you what to do like clearly. Your life is working. I said the the problem is most of the time if not all the time. The story is quite the opposite. It's kids get involved with smoking weeks. They wanna fit in. They don't even know why they're doing it. They don't like the taste of it. They just know it's cool. It's a certain vibe around the community. They're immersed in They're anxious depressed in grade. Start to fall. They start to create tension in the household if they have a job. They're showing up late or they're not going at all just because they're becoming even more lethargic addicted to the lifestyle smoking pot and i think kids tend to respect me just in my delivery. I've been told a very approachable in in very good at holding space. That i really care because because this is my purpose and i feel like this is god's calling for me it's not about money for me or it's not about getting my point across to them so listen to me it's about how can i come across to them in a way that they feel. I understand them now understand that. I understand that really being able to empathize with these kids. You've been them no bullshit with that. You're not draw some psychiatrists come and with this studied Delivery or this thing. You found a research article you've actually been them and then spent the rest of your life getting out of that and actually then adding onto it and learning about how to be optimal and be better. So you're coming from that space. That is that's the invitation ee. There's a five and kids will pick up on a vibe and they will know when it comes out of your mouth if this is true and there's no one can deny that you've gone through this like you've gone through it you know and there's bullshit and and so so you and then the the empathy that you're bringing and the cultivation that you've created in yourself and to be able to deliver that and show up for them it's clear that this is your passion and and they can sense it and like you said you can't touch everybody but the ones that are you can do a lot and one of the things that was actually one of the things that i actually tell people when they're going through a stressful moment in their life or their. They've had a bad day or they. They really need to check out to keep their minds off. It is to do something active. Because if you're just sitting on your phone scrolling through social media or looking or watching tv it's easy to be distracted right because those thoughts can come through him. You're gonna fight your parents get no fight with a girlfriend boyfriend. Whatever those thoughts are going to still be there and you. Can you refocus on that. If you're just going through your phone because there's no he wrote the focus on anything on your phone but if you're out like skateboarding or maybe you're surfing or you're hiking or you're working out or you're doing something active. You have to focus on the activity itself playing basketball whereas if the thoughts. You're not really thinking about the thoughts because you're so engaged in playing basketball on higher going to help your team score if you're skateboarding. whether fall that the time kind of subsides they say time heals all wounds. And i believe that when you have a trauma or you have a stressful situation. Time heals that one of the other things. I tell people to do especially people who are trying to recover from drugs. As i'll say. Listen the next time you think about using drugs when you're stressed out. Here's what i want you to do this. I feel if you wanna make the choice. Do drugs do you on you do this. I i say go for at least a twenty minute walk or jog. Whatever you want to twenty minutes and then to do a set of as many push ups as you can and then decide if you're gonna do drugs. I think because. I think what happens. It takes takes a little bit of the edge off. They feel a little bit of euphoria because they've gotten their endorphins. Going gotten a dopamine rush. They moved their body to channel that negative energy. I think what people have found. I've had people who have trained to struggle with addiction. Tell me they felt like getting high all day until they moved their body and exercise and people don't like this approach is popular because the numbing. Feeling in a euphoric isn't as intense. Quick rate is doing drugs long term. It's obviously much more productive. And you get that natural feeling where short-term doesn't feel as good but long-term it pays dividends whereas if you do drugs short-term feels great term long-term will sink your life will dude. Clearly you've came out. You're cultivating you're charging. Super proud. Said addiction stuff is is super close to me And it's just wonderful to hear all of what you've done as a result of that You know i. I can't help but to have a party wishing my dad would have done some push ups before he you know picked up his last drink in You know but i celebrate you. I celebrate all people who have made that other choice and that you're bringing that light back into the world in a positive way so very deeply. Am i in gratitude for what you're doing and what you've done with your life moving forward do them super stoked for you to keep shining that light and to keep bringing it. The kids and beyond i appreciate. It's been quite the quite the journey. It's funny you know we're going through these times like for me. When i was in jail. I never thought i would be where i am today. He told me when if you'd asked me jail you think you're going to be a personal trainer in ten years or five years or wrote a book joking right now. If there's no way. I could barely graduated high school. I was a drug addict ozone drugs that there's no way but i think sometimes when you go through these deep moments of adversity in stressful situations your purpose begins to develop based on the way respond in for me. I was fortunate enough to make some smart choices and continue to put one foot in front of the woods next care. I can do ten pushups. What's next run a five k. What's next only do thirty push ups. Oh i can do this in my fitness about She goes in other areas in. My life was changed nutrition. That's change my friends. Oh you never thought you could Completely transformed the people that were around you the elevating yo. Let's write a book. And then we ever read a book and then these these are just stepping stones. Success than sure enough. I'm sharing my story of the clemson football team last year. And and you and you look back on. It all started with just one.

basketball football
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"There anymore. Much much weaker right. And that's really where you make that argument of. Listen this is. This is a breakdown. A mechanisms. This kind of a disease. Pathway this this whole aging thing right. That's that's kind of. You're you're seeing these mechanisms Go down and many other markers right so Best your argument. So what was the lightbulb moment when you saw this And then you realize that it's expressing in the moment like what would what was that moment like and then when did you start to understand that it's.

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"Is synonymous with that integrity. You are practicing the highest level of integrity as a human being when you come in touch with apps sovereign capacity for regeneration and energy production in your body. And so what are you gonna set your hand to. It will be beautiful and it will manifest life if you stay in the sense of.

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

13:00 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"As you know looking back was barely a kid coming out of pre med program the university of colorado altruistic as all get out you know and i started going to pretty holistic space. I started. I shifted from engineering to medicine. When i had the opportunity to go over to the philippines with an onto mine. Who was helping. Running a multinational group of midwives that was working on birthing babies in the philippines and and the squats and and impoverished areas and it was just an incredible transformation in my life to see the miracle birth to see you know health care being provided by this holistic group of women who were really helping educate these women around things like breastfeeding the importance of nutrient delivery to these babies to prevent malnutrition belt immune system in all of this stuff and so Thought maybe be a nurse though. And so i started going out nursing. Pathway then discover the nurse practitioner route and thought. I could do that and do that. You have to get deer premed stuff and so then. I'm doing pre med. And then somebody in my life came along. It was like right. You just do the. Md thing it's only like one more year than nurse practitioner. Unfortunately at present new idea what they were talking about asli took me seventeen years at the complete my medical training after that. But you know it was a slippery slope of just wanting to do something really impact humanity. I think and if you fast forward through those seventeen years finding myself to be a technician within a pharmaceutical monopoly. That was just still unseen by myself. I understood this is where the money comes from to do research. And if i want to be an academic doctor. I need research dollars be in and so any do a project. That's relevant to the pharmaceutical industry to get funding and then suddenly the you recession depression of two thousand eight two thousand ten unfolds in the country the whole country collapses economically and the government's reverses finding on the general clinic research center at the university of virginia where my research was all done through. Inci lose my findings. So there's this cascade of events two thousand eight to two thousand ten and what had been considered the number three hundred program in the world suddenly dropped off the map. We went from seventy five fulltime faculty to less than thirty in the eighteen month period. So it was just this claps that nobody was really talking about it. But it's time about the housing market and all this but we were losing academic freedom in those years. We lost a huge amount of the foundation that led to the ability to ask new questions and coming out of that recession. Most the that disappeared from the university of virginia ended up in schools. Like the university of indiana that nobody had heard of before as academic leaders. But we're now funded by the pharmaceutical company. Eli lilly for example. Bought an entire university and their med school ends was giving physicians funded labs which means you never had a write another grant to try to fight for the nih to fund research but now you were solely owned by the pharmaceutical industry. I had no idea was that deep. They literally just bought the university university. They own the labs they funded the labs and there was a that was the moment that recession justified -demia winding itself not with the public funding source but for pure pharmaceutical funding sources and it wasn't at all limited to that. University of indiana was across the board. That was a new dependence and coat codependence of academia and pharmaceutical special interests in that moment so of course on the banking side the same thing. Yep when you start to see an old system collapse justifies. What would have been considered illegal behavior just moments ago for gamage control to help stabilize things. That are too big to fail. And the pharmaceutical healthcare industry had claimed too big to fail. And so it got you know boosted up by all these artificial economies that put us in a more indentured servitude ulta drug development and the irony. Is you you discovered vitamin a. Essentially destroying cancer cells right before all of that happened. That's like the most the easiest kind of Application non-drug application That you pursue anymore. Yeah in you know. As far from the only person knowing that i mean in the vitamin d receptor happening as ubiquitous receptor in the whole body which is nobody talks about nutrition like. Did you know that every single hormone relies on and a somewhere in the cascade of vitamin d receptor being bound of vitamin like. It's unbelievable the dependence of your body. Do anything requires an activated. Vitamin d receptor. And so when when you start to talk about you know what's ideal diet. Protein versus fat versus carbohydrate. Oh hell no like if you don't have item in there what you're eating your dying. Your body cannot regenerate without you know these fundamental nutrients in your in your food. And who wasn't was the last time you saw him. They listed in a food package of real whole foods. We we never know because of the way the created our labeling system we've never known the nutrients in our food and so a care it doesn't have to list whether it has a left in it or not because of its casual or nutrient dense soil. Sesame was grown in. we just don't know. And so if it says organic thing while i hope that works and we move forward but as left academia in twenty ten i started nutrition center to reverse chronic disease through food because i was introduced in two thousand and eight. The work of calling campbell and sst. Now cleveland clinic and all these guys for for forty five years been proving. That plan medicine could cure everything anti so excited. You know the farm pharmacy. My doctor is blowing my mind over this. Like why named tell me this. Like we mean reverse diabetes. I didn't i went to third in best underpin program the world nobody told you reverse that I just thought it needed more insulin. You know you just think these simple things and I was blown away so in my super altruistic super naive state jumped in two thousand ten. And you know smartly. I jumped into a complete food. Desert to team teach nutrition. Because i figured since. I don't know anything about nutrition to them. Doctor i at least go to a food desert where people are eating twinkies and hogs off the spit at the local grocery store or at the local gas station as their main food intake. I could probably do better than that. And i was super humbled to find out. I couldn't do better than that often. And when i tried to give nutritious meal nutrient dense foods people who had been devoid of it for a generation their guts handle that stuff. You you can see inflammation markers go up on something as simple as kale when you give it to a gut that's not ready for and so is this extraordinary realization that the the long term deprivation from nutrient density as a population has put us at this vulnerable phase where we don't even have the ability we've forgotten the biologic intelligence had implement or integrate nutrient dense foods into our bodies and it's fascinating to realize that we have to train for that just as like we would train from marathon. You got to train your gut microbiome to handle something as complex as kale. Especially when you've been doing that standard. American even the worst of the standard american diet. And you've just destroyed all of the healthy bacteria. Microbiome it as you've no mechanisms to deal with the nutrient density anymore. The fibers in the complexities. Yeah yeah it's a startling thing to find out that you know the revolution scientific revolution that we're in the midst of right now. Then we'll take us perhaps a couple generations to even begin to handle his knees because it's so disruptive but the profound discovery that we're making our last twenty years of genomics is to find out that human health is not founded upon is not at the center. the human cell. The center of human health is the microbiome forty thousand species of bacteria three hundred thousand species of parasite hundreds of thousands of species of protozoa. Three and a half million species of fungi. That's at the center of human health. Which means we were wrong about everything because only studied cardiovascular disease in the sense in the in the structure of sterile petri dish we only study cancer in a sterile petri dish we have no idea what the relationship of a cancer cell is to the microbiome and yet we know that the first injury that happens towards cancer now as a disruption of the microbiome and gut and so specific now by genomics that we can say if you're missing this bacteria you're gonna get breast cancer if you're missing this family back your colon cancer and so it's gotten that specific to find out that when we talk about cancer prevention. We're not talking about mammograms talking about cancer. Prevention is about changing the flora and fauna within you and so it's so fascinating to realize that just as we did in the sixteen hundreds with galileo coming up with this super disruptive concept that the earth was not at the center of the solar system let alone the universe that took centuries for us to get a hold of that but that was just planet earth when you find out that you are not at the center of your health and that you are actually the result of this complex ecosystem this little galaxy this little universe of life within you so disorienting. Suddenly somebody trying to sell you protein powder just doesn't make the same. It doesn't calculate the same way it's like the new question is what does that protein powder do for my question. You don't yet know what kind of health it's gonna create or what kind of boehner bill is gonna create so we have to re imagine now food itself in as a as a relationship to solar system son particular and its implementation with chlorophyll which are bacteria that live within the plant cells and the chlorophyll these plant plastics which are basically the my conjure within plants might have conjure within ourselves make energy and then those chlorophyll create enough energy for the plan to interact with fungi within the soil to create these weird structures. Like michael risa and the whole infrastructure and architecture of assembles really like a coral reef but within the soil to allow hundreds of thousands of species to interact intelligent. Winds these super intelligent hyper intelligent biologic systems. All of that is made possible not by human life. We just showed up two hundred thousand years ago. For billion years marched along and created level of hyper intelligence that would allow for the human genome to express itself in the way does fifty percent of that genome. We already have found out is direct insert from viruses. You know we would not have existed without the genomics of the bacteria. The fungi protozoa. Slowly building the intelligence by swapping through the viral not janetta information to something organized into intelligent and adoptive life our response to that nature. Our action towards that nature is more antibiotics wearing anti-virals more antifungal. That's been that's the march of the. That's the march of my. My industry of madison is. Let's kill nature. Human health must be the result of eliminating nature around us a weakened fulfil this space in our manifest destiny as the smartest species on earth. We and take it over. We can control it. And in that effort towards control we've created our own demise so for years maybe all most of my life people have been asking me. What kind of foods do you eat. What kind of exercises do do what kind of water should i drink. All of these things and so much more we put into a twenty one day program so that can take you through a theme every day of knowledge action and then eating this delicious meals working out getting support. Anchoring in these new habits so you can do what so that you can kick ass so you have the energy the to live the kind of life that you really want. That's what it's all about so all in this app we have grocery lists. We have education about real hydration and what greater oxygenation and the balance of elkin. Ization all of these things. We are diving into as your heading down hero's journey of implementation into a new life to give you the kind of life that you actually so join my tribe. All you have to do is go to one to one. Tribe dot com. Sign up and get three three days. Join me on this. Hero's journey..

university of indiana philippines university of colorado university of virginia Eli lilly technician university university cancer colon cancer nih cleveland clinic Sesame
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"I have honest conversations with people that inspire me. I hope that through their knowledge and unique perspectives them inspire you to we talk about all kinds of topics from amping up your diets and improving your well-being to the mind-blowing stories behind The Human Experience and black people that are striving to save us and our incredible Planet. We've investigate some of life's fatal conveniences, you know, those things that we are told me that might be good for us, but totally aren't so here's to making better choices and the small tweaks in your life that amount to big changes for you and Ed. People around you and the planet. Let's do this. This is my show the Darin olien show. Everybody welcome to the show. Thanks for tuning in. I am your guide down this Rabbit Hole of innovation possibilities invention disruption of the status quo to invent and reinvent and reinvigorate ourselves into a new paradigm a new future. Listen. This is election time. I'm not going to make political statements because I do believe that there's a world outside of politics where we can largely create and change a lot of things in systems and ways we go about our lives and about the lives of the future Generations that make sense that are acknowledging both sides of the aisle at the same time creating a world that's different. So hopefully all of you that have have voted and you're voting and we will see who the next wage. It is but if interview have followed me. I believe in the power of people. I believe in the power of the humanity of the spirit of the collaboration of the Dead heart centered kicking ass movement of what is possible for ourselves in our lives as we get clear and that we do no harm as we move through this life. I am calling out all of you to check out my newsletter Darren only. We have a group of gen Z researchers off trading information trading possibilities moving forward creating action steps towards a better healthier planet and a better healthier you my next guest Choice. Whoop is a perfect example of someone leading and living his life in a way that's bettering everything in terms of single-use plastic in terms of better Packaging. In terms of making money while doing great things all of you need to listen to this episode because what you're going to walk away from is oh my God, there's hope someone is actually on a big scale changing single-use plastic creating alternatives to this horrible situation. We all find ourselves and as business owners as consumers Choice swoop and his partner yoke Chung started this company footprint that they literally believed and innovating for a healthier Planet working with some of the biggest companies on the planet right now Cargill McDonald's Pepsi focusing on disrupting our dependence on single-use plastic. So their Vision has caused this whole world to start changing in a big Way, so they're literally one of the biggest companies working in this way so that you can scale. So finally these big companies without losing all this margin they can walk up on board saying yes, let's do this. Let's transition. Let's get billions and billions billions of single-use plastic off the market with these other polymers with all these plant-based materials. So it is with my great honor and great pleasure and full disclosure. I have just signed on as one of their advisors to footprint and I am so excited to help them wage blow this up to the let people.

Darin olien Ed yoke Chung Darren Cargill McDonald partner Pepsi
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"We got together for lunch, and after like a three or four hour launch I said someday I would love to work with somebody like you but probably younger. He's just getting his feet wet but clearly shown that he knows what to do and Dennis says will what about me I said I don't think I can afford you because I'm retired and I believe in what you're doing as Bingo you're hired hence Dennis in addition to being our senior product developer chief product officer has been our business mentor as well because he has lived through all of it and you know what are the odds that? Dogs meeting led to this person who has been integral in the success workup how what a I mean you use luck in I? Think there's probably a lock involved but also believed that there's a lot of serendipity around everything that you shared and and call that the fabric of how this whole universe works who knows but but you're doing something good and you're doing something that's beyond just footwear because your goals and visions to me feel infinitely bigger. Exempt, much bigger. I I gotta say I really enjoyed this conversation. I really plaud- you appreciate you and your wife doing things in doing things in it open sustainable connected way and and I also appreciate the grind that you've. Done because it does it's not easy doing anything. Even the greatest heard this attack thousand times the greatest ideas but but sprinkled with the right intention the collaboration you've clearly amassed a great. serendipity filled collaborative unit around you. And you are because again, I wasn't paid by you to wear the shoes. I wore those shoes because they feel good on, make the when I have to. Put shoes on, and so I, just WanNa say thank you for everything that you've done an you're also been kind to. Give the listeners discounts will put all of that in the in the show notes and and Dare we say we just want people's feet to be happier than than they've been untrained in the in the way that they've been. So really appreciate everything that you've done. No it's a total pleasure, and of course, you know the feeling is mutual worth it. You're doing is is helping innumerable people and changing lives and in so many ways, and it's just a treat to watch how that's evolving too man. It's only beginning of our journey and so Let's just keep keep Rockin and changing change changing people's lives in freeing their feet. We we like to say live lifebeat first. Awesome man thank you.

Dennis chief product officer Dare developer
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"Not only. Were able to evolve because of that merger where these Mitochondria began to be able to focus on energy production in the host was able to focus on structure and function essentially We are still dependent on the economy to generate all of our energy because we require energy. So the reason that that work just for the people curious how did that work? Well, the Mitochondria each had about, let's just say about one thousand genes to maintain express, and now that the host was gonna take care of all of that. They no longer needed all of those thousand genes, which again is where most of their energy was going it be kind of like if you had in in one room, you had a thousand people all solving the same problem individually. Even if one of them had already solved, it'd be like well, why can't you just take the one person who solved it? And copied across the other thousand. That's what was not happening, and that's what happened was they deleted all of the Maya conrail bacterial genes except for thirteen, and we can talk about why they didn't delete those thirteen jeans and why they're still in the Mitochondria. So we have two genomes still we have a nuclear genome and conrail Gino in our economy a-. Evolution in epigenetics all happened through the cadre genome because there's a thousand mighty Conrad per human cell and they react much more quickly to the environment because of you know physical changes, then they communicate with the nuclear genome, which is what turns on and off our nuclear genes, which is the mechanism for all everything. Everyone talks about with epigenetics whether it's diet light everything it all happens from environment to my two hundred then to the nuclear genes. So there's this thing about that everyone like just sit with what he just said for a second. Because that, that takes what you used to think in my parents and everything else that this is just who I am, and this is what happens and these Mitochondria and the thousand genes are sitting there intimately listening reacting. Response like like on a level that is just infinitely mind blowing and they have to keep in mind they have to for their two billion years of evolving before they even got to this point they have to listen to the environment they're dead their jobs. Their jobs. So so if we don't live in congruency and I want to dive into that, so people can really understand how they can optimize this meadow Qendra, you need to provide these basic things that are not that are so basic. We have gotten so far away in our modern day world, right? So we've we've are ninety, two percent indoor living in all of this stuff has just. Choked out. This powerful powerful two billion years of evolution system hundred percent. If we just tune ourselves back into, this isn't biohacking. This is this is evolution at its greatest expression. And we don't have to do much and we don't have to be in fear we can. Turn that on. So let's get into. Let's turn on. Our our. Motto. Qendra. As that they've been waiting for thirty percent of our volume is might economy. So we are largely water, right but a lot of that water is within and around the Mitochondria. So can you imagine like thirty percent of my weight is my congre? That's pretty ridiculous. I didn't know that until recently but so that is our that is our by these things are us we are them. It isn't like there. This other thing they are, they are us in the better they work. The, we work and so I'm sort of you know with with sharing all this, my goal is to get people to be friendly with our mighty economy because. Just like you said, the old model is the nuclear model, which is I have these genes in these are my jeans and it's like, yes but those are just like we talked about it's almost like a grocery store. It's like you can go in and get anything you want it. All depends on what you choose and the way you choose is by being friends with your Mitochondria and doing things in your environment and your life that make them work better in that makes all the nuclear genes be expressed better too. So anyway that like we said that energy savings allowed for complexity to begin to evolve, and then life could start to consume other organisms even to build further complexity using your Ganic materials that they spent an entire life building just to do it in one meal essentially and. Things went from there, and so the reason we went to the whole mighty conrail side of things because when we're talking about sunlight, one of the main things, the red and the infrared component optimize is the the mighty conrail energy production. So that's sort of how he got there. So this, this doctor Wallace, the coolest thing that he showed is basically. All. The diseases that we're facing today are mediated through the Mitochondria. So he started looking at these same patients in people and looking at their Andrea, and consistently there might Qendra are having problems and the simplest way to put it back to this analogies and things we've talked about from the beginning of life but. Really, summing it up is. When you change the environment that the mighty connery exist in like we talked about that you know they're super-sensitive they're reacting very closely. They're monitoring everything. You change the environment where there used to generating energy and what they've evolved up to. It lowers the amount of energy production and increases the amount of reactive oxygen species being generated and everyone knows it reaction reactive oxygen species and access cause problems. Most people don't know that they're actually essential to our body function. Properly some people think you don't want any, you actually need them there. Signaling Molecule. But what they do is they cause mutations in the Mitochondria genes within each might congress. So that's sort of the system. This is where we can start to dive into the the really interesting stuff of like what is affecting me systems if if it's as simple as you change your environment that lowers might accountable energy production. It increases reactive oxygen species generation, which mutates the MITOCHONDRIAL DNA. which affects the Mitochondria ability to generate energy and they've been able to show them literally diagrams charts that show that for example, in Alzheimer's the Mitochondria and the brain can't generate abuse energy properly to carry things out same in heart disease in the cardiovascular system, it is same in metabolic diseases. If you're obese, it's like there's issues in our society signaling and our hormones and things which are underlined by mitochondrial damage and the only thing I'd WanNa add is like you said, they're adoptable. So a lot of this is an it's an adaptation system. So the diseases were facing today. Even though we call them diseases, it's just our body trying to figure out a solution to a totally changed environment where at one point when the Mitochondria, for example, when people moved to the tops of mountains like the Sherpas and the Himalayas there might have had a problem and they figured out a solution that eventually migrated into their genes or they can crush with really really low oxygen compared to the rest of us when they're living up at fifteen thousand feet. What can people do to ramp up turn on engage express their mitochondrial energy? What can they do ethic questions so I spent a very long time not knowing how to answer that question so I would I learned all the stuff from while many sources but again, primary connector of these researchers for me was Dr Jack Creuse and. Still though trying to take all these things that were scattered across tons of different books, researchers, and videos and papers. It was all still a bit much. You know. So I, came up with what I call the light diet after. A period of time grew great name. Yeah, and it's funny people think of when I say it sometimes, people will say think of like a light diet as enlightened food like vegetables, fruits, which interestingly enough to to our discussion earlier might actually be directly related..

congruency Himalayas Gino Dr Jack Creuse Alzheimer connery Wallace Qendra Andrea
Episode 009: Understanding the Digital Patient Journey with Darin Swan - burst 02

The Better

02:43 min | 2 years ago

Episode 009: Understanding the Digital Patient Journey with Darin Swan - burst 02

"So it's up to us again to meet their expectations and we don't. Of course, we hear about it right away There's another thing about digital is if you upset somebody, they're definitely willing to share that information online and anyone that wants to hear about it. Yeah and that's not just for health systems as well. That's that's for any. Yeah Yeah. They always say you don't WanNa bad. YELP. Review. So we we actually work on the other side of that to ensure that we have. A good patient experience and that we're addressing any issues that may come up the whole. The whole thing that we want at the end of the day is a satisfied patient that has a good outcome and of course, I think technology can assist greatly on that and we just don't want that to be independent. We want that to just open up more doors exactly. Yeah. What? On Your just your experience, what are those things that might negatively impact a patient's experience? Well I I think the biggest one from my perspective is when the technology doesn't work and it doesn't matter if it's their provider matter if it's their cell cellphone or their connection, if it doesn't work at the end of the day, the ownership released going to be on the particular health system that provides that feature set Again, even if they're not our issues, we're still going to be the ones that are there. Are Cell Service and they WANNA know how to yeah right. Yeah and of course There are multiple steps within that journey that we can control their multiple steps. We can't again setting the expectation is. Is Appropriate any consumer of where those challenges are. We really can't necessarily get to that depth. But. We can. Always you know provide better customer service to ensure that you know the frustration level comes down a little bit. But the consumer at the end of the day is going to have. A lot of options choices we know that that's happened especially with Tobin, and so we need to provide the best experience possible so that you know the word of mouth gets out there and then we have returned visits and that people realize that's another option it may not It may just be an additive action to them, and they may choose a different pathway but as long as the options there and the people that need to embrace and user there. But again and no matter what technology it is what how system they want that unified experience they want to just be able to enter a few lines of information about themselves and see a doctor. Fairly. Quickly and that that's essentially what we're trying to do with our new is really make it easier for the consumer to get to us and to have a good experience, good outcome, and then to move on

Yelp Cell Service Tobin
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

06:14 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"Its potential for for Hefty use but this idea of just being comfortable around programming logic and you know, of course the fact that that we live in an era. Yes Minecraft in which being able to work your way around in computer programming and software I think is it a useful skill. That's a form and then the final is rhetoric / persuasion, right just being able to defend the thought being able to argue effectively being able to understand, you know, Game Theory, you know every night we have these one dog. Full family dinners where we wait until the end of the day and we break all the rules about not eating late at night just because we want everything to be done when we sit down to dinner. And so we spend time all together a family preparing a meal and you know, we have a wonderful vegetable garden and we got ten acres of forests. It will go out and harvest nettle and mint and plantain and you know little Rosemary and Thyme from the Garden Ridge Fresh heirloom tomatoes and we got Chicken Little get eggs from the chickens and we've got these wonderful Nigerian dwarf goats and you know, I do a lot of bowhunting so we have a freezer full of full of fresh harvested meet wage and we'll make these wonderful family meals together and then gather round and we play games for like an hour, you know quiddler and Boggle and Scrabble and scattegories and you know, a lot of kind drinking game theory type of games and this idea of teaching them how to argue how persuade how to engage in good rhetoric. Some of that actually happens at the dinner table wage. Knowing that you know, that's that's kind of our tradition. That's our our you know, I believe that I'm not raising my children. I'm raising my children's children. And so Legacy is a big part of the fact that I parent back to the smartphone example, if I'm pulling out my smartphone at the table, what are my kids going to be doing with their kids, you know when they're eating dinner and all of a sudden I've got whole generation of greenfields coming after me down there digging around in their phones at the dinner table versus if I step up as a father and as a leader and as a king of the house and I demonstrate responsibility, you know, the same tactics that that that are in our house, you know, I lead morning meditation with the family morning journaling with the family, you know evening prayer time evening music family dinners, you know, Wednesday and Sunday Night tennis outage and you know, Tuesday night Bike Rides the farmers market. These are all things that I would hope my kids would do with their kids. And so, you know, it's important to realize that trash. Things that you set up can really stick as part of your legacy and so Reading Writing arithmetic rhetoric and logic are even if they're not expressing an interest in that as part of their own schooling things that I weave in regardless. I hope all parents listen to this because you can have the information you can have the Cutting Edge information that can change a world but if you can't articulate it and and deliver it then it is gone. It's literally his work is just gone right and that holyshit and if you're looking at and I just love this because if you're looking at your children's children, and you truly hope people just take a pause right now and just go fuc that responsibility of literally. Do you want them picking up their phone or do you want them critically thinking and all she We've talked to and we'll get into the soul part of the thing like the connection the emotions the beautiful conversation we've had before because that's that emotional that spiritual that of course is part of it. But but that's what I'm thinking of when you're yeah and and I mean think about this and it's human nature right people responding to pastures message favorably with his rhetoric was was very likely a big part of that. But also the human natural response to want the shortcut to want the Quick Fix as part of that too because we're talking about triggering a 9-8 immune response which short-term can be effective. But but to the neglect of the Adaptive humoral response, which takes longer training repeated exposure being outside with animals and you know, eating produce grown in a garden that might have a little bit of dirt on it and you know, not excessively using antibiotics and do they're doing wrong. That gradually slowly allow the body to become stronger in you know, you could say the same thing for people wanting the fast track to Fitness or nutrition getting a gastro bypass instead of gradually reducing calories and accepting the fact that if you spent time from the age of fifteen to forty becoming overweight, you are not going to lose all that in a year. It'd probably be a good five to ten years of a new one and eating and living in a healthy way in order to restore your body composition back to where you want it to be that's a painful message for people with the innate immune response trigger, then I'll have to worry about doing all the hard work on backend preventively, you know, people want the pharmaceutical instead of the lifestyle change the gastric bypass instead of the dietary change them get it I get tempted towards the quick acute fix all the time, but when it comes to building character when it comes to developing a long-term stable Foundation wage Whatever it is you're going after in life. Usually it's not fraught with shortcuts. It's it's hard work. It's sweat. Sometimes sweat Blood and Tears but patience and sticking to things long-term pays off and and what we're seeing now in the modern medical industry is the complete opposite of that people depending on a quick fix Physicians being unwilling to give out for the large part good preventive Medical Care advice. And as a result, we have a lot of people who who are not getting the Medical Solutions that they need. So for years, maybe almost in my life people have been asking me what kind of foods do you eat? What kind of exercises do you do? What kind of water should.

Garden Ridge Rosemary Medical Solutions
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"You see so much of that where where parents kind of like throw their hands up in the air because the kid is just constantly going to the screen you just never set that up that way your culture and your house right that up that way but also and I'll get back to the five Core Curriculum eventually and that that story about the bookshelves but we a when Mom and I have down time the kids will pay attention to what the parents do, you know, and if I'm pulling out my phone at the dinner table or you know, Mom is off watching Netflix or playing a video game then that's what the kids are going to assume that a human being does when there's time on your hands and and for us, you know, reading books sometimes painting, you know, cooking playing musical instruments. So they've grown up with normalcy not involving, you know, a lot of Hefty screen time or activities that that might be a relative waste of time depending on how you use them. And there's no rules in our house. You know, there is no screen time limit. There's no you can't have gluten there there. There's really very few rules. We just educate them about the consequences of any decision that they might make them and then let them live with the consequences. So if they want to get on there I touches or their computers at night and just you know, dick around in their bedrooms on those for a while. I tell them hey, you're you're not going to sleep. Well, you probably get a crappy day tomorrow, you know, there's a reason dad, you know, if I am on my computer, I'm at least wearing blue light blocking glasses and have you know, screen software like like Iris installed on the computer to to keep pressing my melatonin as I'm going to sleep, but I don't tell them. Yeah, you have 15 minutes. You got 30 minutes, you know, there's there's your screen time allotment because all that does in my opinion is set up whatever you've settled down on as forbidden fruit for a youngster, you know, I would much rather win. Let's say we have, you know, a new shipment of this fine organic biodynamic wine come into our house, you know poor the boys off. Shot glass and teach them about the tastes and and you know how to note the the aroma of the wine and and the flavor and how to sip it and you know and aerate it in the mouth and I guarantee they're not going to like steal a bottle of wine from the pantry get drunk in their bedroom. Cuz that's just, you know, it's not going to start the relationship. It's not forbidden fruit literally in that case. So what I love about that though is is your your image powering them. You're giving them future potential downsides, right? You're giving them the information you're treating them as a infinite being that they are they're just a kid, but they're still a being that has consequences to the choices. So you lay that out up to you Deb like you're empowering them with that because they'll get that exactly and in there. I mean if you've got a one-owner toddling towards the hot stove you don't say don't touch that you gave birth and let him go, you know recovery installed in their hand. But within reason, you know, you you it's I think the name of this town Parroting is love and logic and there's a few books out about it. But yeah, it's essentially educate your child about the consequences of any decision that they may make then as much as you can while keeping them, you know, somewhat life allow them to make the decision and to deal with the consequences and and I think that Fosters a more responsible free thinking independent resilient individual going forward in terms of their lives. And so I'll take them down to that bookshelf, you know back to the five things that I think a kid should know even if even if you know, they're not interested in the moment and I'll let them select the book and and you know, they'll point out different books. Like what's this book about breathwork Dad or you know, Benjamin Franklin who was that guy, you know should have read this biography and I'll help them select a book and their wage job is to read that book within a week, which I think is reasonable for a young man or young woman to grow up being able to digest about a book a week. And in in you know reading is like a muscle and have taught How to skim the table of contents look at how each chapter is laid out go through with with your finger with the pain as you scan down one page then scan down the next page. I taught them out the rule that I bought for myself, which is that when I'm reading a book my my special rule is that I'm not allowed to turn the page backwards, right? So whenever I'm looking at a page, I'm reading very mindfully because I think I'm not going to see this again. So I better pay attention. So, you know, I teach them some of these tricks and then they take the book and this leads to the second skill in addition to reading I think I am a human being for success in any career that are going to go into should be able to express their thoughts in clear written form Beyond a hundred and fifty character tweet or a or a text message with a smiley face like actually be able to write meaningful shit. And so their their job after they've read that book reports they birth For the bread that book to the one week to turn in a one-to-two page book report that not only kind of outlines what they've read but because I know how easy it is to read a book and then kind of you know copy and paste some bad stuff and you know, and and here's what this book is about maybe grab the Amazon description and just use that tell some personal stories. Tell some televised know how this related to you as a human being wage, which is also important. You know, that this is how I wrote. You know, my last book bound us is everything starts with a story because humans relate to stories and if you tell things from your own point of view your own time in the trash your own experiences, that's relatable. And it's a it's a wonderful way to teach something to someone so reading and writing are are two of the skills that that will serve them. Well, just to make a note on that tube. You're allowing them to choose the book that's of interest to them. Right? I don't know about you but later in my life when I was interested in thought Thing I would devour it because I was driven by this innate desire and passion. You're not forcing a book. You're not grabbing it for them and say do this report. They don't give a shit. There's not a meaning for it in their life, but you're allowing them again. That's empowerment which I love I'd love to meet your kids. But you just I will give them helpful nudges. Like for example a few years ago. I did note that, you know, my mom and I should go to bed by 9:45 10 p.m. I mean, we've got some some pretty healthy sleep cycles in our home and you know, I would get up and go to the bathroom hear them listening to me that they've got this radio show. They listen to called Adventures in Odyssey, you know, it's like Old School radio show and and it was like midnight and they're still in there and I can see the lights in the bedroom are kind of on so the brake I didn't choose this for them. But you know, I kind of navigated it was River in this case and we were over by the Sleep section the bookshelf and I started pulled out a couple of books like sleep smarter and over Matthew Walker's books laid off. And you know, these are some pretty good book that you guys would dig this book this week. I bet and so sometimes I'll plant a seed because you realize they're messing up their sleep cycles that's going to affect them. So you page them in a like just learn about this right not telling him you're not lecturing. You're not arguing with them. You're not scolding them. You're not screaming at them at midnight, right? You're you're again presenting an opportunity for them to learn about something that they have been choosing for themselves. So here's take some more information in because this is affecting you right and and Thursday the same thing the same trick kind of works with a partner because you know, we all know the shoemaker's wife wears no shoes and you know, the person least likely to come to me to health advice or listen to any damn thing. I say when it comes to fishing at advice is my wife, of course because you know, she has to put up with me all day long. So, you know, if.

Netflix melatonin Iris partner Deb Benjamin Franklin Amazon Old School Matthew Walker
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"Me. I hope that through their knowledge and unique perspectives them inspire you to we talk about all kinds of topics from amping up your diets and improving your well-being to the mind-blowing stories behind The Human Experience and thoughts people that are striving to save us and our incredible Planet. We've investigate some of life's fatal conveniences, you know, those things that we are told me that might be good for us, but totally aren't so here's to making better choices and the small tweaks in your life that amount to big changes for you and Ed. People around you and the planet. Let's do this. This is my show the Darin olien show. Welcome everybody. Welcome to the show day and only show The Crowd Goes Wild. Hey, just want to say hey man, we hit a million downloads in a very short amount of time launching. I am beyond excited my teams excited. I want to give a special shout-out to the amplify team for just suck ass and being professional and great and making making these conversations even better by just their professionalism and keeping me on track cuz I can definitely go off on tangents so grateful for that grateful for you because it's you that's listening. It's you that's resonating. It's you that's generating. The reason I'm doing this. So thank you God for you and thank for tuning in. I am stoked. So thank you for for all of that. Yeah, and also I'm curating a lot of things to help the movement the mission dog. Of supporting and realizing that we have a whole bunch of people in the world that are inspired and touched want to do something and know where to go in order to take action to make this a better place My Philosophy is take care of yourself. Take care of your health and take care of your spirit home learn about who you are what you are and what you want to create in the world. And then that team that mission is infinitely more powerful. So my next guest house is a Powerhouse amazing guy and through a lot of conscious conversations with him. I have just grown to respect and love what this guy is up to he is a bright smart dude who has dedicated his life to trying to unpack the the best way to health wage. And you know, he's a biohacker researcher experimenter extraordinaire. He loves our Brew cuz he loves making great recipes got this kick ass cake recipe with our brucas that is to die for and we dive into his backstory. So many of you may not know who Ben Greenfield is with some of you do these out and around he's on been Rogue and he's done had many accomplishments in terms of athletic performance has worked with everyone Under the Sun done a lot of public speaking and it's just pushing the envelope on many levels from longevity to health to brain hacking to stem cells which we always nerdout on and this conversation and it's different his conversation. We dive and unpack. I'm going to keep a few of those Secrets, but we dive in a pack how he was home-schooled before home school was a thing off. And how he's curating that learning and curiosity in his own kids in his own family making it fun adventurous. We actually had two conversations the first conversation that didn't record. It's like podcasters Nightmare and we spent two hours and it didn't record and he came back the next day because he was in town and we did it again and I think it was even better. So you got the best version. So everyone, please enjoy Ben Greenfield this conversation and what this guy is up to and the one caveat in a strict and I want to put put on here I'm plant-based. He's not he eats a lot of meat. He does it from a hunting perspective obviously in that area. We don't agree. That's okay. That's okay because probably ninety-nine percent of everything else we do agree on so we don't need to debate and beat try to beat each other up on whether we should eat meat or off. Of that stuff. It's irrelevant. In this case because we want to come together. We want to collaborate we want to share from that perspective. So just understand that. I have a different philosophy on that package has a different philosophy, but there's mutual respect here and I do respect then and I do respect what he's doing an Incredible Book boundless. You want to check out hits got more information than you can possibly imagine. So really sit back or while you're driving or while you're walking make sure to subscribe make sure to tell your friends. We love the support because that generates more and more inspiration for me in the team to gather more and fun amazing guests for you. So sit back enjoy walk down size. Enjoy my conversation with.

Ben Greenfield Darin olien Ed researcher
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"Like crazy. Okay. That's it. Thanks for tuning in. It was a little different fatal convenience, but I just wanted to talk a little bit about some of the negative sides of two too much. Coffee and caffeine. It's really centered around caffeine. But coffee has this negative kind of lower voltage acidic side of things. Okay, so I know you guys are coffee lovers. Most are just take a break. Remember always pick good quality ingredients and that is the bottom line, and with all of this stuff. Okay. Love you all. Thanks for tuning in. I hope that left you feeling inspired to take a closer. Look at the things you might be doing that could use some tweaking for a better rate down on the potato conveniences. We discussed you can head to Darin olien. Here. We have a ton of info on how to be more aware of them. How you can avoid them. Remember it starts with you and the choices you make Oh, and if you haven't had a chance to check out the interview, I released earlier in the week. Here's what you missed. Well, we know the food is designed to be addicting and highly palatable any animal in a choice between processed highly palatable junk food will choose those Foods over their natural diet and eat themselves to death then so it's it's a biological and 1/8 primitive drive to eat high-wage concentrated calories in a highly flavored substances. The problem is we have to indoctrinate people in Newton the importance of nutrition from a young age and it doesn't happen. So our job becomes a little more difficult at times to convince people to eat healthfully, but that's my specialty at this point is taking people in giving in the motivational tools and changing their personality and intellect and emotions and spend personalities even have to change for them to enjoy this more than their old diet. Learn the recipes change their taste buds, but also change their personalities to a degree to a really totally enjoy living this way. This episode is produced by my team at must amplify and audio marketing company that specializes in giving a voice to a brand and making sure the wrong people here. If you would like or are thinking about doing a podcast or even with like a strategy session to add your voice to your brand in a powerful way. I go to ww.w must Amplified must amplifier off. Darren..

caffeine Darin olien Darren Newton
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"It's that time of the week for another fatal convenience. This is a bite-sized segment that addresses some of society's fatal conveniences down the steps. You can take to avoid becoming a victim of them. I Define fatal conveniences as the things we may be doing because the world we live in makes us believe we have to tap water shampoo sunglasses food. I dive into the Hidden Truths Behind Some of our everyday choices that could not only be harming us, but even killing us. So let's Dive In Welcome everybody to the Darin olien show special episode again of a fatal convenience. Thanks for tuning in. Thanks for being here. Kill the Messenger on this one. Please don't send me any negative comments. I'm kind of being the little cheeky on that. But at the same time, I'm just going to go into a little bit of this fatal convenience, which is caffeine slash coffee. So I'm focusing a little bit on coffee and the caffeine what it is and there's a negative side to it. So I just wanted to bring it up. It is a fatal convenience. There's many reasons. I don't drink it, but there's also many benefits to it too. So I don't want to be completely a Debbie Downer, but I just want to bring your attention to age. Think so you're informed. That's what this is all about. You don't have to change certainly don't have to change for me and I get it the morning Ritual Coffee and the smell of it off the dopamine effect that is literally produced before you actually drink the coffee just the ritual alone should be centered and acknowledged job in any sort of consistent ritual in your life. So the coffee ritual the dopamine effect before you're actually even home sipping. The coffee is very powerful. Let me put a little asterisk by that right? So let me just bring you a little bit that lesson the culture the same story around coffee is phenomenal. Obviously, it comes from the Coffee Bean, but it's really a seed. And and you know, I love coffee. I do. love it. I love y'all know maybe you've many of you heard me talk about the Alchemy between the coffee seed and the fruit when dried together. They're one of the greatest neurodegenerative bdnf brain-derived neurotropic factor support of the brain, but you're not talking about a lot of caffeine very very small amount when it comes to that. So I love coffee. It is a medicinal herbs and it does have a lot of great benefits. So I just want to say that before you turn this episode off just need to be aware of a few things. Now, let's just get into I typically don't do story off on this but I think that's so fascinating. We're talking about the 16th century. Now, there's a little argument around where they're actually originated, but it looks log. To the Ethiopian Plateau was one of the was probably the origin of where it came from. So the legend has it that in that Ethiopian Plateau their wage or the herders of goats and they observed really the effect but then when they observe the goats that we're eating these berries now, listen, I've eaten a lot of coffee fruit Berry and it's delicious. The problem is that when you harvest it goes rancid right away, that's why they take it away from the seed wage then they roast obviously the coffee and everything else and just discard this beautiful fruit. So these so The Story Goes a legend goes that the that goats were eating them berries and the herders would actually observe them not sleeping at night. So there were just full of energy running around and of course then that kind of moved through and they immediately started eating chewing eating the fruit eating the bean and realized that this off an incredible stimulant which is then kind of spawned the first coffee houses in the 16th century incredible, right then, you know, it moves throughout Europe and about 1615 the local clergy of Venice condemned and they actually said that this was a bitter Edge invention of Satan corset everything that makes someone feel good the church poopoose because apparently the Muslims took took on this drink straight off because of all the benefits and then Pope Clemente 8th, but was asked to intervene and you actually drank some of this and he bath Ties to kind of as they call it cheat the devil and then it was accepted. So the clergy came in baptized this amazing Elixir the gave people energy and proof. It was resolved. If it's Satanism crazy, right? So, you know, they caffeine coffee interesting thing. But the thing that you don't realize is is caffeine is an actual pesticide that hundreds of plants use obviously coffee is the the most widely known of the caffeine producing. This is a seed it also obviously in leaves green tea and certain fruits have caffeine in it, but the most recognized is coffee. So this is a natural pesticide that smaller insects and everything else that they actually eat the seed money. Fruit and then they get paralyzed and died. So it keeps it keeps the you know, everything in life wants to keep life moving. So that's what these plants have created sort of created a a a neurotoxin to smaller animals and insects and that is caffeine. So you're actually taking in a poison off the Another Story shows that the sufis Apparently used it in the Fourteen hundreds to stay awake. If the sufis of of Yemen used to stay awake as they're doing their Sufi dances and rituals to stay up all night kind of thing. So there you go started in the Sufi tradition and the Islamic tradition and or the Ethiopian, but we do know for twelve hundred years. We've been using and consuming cough and what is.

caffeine Ethiopian Plateau Darin olien dopamine Debbie Downer Yemen Europe stimulant Pope Clemente
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"It's that time of the week for another fatal convenience. This is a bite-sized segment that addresses some of society's fatal conveniences down the steps. You can take to avoid becoming a victim of them. I Define fatal conveniences as the things we may be doing because the world we live in makes us believe we have to tap water shampoo sunglasses food. I dive into the Hidden Truths Behind Some of our everyday choices that could not only be harming us, but even killing us. So let's Dive In Welcome everybody to the Darin olien show special episode again of a fatal convenience. Thanks for tuning in. Thanks for being here. Kill the Messenger on this one. Please don't send me any negative comments. I'm kind of being the little cheeky on that. But at the same time, I'm just going to go into a little bit of this fatal convenience, which is caffeine slash coffee. So I'm focusing a little bit on coffee and the caffeine what it is and there's a negative side to it. So I just wanted to bring it up. It is a fatal convenience. There's many reasons. I don't drink it, but there's also many benefits to it too. So I don't want to be completely a Debbie Downer, but I just want to bring your attention to age. Think so you're informed. That's what this is all about. You don't have to change certainly don't have to change for me and I get it the morning Ritual Coffee and the smell of it off the dopamine effect that is literally produced before you actually drink the coffee just the ritual alone should be centered and acknowledged job in any sort of consistent ritual in your life. So the coffee ritual the dopamine effect before you're actually even home sipping. The coffee is very powerful. Let me put a little asterisk by that right? So let me just bring you a little bit that lesson the culture the same story around coffee is phenomenal. Obviously, it comes from the Coffee Bean, but it's really a seed. And and you know, I love coffee. I do. I love it. I love y'all know maybe you've many of you heard me talk about the Alchemy between the coffee seed and the fruit when dried together. They're one of the greatest neurodegenerative bdnf brain-derived neurotropic factor support of the brain, but you're not talking about a lot of caffeine very very small amount when it comes to that. So I love coffee. It is a medicinal herbs and it does have a lot of great benefits. So I just want to say that before you turn this episode off just need to be aware of a few things. Now, let's just get into I typically don't do story off on this but I think that's so fascinating. We're talking about the 16th century. Now, there's a little argument around where they're actually originated, but it looks log. To the Ethiopian Plateau was one of the was probably the origin of where it came from. So the legend has it that in that Ethiopian Plateau their wage or the herders of goats and they observed really the effect but then when they observe the goats that we're eating these berries now, listen, I've eaten a lot of coffee fruit Berry and it's delicious. The problem is that when you harvest it goes rancid right away, that's why they take it away from the seed wage then they roast obviously the coffee and everything else and just discard this beautiful fruit. So these so The Story Goes a legend goes that the that the goats were eating them berries and the herders would actually observe them not sleeping at night. So there were just full of energy running around and of course then that kind of moved through and they immediately started eating chewing eating the fruit eating the bean and realized that this off an incredible stimulant which is then kind of spawned the first coffee houses in the 16th century incredible, right then, you know, it moves throughout Europe and about 1615 the local clergy of Venice condemned and they actually said that this was a bitter Edge invention of Satan corset everything that makes someone feel good the church poopoose because apparently the Muslims took took on this drink straight off because of all the benefits and then Pope Clemente 8th, but was asked to intervene and you actually drank some of this and he bath Ties to to kind of as they call it cheat the devil and then it was accepted. So the clergy came in baptized this amazing Elixir the gave people energy and proof. It was resolved. If it's Satanism crazy, right? So, you know, they caffeine coffee interesting thing. But the thing that you don't realize is is caffeine is an actual pesticide that hundreds of plants use obviously coffee is the the most widely known of the caffeine producing. This is a seed it also obviously in leaves green tea and certain fruits have caffeine in it, but the most recognized is coffee. So this is a natural pesticide that smaller insects and everything else that they actually eat the seed money. Fruit and then they get paralyzed and died. So it keeps it keeps the you know, everything in life wants to keep life moving. So that's what these plants have created sort of created a a a neurotoxin to smaller animals and insects and that is caffeine. So you're actually taking in a poison off the Another Story shows that the sufis Apparently used it in the Fourteen hundreds to stay awake. If the sufis of of Yemen used to stay awake as they're doing their Sufi dances and rituals to stay up all night kind of thing. So there you go started in the Sufi tradition and the Islamic tradition and or the Ethiopian, but we do know for twelve hundred years. We've been using and consuming cough and what is.

caffeine Ethiopian Plateau Darin olien dopamine Debbie Downer Yemen Europe stimulant Pope Clemente
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"Around you and the planet. Let's do this. This is my show the Darin olien show. Everybody welcome to the show. Thanks for tuning in. I'm your host the Darin olien show stoked to have you here. It's all about empowerment for me. You know, it's not about fads. It's not about carbs and proteins and all of this stuff is bad. And I'm also one of those plant-based guys who's not going to tell you what to do. I just don't want to do that and it's not my place to do that. But I do.

Darin olien
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"Plastic. Then we need to limit that and create those new habits. Okay so please. This is a big one. This can over time and over years of living if you start to lessen and lower the amount of exposure to plastic and BPA and estrogen dominant and limit your exposure to estrogen disruptors. This will have a huge effect on your life. I promise you healthy habits added up over time will create health. Non Healthy Habits will create destruction. This is what fatal conveniences all about opening your eyes to the modern day issues. The Modern Day conveniences that have a fatal flaw and plastic has got a big fatal flaw. Okay guys leave on a positive note. Take your power back use glass? Try not to use plastic with your food especially in your water. K- love you all. That was a fantastic episode. What was the one thing that you got out of? Today's conversation if today's episode struck a chord with you and you want to dive a little deeper on a variety of topics check out. My live depends on Derna. Lean Dot Com backslash deep dive. More episodes are available on Darnell. Lean DOT COM as. Well keep diving. My friends keep diving..

Darnell
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

10:10 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"Of joined in that horse advocacy. Yes that's interesting by the way none of. That's Debbie Downer to me. That was that's all. That's what I put my on my cereal in the morning. None of that is If sometimes it sounds a little too onerous. It's not right to me. It's oxygen. I'll do you mean that like just because you can be an advocate and do something for this population and because you believe it believe in it both the language use and you can use it here is that it's a privilege and an honor to have maximum your life because you you've already said you bring Max with you and you pointed to your heart and that clearly changed your life. How has Max the list is long? But how what are the highlights of of Max coming in new life. How's IT changed your life? Will I think I I just I tried to explain as an as a storyteller how Max impacted me but also Max introduced me to? My wife was a A kind of a cold rainy march Saturday and at that time I only had maximum Friday nights and then he had to go back Sunday mornings so it was desperately finite period every weekend and so and I to chocolate labs at the time and we live about seven houses from the beach in southern California and everybody was losing their minds a little bit rainy March Day and so I said all right. Let's go down to the beach. Will Run some rain gear? And so Max probably was six seven at the time and the two chocolate lab for very precocious and they were getting antsy in the house. So we marched down to the beach and we get down there and sure shoot in the first thing that chocolates do. Is they go down to the beach and they get into it with Jack. Russell terrier about two hundred yards down the beach and so I put maxwell above the mean high tide line and I went to go. Get them and When I came back Maxwell sitting on this woman's lap and that had happened when we were really working very hard on speaking at arm's length which is about forty two inches. A lot of people in the special needs community. Do this close talking which is not appropriate when you see are people talking here and it's something that that's not appropriate so we were working at arm's length talking at arm's length for to see him sitting on this woman's laugh and having him face to face with her and she was sitting in kind of across late pose looking out at the ocean and Max was rate in her grill and I walked up and I just got the two chocolates and I came back and I asked this woman I said. Are you okay with this? And all meant was the proximity of my son's face to hers with total stranger on a rainy march afternoon. And she said you have no idea because she had gone through some stuff and I didn't have any idea all I knew that it was that she was Reiki hot and just like his father. Doing Max introduced me to my wife. I would never bothered this woman right on a Saturday afternoon. It's not in my thing. I'm not good at all that. And so but Max did and so I. We talked for a little bit and she had to go and so we don't want to. You want to grab drinks some time she. I don't drink on my meter and she said you coffee. That's that's invoked Coffee Coffee Coffee Mike. Open about T. t guy and she's all right. I'LL Cup of tea with you. I'm like toll over and so I finally got her digits and then I got nothing two months I could nothing nothing. It was like being forty days and forty nights. He reached out and she never responded and didn't get a kiss and get a hug action. I was very physical and so but I probably dating you were dating. You know Cole. Good recall the but you're hanging out. They were hanging out getting go sick. And so Max introduced me to vote the woman who would become my wife so that would lead the league in hall of fame. Contributions and Nicole McGinley is a walking angel. She is unbelievable person. And my God But I never would have met her. If Max had an introduced us no chance or how do I know but I would never have introduced myself on that rainy too. Many other things going on a dogs a special needs kid bothering strangers. I would never. We would have gone for a walk and gone back. Up to the House and tranquillo. We would have hung out for a second and two so he chose her. Max chose her whatever however you want a package that that's that's what happened. That's amazing and you've been married for. How long has it been now? A Oh gosh abilities. Eleven so thirteen years for fourteen. So that's a that's a good one. That's a good run. Yeah it's a you guys run a run a pretty amazing demonstration of family includes two inclusivity. Two daughters are credible like well disciplined. Respect both ways. It's pretty. It's it's for anyone as chaotic family life. Not that year gaped from that. It's a looney bent over there sometimes. But there's a lot of respect that you have with your family and your kids but and it you can see that you again. You can see that both ways and so when you speak. They respect that sometimes. Sometimes they don't Novak anybody. Bring the trash cans down from the curb of offered the money. I've tried to incentivize the whole thing. Nothing but the my family is Max Nicole. Billy grace and kate has also especially recently. They're really impacted. How much I and wear I wanNA work and how much I want to be away from you guys how much. I'm willing to be away from this nucleus as a sixty year old man. And if if money's not gonNA be the The catalyst of the driver for taking gigs and doing gigs. It's interesting has to be something else. It has to be a personality as the director or the writer or maybe they both suck and the material and the pages just stunning. Or there's not many then other ores And so I felt a felt the gearshift especially in the last year or so in wanting to be here. Many of you follow me. No I've spent most of my life searching for the healthiest foods on the planet from Amazon. Jungle to the Andes of Peru to the Himalayas in Bhutan to the desert's of Africa and everything in between discovering hundreds of plants and herbs and superfoods like this is my passion things like Sasha g wild cow Moranga many adapted Jennifer herbs and on and on and on if you look hard enough there are a few unknown extraordinary foods around the world that people still don't know about in a few years ago. I came across my favorite superfood discovery of all time. Barracas nuts when I first tasted them. My eyes lit up like I was blown away there so delicious with notes of like popcorn and kick cow chocolate and with this amazing crunch so the tastes alone just absolutely blew me away but after sending them to a lab which I do and getting all the tasks I realized there the healthiest nuts on the planet. Like no other not even compares. They have like an unusually high amount of fiber which is critical for healthy digestion. We're all getting way too low of fiber in her diet and it's good for the healthy bacteria microbiome and they're off the charts in super high antioxidants and have few calories than any other nut like. It's jam packed with micro nutrients and what they don't have is just as important as what they do have because they're found in the forest in the Savannah. What's called the Sahadi by on the Brazil not grown a plantation or form there untouched by industrial pesticides. Larvicides fertilizers. They're truly wild food. But they're not just good for you. They're really good for the planet. Most other nuts require millions of gallons of era gated water but Baraka trees require no artificial irrigation. Brewers are truly good for you. Good for the planet and good world community. It's win all the way around. I really think you'll love them so I'm giving all of my listeners. Fifteen percents off by going to Baru. Dot Com backslash Darren that's B. A. R. K. S DOT COM backslash. Darren D. A. R. I N I know you will enjoy.

Max Nicole Maxwell Debbie Downer California Nicole McGinley Brewers Jack Darren D. A. Reiki Russell Andes Cole Amazon Himalayas Novak B. A. R. K. Africa tranquillo Bhutan
"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

10:23 min | 2 years ago

"darin" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"And I've had my mind blown along the way by the people the far off places I have been and the life altering events that have changed my life forever. My goal is to help you dive deep it to some of the issues of our modern daylight societies. Fatal conveniences the things that we do that were indoctrinated into thinking we have to even though those things are negatively affecting us and in some cases slowly destroying us and even killing us every week I have honest conversations with people that inspire me. My hope is through their knowledge and unique perspectives. They'll inspire you to together. We'll explore how you can make small tweaks in your life that amount to big changes for you the people around you and the planet. So let's do this. This is my show the lean show everybody welcome to my first ever episode of the Derna. Lean show thank you for tuning in. I'm excited I've actually been wanting to do this. And Push it off for about seven years. So many people before podcasts. Were even thing kept telling me to do this. And I've always had so much on my plate or perceived. I have and have not done it. But I've done it so I actually have logged about ten or so podcast before the pandemic so I had an intro but I really felt like well. That's crazy It was before the pandemic and that makes no sense. I have to at least acknowledged the new world that we're living in when I recorded all these things we weren't in that and I did it months ago in some cases so I just need to acknowledge that this is a weird world and long form thought and discussion and connection is more important than ever. Let me just say that more important than ever to connect have long form unedited discussions and idea is and freedom of speech because we're absolutely being strangled by big corporations telling us what we can and cannot say and that's just not gonna fly with all of us the world certainly as Americans nobler no man and no good. So that's a long way of saying man. I'm stoked my first launch. And my very good friend Brandon Jenner. He's my first. Guest is about a decade younger than me. If you don't know who brandon. Is you kind of probably already do in some way? Because his father is Bruce Jenner. Caitlyn Jenner so he comes from a pedigree of strong DNA Olympian DNA. His Mom Linda Thompson. Who is this beautiful angel of a person got to meet her and know her and she's a bad ass herself? One of Elvis Presley's loves of his life and then later on she met. Bruce had brody And Brandon so brandon as a brother Brody Jenner and so- Linda and Bruce at the time had these two beautiful kids and so the story goes they broke up. David Foster became brandon and Brody Stepfather. Highly influential music producer. And probably help them move into the music scene. Like they're both are. And then Bruce at the time got connected with the Kardashians and then there you go. The story goes so brandon's step. Siblings are Kendall and Kylie Kardashian. And then he's step brother to Courtney Kim Khloe and Rob Kardashian there you go. Wow I mean and there's so many more connections but I don't WanNa make it about that. Brandon is one of the sweetest humans talented checkout his music. He's got his mom by the way Linda Thompson. One of the great writers of our time. Looker up from Whitney Houston Kenny. Rogers tons of hot top music lyricist songwriter. While Brandon's right there had listened to his words. Listen to his music I love his frigging music and he's just an amazing soul so before we recorded this as well. He was about to have twins with his new bride. So now he's had those twins so he's got to fraternal boys And his whole life is changed as well stayed the same to in terms of who is amazing human. So I'm excited for you guys to get to know this awesome fellow bad ass beautiful human. Enjoy this episode. Enjoy my first episode. Subscribe leave your comments. All of that jazz love you. I'm excited to bring this to you. I would. I would hope that by a sharing my perspective. On the way I see the world and at least the lessons that I've learned in my life hopefully will give a little bit of insider inspiration to other people that might see. That might also understand how unique of an upbringing. I've had If don't minutes miss it's all good but I I do. Enjoy talking about My upbringing and part of the reasons why I became who I am today Because you know in in hopes that somebody will just find a little bit of of inspiration in it You're right my dad. Caitlyn Jenner my mom. Linda Thompson My Stepdad was David Foster Music Guy and I I end up a music producer very successful and I ended up actually getting into music rather than athletics. I kind of did both growing up because I was almost always told that with the last name. Jenner. You're supposed to be the best at you. Know right so as a little kid. I always like tried harder because I had some really had something to prove and then But music is what really stole my heart from a young age and took me until going to college until I really realized that. That was what I wanted to do full-time I had a bad knee. Injury ride motocross and so that was kind of like. I didn't really want to spend my life getting beat up like that so I figured there was a lot more longevity. you know. I I think about this when when you go to college and you see people that have been sheltered. Their whole lives have not been exposed drugs and alcohol and not let to stay out late Stephan. They're just a danger to themselves like freshman year. They're just out of control right whereas the kids that kind of grew up a little bit quicker of a little bit of exposure to that yes not as conservative exactly and so I I kinda see like my my upbringing in that way a little bit. Where from a very young age I was exposed to fame and fortune. It was all around me. My parents were well off and were famous and they always had very famous people over very well off people over and I realized very young age that one they were human beings just like the rest of us. You know they don't. They're no healthier. They don't have more time. They can't buy more time than any of us. Have they still Feel sad they still You know bite their tongue in conversations they still feel all these same feelings and the truth is is that a lot of the times the people that had especially the most fame also had the darkest energies around them they just kind of like like it was almost like they were a target even in any social situation it was like they felt a little bit like everybody staring at them and they were a target and and they were a bit more isolated. Because you just can't go out and do the same bed bath and beyond errands and all that stuff is you know a normal person can so there's certain isolation that comes with it so I I realized from a young age that that pursuing those things wasn't GonNa make me any happier So I've most mostly in my life. I focused on things that are going to bring me true. Happiness and the big one for that is friendships. Real friendships family. I have a daughter now and I've twins on the way so being a good dad you know saying good night to your daughter and kissing her on the forehead as she goes to sleep and she runs to you the first thing in the morning. It's like there's nothing better than than those things and so you know I try to be a I try to. I strive to be a good friend a good family member or good dad And then if I can inspire people with what I do with my music which is which has been happening which does happen. It gives me this real sense of purpose. Like what I'm doing in this life is worth it and You know so I I really my life has just been focusing on the things that are GonNa bring me real happiness not the things that that other people that maybe they pursue later in life and they get a little bit of fame and they get a little bit of fortune then they realized late in life. This isn't making me any happier. There was something that was missing all along so I potentially.

Brandon Jenner Bruce Jenner Caitlyn Jenner Linda Thompson Derna producer David Foster Brody Jenner Elvis Presley Whitney Houston Kenny Kardashians Courtney Kim Khloe Rogers Rob Kardashian Brody Stepfather Stephan Kendall Kylie Kardashian brody
Darina Allens food philosophy

Monocle 24: The Menu

11:00 min | 3 years ago

Darina Allens food philosophy

"We start today spoke with Irish chef author and broadcaster Darin Allen who has for over three decades being tempting curious food folk would be shifts from around the world to East Cork. That's where she runs the world famous. Bali mellow cookery school. After twenty or so cookbooks and countless Seles. TV shows Allen has become the face and the voice of a coronary revolution in Ireland. And now she has released yet another cookbook call to one. report feeds or Marcus. Joyce finished meant during Allen to talk about the book but before that they discussed dreariness food philosophy and into why rice cooking and farming practices. Really do matter. Not Enough has changed in that direction because really the message not even subliminal message nowadays is is that the skills that are really important are the academic skills and that the practical skills are of much less importance and this is a big mistake. My goodness sweep Latin now. Two generations at least out of our houses and our schools without equipping them with the basic life skills to feed themselves properly or feeding right into the hands of the multinational food companies. We've handed over complete control over the most important thing in our lives really are food to the supermarkets and it's not their responsibility. Our health is not their responsibility so basically I feel really failing in our duty of care to our children and the next generation by not equipping helping them with the basic practical skills to make a little meal for themselves own. I could really do was actually scrambled eggs or whatever you know With a basic skill. I've had a really interesting life. I now have what I absolutely love. It's actually a privilege to be able to pass on cooking. King skills to the next generation could be teaching algebra geometry or something and of course it's hugely important but you can't flip and Matt's Book and the Look on somebody's face when you teach them how to make a loaf of bread or a super it actually touches their lives at something they're going to use every day so I feel fortunate that I've found something that I totally love doing and feel like jumping out of bed still every day at seventy one years of age. Don't jump on quite desert fossil. Awesome US two years ago but still if we flash forward I mean people wouldn't have to look far to see the success. All of the amazing graduates have come through the school. All of the things that you've you've taught them not to mention as you said your TV shows your books sold in the hundreds of thousands of copies. But I had the good fortune two years ago. I believe to come to Bali demanded to a story for Monocle magazine. And you told me something curious. I'd like to ask you about the first recipe. Teach students is a recipe for soil. And in your clothes. It's actually the recipe. I give them as how to make compost scams where you're very very close. So basically the school operates a whole year round but we do three-month dream on certificate courses on the first day. The first one the first thing I do is I introduce them to the gardeners in the far manager. And maybe I'll have a bunch of carrots or something and I say to them. Look at these lovely carrots. It took I lean three months to grow these carrots three months and don't you dare boilers them. And you get them into the kitchen and then we go out into the fruit garden and Eileen will have a wheelbarrow full of soil there. Actually its humus in fact and they stand around me and a big semicircle in a wondering doing what's coming down the line the feeling a little awkward and I just run my hands to the soil and I say to them remember. This is where it all starts in the good earth in the soil and and looking at me and thinking. Oh my God do myself say. They've visited brochure. thinking some aged hippie on a mission or something but I have to shock them out of thinking that food is just something that comes wrapped in plastic offer supermarket shelf. I need them to think about how it's produced where it comes. I think about the feed for the animals. The breed the the variety such a such a toll. The better if I can find futile worms in this wheelbarrow full of soil. But then it's even more interesting for me. I think because wash is in that wheelbarrow has come from the compost heap and it's now at the final stages of compost which is called Humus when life comes back into it and actually has been made from the scraps from the morning's cooking that have gone onto the compost. It's broken down and in life has come back into it and that is what we feed the soil with. I mean if I come back another time I want to be a soil scientist. 'cause the so much going on because our health everything comes in the soil bill but then one of the many wonderful quote some lady eve how far and say to them remember the health of the soil. The health of the plant health at the animal and the health of the human are all one and indivisible so we're totally dependent on that four or five inches of soil around the world for our very existence. Farmers are really worried about the diminishing fragility of the soil. Because we've racked the soil by very intensive monoculture over the years and we can't go on with businesses usual. We simply have to go back and I mean as a farmer I feel a strong responsibility that whatever I grow you and we have we sell a little of our excess produce Mardell farm shop on the farm farmers markets and. I just feel strong responsibility that I can look somebody straight in the. I know that that food is going to nourish them rather than make them ill. which is what's happening with lots of food nowadays and during the you've been proved right over time I mean these are opinions slowly working their way into the mass media their opinions that people are slowly beginning to agree with? You have held this idea for a long time. How hard is it meant to convince people to even get to this point into the debate where people countenanced the health of the soil? There's a lot of chat about the fertility of the soil. Now because I think people really beginning and not just beginning but realized the connection connection between fertile soil and good health also. There's been enormous amount of work done on the link between the health of our gut bio and both are mental and physical health. And that's when you think of it. It's like so obvious at the school where very lucky we have a little dairy herds so we also have role milk for people if they want to drinker but we notice this is sort of anecdotal. Because I've watched this over thirty years the difference in people's energy level and they're scared and so on when they're with us for three months but now this is all scientifically proven and also the other interesting thing that's happening actually is for the last five six seven courses this is. We've had at least one doctor. Sometimes to an on this course of the moment we have three doctors on the twelve week certificate cooking course these doctors who come they all come for the same reason they tell me that basically they feel because medical training. There's no training in nutrition even still although a lot of the young doctors. There's a now demanding that they're given the proper information so they can answer their patients queries properly and so many of the patients presenting hunting with conditions. That can be at least hot. An often cured by a change of Diet for one of the problems is. Where'd you get this nutrient dense food? I mean a lot. The people don't have time to buy directly from farmers but there are other ways of excel tarnish of routes to market retell routes to market developing over here. You have formed drop and we we have neighbor food and onto you can buy on nine. And then the farmers get eighty percent of the price which is fantastic has so many farmers not being paid enough any longer to produce nourishing wholesome food which is a real problem. And that's as opposed to us was between twenty five and thirty percent of the retail price. If it's going through a supermarket so that's important portent and also I'm encouraging people to try to grow something themselves again and as you mentioned you're concerned about the quality of food that people have access has to and maybe also sometimes I guess the quality of food that people were reached for when they could reach for something else which are believed to be some of the inspiration behind rather fetching new book work in front of me number. Nineteen number nine teams needs another during having good but I I think this one says one feeds all one hundred it new recipes. Tell us about the inspiration for after you've done. Eighteen books hackles up. The ALITA writes her. Another one. Why it took me to write this book? Actually because it's been bubbling away in my subconscious for years. Because we've been I suppose is about five or six years. Now we've been doing a course called one wonders it's a bit of a cheesy name for recourse but it's almost full and of course one can see year after year that everybody's becoming more and more frenetically busy and sort of for an fact have dedicated this book to all the heroic young couples who are trying to keep all the balls in the air and that's for many people. The reality now is so dashing home from work in the UK. Okay here in Ireland to terrible traffic off the time dashing into the supermarkets picking up the kids in the crash trying to get a few ingredients and then coming home exhausted and and really wanting to be able to cook a big part of something or make something that you know will nourish the family and we'll be delicious and wholesome and good and comforting after that long day and it's just time it's almost impossible to keep all the balls in the air and so. I hope that this book will provide a little bit of the solution for so many of the busy people to the title says Israeli. Because it's one part feeds also one pass one low sinton baking tray or one trae Bake I. I hate that word trade bait but there's so many good things loved it desserts. You can do it as well so this book was written for that reason and it's getting a fantastic response. Actually I think it's really touching a nerve with a lot of people in so many people say that's exactly what I wanted. It's exactly what I've been waiting for so I. I'm quite proud of it in many ways because I kept putting the recipes and saying I think left without an they'd love that they'd love letter left out and actually does apart from of course fishing means on there's also lots of vegetarian -tarian dishes and lots of accidentally Vegan things to and during last question for you but number nineteen thirty six years of running the cookery school. What was the one talk tip that you've learned over that time? It can be a technique for boiling an egg could be owning a mandolin. Was the one bit of advice I can ask you. That you think is made life a little bit easier in otherwise hectic schedule. Oh my goodness I think. Sit Down after your days work. Sit Down and enjoy. Enjoy something at the kitchen table. Whether it's just a simple boiled egg little scrambled eggs or nomination it loss of wine but sit down and enjoy us and let the cares on the worries of the days. Slip away as you enjoy a little special moment at the kitchen table during their and her new book one pot feeds all all is out now

Darin Allen Ireland Seles Marcus United States East Cork Joyce Mardell Bali Monocle Magazine Scientist Eileen King UK Matt
BBC says podcast listening will quadruple by 2021

podnews

03:06 min | 3 years ago

BBC says podcast listening will quadruple by 2021

"Podcast listening will quadruple up to thirteen point six percent of all audio listening. That's according to the BBC's head of research for radio and education. Anderson winter radio days Europe today in lasagna, she highlighted how the BBC sounds app chooses mandatory signing offers better data analytics for the broadcaster and allows better recommendations, meanwhile, Ben Chapman, head of digital for BBC audio and music says that we hope that in the coming months. BBC sounds will be an international proposition referring to the app the sense of connection and ownership is far more on a podcast, then on broadcast, TV or radio. That's according to Chris Mason of the BBC's Brexit cast speaking at radio days Europe today via video adding that the podcast generates significant amounts of contact fire social media the puck. The podcast is now films for BBC television. Dino, saw fos the podcast producer also shared that. They have had over four million downloads for the podcast one hundred episodes polish men and Emily Boutin from WNYC studios. Also spoke this morning radio. Does Europe highlighting how they use audio to build community and focusing on listener episodes, which do better than well known names every show. They said is created with listener interaction in mind and iheart radio. President Darin Davis is also been speaking of radio days Europe. He said that the iheartradio at which includes podcasts has been downloaded two point one billion times. And it has one hundred twenty seven million registered users, be everywhere. The consumers are he says with the services and the products they expect Davies also said that podcasting was in new audience development tool for talk radio reaching younger audiences in other news in the US little. Snippet of interesting years from the latest Nielsen data more people listen to podcasting per week than listen to Sirius XM the figures are from quarter three two thousand eighteen and there's been more growth since what causing in Puerto Rico is at a turning point. That's according to a Dante media in a post with data from the country. The CBC reports on a new way of making your own podcast borough. The equipments from your local library a podcast platform for aerobics speakers pod, you has one funding at the university of Chicago. And is everyone happy that Google podcast is now transcribing podcasts. Some people have doubts in our podcast section today. We highlight run pods new podcast from global aimed at people new to running and seasoned marathoners alike. Bomber released episode three last Friday, it support costs focusing on the two thousand eighteen Austin serial bomber and attracting a large amount of media attention. And our friends at palled sites. Also pointers to the weekly skip. It's a podcast of hosts from it's a podcast off hosts from thousands of shows reading just brand names. We like the quip and his and that's

BBC Europe President Darin Davis Head Of Research Emily Boutin Ben Chapman Anderson Wnyc Studios Nielsen CBC University Of Chicago Dino Chris Mason United States Google Austin Davies Puerto Rico
Purpose and a Paycheck: Finding Meaning, Money, and Happiness

Radio Night Live with Kevin McCullough

05:16 min | 3 years ago

Purpose and a Paycheck: Finding Meaning, Money, and Happiness

"Our first guest today. I just love his book, it's called purpose and a paycheck. Who doesn't want to have purpose in life who and get paid for it? There's a great song that the late. Bobby Darin used to sing at the end of his shows, and it was. To even think I get paid for. This is just it's just a brilliant song. It's true. We all want to be compensated. But we also want to have a purpose in life. And that's what Chris Farrell has done in his new book finding meaning money and happiness, but wait. In the second half of life brilliantly done. Chris welcome to the program. Thank you very much. And thank you for having me. So roughly ten thousand ten thousand of us baby boomers will celebrate their sixty fifth birthday every single day from now until twenty thirty. That's right. Amazing, especially as ING thing number. Yeah. It really is. So I love this book. I love it on a good day. But I love it. That is designed for us. As we get older. So so share a little bit about the research in the work that you've compiled in the book purpose in a paycheck. So the motivation behind this book in I'm sure you've run across this. They're all kinds of stereotypes about people as they get older. And you, you know, they're stuck in their ways. They don't wanna lose. Learn new technologies. They're they're not created. They're not productive. And underlying this conversation is sort of fundamental beliefs. Add as with the aging of the population. We're just gonna have to few young people supporting too, many dependent elderlies always in this terrible. And the thing is there is so much research. The people just take a moment to think about it. That people in their sixties are often more creative than they were in their twenties and thirties in their seventies or more creative than they were in their productive. They're healthier. They're better educated. Then before they don't want to learn new technologies. I don't know about you. But my first office job I used to be merchant seamen that was my first job. But my first office job, I had an IBM selectric typewriter. And what was so exciting was that if you tight one line and made a mistake and hit enter you could backtrack any ratio line. Now think about it. We started with that you go to processing you go to PC's, you go to smart, tablets smartphones, tablets, the whole thing. People have learned technology throughout their lives. And so I did research looking into what is really going on here. And this story is. Aging population is our most under appreciated asset. Amen. It's true though, because the brain works differently as we get older, and let's let's face it. There is absolutely. A lot to be said for experience experiential learning is so powerful. And there's this expression connect the dots. That's with experience. You're you're drawing on shards of memory and shards of knowledge and your skill to solve a problem. And that's what so many people want people to be doing in their organization. So if if an Asian population and aging workforce is going to be creative. It's going to be innovative. Then what we want to be doing is rather than thinking about how to push these people out of organizations and use the word retire, which the French derivation of that word is to be socialist to be isolated. We want to retain these people we wanted and we want to in the best sense of this word if you're a manager you want to exploit them. I love it. I love it, you, you know, you, and I both know how many Uber drivers lift drivers. Seriously. You see that are doing this as a side gig. And what is really interesting about this in with the Uber driver the gig work. You know, if you're young and you're starting a family, boy, there's some real issues there about health insurance about retirement savings, all kinds of things. But if you're on Medicare and social security in your supplementing, your income in your off being an Uber driver. It's flexible, I was interviewed the super drivers seventy three years old and she's in the book and she'd been an entrepreneur life, and then she worked at a senior center for a while but had a regular schedule and she didn't want the regular schedule. So what she does gets up in the morning walks through dog to watch a little TV. Then goes, what am I doing watching TV? So she turns on her smartphone. And then she works. She doesn't work at night. And she doesn't work the weekends and you go. This is incredible. And the money pays for her to be with her daughter for a month in Arizona, and then three of her friends they go to Europe for two or three weeks. Yeah. I love it. I love it.

Chris Farrell Bobby Darin IBM Europe Arizona Medicare Seventy Three Years Sixty Fifth Three Weeks
Podcast company one of world's most innovative businesses

podnews

02:22 min | 3 years ago

Podcast company one of world's most innovative businesses

"Winter podcast up fronts and opportunity for podcast creators to pitch to ad agencies. Was yesterday in Beverly Hills, California in the US willing to want digital learnt at the event in our show notes and in our newsletter, including some very colorful descriptions of shirtless. Comedian also at the event wonder released their two thousand nine thousand nine hundred eight of programming the company has new partnerships with the LA times Bloomberg and a new documentary from Ramsey insight Star Wars, the company has also just launched one plus one about the world's greatest collaborations. Also, the winter podcast up fronts. Iheart radio announced a new slate of true crime podcasts starting the season. Three of disgrace land, the season three premiere will be played out on iheart media broadcast radio stations the day before release WNYC's new slate includes a suite of podcasts featuring stand up and storytelling from emerging and established comedians. They also preview and new podcast from God. Missed the hyper local websites that WNYC purchased a year ago in other news Marvel's wolverine. The loss trail has a release date. It'll be exclusively available on Stitcher premium for March the twenty fifth that will cost you four dollars ninety nine a month. White what the podcast creator and quotes media invention company and as this morning that it has raised four million dollars in funding. The company was founded by former Ted executives June Cohen, and Darin trip and is responsible for the webby award winning masters of scale. So now have released a new WordPress podcast theme called cast oppress Google podcast has mysteriously and quite annoyingly disappeared from Android auto reported number of annoyed retinas and me speaker has added trimming functionality to its IRS app. The New York Times has promoted THEO bowel, come to executive producer of the daily news. Congratulations as well to cadence thirteen who've been recognized by fast company. As one of the world's most innovative. They share the accolade with twitch Domino's and Mozilla we highlight three podcasts in our newsletter in our show notes, including bawdy storytelling, celebrating twelve years a stage show this week. The two year old podcast has just hit a million downloads. It's allies storytelling podcast much like the math, but covering rather different subject matter,

Wnyc Beverly Hills Twitch Domino La Times United States California The New York Times June Cohen Bloomberg Google Ramsey Executive Producer TED IRS Darin Four Million Dollars Four Dollars Twelve Years Twenty Fifth
Starbucks stores to close Tuesday for anti-bias training

Brian Copeland

02:17 min | 4 years ago

Starbucks stores to close Tuesday for anti-bias training

"Your usual caffeine routine could be interrupted no more than eight thousand starbucks cafes nationwide will be conducting antibias training tomorrow it's for good reason the coffee chain's leaders reached out to biased training experts after the arrest of two african american men out of philadelphia starbucks late last month i'm kevin mcallister back to the best of chip franklin on o eight ten so we're we're talking about heroin the city and some of the problems with trying to deal with all these needles and i took some photographs i'm going to put them on facebook i found like thirty six needles in a block right nearby where we work here and i know and we're not anywhere near the tenderloin i can only imagine what some of those streets are like over there and what that means to a city we have a problem and here's the problem like the mark farrell who the mayor current mayor suggests that we go out and service them and bring the drugs to them and not heroin but a drug that would make them feel high but not on heroin i i don't know man i just you know i know it's hard i know you're an addict there's a genetic part of this you know darin cabin okay is with us here one eight hundred no cuffs darren you've been of course you deal with a different drug most of the time which is alcohol which is the biggest killer by the way kills more people in the united states each year than heroin cocaine and meth combined although when you start getting into this opioid crisis you start to see some numbers that eclipse that eclipse those but yes i i do deal a lot with alcohol related cases and clearly that's that's caused some issues my home in san diego was i was about six blocks from high school and the and the homes around the high score getting broken into by teenagers looking for oxy and then you know smash ups norton adderall and all this stuff and you know i even though adderall is not in the same ballpark it's not addictive but nonetheless it seems like we don't really have a plan here and by the way when you're talking about people breaking into houses to try and get painkillers i see quite a bit of this where a you're someone get started on an opioid for either legitimate medical reasons or for illegitimate reasons.

Starbucks Kevin Mcallister Heroin Mark Farrell United States Cocaine San Diego OXY Adderall Painkillers Caffeine Philadelphia Darin Darren