35 Burst results for "Dara"

"dara" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

03:30 min | Last month

"dara" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"The poker community that were really fucked up and had to make a really horrible image in the Booker community and I mostly recognized that that would be like minus TV for dart to be associated with. Nobody's going to be negative EV being associated with you. For the record. I just hope you know that. Sure, though. In the past, for sure. I can't imagine a world where Dara would believe that. Well, I made it clear that it was important to me, yeah. So moving forward, you met Dara Dara very kind, helped you out, empathetic. You guys became friends. And he became a mentor to you. And from there, I'm guessing you went to Vegas and then from that relationship, is that where you kind of found backing or what happened in the interim there that led to backing. Yeah, well, Dara helped me, I mean, Dara still has some of my action and he helps me also find other people to find my action additionally. Cool. Yeah. I think it was really helpful for me to feel like I was valued in a way that wasn't sexually, which is like the way that I always the only way that I thought I could be valuable to people in the past and it was really, it's been really upsetting to me to lose in poker because I feel like I'm proving to people that I'm not capable of well this is a marathon and not a sprint and as long as you're trying your best to regularly progress and do the best that you can so that you're in a position to be a winning and profitable poker player moving into the future. That's the thing that you can control and not the day to day wild swings that this lifestyle brings. Yeah, so from there, how did you start getting on all the streams? How did that come about? Yeah, I just got really lucky that despite my reputation and poker, I got the opportunity to play on could we address the reputation, I guess, for a moment. Yeah. I did things that were very destructive toward others. And.

Dara Dara Dara Vegas
"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:53 min | 5 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Systemic racism is pervasive and it is destructive and it also exists even in countries that might be predominantly black. Because of outside social and media influences, exactly. And historical contexts, right? Nature became independent in 1960. It's not that long ago. You after you graduated, you went to take a job at Goldman Sachs and so you had this incredibly rich experience at Harvard and you I guess you took a job in finance. And there's nothing wrong with that. Lots of people do that. It's a really secure path, right? I'm sure you were particularly attracted to the idea of maybe financial security after all the sacrifices that were made to get you to the U.S.. Is that why you chose to pursue path of finance? Absolutely. And it was an accidental path, you know? It was almost like I saw that that was what, you know, the kids of parents who were in this country and successful. All those kids were going into finance and so that was like, okay, this is like the thing to do, you know? And it was again seeking stability and sort of trying to find a place where I can start to pay forward, you know, and really seeking that and again, if I go back to my history, my background is, hey, if you I might not be the smartest person in the room, but I'm going to work really hard and I'm going to make sure that I'm adding value. And so I felt more confident in my ability to be successful in that environment. I read a story about your time there when you record sex. And there was an executive there who said, hey, you know, Dara, you know, you're pretty good at investment banking, but you're actually really great at marketing. And initially, when you heard that you were taken aback, you were actually you were actually hurt by that. Yeah. Yeah, it's so funny. I doubt this person will ever even remember this conversation. It's amazing to impact people can have in your life, right? Just like a comment. But I was an intern actually at the time, and I was going through this rotational program. And at the end, you would kind of rank what you wanted to do and you would be assigned to. And I was gunning for investment banking, right? That was where you got the big bonus. That was where the most prestigious that was kind of what you did. And I remember this executive who was sort of observing the program and getting to know those of us who are in it. And he said that to me, he was like, you know, I feel like marketing is where you really shine. And I was like, what is this man talking about? This is an investment bank. Nobody comes in investment bank to be a marketer, you know? And the CEO of this bank is not a marketer. They're a former banker. And so I had this very narrow perspective, right? And I got home and I called my mom and I was like, can you imagine what this man said to me? And she paused a little bit. And she said, well, Dara, I mean, as you've been telling me about your experience, it sounds like marketing the marketing team there was actually what you really enjoyed. You know, it sounds like you were really killing yourself in this other area, but you were kind of doing it, but you certainly weren't the best there, but it sounds like in marketing you were shining and you were and I was like, oh, you know, and I reflected on it. And I kind of made the decision. You know what, I'm going to be in marketing. And I think I realized something about myself, which is I love the creative side of marketing. You know, the storytelling. I start from a data insights driven perspective. How do we create something that connects when we put out creative in the world that people resonate with? It's like the best feeling for me. When a campaign is successful, I love it. I love storytelling. I'm an amateur singer and songwriter, like in my Bristol fun life. So the idea to work in a space that's creative. But guess what marketing? There's also the science of it. There's a very quantitative side of it in the fact that you can kind of measure your results. And I think I'm happy when I'm in a world where I'm being ambidextrous. I'm flexing the very data driven side of myself, but I'm also able to focus on the creative strategic storytelling aspect as well. On your journey to peloton, there were a few stops along the way, including an MBA at Stanford. And while you were there from what I understand, you really kind of caught the startup bug. I did. I did. It was actually funny because I was I was doing marketing consulting, you know, which was great, because being an MBA costs a lot of money. So anything you could do to Stanford is such an entrepreneurial school, they had these amazing programs that even as an international student, you could get some real hands on experience, building something and you could get course credit for it. And you could do it in a way that the university really supported you, which I greatly valued. It was one of the reasons I was so thrilled when I got the opportunity to go to Stanford. And so I was doing that. And I still thought, you know what, I'm going to build a tech company, right? Because that's what all you know. That's been many of the sort of Stanford MBAs where they can write everybody was like, well, you gonna work on my startup, or am I gonna work on your startup, you know? And so I definitely caught the bug and you know I was really trying to move forward an idea of a digital closet. So I don't know if you ever watch clueless or remember that movie, but you share is in her room on her computer getting her outfit. I was like, why don't we have that? I wouldn't make that. That would be so easy. It's so great. We should make that happen. And so for a while, I tried that. That kind of new closet entrepreneurial idea. And it was it was interesting because I remember I got married actually in my second year of business school to my phenomenal husband who is just my rock and super supportive. And he I remember when I graduated and I was working on my startup and I had, you know, I didn't really have fundraise. I was like trying to get ready for my seat round and all of these things and he kind of sat me down. And he said to me, he said, I've been observing you and I feel like what you enjoy most about this is managing the people. This is a push like pitching investors and actually trying to build this incredible futuristic closet. Yes. And I was like, huh? What are you talking about? I'm trying to build this epic share Horowitz, like, closet. You know, like make cool has happened right now. I don't know what you're talking about. But again, I think one of the things I've learned about myself is actually sometimes when I hear negative feedback, I but then I sit with it and I think on it 'cause I want to be better at the heart of it that's like my it's like my thing. I'm a learner. And I want to grow. I love the idea of self improvement. It's so core to who I am. And so I reflected on it and I thought about it. And I said, wow, you know, he's right. What I enjoy most about this is managing my team, I'm building a team at the marketing side of it. You know, I was like, I'm feeling actually a little bit uncomfortable about raising money and some of these other things, you.

Dara Stanford Goldman Sachs Harvard U.S. Bristol Horowitz
"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:42 min | 5 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"You primarily speak English at home? I did primarily speak I spoke English and Europe. So in Nigeria, there are many, many tribes. And I'm part of the Yoruba tribe where fun tribe as we like to think of ourselves. I would like to eat and enjoy life and celebrate. And yeah, so we spoke English and then Yoruba because I was very interested in making sure that I retained that part of my heritage. And in terms, how would you describe yourself as a as a student at school did school come fairly easy for you? School did not actually come very easy for me at the beginning, but you know, God bless my wonderful Nigerian mother. She pulled me aside and she said to me one day, 'cause my sister was very what we called naturally gifted, you know? She was very naturally brilliant. She didn't have to work very hard to excel. I, on the other hand, had to work very hard. My mom pulled me aside, and she said, Dara, you know what? The reality is you're gonna probably, if you wanna be a top of your class, like your sister is you're gonna have to work probably twice, maybe even three times as hard as she is working. But if you do that, you will excel. And so since then, I just have always had this work ethic, right? I will outwork, I will give myself to this. I will, I was very focused on achievement. At a certain point, when you were a young woman, you went to the UK to go to boarding school for high school. How did that come about? Tell me the story about how that happened. So my mother, you know, it was kind of looking and thinking about higher education. And my father had actually, he went to do his masters. He had gone to imperial college in London. And then if you remember kind of what I said about Nigeria being a former British colony, you know, there was a lot of the idea of going to England for higher education was very much something that had started actually in colonial times and continued even till this day. And so my parents were wanting to provide the best education for their children, right? Just like people might move neighborhoods to a buy a different house to try to get into the better school. My parents were looking at us going to England. And so I actually took a scholarship exam. To go to this boarding school. And I got in, but I didn't get the scholarship. And so I was quite distraught, you know, because I knew my parents wanted me to go to the school and it was going to be a great school and a great experience. But financially was really challenging and even thinking about it right now is just like making me feel so emotional, but my grandfather actually emptied his bank account so that I could have that opportunity so my family and my community so many people rallied around my parents to support them. It was a very difficult time for my parents financially. 'cause my mom I told you it was entrepreneurial and as you know in the entrepreneurial journey, there are times when it's very challenging and it was one of those seasons and you know I think that without the support of family and community, I definitely would not be where I am today because if not for that generosity of people being willing to sacrifice so that I could be here. So I think very much I stand on the shoulders of giants. I am a product of my family and the people who made sacrifices and invested in me and believed in me and supported me and gave me opportunities. To be where I am. So you, I guess, at the age of 14 or 15, had to to the UK. Yeah, I was just turning 16. To school called the cheltenham ladies college, which is a very prestigious boarding school, but it's like in a rural part of the UK. I mean, it's sort of far away from anywhere any major city. What was your impression when you got there? It was hard because you remember I left Nigeria and I went straight to this boarding school. And there were literally I think three black girls in my class which was several hundred people and I felt it was a shock. It was a culture shock. And I remember every night I would cry and cry and cry. And you know, my mother was very understanding, but I think maybe 6 or 7. She literally was like, if it's so bad you can come back to Nigeria. And you know, and I think in that moment I realized, hey, I gotta make the most of it. And that was when I kind of changed my mindset to how can I impact this place? And I kind of helped to revive a gospel choir. I love to sing. It's like my hobby. I'm an amateur singer. And so I led the choir. I led the gospel choir and I found so much joy in that singing and I joined the athletics team. I'm a runner. And so I did that as well. And I obviously threw myself into my academics. And that was actually when I realized I wanted to go to the U.S. because there was something very different about the UK that I felt was in the U.S. in the United States. The concept around the American Dream and the idea that it doesn't really matter who you are. You can accomplish something. And of course, America has a lot of issues to deal with including systemic racism, which exists everywhere, including the UK and it's not mutually exclusive. That is true. And America still welcomes people, right? Someone like Barack Obama could be president in this country. Something about the American Dream stood out to me in the sense of. This country is a place as imperfect as it is. There's beauty in it. And there's a desire to be better. It's uniquely I was very attracted to that. That desire for self improvement. We're going to continue to evolve. We're going to continue to grow. It very much resonated with me. I didn't even know the term growth mindset at the time. But I very much felt that that was present in the United States. And so I wanted to come to the United States for college. And I told my parents, I wanted to go to America and they were, of course, absolutely not. It's too far away. Never come back. When we come back in just a moment, how Dara's experiences as a student in the U.S. change the way she thought about the world and about herself. Stay with us, I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message is brought to you by NPR sponsor, Airbnb. If you've ever thought about hosting, you might have a few questions. What's it like? Where do I store my stuff? Is hosting worth it? Now, with ask a super host, you can get free one on one help from Airbnb's most experienced hosts. Whether you're curious how to get started or just wondering if it's right for you. You can now ask someone who's already hosting. Learn more at Airbnb dot.

Nigeria UK Dara U.S. cheltenham ladies college England Europe London giants athletics Barack Obama Airbnb NPR
"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:09 min | 5 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Was one of the biggest business stories during the pandemic. As Jim's closed across the U.S., there was a huge demand for home exercise equipment, and peloton was perhaps the biggest beneficiary of that surge. Part of the reason is obvious the company makes good products, but the other part is its branding and image. Peloton instructors have become celebrities in their own right. Each with their own falling. And one of the key leaders in that branding effort is Dara Treacher. She was recruited to join peloton in the summer of 2020. After running marketing at GE ventures and earlier working at Apple. Her journey into marketing came by way of what she might jokingly call a failed career in finance. Today, she sits on several boards and is widely thought of as one of the most influential marketing leaders of her generation. Her journey to the C suite and even to the United States was neither planned nor certain. Dara grew up in the city of ibadan in the southwest of Nigeria. She managed to earn a place at a prestigious boarding school in England and eventually to college in the U.S.. And from the start, Dara's family played a huge role in shaping the person she would become. My father is a physicist and a pastor, which is a very interesting combination because he's a man of science and a man of faith. And my mother is a businesswoman. She kind of started out as an educator and went on. She's very entrepreneurial to start a bunch of different local businesses. So my parents are, I think, one of the things I learned from my parents, they greatly valued education. You know, they didn't have a lot, but they were so committed to making sure that their kids had the very best. I remember there was a time growing up where some kids would make fun of my mom because she literally, they would be like, if you dropped her dress in the middle of the street, they would bring it to your house. 'cause she wears the same dress all the time. But she was, you know, taking working really hard, putting all the investment into the education of her four children into trying to make her business as successful and I learned so much from both of them about ambition and contentment and hard work. And really trying to create something out of nothing. I'm so interested in the idea that your dad was a man of science and a man of the cloth at the same time. Because sometimes those two things can collide physics and faith. And I think that's just so interesting that he was he did both. Yeah, it's so funny because to me, I see them as very complimentary, right? Because growing up, it was a deep belief in science actually strengthened his faith and vice versa. And so to me, I always saw them as not things. They're not mutually exclusive. They're not in opposition to each other, but they're actually complimentary. And I think it's from it's from my upbringing, right? Because it's pretty rare. I think to have he's certainly the only physicist pastor that I've spent a lot of time around. And so I very much feel like that. That was also very grounding. 'cause I think one of the things that it taught me is that I can be very open minded about things. I can explore I can ask questions I can be curious. And I can keep searching. I can dig deeper rather than just accept a surface level discussion or surface level to be. How would you describe yourself as a child? Were you focused or you well behaved for you a good student or you all those things where you rebellious? You know, in my town and the people who knew me my family and community, people used to describe me as what they called forward. Which was I'm not sure how much that concept translates here, but it was I always was eager and wanted to do more and be more and had very big dreams. And my mother was actually very encouraging because many times people would just be like, oh my God, darra, she's just getting your head out of the clouds and back on the earth. And my mother actually encouraged me. She was always like continue to dream big. But she was also ground me insane. You know, she said to me all the time, ambition with contentment. So be ambitious, but make sure it's rooted in contentment. Don't seek just, you know, glory, but seek impact. And those have been things that have really, really shaped me. And so as a child, you know, I was curious about the world around me and growing up as a black girl. You know, many times the people that would be celebrated on international TV or the things that I saw around the world, it just wasn't a lot of black women. And so I remember when I first learned about the concept of the Fortune 500 and was trying to figure out where the people that looked like me were and at the time, the only one I could find was Ursula burns. And it hit me. You know, and I always thought about, wow, wouldn't it be better if we had more representation and how inspiring that would be for girls like me? And so that desire to impact the world has always been something that I've had even from when I was a child. In terms of global culture and its impact on culture in Nigeria, particularly where you were, did most of it come from the United States or from Europe or from other parts of Africa? Most of it came from the United States when I was growing up. At least most of what I was exposed to. Also from the UK because Nigeria is a former colony, a former British colony. So there was a lot of influence from the UK and the U.S.. Those were the predominant western forces at play. Also, you know, we were impacted by obviously our neighboring countries in West Africa like Senegal and Ghana and Ivory Coast. And we also drew on things from South Africa as well. But when I was growing up, there was actually appetite was going on in South Africa and I very much remember a lot of the conversations that would be hard around the dinner table about what was going on and the need for it to end and also kind of hearing from my parents and my grandparents about what it was like to be in a colonized country. And it was very interesting because you could see how colonization had really impacted people and people had different perspectives, but I think that was another force that was definitely very present. It was like we definitely thought of ourselves as members of the former British colony. And that was something that was a part of the experience. Did.

Dara Treacher GE ventures Dara United States southwest of ibadan Nigeria darra Jim Apple England Ursula burns UK South Africa Ivory Coast West Africa Senegal Africa Europe Ghana
"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

01:32 min | 7 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"And so I think that actually some of the things that I love about myself as a leader are things that I learned. That star a treasure, SVP head of global marketing and communications at peloton. Since Dara joined the company, it's launched several major campaigns, including one with the artist whose songs are the most requested in peloton classes. Beyoncé. It's a partnership that's gifting digital memberships to students at historically black colleges and universities. And Dara got to announce it just three months into the new job..

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:51 min | 7 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Just use the old playbook. You can't just do things the way you've always done them. And that will require you to dig deeper. That will require you to ask some hard questions of yourself and your team. I know I ask myself those questions. And so I think that the future of marketing is going to be created by people who are willing to be curious about the emerging customer and who are willing to invest in marketing that reaches that customer and in marketing that that customer truly connects with. So I think it's got to be it can't be a surface level commitment. It's got to be a deep commitment. And guess what, it's gotta be sustained. Yeah. You know, so many times, oh yeah, this sounds great. I wanna do this and it's like, this is really hard. This is ugly. This is bringing up things I don't want to talk about. I'm just going to move on. No. It's got to be real and it's got to be sustained. And then the second thing that I would say is, I think you need to celebrate what's real about the people that you serve. And so many times we're tempted as marketers to try to create something that's like an alternate reality or what I like to call a marketing fantasy. And we need to ground ourselves in reality. Because nobody wants to be pandered to. But I think that by keeping authenticity at the heart of what you do, you're not going to get it right a 100% of the time. But it's going to make a big difference. Yeah. And what you present feels culturally connected, I guess, right? The playbook in the past was, if you want to target LatinX communities, you advertise in Spanish, which is not doesn't make sense anymore because the vast majority of second third generation of LatinX Americans are English speak primarily speak English. But there's still a cultural connection. So do you see the future of marketing and advertising? I mean, presumably it's going to look very, very different to the way it looks today. Like even in 5 or ten years from now, do you imagine that brands will have sort of multiple or maybe even beyond multiple advertising strategies where they are micro targeting different consumers in different ways? Absolutely. I actually think I have a theory. And I guess we can talk in 5 to ten years and see if it's real. But my theory is that the future of marketing is precision marketing. Which is exactly what you said. It is you are being very precise about who you're marketing to, you're catering to their need, you're speaking to them in a way that they can hear you. Because guess what? It's not about what you say. It's about what people hear. And I think a more precise targeted approach is going to be important. And then the thing that that's going to be complemented with is you're going to tell them who you are. So you're going to have this combination of precision marketing. That's really focused on being starting conversations, not being an interruption in your day. But bringing you something that's insightful that you want to engage in that you're interested in your combining and pairing that with a broader brand message that is telling people this is who I am. So it opens the door and it creates the space so that when that precision message gets in, I'm ready. I'm ready to hear you. And I think that partnership is going to be really key for the future of marketing. What is the most exciting thing to you about where marketing is headed right now? I'm most excited. About the intersection between technology and storytelling and data. And the reason for this is because we have become there's certain things that you just can't measure. And then there's certain things that you have to measure. And I think that marketing is going to have to evolve where we understand the mix of that. When we understand where we really allow creativity to shine and we have a creative first strategy and then other moments where we have a different strategy, a data first strategy. And you have to have both. You have to build both muscles, you have to have both skill sets within your team and you have to lead with both. And I think that that's what I'm most excited about, because I think that it makes sometimes it feels uncomfortable, right? Because there's a little bit of the unknown. But I think it's in that unknown that the beauty and the magic happens. I'm curious because you are a leader and certainly you lead a team and a growing team and people now, because of your growing visibility, you look to use a leader. Do you think that you were born to lead or do you think that you learned how to do it that you're not a natural leader, but you learned how to become a leader? I consider myself a servant actually. I very much believe in servant leadership. I think that my job is to serve the people around me and to make their life easier and to create an environment where they can thrive. And I think that that I learned, you know, because I think that my instincts, I want to make an impact. I want to drive change. And what I started to see as I rose in my career was the best way to drive change is not to try to go alone. It's to do it with others. And you're going to be most successful when the best people want to be on your team. I want to work with you. I want to do things with you. And so for me, I changed my whole philosophy in my whole mindset and how I show up as a leader. I did one of those interview on things, you know? And I came up with a competitive achiever. You know, I want to win. I want to achieve. That's my go to. And I've learned the importance of doing of starting from a place of service of putting others first of trying to create an environment where others can succeed. And I find that then we all rise together. It's not either or it's both end..

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:55 min | 7 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Classes, not just not just cycling classes, right? But all sort of boot camps, right? So a full body workout. You're gonna have access to yoga. You're gonna have access to meditation. You're gonna have access to strength training. Sleep sleep exercises that you can take to help your mind and your body bar stretching. It's phenomenal value. And I'm not just saying this because I'm the peloton. Peloton is the best value in fitness period. It really is. And I wouldn't say it if I didn't believe it. And I believe it because the data backs it up for $49 a month. Then if you think about what we've also done with our digital offering, where we give you access to our content without equipment, and that is for 1299. That's like less than a couple of cups of coffee in a week at Starbucks. So I think that the we really worked to address the affordability. To your point, not everybody will get a bike. But many, many more people can afford one than they might admit because it is $49 a month. If you had to weigh that, that's like a manicure and a pedicure. I think that there's so many things within our lives that we can ask ourselves, would I make that investment in my physical health and mental health? And then we're looking at the opportunity costs. Before you join peloton, there was and there's always going to be I should clarify this and say that with any brand or any company, including what I do, there's going to be both praise and criticism. It just comes with the territory. But I actually went really thoughtful piece by a man named David coffin. He writes about his experience with peloton, David is a black man, and he writes that I love my peloton, but I feel like that this brand has an unrecognized race problem. He goes into talking about things like the playlists and some of the some sort of the way instructors interact with users and I'm sure you've read pieces like that about. Music used or certain like segmentation, like if it's a 90s class, you know, most of the music is comes from white artists and so on. When you read those kinds of articles, and this one that I'm referring to is really thoughtful. Do you internalize those ideas and sort of think, well, how can we address this and make this better or do you think it just comes with the territory those kinds of critiques? I start from a very data driven insights teams have got an incredible consumer insights strategy team and we are doing research to understand how we should show up again with that north star of improving the lives of our members or spending the time to really understand. What does that mean? And that changes over time. A making sure that we are continuing to do that. And so there's always things you can do to be better and so as a marketer at this incredible company working with our team, my marketing team to really understand what are the things what are the things that, you know, like someone might have written in a piece and just is in factual. And what are the things that like, oh wow, we didn't realize that. What could we do about that? And so for me, it's focusing on learning, making sure that we're plugged in with our members, which we are to understand those insights and then acting on them. And I think this journey that we're on to improve the lives of our members of all our members, including our members of color and our black members, that's a journey that we're committed to. You know? And I'm not going to sit here and say we get it right a 100% of the time because that would be untrue. What I can tell you is that we're committed to it. And from our marketing team standpoint, we have goals around this. We have our objectives and our key results. We measure. And we can see the impact of the work that we're doing. So I think that, like I said, if you're an attractive brand, you know, people are going to write all sorts of things about you. It's just comes with the territory. I think that the most important thing you can do is make sure that you're listening on your learning. This is an incredible time to be a marketer, right? And I mean, you know, you are here at this precipice and exciting moment what's happening certainly with who consumers are. Over the next ten years, the most important significant and least served consumer class probably in American history will emerge in full and that is the emerging majority of the American population. So younger people are more diverse. It is going to be majority minority consumers. From all different ethic and racial backgrounds. When you think about the next 5 ten, 15 years, 20 years of marketing, how do you think about creating brands and services that appeal to the emerging majority consumer? Yeah, I think that the first thing is that a brand has to be truly focused on meeting its customers needs. And it can't be a surface level thing. It's got to be deep. And the only way you get there is by being curious by asking questions by trying out things by immersing yourself in that community, and most importantly of all by having a diverse team. And so I think that that commitment has got to be there that commitment to learning about your members, and because you know what? The reason we say racism is systemic is that it's in the system. So you have got to work at invest in building a new system that will serve this emerging population. You can't.

David coffin Starbucks David
"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:56 min | 7 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"That, you know, that systemic racism is pervasive and it is destructive and it also exists even in countries that might be predominantly black. Because of outside social and media influences. Exactly. And historical context, right? Nigeria became independent in 1960. It's not that long ago. You after you graduated, you went to take a job at Goldman Sachs and so you had this incredibly rich experience at Harvard and you I guess you took a job in finance. And there's nothing wrong with that. Lots of people do that. It's a really secure path, right? And I'm sure you were particularly attracted to the idea of maybe financial security after all the sacrifices that were made to get you to the U.S., is that why you chose to pursue path of finance? Absolutely. And it was an accidental path, you know? It was almost like I saw that that was what, you know, the kids of parents who were in this country and successful. They want all those kids were going into finance and so that was like, okay, this is like the thing to do, you know? And it was again seeking stability and sort of trying to find a place where I can start to pay it forward, you know, and really seeking that and again, if I go back to my history, my background is, hey, if you I might not be the smartest person in the room, but I'm going to work really hard and I'm going to make sure that I'm adding value. And so I felt more confident in my ability to be successful in that environment. I read a story about your time there when you record sex. And there was an executive there who said, hey, you know, Dara, you know, you're pretty good at investment banking, but you're actually really great at marketing. And initially, when you heard that you were taken aback, you were actually you were actually hurt by that. Yeah. Yeah, it's so funny. I doubt this person will ever even remember this conversation. It's amazing to impact people can have in your life just like a comment. But I was an intern actually at the time, and I was going through this rotational program. And at the end, you would kind of rank what you wanted to do and you would be assigned to. And I was gunning for investment banking, right? That was where you got the big bonus. That was where you the most prestigious that was kind of what you did. And I remember this executive who was sort of observing the program and getting to know those of us who are in it. And he said that to me, he was like, you know, I feel like marketing is where you really shine. And I was like, what is this man talking about? This is an investment bank. Nobody comes an investment bank to be a marketer, you know? And the CEO of this bank is not a marketer. They're a former banker. And so I had this very sort of narrow perspective, right? And I got home and I called my mom and I was like, can you imagine what this man said to me? And she paused a little bit. And she said, well, Dara, I mean, as you've been telling me about your experience, it sounds like marketing the marketing team there was actually what you really enjoyed. You know, it sounds like you were really killing yourself in this other area, but you were kind of doing it, but you certainly weren't the best there, but it sounds like in marketing you were shining and you were you know and I was like, oh, you know, and I reflected on it. And I kind of made the decision. You know what I'm going to be in marketing? And I think I realized something about myself, which is I love the creative side of marketing. You know, the storytelling. I start from a data insights driven perspective. How do we create something that connects when we put out creative in the world that people resonate with? It's like the best feeling for me. When a campaign is successful, I love it. I love storytelling. I'm an amateur singer and songwriter, like in my personal fun life. So the idea to work in a space that's creative. But guess what marketing? There's also the science of it, right? There's a very quantitative side of it in the fact that you can kind of measure your results. And I think I'm happy when I'm in a world where I'm being ambidextrous. I'm flexing the very data driven side of myself, but I'm also able to focus on the creative strategic storytelling aspect as well. On your journey to peloton, there were a few stops along the way, including an MBA at Stanford. And while you were there from what I understand, you really kind of caught the startup bug. I did. I did. It was actually funny 'cause I was I was doing marketing consulting, you know, which was great, 'cause being an MBA costs a lot of money. So anything you could do. Stanford is such an entrepreneurial school. They had these amazing programs that even as an international student, you could get some real hands on experience, building something and you could get course credit for it. And you could do it in a way that the university really supported you, which I greatly valued. It was one of the reasons I was so thrilled when I got the opportunity to go to Stanford. And so I was doing that. And I still thought, you know what? I'm going to build a tech company, right? Because that's what all you know. That's been many of the sort of Stanford MBAs where I think everybody was like, oh, you're going to work on my startup or am I going to work on your startup, you know? And so I definitely caught the bug and you know I was really trying to move forward an idea of a digital closet. So I don't know if you ever watch clueless or remember that movie, but you share is in her room on her computer getting her outfit. I was like, why don't we have that? I wouldn't make that. That would be so easy. It's so great. We should make that happen. And so for a while, I tried that. That kind of new closet entrepreneurial idea. And it was it was interesting because I remember I got married actually in my second year of business school to my phenomenal husband who is just my rock and super supportive. And he I remember when I graduated and I was working on my startup and I had, you know, I didn't really have I hadn't fundraised. I was like trying to get ready for my seat round and all of these things and he kind of sat me down. And he said to me, he said, I've been observing you and I feel like what you enjoy most about this is managing the people. This is a post like pitching investors and actually trying to build this incredible futuristic closet. Yes. And I was like, huh? What are you talking about? I'm trying to build this epic share Horowitz. Closet. You know, like make coolest happen right now. I don't know what you're talking about. But again, I think one of the things I've learned about myself is actually sometimes when I hear a negative feedback, I but then I sit with it and I think on it 'cause I want to be better at the heart of it that's like my it's like my thing. I'm a learner. And I want to grow. I love the idea of self improvement. It's so core to who I am. And so I reflected on it, and I thought about it. And I said, wow, you know, he's right. What I enjoy most about this is managing my team, I'm building a team at the marketing side of it. You know, I was like, I'm feeling actually a little bit uncomfortable about raising money and some of these other things, you.

Dara Stanford Goldman Sachs Nigeria Harvard U.S. Horowitz
"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:49 min | 7 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"You primarily speak English at home? I did primarily speak I spoke English and Yoruba. So in Nigeria, there are many, many tribes. And I'm part of the Yoruba tribe where a fun tribe, as we like to think of ourselves. I would like to eat and enjoy life and celebrate. And yeah, so we spoke English and then Yoruba because I was very interested in making sure that I retained that part of my heritage. And in terms, how would you describe yourself as a as a student at school to school come fairly easy for you? School did not actually come very easy for me at the beginning, but you know, God bless my wonderful Nigerian mother. She pulled me aside and she said to me one day because my sister was very what we called naturally gifted, you know? She was very naturally brilliant. She didn't have to work very hard to excel. I, on the other hand, had to work very hard. My mom pulled me aside and she said Dara, you know what? The reality is you're gonna probably, if you wanna be a top of your class, like your sister is you're gonna have to work probably twice, maybe even three times as hard as she is working. But if you do that, you will excel. And so since then, I just have always had this work ethic, right? I will outwork, I will, you know, give myself to this. I will, I was very focused on achievement. At a certain point, when you were a young woman, you went to the UK to go to boarding school for high school. How did that come about? Tell me the story about how that happened. So my mother, you know, was kind of looking and thinking about higher education. And my father had actually, he went to do his masters. He had gone to imperial college in London. And then if you remember kind of what I said about Nigeria being a former British colony, you know, there was a lot of the idea of going to England for higher education was very much something that had started actually in colonial times and continued even till this day. And so my parents were wanting to provide the best education for their children, right? Just like people might move neighborhoods to a buy a different house to try to get into the better school. My parents were looking at us going to England and so I actually took a scholarship exam. To go to this boarding school and I got in, but I didn't get the scholarship. And so I was quite distraught, you know, because I knew my parents wanted me to go to the school and it was going to be a great school and a great experience, but financially was really challenging and even thinking about it right now is just like making me feel so emotional, but my grandfather actually emptied his bank account so that I could have that opportunity so my family and my community so many people rallied around my parents to support them. It was a very difficult time for my parents financially. 'cause my mom I told you it was entrepreneurial and as you know in the entrepreneurial journey, there are times when it's very challenging and it was one of those seasons and you know I think that without the support of family and community, I definitely would not be where I am today because if not for that generosity of people being willing to sacrifice so that I could be here. So I think very much I stand on the shoulders of giants. I am a product of my family and the people who made sacrifices and invested in me and believed in me and supported me and gave me opportunities. To be where I am. So you, I guess, at the age of 14 or 15, had to to the UK. Yeah, I was just turning 16 to school called the cheltenham ladies college, which is a very prestigious boarding school, but it's like in a rural part of the UK. I mean, it's sort of far away from anywhere any major city. What was your impression when you got there? It was hard 'cause you remember I left Nigeria, and I went straight to this boarding school. And there were literally, I think, three black girls in my class, which was several hundred people. And I felt it was a shock. It was a culture shock. And I remember every night I would cry and cry and cry. And you know, my mother was very understanding. But I think on maybe night 6 or 7. She literally was like, if it's so bad you can come back to Nigeria. And you know, and I think in that moment I realized, hey, I gotta make the most of it. And that was when I kind of changed my mindset to how can I impact this place? And I kind of helped to revive a gospel choir. I love to sing. It's like my hobby. I'm an amateur singer. And so I led the choir. I led the gospel choir and I found so much joy in that singing and I joined the athletics team. I'm a runner. And so I did that as well. And I obviously threw myself into my academics. And that was actually when I realized I wanted to go to the U.S. because it was something very different about the UK that I felt was in the U.S. in the United States. The concept around the American Dream and the idea that it doesn't really matter who you are. You can accomplish something. And of course, America has a lot of issues to deal with, including systemic racism, which exists everywhere, including the UK and it's not mutually exclusive. That is true. And America still welcomes people, right? Someone like Barack Obama could be president in this country. Something about the American Dream stood out to me in the sense of this country is a place as imperfect as it is. There's beauty in it. And there's a desire to be better. It's uniquely I was very attracted to that. That desire for self improvement. We're going to continue to evolve. We're going to continue to grow. It very much resonated with me. I didn't even know the term growth mindset at the time, but I very much felt that that was present in the United States. And so I wanted to come to the United States for college. And I told my parents, I wanted.

Nigeria UK Dara England cheltenham ladies college United States London giants athletics Barack Obama
"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:49 min | 7 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"I'm guy Roz, not on the show today, dhara treader, SVP, head of global marketing and communications at peloton. I want to make an impact. I want to drive change. And what I started to see as I rose in my career was the best way to drive change is not to try to go alone. It's to do it with others. You're going to be most successful when the best people want to be on your team. I want to work with you. I want to do things with you. Directed on making an impact on the world and following her ambitions at peloton. Peloton was one of the biggest business stories during the pandemic, as Jim's closed across the U.S., there was a huge demand for home exercise equipment. And peloton was perhaps the biggest beneficiary of that surge. Part of the reason is obvious the company makes good products, but the other part is its branding and image. Peloton instructors have become celebrities in their own right. Each with their own falling. And one of the key leaders in that branding effort is directed. She was recruited to join peloton in the summer of 2020. After running marketing at GE ventures and earlier working at Apple. Her journey into marketing came by way of what she might jokingly call a failed career in finance. Today, she sits on several boards and is widely thought of as one of the most influential marketing leaders of her generation. Her journey to the C suite and even to the United States was neither planned nor certain. Dara grew up in the city of ibadan in the southwest of Nigeria. She managed to earn a place at a prestigious boarding school in England and eventually to college in the U.S.. And from the start, Dara's family played a huge role in shaping the person she would become. My father is a physicist and a pastor, which is a very interesting combination. 'cause he's a man of science and a man of faith. And my mother is a businesswoman. She kind of started out as an educator and went on. She's very entrepreneurial to start a bunch of different local businesses. So my parents are, I think, one of the things I learned from my parents, they greatly valued education. You know, they didn't have a lot, but they were so committed to making sure that their kids had the very best. I remember there was a time growing up where some kids would make fun of my mom because she literally, they would be like, if you dropped her dress in the middle of the street, they would bring it to your house. 'cause she wears the same dress all the time. But she was, you know, taking working really hard, putting all the investment into the education of her four children into trying to make her business as successful. And I learned so much from both of them about ambition and contentment at hard work. And really trying to create something out of nothing. I'm so interested in the idea that your dad was a man of science and a man of the cloth at the same time. Because sometimes those two things can collide physics and faith. And I think that's just so interesting that he was he did both. Yeah. It's so funny because to me, I see them as very complimentary, right? Because growing up, it was a deep belief in science actually strengthened his faith and vice versa. And so to me, I always saw them as not things. They're not mutually exclusive. They're not in opposition to each other, but they're actually complimentary. And I think it's from it's from my upbringing, right? Because it's pretty rare. I think to have he's certainly the only physicist pastor that I've spent a lot of time around. And so I very much feel like that. That was also very grounding because I think one of the things that it taught me is that I can be very open minded about things. I can explore I can ask questions I can be curious. And I can keep searching. I can dig deeper rather than just accept a surface level discussion or surface level to be. How would you describe yourself as is a child? Were you were you focused or you well behaved were you a good student, were you all those things where you rebellious? You know, in my town and the people who knew me my family and community, people used to describe me as what they called forward. I'm not sure how much that concept translates here, but it was I always was eager and wanted to do more and be more and had very big dreams. And my mother was actually very encouraging because many times people would just be like, oh my God, Dar. She's just get your head out of the clouds and back on the earth. And my mother actually encouraged me. She was always like continue to dream big, you know, but she was also ground me insane. You know, she said to me all the time, ambition with contentment. So be ambitious, but make sure it's rooted in contentment. Don't seek just, you know, glory, but seek impact. And those have been things that have really, really shaped me. And so as a child, you know, I was curious about the world around me and growing up as a black girl. You know, many times the people that would be celebrated on international TV or the things that I saw around the world, it just wasn't a lot of black women. And so I remember when I first learned about the concept of the Fortune 500 and was trying to figure out where the people that looked like me were and at the time, the only one I could find was Ursula burns. And it hit me. You know, and I always thought about, wow, wouldn't it be better if we had more representation and how inspiring that would be for girls like me and so that desire to impact the world has always been something that I've had even from when I was a child. What was in terms of global culture and its impact on culture in Nigeria, particularly where you were, did most of it come from the United States or from Europe or from other parts of Africa? Most of it came from the United States when I was growing up. But at least most of what I was exposed to. Also from the UK because Nigeria is a former colony, a former British colony. So there was a lot of influence from the UK and the U.S.. Those were the predominant western forces at play. Also, you know, we were impacted by obviously our neighboring countries in West Africa like Senegal and Ghana and Ivory Coast. And we also drew on things from South Africa as well. But when I was growing up, there was actually appetite was going on in South Africa and I very much remember a lot of the conversations that would be hard around the dinner table about what was going on and the need for it to end and also kind of hearing from my parents and my grandparents about what it was like to be in a colonized country. And it was very interesting because you could see how colonization had really impacted people and people had different perspectives, but I think that was another force that was definitely very present. It was like we definitely thought of ourselves as members of the former British colony. And that was something that was a part of the experience. Did.

dhara treader GE ventures Dara U.S. southwest of Roz SVP ibadan Nigeria Jim Apple England Ursula burns UK South Africa Ivory Coast West Africa Senegal Africa Europe
Lyft, Uber to Defend Drivers Sued Under Texas Abortion Law

CNBC's Fast Money

01:19 min | 9 months ago

Lyft, Uber to Defend Drivers Sued Under Texas Abortion Law

"At a news. Alert on uber contested. Burs got the story contessa. Hi melissa what we have just heard from. Dr nassar shot. He is that he's coming forward and clapping competitor. Lift on the back for the actions that it's taking in texas and saying it's going to match that. So here's what happened. Lift him forward and said that they were going to start a legal defense fund for any of the drivers who got accused under this new texas abortion law antiabortion law of assisting women receive now illegal abortions in the state of texas lift would set up a legal defense fund to defend those drivers and just a short time ago. Dara had tweeted out that He thought that that was the right. Decision on lifts part and they were planning to have uber matt. Make the same move So uber now also will cover legal legal fees for drivers in the same way. And there's dr thank. Thanks for the push. Logan green. That drivers should not be put at risk for gani people where they want to go. Melissa basically the premise contest is that even rideshare drivers. Who take women to these appointments are seen as aiding these women in an illegal abortion at this point and could be fine and so so at that point. The companies will step in and cover the legal fees.

Dr Nassar Texas Melissa Logan Green Dara Gani
Nothing to Break the Fall: Afghanistan

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:31 min | 9 months ago

Nothing to Break the Fall: Afghanistan

"Over the weekend afghanistan's acting interior minister warned citizens not to fall prey to taliban propaganda assuring them that the capital kabul would be safe but it was not safe kabul was the last bastion of government control at any pretense that the government had any disappeared. As reports emerged that president ashraf ghani had fled the country. Afghanistan is now squarely under taliban rule just as it was twenty years ago when america invaded. What brought off on your fan man. Mulata the dara renault this morning the taliban released video claiming a great victory congratulating the people of couple on their new leadership and claiming now is the time to give serenity to the nation law so the serenity is distant crowds continued together at kabul airport hoping to hitch rides on the evacuations. Being haphazardly arranged by western powers there was always a risk that as american forces and nato allies withdrew from afghanistan that the taliban would surge but with three times the troop numbers no one predicted. The afghan forces would fold so fast when the soviet union withdrew from afghanistan at the end of the nineteen eighties. The regime that they created losted for several

Taliban Kabul President Ashraf Ghani Mulata Afghanistan Kabul Airport Government America Nato Soviet Union
What Does the Future Hold for Uber?

BTV Simulcast

01:48 min | 10 months ago

What Does the Future Hold for Uber?

"Rival Lift, Uber is yet to turn a profit as the company posted a wider loss in the second quarter compared to the prior period, uber spending heavily to lure back drivers and also on ways to expand the business while beyond ride hailing. I spoke to uber CEO Dara Cosmo shot earlier about the game plan as Delta rages on, and His longer term vision for to uber's rides and eats. Take a listen. Mhm. Overall, we're really happy with the results the top wine beat. We knew that we needed to get more drivers out driving and couriers delivering because the demand was growing so quickly, So we leaned in to really increase earlier supply and driver supply and we added 420,000 per years. And drivers, Uh, during the quarter between June in February, added another 110,000 with Postmates couriers as well. So we're really getting the earner force out there and it's resulted in top line volumes that are very, very strong. And it's putting us on a path where Q. Three losses are going to come down significantly in Q four. We're going to hit the dog profitability as well. As far as the Delta goes, It's difficult to tell what the effect is, except for markets that have closed down. So Sydney, for example, has really shut down. The mobility business comes down, but our delivery business grows very significantly. And we net out, for example, in Sydney 30% ahead of, uh, of 19 volumes. So overall we have this very hedge between mobility and delivery. But when we look at city by city, you look at a New York you look at the Paris You look at an L. A etcetera. It's very hard to discern any patterns. As far as Delta goes, we'll be watching very

Dara Cosmo Uber Sydney Paris New York
"dara" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

01:32 min | 11 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Adlandia

"Matters to you about the things that are important to you and that allows you. I think to really have that incredible unparalleled experience. What are the things that you're most excited about as you look at your marketing coms roadmap in the year ahead. We'll i'm really excited about. I mean there are so many things i'm excited about. I think one of the things. That's more in the immediate future that i'm excited about is we have nine top tier athletes who are members of the politics community. Some of whom are former olympians on some who may be competing in activities over the summer. And we're excited right. We've got a whole train with champions south. That's going to be going down this summer and that's gonna be a lot of fun. I think you know it's like we're all excited right for all ready to kind of make most of the summer and i'm so excited to do that with fellow members of the peleton community how we that to life and get inspired challenge And just enjoy ourselves. Can i just offer one product like this in the spirit of you said. We do product feedback tap on the screen. I want that shirt. Drop it in a shopping cart from repel tunnel biden on the end of the ride. Just a product feature justice suggestion. I like to tap to buy instructor outfits from the screen. I don't know if that's coming. Laura thank you. Thank you for sharing with us. I will say..

Laura one this summer nine top tier athletes olympians one product peleton
"dara" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

03:23 min | 11 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Adlandia

"The brightest minds at the university of florida come together. Something extraordinary happened. Engineering empowers medicine data scientist rice. Agriculture geology fuel space exploration and artificial intelligence transforms learning and research. The ideas that go on to change the world. They're launching right from here. At the collision of big ideas and massive the tential something momentous becomes possible at the university of florida ufl dot. Edu alright atlanta. We have a very special guest. Were so excited to have. Svp of global marketing and comes from peleton. Welcome to the show dara. Tra- cedar thank you so much for highly so excited to be here. So darn getting ready for the show. Lex and i were talking about. We really need to get into like the peleton vibe. Let's do it dr. Da da da show now. You got me from what i've at that set. Let's do wearing tondo. That's very peleton right the slow zone so obviously we've all known each other for quite some time. We go back to the days when you were the cmo of ge ventures in the spirit of catching up dr in this new role at peleton. Tell us what your initial experience has been like. I love doing this on. You're doing it with old friends and so much more fun. And i mean it's been really great. I think that you know peleton is in such a amazing position because here we are motivating millions of people around the world trying to help them be active centered on connected. And it's really a marketer's dream. How do you make that happen you. What are the differences in your toll. Get that you use to motivate people and it's been a really enjoyed. Did we have such a wonderful team. So all credit all is coast to the team. And i think it's been incredible to see what we've been able to accomplish in just a short period of time and we're only getting started the feels like the whole world knows palatine loves peleton. You guys still have a lot of room to grow when we talk to our friends and family. They're like oh yeah peleton no question. I know who they are. I know what they do but if someone who doesn't know polygon i'm really interested in knowing how do you describe peleton if that's a really great question and i think at the end of the day what we're doing at peleton is were helping you become the best version of yourself a helping you with your physical and mental health and it's connected fitness experience so right from the comfort of your home you can get agree. Workout phenomenal workout. And that was not something that you could do. Before peleton came on the scene. I give so much credit to our founders and our ceo. John holy because when they came up with this idea with our founders. The world was like wait. What are you talking about me. i'm from my home. i'm going to get a great workout. And now the whole world knows it to be and now everybody's like oh. That's a great idea. I want to do that too. And at and so i think it's not that unmatched motivation right that you can get three connected fitness experience. That's what on brings you. And so you have that power whole combination of content and digital and hardware and software all coming together.

Lex university of florida three John holy peleton millions of people Tra- cedar atlanta ufl dot dara Da dr. tondo da
"dara" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

02:31 min | 11 months ago

"dara" Discussed on Adlandia

"In marketing having marketing lead multimedia products interesting and collaborations. And then you start to drill down on what are the things that really work for this group of buyers or this community and is that something. That's actually more viable widely or viable to a group of people and buyers that are so critical to my core product and proposition. That starts to become really exciting. And do i think that the product up a function of a product team or marketing team. I think it's both but i think that marketers have a real place in a real voice Where we should start thinking more about product and product development. Here the second really quick point about what you said that i think is really interesting and leading into the interview it is. I got really excited. The other day. I actually saw on linked in someone from dunkin donuts was talking about the same kind of mindset when you kind of combine product collaboration and brandt. And there's real value around those things you start to get a whole nother set of innovation ideas creativity and community. You start to attract to your company in your brand. Speaking of dunkin they just announced a collaboration with a backdrop for their first ever pink collection. So i know in our last episode. We were talking with steve wilson that he wishes there was a podcast talking about paint. But i don't think he would have expected it to come from dunkin. So i think this is like what we're talking about. Is there a podcasts out there. That's like pink colors over coffee. You know what. I mean like i. It's just really interesting to start thinking about. How brands can open up the aperture of access to new and interesting ways of thinking about you know products experiences services that don't necessarily have to be specifically in the wheelhouse that are just adjacent enough. That can can expand your mind to think about ultimately the the oneplus. When he was three. I think that it's very hard to do this. So you have to have the right leadership. The right mindset. And i'm excited to get into a conversation with dara because peleton has done this really well now. I have not seen a company. Do this really well. For a sustained period of time. And i'm really interested to see how does peleton may be start to show the world of marketing and product a bit more about how you sustain these types of things collaboration cooperation and creativity over.

steve wilson both three first second peleton dunkin donuts dara dunkin
Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson Addresses Race Hustlers

The Dan Bongino Show

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson Addresses Race Hustlers

"But the lieutenant governor was speaking at the convention this weekend in North Carolina Convention where President spoke Trump President Trump spoke to Excuse me. And I'm telling you, I haven't heard a finer two minutes and 20 seconds of a speech in a long time. Here is Lieutenant Governor Mark Robinson. Here's the first part about a minute or so. Play the second part, obviously right after I just want you to listen to this. Addressing Mark Robinson happens to be a black man, which is totally insignificant to Republicans. But the Democrats, it's everything because I guess he's oppressed or You're oppressing him or whatever. And Mark Robinson just takes it to the race hustlers like I have not heard in a long time. Play Mark Robinson, Dara some people that we're talking about reparations in this country. They wanted reparations. And I remember I made this particular liberal so angry at me because I told them right to their face. Nobody owes you anything for slavery. If you want to tell the truth about it, it is You who owes It's you, who owns Why do you? Oh, because somebody in those fields took stripes for you. Somebody After those fields were ended in slaver was ended. Somebody had to walk through Jim Crow for you. Somebody fought wars and died for you. Somebody lived less than because they didn't have what you have, and they did it for you. There are people in their graves right now. And they are there because they were willing to stand up and fight for you. Whoa!

Mark Robinson Trump President Trump Lieutenant Governor Mark Robin North Carolina Dara Jim Crow
Bryson DeChambeau on upcoming Masters Tournament

The Masters: Fore Please! Now Driving...

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Bryson DeChambeau on upcoming Masters Tournament

"Back in november when we were here for an unprecedented masters tournament. One of the most noticeable differences was the lack of patrons it made for a very different tournament for the competitors. Here's bryce into shambo on what it was like playing with no patrons and his perspective on what to look forward to this week last year. It's masters dara's patron and it was pretty empty and quiet. How did you feel the fans are finally back to cheer for you here. Yeah i've already seen it in the practice round Yesterday i played nine with the all ian. Kevin kevin ollie Runner up in the us amador. And obviously kevin's a good friend and we had a fun time just messing around with the crowd. There was a moment on nine. Probably about a minute minute and a half. We were just joking around with the crowd. It's fun to be able to interact with the crowd and and get them going again. I think hearing those sounds you know whenever something somebody makes an eagle or amazing birdie or those sounds down by aiming corner and then you know buy fifteen sixteen are going to be pretty special here in that again. We haven't heard that in

Kevin Kevin Ollie Bryce Dara Amador IAN Kevin United States
Interview with Dara Treseder, Peleton's Head of Global Marketing and Communications

Skimm'd from The Couch

03:29 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Dara Treseder, Peleton's Head of Global Marketing and Communications

"To our women's history month series on skimmed from the couch. Where we're telling you about the women who made history this past year this week. Our guest is dr troy cedar. She's svp had a global marketing and communications for peleton the world's largest interactive fitness platform. That's led the charge. Apple fitness during the pandemic and dr herself is one of the most esteemed marketing professionals in the country. Before arriving at peleton last year dr was the cmo of carbon a three d. printing company and before that was the cmo of ge ventures darn. Thank you for joining us. Welcome to skin from the thank you so much for happy. Abby excited to dig in you have a great and lengthy resume. And so i am curious of all the jobs that you've had or activities you've been a part of which one stands out that means the most to you while obviously my palatine experience. You know it's interesting. You learn so much in your career right. You grow so much. I remember sitting in. The audience wants listening to meg whitman. And she talked about what it was like to be a veteran ceo. I remember kind of being like That's an interesting an interesting phrase. I had never heard someone use that before. And because i've had the opportunity to be a cmo twice in my career before this role. I felt really prepared. I kind of really understood what peleton needed. And i feel really equipped to be able to bring that to my team and to really create the environment that allows the amazing humans. I get to work with to thrive and succeed because you get better with time. It's almost like practice. makes permanent. Practice makes perfect practice. Makes better. And i feel like i've had experience practicing and so it feels really wonderful to be able to bring all the amazing things i learned at the amazing places. I worked to peleton at this moment. In time you are born and raised in nigeria and went to school both in the uk and later in the us. I'm really curious about your background and having the exposure in perspective from multiple places how that led you to marketing are inherently makes you a good marketer you know. I think that it's really important to live in different places and get exposure to different cultures. 'cause it's very interesting. How things change at how things can be very different as you move between different societies different cultures different nations and. I think that i am able to bring a certain richness and fullness to my marketing experience. Because i've had many experiences where i has been you know other and i have had to see how do people relate to me. How do people talk to me in a way that really resonates that feels authentic that draws me in and so having that in my own personal life i've been creates a wonderful texture right wonderful context for how i'm able to kind of step into the shoes of others step into the shoes of other segments of our customer step into the shoes of customers with behaviors. That are different than mine. Because i've had the experience of having basically navigating different worlds in my own personal experience. So i think it's i think it's a richness and i think it definitely has prepared me. I think to be a better marketer.

Dr Troy Cedar Ge Ventures Meg Whitman Abby Apple Nigeria UK United States
Forget Me Knot,  A Journey to Support Caregivers

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

06:55 min | 1 year ago

Forget Me Knot, A Journey to Support Caregivers

"So with me today. All the way from way across the pond is johnny ball. He is with the forget me not charity. It is designed to end the silent suffering of dementia caregivers mostly in the uk. But i'm sure we can expand a little bit someday. So thanks for joining me johnny. So your mom took care of your dad for many years tell me about your dad and your caregiving journey. Yes so my dad. Got fronted dimension when i was full team. Mac i mean we didn't know initially kinda very subtle onset sir some stuff assigns. Some sort of an ocd behavior and habits ejaculated needs to have sort of started coming in and we. We weren't really sure what is meant. Probably when i was seventeen means fooling diagnosed and definitely before at the age tom shanklin saddam was now twenty years ago so he had yes hunts and and then he had to mention until two years ago when he passed away and and the majority of that time he lived at home. My mum and it was just because my sister. Self we guns university on my other system rather Back ceremony on singlehandedly. Careful for him. Full probably nolan probably fifteen years until it's long time i mean as nearly law tougher laws on sarah and tools variants He was to be introspective scare him. You're amazing awesome. But even then i mean did doesn't end full primary care as you know grown same every single day. She still you know she can go on holiday. She just went down and look at the data. even she wasn't enough to all the time she loves him. Most of the to worry. Also vistas right in terms of you always concerned a well-being the and worrying if it comes to bowl of marrying a happy state of mind and that's all still there. Yeah so that was. Conical happens is really back about seeing my mum's dedication. How tough was even though. She handled it incredibly news so stoic. Yeah it was. That serve inspired this inside this expedition. Maturity stop so. How's she doing now. she's doing well. Yeah crazy agree raw. She's she goes now. I'd say sure exactly now so that it was To two hundred years ago died. Since then i guess she suggested completely to new life. Ace i suppose the even though she's a stephanie very different way of living and in some sense of relief. I suppose it's still transitions dara. It's interesting because you still have guilt. Like i know especially now with the holidays coming. There's just times when i think you know. I tried so hard with my mom and like christmas. Two thousand nineteen. Our city. park is full of christmas. Trees that are decorated with different organizations or businesses. Some of them just decorate 'em however they want some decorate them with the theme like one of them was basically a pizza christmas tree so all. The decorations looked like slices of pepperoni slices of pizza. Which is kind of not super christmas. But it was very cute. I took her there because it was bright. It was outside it. You know i thought. Oh she'll love this and it was just like she was like clueless and it was and she was honoring. I think she was having a bad day. And it's hard knowing. That was her last christmas. We did have a really good lunch on the twenty third of december and then everything went to hell after that. So there's interestingly enough you still have like these guilt feelings. Like i should have done more could have done more and it takes a while to get through those i think so. It's i'm i'm finding that with myself and other caregivers that are in my position. So if you guys are experiencing that it's pretty normal which is frustrating. But there it is so. I read on your website that the alzheimer's society which is pretty much the mirror. Image of the alzheimer's association here in the states found that ninety percent caregivers experienced feelings of stress and anxiety weekly more like daily probably at least sixty percent of them struggle to talk about the impact of caregiving on their lives because of feelings of guilt. It's like. I can't complain about what. I'm going through because my loved. One has a tea or alzheimer's or whatever and so how can caregivers balance their needs and the needs of their loved ones. In your opinion like you know have we. Have you thought that one through as you launch charity. I think the as mansell. How things i i think the fittest into that. It's okay to feel the way you feel. i think. Give a lot of as you just explained guilt and extreme sense of gt Which means the facebook does because the caring for fest often before themselves. That i think is important for the mental health of the unification which ben immediately impacts the wellbeing of the patient. They need to care for themselves as well. A member. the average duty of air to themselves as much as they have achieved care to the person benefitting asta and i think inaccessible and really letting mass inside. You know that that's true. I'm giving yourself giving his a brain give yourself the option to feel how you feel and to Except that you need to care about yourself. As well is the vista

Johnny Ball Tom Shanklin Saddam Dementia Johnny Nolan Dara Alzheimer's Society Sarah Alzheimer's Association UK Stephanie Alzheimer's Mansell Facebook BEN
Uber, Gig Companies Seek Labor Deals to Avoid Workers Becoming Employees

Morning Edition

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Uber, Gig Companies Seek Labor Deals to Avoid Workers Becoming Employees

"For the Supreme Supreme Court Court attorney attorney general general and and Legislature Legislature all all agree agree that that there's there's one one accurate accurate term term forgive forgive workers workers employees, employees, a a term term that that guarantees guarantees benefits benefits and and protections. protections. Good Good companies companies spent spent over $200 million on Proposition 22, which legalizes a new sub employee category. There's limited benefits, but the company's still controls how the workers work and how they get paid. Here's uber CEO Dara Couser Shah He our proposal is essentially what we call an independent contractor. Bus model gig work of cross model, the independent contractor plus Well, Sam Walton and Wal Mart mainstream fancy titles for low paid employees get companies like Lifton uber have succeeded in writing their terms for for workers workers into into labor labor law. law. I'm I'm Sam Sam Burnett Burnett Security Security News. News.

Supreme Supreme Court Court Legislature Legislature Dara Couser Shah Wal Mart Lifton Uber Sam Walton Sam Sam Burnett Burnett
Uber sells self-driving cars unit to Aurora Innovation

Daily Tech News Show

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Uber sells self-driving cars unit to Aurora Innovation

"And it's thomas car plans in deeds so this story broke right at the end of detainees s. Yesterday uber announced on monday that it so sell selling and self-driving unit advanced technologies group also known as eighty jim to aurora innovation. A competitor uber. The deal is expected to close in q. One well zuber given up on autonomous vehicles. Be nuts uber ceo dara khosrowshahi will join. Aurora's board an uber. At investors and employees will in forty percent of aurora following. The deal uber will also invest four hundred million dollars into aurora directly and errors. Autonomous cars will eventually operate on uber's ride hailing platform. Aurora was founded by google's former lead engineer for thomas cars. Chris urban along with sterling anderson. Who helped lead tesla model x. project and drew back now who ran carnegie mellon's research lab and worked on a thomas vehicles at uber.

Thomas Car Advanced Technologies Group Aurora Zuber Dara Khosrowshahi Uber Thomas Cars Chris Urban Carnegie Mellon Google Tesla Anderson Drew
Uber sells self-driving cars unit to Aurora Innovation

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Uber sells self-driving cars unit to Aurora Innovation

"Uber selling. Its self driving car. Unit took competitor called aurora innovation as part of the deal uber will invest four hundred million dollars in aurora in exchange for a twenty six percent stake in the company. Uber ceo. dara khosrowshahi will also join aurora's board. 'cause was shot. He has been working to make uber. Profitable by the end of next year and the deal with aurora is the latest in a series of moves to scale back non-core businesses including winding down the company's product incubator and artificial intelligence lab

Aurora Innovation Aurora Dara Khosrowshahi Uber
"dara" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"dara" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"She's so tall, she could go cross courts to get the ball down quickly enough to get it in. Wild Aramis. It's at one on the serve service area to Wall Dara. That is not what they needed as they now trail 8 to 2 Set number three on the horn. Bacher scoreboard Megan Klein back to serve for Bismarck century. Overhand served taken back roll by Binstock. So when he's going to set this one to be a kusky, and she gets that wanna go down close, But she gets it right inside that line. And that makes it 83 in favor of Bismarck century. So, Halle Erickson. Get set to serve this overhand pops it over. Played by Julia Fritter Fletcher Back set to Hattie Fitter. Just tips it played by a wall Dara set to marry Schnell off the block and down. I believe that was Mary Free gin on the block. Mary Snow. She's one of those type of players. She really tried tries to get that those kill attempts from that 10 FT line. So Mary Snow is gonna come out and Lucy holiday I'll come in for the Packers. Checking in for Bismarck century is Delaney Clark. She'll serve Taken back row by Wall. Dara Erickson's going to set this one. The holiday goes off the block, played there by Clark Bump set to filter is gonna play it over via Kusky, but may back said it the holidays kill attempt. I got nicely by Clark..

Wall Dara Mary Snow Dara Erickson Delaney Clark Kusky Halle Erickson Julia Fritter Fletcher Mary Free Lucy Megan Klein Hattie Fitter Packers Schnell
"dara" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

Carry The Fire Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"dara" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

"Here's a sneak peek at some additional patriot only content. If we want to like anthropomorphized. God at all i would like to think god also has the same questions about god self. The god is wondering who god is like that. There is some sense of a unrevealed nature. An unrevealed self to god self And i think that's really important for us to think about the you know. Not only do. I think that god hasn't fully reviewed god self foley revealed and some moment in time fully. Reveal god's self to all of humanity into all the world. I don't even know that. God has been fully revealed to self to god so Which i think. I think gives us permission as humans is finite beans to not have all the answers to because if we haven't even been re if god is not even revealed to god's own self fully the maybe we should be given some grace that we don't have the answers for the full revelation of god and that we can't absolutely say certainly what god is like. I think it gives us a lot of grace. If you're digging this podcast and wants to join me and others like you. In our pursuit of the good the true and the beautiful joining us on patriot is the best way to do it. Sign up today.

foley
"dara" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

Carry The Fire Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"dara" Discussed on Carry The Fire Podcast

"Welcome to carry the fire. A podcast where we explored the big questions of life through the lens of the good the true and the beautiful. I'm your host. Dustin cancer and my hope is that through these conversations with people of diverse and divergent backgrounds and beliefs. We can glimpse the world the new through each other's unique perspectives that whole issue around heresy and arthur c. was a main point for for the church's energy fighting off heresy and trying to establish orthodoxy. I suppose it continued then with with the break-up of christianity in to all the various factions all these factions mainly emphasized their difference from each other through what they believed now if you take in comparison to the celtic monks during that period of chris down. There's no evidence that there are any disputes among amongst themselves has to orthodoxy as to who was believing the right thing and who was teaching the wrong thing. There's no evidence of any controversy in the irish church. Hey everybody today. We are joined by dera malloy. Darah is a celtic priest. A writer and a guide for pilgrims on the aaron islands where he lives up the coast of ireland in our conversation. We talk about some of the negative consequences of institutions and globalisation dare shares. What sets apart the celtic tradition from the roman catholic one of previously andy shares about the importance of experience in his own life. Let's dive in thank you.

dera malloy Darah Dustin cancer irish church arthur c. aaron islands chris andy writer ireland
How To Be Grateful When Everything Sucks With DaRa Williams

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:10 min | 1 year ago

How To Be Grateful When Everything Sucks With DaRa Williams

"Hello Dora first time on the PODCAST. Thanks for coming on. Appreciate it. Thank you, Dan. Yes it is. I'm really excited. You made time for the so thank you. You're welcome. You're welcome. You said something super interesting. What you said a bunch of super interesting things before we started rolling the first one I wanna, latch onto and. Bring back into your mind right now is use said you appreciate that we've been doing this focus on the? Four BRAHMA VIHARA during the election. And you said, I think there should be a fifth breath of Yarra, which is gratitude. And I love that and I want to know. Is gratitude possible when everything sucks. That's a good question. Is gratitude possible. Not only do I think it's possible but I think it's essential in order to navigate the sucky. You now. And when we think about gratitude, it doesn't have to be this big grand. But it could be something like I'm grateful I woke up with breath this morning you know and I'm not gonna down the whole political thing right now. But the breath is something we've all been very present to in these last five months in terms of how quickly it can be something other than available to us. Gratitude can be something as simple as waking up in the morning and really censoring oneself or really bit before this I do this even before my feet hit the ground like, thank you not to any body but. Just the expression of gratitude through my heart and mind that I'm here for another day, and then I do the listen and I hear my mom I live with my ninety six year old mom I hear her start moving around downstairs of bombs good. You know and then I hear my husband and then the cat jumps on the bed and we get a little morning greeting like those kinds of just day to day kind of small. But incrementally acknowledged opportunities for gratitude really helped to serve as a cloak or as a holding. To navigate all the other stuff that mostly all of us do from the time we start engaging with the world until the time we go to bed at night. So yeah. Yeah, and I also think maybe that aspects of gratitude are a natural kind of organic unfolding if one is engaged with Meta or loving kindness or Karuna compassion as its English word or Madisha. Sympathetic joy packer. Equanimity anyone are all those together we're in the practice of those at also Kinda fuels are strengthens this turning towards remembering. That we all have something to have gratitude about. So. That's kind of what just of showed up there in relationship to then and other thing of Abou- gratitude. Yes. Certainly these times are really off the charts and I'm a good one for saying you know. Throughout history, there's been off the chart times for groups of people at various different times but there's something about the coalescing where the coming together sn numerous. So many challenging and difficult things along with the kind of really. Challenge with. Moving away from all of that, creating the space from all of that sometimes, you may not be feel in love in your heart. Sometimes. You may not be feeling economists will like this. Sometimes, you may definitely may not be feeling joyful, but we always find something always find something that we can have gratitude for end. Every person every person I don't know if this podcast I'm sure it is probably heard outside of the United States as well. But if I'm speaking to the United States every person here including first nations people including the indigenous people of these lands. Come. From people where there were hard times. You know if you're a descendant or your ancestors are immigrants from someplace else you can bet they were hard times. You know certainly if you're African American or out of the African diaspora, you know that there were hard times and sometimes continue to be hard times and certainly if you are indigenous to this land, if you come from people who are indigenous this land from this, you also know that they were hard time. So hard times are not new it's not a new place to. Be is not a new happening in humankind, but fortunately for us beyond our ancestors needing to also just survive in those times you know like how food shelter have water all those kinds of things that's pretty much for many of us not all of us, but that's pretty much available to all of us. So even that is to be as stand under the shower like, Oh, I am so glad to have this shower hot water hits my back in the muscles start to relax. Gratitude.

United States Brahma Vihara DAN Joy Packer
Appeals Court: Uber and Lyft must reclassify drivers as employees

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Appeals Court: Uber and Lyft must reclassify drivers as employees

"In a suspected let down to Hoover and lift a California appeals court said Thursday that the companies must classify their drivers as employees rather than independent contractors. Dara Ho shou, CEO of Uber tells CNN. The drivers like the status they have now. Our drivers are their own seals. They're their own bosses. They make their own hours. They decide when they're going to take a vacation when they're not on vacation. They do not want to be employees that chicken clock in and clock out the traditional way on DH, and they love the control that they have. And if they work hard, and they do well, they make more on they can make the trade off between earnings and flexibility. State argued that by classifying their drivers is contractors over and lift deprive those workers of benefits They're entitled to under a new law that took effect January 1st law, known as Assembly Bill five, or 85,

Dara Ho Shou Hoover CNN CEO California
Rohingya Refugee Camps Recorded First COVID-19 Death

Morning Edition

03:57 min | 2 years ago

Rohingya Refugee Camps Recorded First COVID-19 Death

"As hard as it can be for most people to maintain social distance consider how much harder it is for refugees packed into makeshift camps that is the reality for one a million Muslim minority rocking guy who fled Myanmar their camps are in neighboring Bangladesh and those camps recorded their first confirmed deaths from covert on June first Michael Sullivan reports two weeks ago Bangladesh declared parts of the Cox's bazaar district where the camps are located a red zone and climb to lock down on those areas as the virus spread I think everybody is very concerned that the numbers are going to increase significantly Louise Donovan is spokesperson for the U. N. H. C. R. in Cox's bazaar if you look at Bangladesh's Utica Cox's bazaar the numbers are increasing very rapidly and we're concerned that the same thing will happen in the camps camps that have some of the highest population density in the world Rahm das runs the roving the relief effort in Cox's bazaar for the NGO care international it is four times the density Arafat New York City eight times the density of Wuhan city about how activities but here you are at and that he says make social distancing in the camps almost impossible your contact the people inside the house thirty four hours they have to go out for food they had to go to the community Charlotte they have to go to the house that does though it thank you photo make sure that all the a million people followed the thunder one million people aid groups are struggling to finish twelve new clinics for COPD patients with a total of nineteen hundred beds by the end of June Robert look what does food for the hungry opened the first a few weeks ago we are using it as a crime I think casting top style because of the need on the ground we had to modify each better faster and to ensure that we are responding to that I did to needs which is called his clinic has fifty beds for isolation and treatment of moderate to severe cases another clinic outside the camp has one hundred and fifty more but critical cases the require intensive care and ventilators we'll have to go to the government hospital in Cox's bazaar and that worries him the number of beds in Cork's Bastos de limited as I talk now I told you there any beds that are blind right now with that being said all I did accident dropping their question Keysight Torah the number of cases another concern Rohingya in the camps are reluctant to come forward for testing and instead self medicating with help from makeshift pharmacies inside the camps so Tom Raheem ola runs one after another not that excited again about it do you fear he's the go to the clinic the doctors will send them to a different team not just them but their whole families so they come here in the state yes me Dara is arriving activist who works for an international aid group to build awareness in the camps my name and the lamb are bad I hope they will guide you right now some deep blue sea yeah I'm afraid to go to the cleaning because they have heard there will be Q. we told them no and explain what isolation and quarantine are and we told them if there are C. will get treatment and Judy are better then they will go home but people are still suspicious the Bangladesh government's ban on internet in the camps isn't helping people get information either and then there's the rainy season which brings a slew of illnesses that present much is cobra does with costs eighty bones and fevers that leads people to self medicate for those elements instead of getting tested combine that with the fear factor and it's little wonder that some aid workers worry the number of cases in the camps is far greater than what's being reported so far

Uber cuts 3,000 jobs as pandemic slashes demand for rides

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Uber cuts 3,000 jobs as pandemic slashes demand for rides

"There's another layoff announcement from uber as the ride sharing giant experiences more fallout from the corona virus pandemic San Francisco based uber has cut three thousand jobs from its workforce and the company has cut a quarter of its workforce since the year began the corona virus has slashed demand for rides uber lost two point nine billion dollars in the first quarter and the rights business the company's main profit generator fell eighty percent in April compared to the same month last year uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi says they're closing or consolidating forty five offices globally and refocusing on their core business one silver lining to the pandemic is it eats business delivering food is doing great but the growth does not come close to covering expenses I'm Jennifer king

San Francisco Dara Khosrowshahi Jennifer King CEO
Uber Cuts Thousands of Jobs, Citing Coronavirus Pandemic

BBC World Service

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Uber Cuts Thousands of Jobs, Citing Coronavirus Pandemic

"Uber is laying off more than three thousand employees as demand for rides plunges and Paris and Bonn reports that uber joins other tech companies and cutting jobs due to the corona virus pandemic the layoffs are hitting fourteen percent of uber's corporate workforce jobs are being cut in customer support and recruiting because of the drop in ridership and a hiring freeze over is also closing around a hundred and eighty help centers for drivers and CEO Dara Khosrowshahi is for going the rest of his one million dollar salary through the end of this year Coster shy he said there will probably be more cuts to come as the company tries to rein in costs he told staff quote days like this are brutal over was already losing money before the pandemic which has hit transportation and travel companies hard uber's competitor left and Airbnb both laid off thousands of employees in recent days Shannon bonds NPR news San

Coster Airbnb SAN Paris Bonn CEO Dara Khosrowshahi Shannon NPR
Uber to cut 3,700 jobs, CEO Khosrowshahi to waive base salary

Mark Thompson

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Uber to cut 3,700 jobs, CEO Khosrowshahi to waive base salary

"Over is laying some people off as you're aware I mean I'm talking about not the drivers these are the people associated with the administrative access aspects of management aspects of Francisco based uber has just announced that the company will be making major cuts and due to the corona virus pandemic what we've learned from the U. S. securities and exchange commission is that uber will cut thirty seven hundred full time jobs or fourteen percent of its work force the job cuts will be from the company's customer support and recruiting teams CEO Dara Khosrowshahi is also leaving his base salary for the rest of the year Hoover also says it's evaluating other costs and hinted more cuts could be coming the company has also lost a lot of business recently since fewer people need rides during the

Francisco Dara Khosrowshahi Hoover CEO
Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

Squawk Pod

01:36 min | 2 years ago

Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

"Today Andrews interview with Uber Ceo. Dr COSMO shocking. Investors have been watching Uber closely for signs of profitability when Uber went public on the New York Stock Exchange in May of Twenty nineteen. Andrew asked Dara about it and Dara. Well here's what he said so for us. The Path to profitability isn't theoretical there are cohort of countries that are profitable. We do reinvest profits aggressively recipe. New Business Lines like eats that have great promise but we're pretty comfortable when we look at the portfolio of businesses. That we have that we have a very strong Pathak off a a few months later in an interview with CNBC November Dr Projected profitability by twenty. Twenty one we are actually targeting twenty twenty one for adjusted even profitability full year and this week around eight months after the company's First Trading Day Uber reported its fourth quarter financial results. And and as you'll hear there was also some good news for investors about that profitability goal. Here's Andrew Uber reported quarterly results. Last night the ridesharing giant announcing announcing on its call with investors. It is moving up. Its target for profitability by a year. Join US right now. For an exclusive interview is Uber CEO. Derek Ezra Shack Good morning to you. Good morning thank thank you for for coming in. Let's walk through if you could for investors so they understand how you think you get there and when I say get there. I'm talking about profitability. Well as we made through our way in two thousand nine hundred and we became more and more confident of the strength of business and the ability of our teams to execute.

Andrew Uber Uber Ceo Dara Dr Cosmo United States Derek Ezra Shack CEO New York Pathak Cnbc
Travis Kalanick Selling Out

Squawk Pod

02:32 min | 2 years ago

Travis Kalanick Selling Out

"Former. CEO OF UBER. Travis calsonic has now sold more than two point. Five billion dollars worth of his shares since lock-up period expires aspire. Just last month that leaves now with less than ten percent of his holdings left and put them on pace to be completely divested within days is remaining stake is worth about two hundred fifty million billion dollars. He's still a member of Uber's board calendar has been working on his new venture cloud kitchens which has been buying real estate around the world in a bet that restaurants. Well it's went. We pay rent capacity to create food four delivery but this is A. This is an indictment I think of Ober your terms of In terms of crevices view of the future of the company. Or is it something else to quote Jim. Cramer sell sell sell sell sell the smart money. Nobody on earth knows more about Uber than traffic on the board in business he knows the competitors e I mean this is a very very smart but could it be either some frustration eh frustration with the direction of the company that he disagrees with may not be wrong. Company was very nice to him when they were going out with. That was my question. It was really an indictment of over or is it just say something about the relationship so soured this guy cares deeply about his own personal net worth the first time I met him He told me how much personal net worth was a guy. So I don't think he's making control it the idea of handing over control to somebody else to be able to run his money if he can take it out and invested in a project where he actually has hands on experience because even though he's on the board I don't think he gets much much of a say in what happens in the company at this point and disagrees with Derek. Ostra Xiaoping where where things are headed as. Well things have been so afraid I I thought it was a poor form warm. They didn't allow him to stand on the New York Stock Exchange the day that they went public rather. It was a personal clash. They don't have to raise money for his new project and I see him. I don't see him as the type of person who would like to run his own money. He doesn't seem like somebody who is a passive sort of investor or somebody. Who likes to say okay? You run the show and I'll and I'll figure it out. It seems to me that he would WANNA be more in control of his desk. But aren't you both right. Isn't it also a personality clash every time Andrew. I've seen you ask Dora. Yeah and I've asked Dara the answer you get back. It is an emphatic. We love. We're besties release together.

Uber Cramer Ostra Xiaoping Travis Calsonic CEO Dara New York JIM Derek Dora Andrew Two Hundred Fifty Million Bill Five Billion Dollars Ten Percent
"dara" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"dara" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Dara when his herds required a new and larger pastures both place and time were changed had I dwelt nearer to those parts of the universe and to those eras in history which had most attracted me where Briolette was as far off as many region butte nightly by astronomers we are want to imagine where and delectable places in some remote and more celestial corner of the system behind the Constellation of Cassiopeia his chair far from noise and disturbance. I discovered that my house actually had it site in such withdrawn but forever new and unpreferred part of the universe if.

Dara Briolette