18 Burst results for "Dante Lauretta"

"dante lauretta" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:15 min | 2 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on Short Wave

"You're listening to shortwave from npr madison here with npr. Science correspondent nell greenfieldboyce high. No hey mattie so. It is the final day for voting. Which will prove to be a very stressful day. We have decided to promptly leave earth and go to space gonna escape that easy because you know there is still voting in space astronauts. Get to vote on space. That's true escape. But today we are talking. Asteroids specifically an asteroid named benue. It's more than two hundred million miles away. It orbits the sun in about one point. Two earth years nasa spacecraft to the asteroid in twenty sixteen right right so it reached the asteroid in two thousand eighteen. and it's been surveying benue and in the last few weeks it's been undertaking the most critical part of its mission. And let me tell you. It has been a crazy few weeks. I have been covering the whole thing and it's just been fascinating to watch. Okay first things i know. I know the earth gets hit by little space rocks all the time as a single planetary life-form how worried we need to be about this asteroid. Well technically it is considered to be potentially dangerous asteroid. It's wider than the empire. State building is tall. It shapes sort of like a spinning top. It's all gray and bumpy. And here's what dante lauretta. The principal scientist for the nasa mission. Had to say about this whole danger thing our most recent calculations suggest that it has about one in twenty seven hundred chance of impacting the earth. The good news is such an impact would not occur for at least one hundred fifty years. I mean that's not no chance now. You know what i mean. No it's not nothing but you know. Scientists are aware of it. They've got plenty of time to deal with this if it looks like it's going to become a problem and actually understanding more about this kind of asteroid threat is one of the reasons they built a spacecraft and send it out there in my understanding is that nasa wanted to do more than just look at this asteroid right. The scientists wanted to get up close and personal. They wanted to grab some of it and bring it back to earth exactly and there are so many ways. This mission could have gone wrong. The researchers spent years planning it worrying that they wouldn't be able to nab enough the asteroid to get a decent sample but as it.

nasa nell greenfieldboyce npr dante lauretta mattie madison principal scientist
"dante lauretta" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

Astronomy Cast

03:59 min | 2 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

"Watch together launch in september of two thousand sixteen and this little mission. I was one that had the youngest nasa of spacecraft today dante lauretta. It was run by really cool. Team of people university of arizona working with international partners nasa centers myriad of other institutions and. Canada had a laser altimeter. The sample they collected is going to end up getting split between the canadian team with that laser. Altimeter that we're going to return to because it was not used as planned the japanese team that they're going to be doing an exchange between The sample that comes back and the new sample that comes back. And then the rest is heading off to arizona for processing so in this case cyrus rex arrived at banu. In december of two thousand and eighteen. We began to get our first high-resolution images in two thousand and nineteen which caused me for one to completely panic. You have a little little skin in the game on this. One i did i did. So the cosmic christ citizen science community was part of the process for mapping out all the hazards benue. Now as i said before we expected benue to look a bit like eat akaba mostly smooth with areas. That were hazardous. We were expecting most of the images that came back would have a few boulders boulders. A few dozen rocks and we just map things out no big deal. The reality was each image had dozens of boulders and hundreds of rocks and all the software that we had written the process. Everything and sort everything. Do everything had to get redone to deal with the complexity of this little world that we found and making it even worse as the space craft approached benue cyrus wrecks in its camera glint of light from pebbles being flung by bhanu space. We had found a rock throwing asteroid. Right right yeah. I mean it's funny when i think i think it was donte was saying the landings the final landing site. That was chosen. I would not want to land a spacecraft. They're like it's a nightmare and yet it was the best possible landing site on on a nightmare rock. Yeah they they had to change their hazard conditions to go from having a area big enough to park a couple semi trucks to having an area big enough to park a couple. Suv's as their safety margin. And so they had this need to find some place that they could go down not hit the wings of the spacecraft on anything and that would be smooth enough that in all likelihood when they're tag instrument which is a flat disk hit the surface it would hit flat in the space craft wouldn't tell more than a few degrees and it turned out the only places that vaguely matched these conditions were areas. That were either craters creditors inside of craters. And these weren't normal looking craters. What these were areas where the rocks were more smashed than the regions around them and smashed rocks were in a fairly circular pattern indicating. This is a crater with the rocks. There got crushed Ninety gale crater where. They ended up. Doing their sample collection was in the northern part of the asteroid about fifty five degrees latitude and it was a crater with a few boulders that they.

Altimeter Ninety gale crater dante lauretta nasa people university of arizona arizona Canada donte
"dante lauretta" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

05:58 min | 2 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on Space Nuts

"So just to recap the the the the device that they use it's so the spacecraft itself off. Roaches the surface of the asteroid bennu or did this last week? In fact, whether it kind of almost like a miniature backhoe stretched out which contains a device on the end, which is called tag. Sam & Tags is an acronym for touch-and-go's sample acquisition mechanism. It's great. I love it, but I don't mind that one. I don't mind that one at all. It's got that sort of feeling of you know, just touching the surface to it. Hasn't it tag, sir? Yeah tag. Yeah like the game exactly. So so this is so sort of shaped like a, you know, a pan Which collects the the sample And then the Apparently is is a mylar flap which is meant to see or shut once the sample has been collected wage, but they were so successful with the tag, son that some of the some of the bigger bits of soil and dirt that didn't go through the page properly of wedged it open. No, you know, they've been they've collected more than they expected to and that essentially means that first of all they they had the possibility of collecting if they didn't feel they'd got enough they have the possibility of collecting another sample wage. I think the 11th of January, but that I think is now been ditched because they feel they've got enough in fact as as the NASA bulletin says because the first sample collection event log So successful NASA's science Mission directorate has given the mission team the go-ahead to expedite sample storage in originally scheduled for the 2nd of November in the spacecraft sample-return capsule two million, minimize further sample loss. So there's this separate capsule the SRC the sample-return capsule, which they've got a stove the sampling and what there's a quote from Dante lauretta who's the principal investigator for Osiris Rex University of Arizona off the abundance of material we collected from benu made it possible to expedite our decision to stove this team is now working around the clock to accelerate the storage timeline so we can protect as much of them this material as possible for return to earth. Now. This is where it gets tricky because what was expected to happen with this storage prestige. Was that a Cyrus Rex would run autonomously through a sequence of events. And so that's what they're doing now is saying no, we don't want that to happen. We want this to be done. So carefully carefully enough that we don't lose soil to space off. So they gotta do it all by hand. In other words send a command Watch What Happens and and then send the next command Watch What Happens the problem is? You've got thirty seven minute delay between sending the command and knowing what it's done because the signal travel time at the moment between Earth and the spacecraft is 18.55 minutes. So each step means that you've got a wait for 37 minutes while you take the step and then wait to see what's happened in in the in the concierge. Since it's going to be very very painful, I think Andrew this is probably happening as we speak because it's scheduled for the 27th of October us time. Yep..

NASA Sam Dante lauretta Cyrus Rex Osiris Rex University of Arizo benu principal investigator Andrew science Mission directorate
"dante lauretta" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

04:11 min | 2 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"In fact has as the NASA bulletin says because the first sample collection event was so successful Nasa Science Mission Directorate has given the mission team the go-ahead to expedite sample storage. In originally scheduled for the second of November. In the space craft sample return capsule to minimise for the sample loss. So this is a separate capsule, the Ash L. see the sample return capsule. which they've got a stow, the sampling and. One there's a quote from Dante Lauretta who's the principal investigator for Cyrus? Rex University of Arizona, the abundance of material we collected from new made it possible to expedite our decision to stow the team is now working around the clock to accelerate the storage line. So we can protect as much of this material as possible for return to Earth now. This is where it gets tricky because what was expected to happen with the storage procedure was that? Cyrus. Rex. would run autonomously through a sequence of events. and. So what they're doing now. A saying, no, we don't want that to happen. We want this to be done. So carefully, carefully enough that we don't lose soil face so they gotta do it all by hand in other words, send a command watch. What happens. And then send the next command watch. What happens the problem is you've got thirty seven minute delay between sending the command and knowing what he's done because they signal travel time at the moment between us and the spacecraft is eighteen point four, five minutes. So each step means that you've got a way for thirty seven minutes while you take the step and then wait to see what happened. In in the in the consequences, it's GonNa be very, very painful I. Think Andrew. This is probably happening as we speak 'cause shadow for the twenty seventh of October. USTA. I would we are the following day? So I, think it's happening now so By the time this this goes to add the outcome might note already oh drought. We've lost it all up. Sure it will be why. Hope not but yeah, it's In terms of glitches when it comes to space missions, this is not the worst. It's ever happened on a visit to another world or another object but. Know, there's been the famous cases of lind's caps getting stuck on by hate all sorts of weird and wonderful things but. it sounds like that go to solution and when Libby Watch. Documentaries or movies about problems in space it's always about working the problem and they obviously have got an idea on how to deal with this. The just GonNa have to be very careful with the execution. Thus correct exactly which is why the doing it one step at the. Rock will we might have a follow up to that yet again next week so we'll Kepa on the Sarah rix mission. which I think will only be the second time that a private is brought back matter from my an asteroid. I think the Japanese have done at once well, done it once already, and there's one other Japanese will on the way back, which will come down. Here in Australia in fact in December think. So. Not, Third attack is. Very good. While the more we get the more we learn that's what it's all about. Greed. Sorry. Any samples at least that we can get back. Absolutely invaluable scientifically. Indeed totally agree this.

Cyrus Nasa Science Mission Directora Dante Lauretta NASA principal investigator Rex University of Arizona USTA Rex. Andrew lind Australia Libby
"dante lauretta" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:42 min | 2 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

". This was a mission way we yet we sent the our SARS rex probe to the asteroid Banu, , which <hes> it sorta hung around. . Looking for a good long while up until last week when I decided I, , Kai we're GonNa land on this thing and take a sample while it was <hes> a success. . <hes> until it may be wasn't where we we've Houston, , we have a problem. . Yeah. . Hopefully, , not long term problem <unk> hopefully solvable but <hes>. . Yeah I think I think the bottom line is they were too successful would that be way of describing it? ? So the just to recap the the device that they use, , it's so the spacecraft itself approaches the surface of of asteroid. . Benadryl did this last week in fats. . With a kind of almost like a miniature BECO-. . Stretched out, , which contains a device on the end, , which is called Tag Sam. . Tag. . Sam Is an acronym for touch and go sample acquisition mechanism scrape. . On. . Mind that one. . That one at all go to the feeling of just touching the surface to it hasn't it tax tag lock the game. . Exactly. . So I'm so this is sort of like a pan. . which collects the the sample. . Then there apparently is. . <hes> as a Myla flap, , which is meant to seal shocked wants the sample has been collected. . Box they were so successful with the tags on the some of the some of the bigger bits of soil and doug that didn't go through the flat properly have wedged it open. . Now. . They've been the they've collected more than they expect it to. . And Dot. . Essentially. . Maine's that. . I feel that they have the possibility of collecting. If . they didn't feel that got enough they have the possibility of collecting another sample in January I think the eleventh of January but that I think has now been ditched because they feel they've got enough. . In fact has as the NASA bulletin says because the first sample collection event was so successful Nasa Science Mission Directorate has given the mission team the go-ahead to expedite sample storage. . In originally scheduled for the second of November. . In the space craft sample return capsule to minimise for the sample loss. . So this is a separate capsule, , the Ash L. see the sample return capsule. . which they've got a stow, , the sampling and. . One there's a quote from Dante Lauretta who's the principal investigator for Cyrus? ? Rex University of Arizona, , the abundance of material we collected from new made it possible to expedite our decision to stow the team is now working around the clock to accelerate the storage line. . So we can protect as much of this material as possible for return to Earth now. . This is where it gets tricky because what was expected to happen with the storage procedure was that? ? <hes> Cyrus. . Rex. . would run autonomously through a sequence of events. . and. . So what they're doing now. . A saying, , no, , we don't want that to happen. . We want this to be done. . So carefully, , carefully enough that we don't lose soil face so they gotta do it all by hand in other words, , send a command watch. . What happens. . And then send the next command watch. . What happens the problem is you've got thirty seven minute delay between sending the command and knowing what he's done because they <hes> signal travel time at the moment between us and the spacecraft is eighteen point four, , five minutes. . So each step means that you've got a way for thirty seven minutes while you take the step and then wait to see what happened. . In in the in the consequences, , it's GonNa be very, , very painful I. . Think Andrew. . This is probably happening as we speak 'cause shadow for the twenty seventh of October. . USTA. . I would we are the following day? ? So I, , think it's happening now so By the time this <hes> this goes to add the outcome might note already oh drought. . We've lost it all up. . Sure it will be why. . Hope not but yeah, , it's <hes>. . In terms of glitches when it comes to space missions, , this is not the worst. . It's ever happened on a visit to another world or another object but. . Know, there's , been the famous cases of lind's caps getting stuck on by hate all sorts of weird and wonderful things but. . <hes> it sounds like that go to solution and when Libby Watch. . Documentaries or movies about problems in space it's always about working the problem and they obviously have got an idea on how to deal with this. . The just GonNa have to be very careful with the execution. . Thus correct exactly which is why the doing it one step at the. .

Cyrus Nasa Science Mission Directora Dante Lauretta NASA principal investigator Rex University of Arizona USTA Rex. Andrew lind Australia Libby
Asteroid samples tucked into capsule for return to Earth

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:42 min | 2 months ago

Asteroid samples tucked into capsule for return to Earth

"This was a mission way we yet we sent the our SARS rex probe to the asteroid Banu, which it sorta hung around. Looking for a good long while up until last week when I decided I, Kai we're GonNa land on this thing and take a sample while it was a success. until it may be wasn't where we we've Houston, we have a problem. Yeah. Hopefully, not long term problem hopefully solvable but Yeah I think I think the bottom line is they were too successful would that be way of describing it? So the just to recap the the device that they use, it's so the spacecraft itself approaches the surface of of asteroid. Benadryl did this last week in fats. With a kind of almost like a miniature BECO-. Stretched out, which contains a device on the end, which is called Tag Sam. Tag. Sam Is an acronym for touch and go sample acquisition mechanism scrape. On. Mind that one. That one at all go to the feeling of just touching the surface to it hasn't it tax tag lock the game. Exactly. So I'm so this is sort of like a pan. which collects the the sample. Then there apparently is. as a Myla flap, which is meant to seal shocked wants the sample has been collected. Box they were so successful with the tags on the some of the some of the bigger bits of soil and doug that didn't go through the flat properly have wedged it open. Now. They've been the they've collected more than they expect it to. And Dot. Essentially. Maine's that. I feel that they have the possibility of collecting. If they didn't feel that got enough they have the possibility of collecting another sample in January I think the eleventh of January but that I think has now been ditched because they feel they've got enough. In fact has as the NASA bulletin says because the first sample collection event was so successful Nasa Science Mission Directorate has given the mission team the go-ahead to expedite sample storage. In originally scheduled for the second of November. In the space craft sample return capsule to minimise for the sample loss. So this is a separate capsule, the Ash L. see the sample return capsule. which they've got a stow, the sampling and. One there's a quote from Dante Lauretta who's the principal investigator for Cyrus? Rex University of Arizona, the abundance of material we collected from new made it possible to expedite our decision to stow the team is now working around the clock to accelerate the storage line. So we can protect as much of this material as possible for return to Earth now. This is where it gets tricky because what was expected to happen with the storage procedure was that? Cyrus. Rex. would run autonomously through a sequence of events. and. So what they're doing now. A saying, no, we don't want that to happen. We want this to be done. So carefully, carefully enough that we don't lose soil face so they gotta do it all by hand in other words, send a command watch. What happens. And then send the next command watch. What happens the problem is you've got thirty seven minute delay between sending the command and knowing what he's done because they signal travel time at the moment between us and the spacecraft is eighteen point four, five minutes. So each step means that you've got a way for thirty seven minutes while you take the step and then wait to see what happened. In in the in the consequences, it's GonNa be very, very painful I. Think Andrew. This is probably happening as we speak 'cause shadow for the twenty seventh of October. USTA. I would we are the following day? So I, think it's happening now so By the time this this goes to add the outcome might note already oh drought. We've lost it all up. Sure it will be why. Hope not but yeah, it's In terms of glitches when it comes to space missions, this is not the worst. It's ever happened on a visit to another world or another object but. Know, there's been the famous cases of lind's caps getting stuck on by hate all sorts of weird and wonderful things but. it sounds like that go to solution and when Libby Watch. Documentaries or movies about problems in space it's always about working the problem and they obviously have got an idea on how to deal with this. The just GonNa have to be very careful with the execution. Thus correct exactly which is why the doing it one step at the.

Cyrus SAM KAI Dante Lauretta Houston Nasa Rex University Of Arizona Nasa Science Mission Directora Maine Lind Principal Investigator Libby Usta Rex. Andrew
"dante lauretta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:04 min | 3 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Returns. We're supposed to be behind just big, right? That way behind for years wave is going to be much bigger. But with 10 days to go before Election Day, President Trump is trailing in most national polls. And each side is working hard to turn out supporters Franco or Dona as NPR news on days left until the election day Corona virus infections in the U. S air surging, according to Johns Hopkins University has reported more than 83,000 new infections yesterday, a daily record. Democrat Joe Biden has been attacking the president over his handling of the pandemic over 19 dwarfs anything we've faced in recent history. Isn't showing any signs of slowing down. Speaking from Wilmington in his home state of Delaware, Biden pledged to work with Congress to get a new economic relief package enacted by the end of January. He is to campaign in Pennsylvania today. President Trump says that Sudan will start to normalize ties with Israel, becoming the third Arab state to do so in recent months. US. Meantime, taking Sudan off a terrorism list as NPR's Michelle Cullman reports President Trump was surrounded by his aides and had the leaders of Sudan and Israel on speakerphone as he announced the deal. Today's peace agreement will enhance Israel security and incidents long isolation. From the world because of what was taking place. He's notified Congress that he's taking Sudan off the list of state sponsors of terrorism. For its part, Sudan, which once housed Osama bin Laden put aside $335 million to compensate some of the victims of the 1998 U. S. Embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania. Trump is predicting that five more Arab states will soon normalized ties with Israel. Michelle Kelemen NPR News around is denouncing the Trump Administration broker deal between Sudan and Israel. Iran's Foreign Ministry Saying today the agreement to normalize relations it's phony and secured by ransom. New clashes are being reported today between us or by John and Armenia over the disputed region of Nagorno Karabakh. A day after talks in Washington aimed at halting the fighting, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met separately with foreign ministers of Azerbaijan and Armenia to Russian brokered cease fires collapsed. This is NPR. Dry winds this weekend in California could prompt intentional blackouts in an effort to prevent wildfires. The state's largest utility, Pacific Gas and Electric says more than a million people in 38 counties could be affected most in the San Francisco Bay area, PG and E. Says. Safety blackouts could begin as early as tomorrow morning. A NASA spacecraft that collected rocks from an asteroid this week picked up a lot of material. In fact, it's scooped up so much, there's an unexpected problem. NPR's Nell Greenfield. VOICE reports. When researchers used a camera on the Cyrus Rex spacecraft to look at it sample collection device they saw that it seems to be holding hundreds of grams of asteroid material. But some of it is escaping a mile are flap isn't closing right because rocks are jammed in there. Dante Lauretta is the mission's principal investigator, He says they think they're losing only a small fraction of the material. But it's more than I'm comfortable with. You know, I was pretty concerned when I saw these images coming in. To prevent further loss. The team is making preparations to stow the collecting device in its return capsule as soon as possible. The capsule will return to Earth in 2023, Nell Greenfield, Boyce NPR News in Washington state scientists are planning to wipe out a nest of so called murder Hornets today. The nest is the first to be discovered in the United States workers with the state Agriculture Department's been weeks finding in the Asian giant hornets or a big threat to honeybees..

President Trump Sudan NPR Israel Joe Biden US Nell Greenfield president Congress Washington Trump Administration Johns Hopkins University Dante Lauretta Osama bin Laden Franco Pacific Gas and Electric Armenia state Agriculture Department
"dante lauretta" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:22 min | 3 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on KCRW

"Corona virus hit so many nursing homes so hard? I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well king. It may not only have been residents agent put them at risk. Some long term care facility skimp on care. While making investors money. Today, the Food and Drug Administration will meet to discuss how to ensure a Corona virus vaccine is safe. Theis FDA won't be reviewing a specific vaccine. Yet the point is to give Americans some doubtful reassurance that safety is a priority. It's Thursday, October A second. Jeff Goldblum is 16 in the news is next. Bye from NPR News on Corvin Coleman, President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden will hold their second and last debate tonight. Before the November election. The leech get two minutes of uninterrupted time to speak at the start of each segment. The other candidates, microphone will be muted. The U. S government says Iran and Russia have taken specific actions to influence public opinion about US elections as NPR's miles parks reports. The announcement comes after voters in Alaska and Florida reported receiving threatening emails about voting. The emails purported to come from the far right extremist group, the proud boys. They threatened voters to change their voter registration and a vote for Republicans. But national security officials now say the emails actually came from Iran, and they were meant to start polarization and undermine confidence in the election. Officials say Iran also circulated a video falsely claiming that foreign countries Khun successfully cheat mail voting systems. NPR's miles. Parks reporting the US Supreme Court is backing a decision by Alabama election officials. In a 5 to 3 decision, the justices upheld a ban on curbside voting in Alabama. From member station W. B H M in Birmingham, G Do Ban has more Alabama's Republican Secretary of state, John Merrill, called the practice of curbside voting fraudulent and the U. S. Supreme Court's ruling now blocks that option for Alabama voters, the three liberal justices on the nation's high court wrote in there dissenting opinion. That the court should not stand in the way of some election officials who want to help vulnerable voters cast their ballots without risking infection from the Corona virus. Curbside voting had been used to help voters with disabilities and others at risk of contracting the virus. State Attorney General Steve Marshall argued the practice presents logistical and ballot secrecy concerns for NPR news. I'm G do ban in Birmingham, Alabama, officials from some states and some members of Congress are criticizing a Justice Department settlement with Purdue Pharma over the company's illegal marketing of opioid pain medications. NPR's Brian Man reports. They say the settlement doesn't do enough to punish the company's billionaire owners. Purdue Pharma apologized yesterday for its past practices, pushing high risk drugs like OxyContin and agreed to pay more than $8 billion in criminal and civil fines. But the company's owner's members of the Sackler family admit no wrongdoing and will face no criminal charges. New Hampshire Senator Maggie Hassan blasted the Justice Department deal the Sackler family siphoned off $10 billion, according to reports from produce profits to protect that money from bankruptcy, And yet they are only contributing $225 million in this settlement, and that's really letting them off the hook. More than two dozen state attorneys general are now urging a federal bankruptcy judge to reject this settlement. Brian Man NPR news This is NPR. The European Union has awarded its annual human rights prize to the opposition movement in Belarus. EU has presented them with the sack Ralph Prize for their challenge to the authoritarian rule of Bella Russian President Alexander Lukashenko. He's claimed a six term in office despite disputed election results. Scientists say they are jubilant after watching images taken by a NASA spacecraft. It briefly landed on a faraway asteroid. NPR's know Greenfield Boys reports, the probe may have collected a good sample of dust and rock. Yo Cyrus Rex spacecraft touch down on an asteroid that's over 200 million miles away. The probe made contact with the surface for just six seconds. Dante Lauretta is the mission's principal investigator, He says it looks like the spacecraft sample collection device sank down at least a couple of centimetres into the surface. And so everything that we can see from these initial images indicate sampling success. They'll be taking photos of the collection device and running tests to determine just how much rock it got. If necessary. The spacecraft could try again before leaving the asteroid in March to return to Earth. Nell Greenfield Boyce NPR NEWS, An American astronaut, and two Russian cosmonauts have safely returned from the international space station landing in Kazakhstan. NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and his two Russian colleagues spent six months aboard the orbiting outpost There. Replacement team, including NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, arrived at the international space station about a week ago. On Corvo Coleman NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations..

NPR NPR News Alabama NASA Iran Corvo Coleman NPR Purdue Pharma Food and Drug Administration Brian Man Birmingham Steve Inskeep U. S. Supreme Court Justice Department Jeff Goldblum European Union Nell Greenfield Boyce Kate Rubins Joe Biden Dante Lauretta
"dante lauretta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:56 min | 3 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good morning. Tonight is the final debate of the 2020 presidential campaign. Joe Biden and Donald Trump meet in Nashville. What can they say? That hasn't already been said it's morning edition from NPR News. Why did Corona Virus hit so many nursing homes so hard? I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well king. It may not only have been residents age with the mid risk some long term care Bility skimp on care. While making investors money. Today, the Food and Drug Administration will meet to discuss how to ensure a Corona virus vaccine is safe. Theis FDA won't be reviewing a specific vaccine. Yet The point is to give Americans some doubtful reassurance that safety is a priority. It's Thursday, October 22nd. Jeff Goldblum is 60. And the news is next. Bye from NPR News. I'm Corvette Coleman, President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden will hold their second at last debate tonight. Before the November election. The leech get two minutes of uninterrupted time to speak at the start of each segment. The other candidates, microphone will be muted. The U. S government says Iran and Russia have taken specific actions to influence public opinion about US elections as NPR's miles parks reports. The announcement comes after voters in Alaska and Florida reported receiving threatening emails about voting. Emails purported to come from a far right extremist group, the proud boys. They threatened voters to change the voter registration and a vote for Republicans. But national security officials now say the emails actually came from Iran, and they were meant to start polarization and undermine confidence in the election. Officials say Iran also circulated a video falsely claiming that foreign countries Khun successfully cheat mail voting systems. NPR's miles. Parks reporting the US Supreme Court is backing a decision by Alabama election officials. In a 5 to 3 decision, the justices upheld a ban on curbside voting in Alabama. From member station W. B H M in Birmingham, G Do Ban has more Alabama's Republican Secretary of state, John Merrill, called the practice of curbside voting fraudulent and the U. S. Supreme Court's ruling now blocks that option for Alabama voters, the three liberal justices on the nation's high court wrote in there dissenting opinion. That the court should not stand in the way of some election officials who want to help vulnerable voters cast their ballots without risking infection from the Corona virus. Curbside voting had been used to help voters with disabilities and others at risk of contracting the virus. State Attorney General Steve Marshall argued the practice presents logistical and ballot secrecy. Concerns for NPR news. I'm G do ban in Birmingham, Alabama, officials from some states and some members of Congress are criticizing a Justice Department settlement with Purdue Pharma. Over the company's illegal marketing of opioid pain medications. NPR's Brian Man reports. They say the settlement doesn't do enough to punish the company's billionaire owners. Purdue Pharma apologized yesterday for its past practices, pushing high risk drugs like OxyContin and agreed to pay more than $8 billion in criminal and civil fines. But the company's owner's members of the Sackler family admit no wrongdoing and will face no criminal charges. New Hampshire Senator Maggie Hassan blasted the Justice Department deal The Sacra family siphoned off $10 billion, according to reports from produce profits to protect that money from bankruptcy. And yet they are only contributing $225 million in this settlement, and that's really letting them off the hook. More than two dozen state attorneys general are now urging a federal bankruptcy judge to reject this settlement. Ryan Man. NPR news. This is NPR. The European Union has awarded its annual human rights prize to the opposition movement in Belarus. EU has presented them with the sacker ofthe prize for their challenge to the authoritarian rule of Bella, Russian President Alexander Lukashenko. He's claimed a six term in office despite disputed election results. Scientists say they are jubilant after watching images taken by a NASA spacecraft. It briefly landed on a faraway asteroid. NPR's know Greenfield Boys reports, the probe may have collected a good sample of dust and rock. Yo Cyrus Rex spacecraft touch down on an asteroid that's over 200 million miles away. The probe made contact with the surface for just six seconds. Dante Lauretta is the mission's principal investigator, He says it looks like the spacecraft sample collection device sank down at least a couple of centimetres into the surface. And so everything that we can see from these initial.

NPR News NPR Alabama U. S. Supreme Court Food and Drug Administration Joe Biden Purdue Pharma Iran President Trump Birmingham Steve Inskeep Dante Lauretta Justice Department Jeff Goldblum Nashville Alexander Lukashenko NASA European Union Senator Maggie Hassan
"dante lauretta" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:16 min | 3 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"All right. So we have this little spacecraft There's been flying along is heading up towards this towards this asteroid, and the whole idea was to go Park next to the asteroid, take some pictures and then parallel park on the asteroid. And then take some samples. Gonna poke it. It's got like an 11 ft Long poker. Right? Is called. Oh, Cyrus. Rex. All right. It's going to collect some loose rubble and the video of this on on. Well, I got the story office science alert. NASA has really good video of it as well. Is cool critical, and the amazing thing is Initially, when we saw this has story the asteroid is called being a B And and you We saw it. It was thought to be just by radar imagery kind of this. It looks like a top like a spinning top. Now we've got there taking pictures. It's exactly Like we thought it was going to be so I mean, that's you know, it's nice to have confidence in science. Has been, you know, it's proved to be correct. Anyway, So we're gonna We're gonna weld obey. No Urbino is cruising along. You know, it's it's coca, and it's going 63,000 miles an hour. So we're going toe pull up to it. In our You know? 61 Of Cyrus Rex with baby moons were gonna pull up next to her going to parallel park, and we're going to poke it and collect some dust. And collect some rocks. All goes according to plan, the spacecraft will deploy And 11 FT. Long robotic arm called Tag, Sam Tag, Sam touch and Go Sample acquisition mechanism. They have acronym for Everything. NASA does. I mean, it's like the Army? We gotta have an acronym. I was going to spend about 10 seconds. His 11 ft arm. Gonna pick up about two ounces two ounces. Of loose rubble. On the asteroid. It is, of course, being remotely monitored by a team of scientists and engineers. Is going to stow the sample. And rather than you know, zap it. Blow it apart in hit her with a spectrometer. It's actually going to fly it back to Earth. Scheduled to be back in town somewhere around 2023 Now here's the cool thing. Oh, crap. Actually happening right now. Go right now touch and go going around right now. You can watch it on national television. Or on the website, NASA website Crap. I didn't really started at three o'clock start 13 minutes ago. So you go there right now. Hate hate for you to leave me. You can actually watch the touch and go. Sample collection with the arm to tag Sam going on right now on NASA television or the website. Now. What's the point? Right? What's the point? Well, first of all, This here, Benno or be know as the right thing. On some sometime late in the 21. Hundreds could become a problem for us so we can look at it. We can analyse it. We can poke it. We can see how hard it is. And you know how can we divert it? So doesn't smash into planet Earth. Long time from now, But you know, probably probably well, it's debatable. Whether they're still be human humanoids on earth by them. Probably going to go extinct because of climate change, but anyone they'll be something here. We're saving. So Ah, University of Arizona has been a big part of this. Planning constructing the whole thing. So there there are some practical application. Now. The asteroids, especially asteroids in near Earth orbit, as Bono is And teach us about formation of our solar system. Dr Michael Drake. Who was the head of the University of Arizona Luna, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. And his protege by the name of Dante Lauretta. It's a great name. Dante Lauretta. Also from University of Arizona Planetary science. Working with Lockheed Martin and NASA. And they started planning this out a long time ago. Obviously, you've got to get a bill you gotta you know. Do all the math all day. Trajectories to fire this thing off in exact right second from the exact right spot. I have to go meet up with the asteroid. These are relics. Fossils of the earliest materials. That formed the solar system and by extension, Planet Earth. So if we can actually get samples, bring him back. We can answer some Potentially really fundamental questions. About how our little solar system formed. No science is one step built upon another stone noticed him. So That's the That's the whole point that's going on, actually right now. I would watch it, But I have no idea if I get NASA TV, bad planning Richard on my television here. So that is called a Cyrus. Hyphen Rex. And the asteroid is B e in and you I don't know if Thea Cyrus Rex looks like a 61 in power or not. That's my take on it. 17 minutes after when I first laid eyes on, you asshole Due in today to clean the fixed me up just.

NASA Thea Cyrus Rex University of Arizona Sam touch Lockheed Martin Dante Lauretta Urbino University of Arizona Planetar Go Sample Sam Tag Benno Sam Army Dr Michael Drake Bono Planetary Laboratory Richard
"dante lauretta" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:34 min | 3 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Now, the Dow, the NASDAQ The SNP are all 1% and Mohr higher Right now. It's a great day for the markets. 1 20 Tomorrow's the day that Governor Cuomo is expected to lift Select Corona virus shut down orders in Queens Mayor Bill de Blasio, expressing some optimism. Today, I have every expectation that the state eyes preparing to act to remove restrictions in central Queens, but again pending final confirmation. Pending final Look at the data. We got some more to do in some of the other neighborhoods. But I have to say again. What we're seeing in central Queens reminds everyone that we can move through this quickly. That if folks go out and get tested, that we can get through this quickly of folks do the social distancing and where the mass we can get through this quickly, so hopefully we get good news on central Queens soon and then the other areas soon thereafter. You can't imagine anyone would still need to hear this. But the CDC is issued a strong recommendation that everyone wear a mask on planes, trains, subways, buses, taxis and rideshare vehicles. The guidance also calls for face coverings, transportation hubs, including airports and train stations, Airlines, Amtrak and most public system's already require masks. But back in July, the White House opposed language in the bill before Congress that would have required masks on all airlines, trains and public transit. A NASA spacecraft is attempting to collect a sample from the asteroid named Bennu. CBS's Mark Strausman spoke with the mission leader, Dante Lauretta on this I saw those first images coming in, and I thought, Oh, boy, we're in for a real challenge here venue is covered in boulders to find a safe spot to grab a sample. Scientists spent a year mapping every square ridge. They settled on small clearing called Nightingale Crater, and there's a large rock on the Eastern rim that I call Mount Doom. That's about 10 M are 30 ft. Tall, and we definitely don't want to fly into that The spacecraft is about the size of a large van. It has to maneuver into an area the size of a few parking spaces. It's 11 FT. Long arm ends with a sort of space vacuum cleaner designed to collect about two ounces of asteroid gravel Get a couple of New York City radio reporters who park in the spaces in this town. I have no problem squeezing that thing in The asteroid, by the way, is about as long as the Empire State Building and CBS's Mark Strausman there with the the folks behind that you have just about the coolest jobs on the planet 1 23 of WCBS Wall Street next, and Joe Connelly, standing by Progressive.

Queens Bill de Blasio CBS Mark Strausman Governor Cuomo Dante Lauretta Empire State Building Joe Connelly New York City Nightingale Crater NASA CDC White House Mount Doom Congress
"dante lauretta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:11 min | 3 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot ay ay. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. Good morning, The Justice Department has charged six Russian intelligence officers in connection with hacking computer systems around the world. The US, France and Ukraine were all affected Other countries and some companies, too. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here with details. Good morning, right. Good morning, knowing how significant were these attacks? These attacks are a big deal, officials and experts say that there's some of the most damaging cyber attacks that we've seen in recent years. And the indictment spells them all out. It starts with cyber attacks that targeted Ukraine's electricity grid. Back in the winner's of 2015 and 2016. Here's how the head of the Justice Department's national security division, John Dimmers, described those These attacks turned out the lights and turned off the heat. In the middle of the eastern European winter as the lives of hundreds of thousands of Ukrainian men, women and Children when dark and cold Now the defendants are also accused of a really nasty cyberattack known is not Petra. That initially targeted you targeted Ukraine but very quickly spread across the globe. It caused billions of dollars in damages included in the United States. The indictment says that it knocked the hospital system in Pennsylvania offline, including its critical systems. In one company in the U. S. According to the indictment, spent half a billion dollars. Dealing with the fallout from that attack was that's a lot of money and also in the case of Ukraine. A lot of people A lot of people hurt absolutely absolutely. And there's more in the indictment more attacks there. They allegedly conducted a hack and leak operation in the run up to France's 2017 election. That targeted the campaign of the now president of France, Emmanuel Macron. Then there are cyber attack start targeting the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. There's an interesting thing in the indictment here, saying that the Russians tried to leave digital fingerprints behind a frame North Korea for that one on. Finally, there are hacks that targeted the investigations. That British and international authorities were conducting into the poisoning of a former Russian spy in the UK with a nerve agent. Who are these guys at the Justice Department is charging. Of the department says that all six men who are facing charges are current or former members of Russia's military intelligence CH intelligence agency. That's the GR EW. It's the same Russian intelligence service that was responsible for some of the hacks that we saw targeting the U. S election back in 2016. Interestingly, one of the defendants here was also charged as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation back in 2018, But this new indictment and the allegations that are in it, it shows what Justice Department officials say. Is really Russia's reckless use of cyber attacks. Here again is the Justice Department's John Murmurs. No country has weaponized. It's cyber capabilities as maliciously and irresponsibly as Russia. Wantonly, causing unprecedented collateral damage to pursue small tactical advantages and fits of spite. Now, the DOJ says these attacks pursued Russia's geo political goals. Take Ukraine, for example, Ukraine and Russia have been locked in a worn out for several years in eastern Ukraine. Now hacks targeting the 2018 Olympics Olympics could be seen. Maura's a fit of spite is dimmers Put it there. Russian athletes were banned from competing under the Russian flag because of a massive state sponsored doping scandal in Russia really runs the gamut Let me ask you, Lastly is the GR you meddled in the 2016 election. Does this indictment say or suggest that they're interfering in this election? There's nothing related to that in this indictment, and U. S. Officials said in announcing these charges that the timing was not tied it all to the political schedule that said, this is a good reminder of what Russian state hackers are capable of. On. It also makes clear that they didn't tone it down after the US called the Russians out for election interference back in 2016. In this case, none of the defendants eyes in U. S custody. It's unlikely that any of them ever will be still, U. S. Officials say it is worth putting the way to the U. S government behind these allegations and calling rush out. Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks, Ryan. Thank you. Today, the space agency NASA will try to land a spacecraft on an asteroid, a hunk of rock in space that is roughly the size of a large building on Earth. The spacecraft only needs to stay there for 5 to 10 seconds just long enough to collect some dust and rocks, which is pretty cool if it works. Which it might not. Here's NPR's Nell Greenfield voice. The asteroid is named Ben. You It's about 200 million miles away, and it's a potentially dangerous asteroid. Our most recent calculations suggest that it has about a one in 2700 chance of impacting the earth. Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona is the principal investigator for a NASA mission called Oh, Cyrus Rex. He says. The good news is this asteroid wouldn't hit Earth for at least 150 years and part of the Cyrus Rex mission is to better understand that impact probability. What's more, asteroids are like pristine relics of the early solar system undisturbed leftovers from when the planets first formed. So NASA isn't the only space agency interested in asteroids. Japan's has already collected a tiny amount of asteroid material that's on its way back to Earth. It will get here in December. Lori Glazes, head of NASA's planetary science division, she says the agencies have been collaborating. And of course, we'll be exchanging portions of each other's sample so that we can maximize the science. Assuming NASA's effort goes off without a hitch. It's probe arrived at Ben knew a couple years ago, giving researchers there. First up close view of this asteroid. Lauretta says they were expecting a smooth sandy surface immediately. I was struck by how rough and rugged and rocky the surface Wass, it's been a real challenge to find a relatively rock free spot where the probe could be ordered to briefly touched down. Later today, operators will send the go command. As the spacecraft leaves orbit and ventures down. The scientists will only be able to watch a trickle of data coming back. There's nothing we can do to change the course of events. In fact, by the time we get the data, everything that happened was 18.5 minutes in the past because that's how far away the spacecraft is from the Earth. The spacecraft, which is about the size of a big passenger van. We'll head to a crater that's about the size of a tennis court. But it's filled with boulders. So we're actually targeting a site about half that size about 10 M. Across this is roughly the size of a few parking spaces in a parking lot. If the spacecrafts onboard systems decide that it's likely to hit a dangerous rock, it might call off the attempt. If everything goes just right. The research team will know right away if they have touched the surface, knowing if they've got a sample will take longer Bath. Buck is the mission operations program manager at Lockheed Martin Space. Our first imagery will start coming in on Wednesday, and that will give us a much better field or whether we have a sample or not, and how the spacecraft is actually performing. With luck, they'll have collected everything from tiny grains to stones. Nearly an inch across Heather E. Knows of the University of Arizona is the deputy principal investigator for the mission. The best outcome would be that we would collect A mass of sample and we say we have a requirement of 60 grand or two ounces, but we have the capability of collecting up 2 kg and I would love for that capsule to be completely full. By October 30th. The team will decide whether or not to try another sample collection attempt in January, and in March, the spacecraft will start its two year journey back home. Nell Greenfield Boyce. NPR NEWS This is NPR NEWS. Joe McConnell with the traffic update as the time approaches 7 43 beginning in San Mateo. South one a one a 92 reports of a big rig stall and blocking the right lane and.

Ukraine Justice Department NASA Russia United States NPR News NPR Ryan Lucas France Dante Lauretta U. S. Officials University of Arizona Steve Inskeep U. S Ben principal investigator South Korea North Korea Nell Greenfield Boyce Olympics
"dante lauretta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:40 min | 3 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Should be available to everybody, but it's not free to produce and that's why we come to you just a few times a year and ask you to pitch in and do your part. So if you're able to help, please pick up that phone now and call us at 888. 376 w N Y C. That's 888376969 to you. That's right. We are counting on your voluntary donations. We thank you very much for listening. And we thank you very much for your support. If you're able to give here's that number once again, 888 3769692 and the website WN y si dot or gui Thank you very much. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. Good morning, The Justice Department has charged six Russian intelligence officers in connection with hacking computer systems around the world. The US, France and Ukraine were all affected Other countries and some companies to NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here with details. Good morning, right. Good morning. How significant were these attacks? These attacks are a big deal, officials and experts say that there's some of the most damaging cyber attacks that we've seen in recent years on the indictment spells them all out. It starts with Cyber attacks that targeted Ukraine's electricity grid. Back in the winner's of 2015 and 2016. Here's how the head of the Justice Department's National security division, John Dimmers, described those thes attacks turned out the lights and turned off the heat. In the middle of the eastern European winter as the lives of hundreds of thousands of Ukrainian men, women and Children when dark and cold Now the defendants are also accused of a really nasty cyberattack known is not Pecchia. That initially targeted you targeted Ukraine but very quickly spread across the globe. It caused billions of dollars in damages included in the United States. The indictment says that it knocked a hospital system in Pennsylvania offline, including its critical systems. On one company in the U. S. According to the indictment spent half a billion dollars. Dealing with the fallout from that attack was that's a lot of money and also in the case of Ukraine. A lot of people are lot of people hurt. Absolutely absolutely. And there's more in the indictment, more attacks there allegedly conducted a hack and leak operation in the run up to France's 2017 election that targeted the campaign of the now president of France, Emmanuel Macron. Then there are cyberattacks heart targeting the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. There's an interesting thing in the indictment here, saying that the Russians tried to leave digital fingerprints behind a frame North Korea for that one on. Finally, there are hacks that targeted the investigations. That British and international authorities were conducting into the poisoning of a former Russian spy in the UK with a nerve agent. Who are these guys that the Justice Department is charging. So the department says that all six men who are facing charges are current or former members of Russia's military intelligence CIA intelligence agency. That's the GR EW. It's the same Russian intelligence service that was responsible for some of the hacks that we saw targeting the U. S election back in 2016. Interestingly, one of the defendants here was also charged as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation back in 2018, But this new indictment and the allegations that are in it, it shows what Justice Department officials say. Is really Russia's reckless use of cyber attacks. Here again is the Justice Department's John Murmurs. No country has weaponized. It's cyber capabilities. Has maliciously and irresponsibly as Russia. Wantonly, causing unprecedented collateral damage to pursue small tactical advantages and fits of spite. Now, the DOJ says these attacks pursued Russia's geo political goals. Take Ukraine, for example, Ukraine and Russia have been locked in a worn out for several years in eastern Ukraine. Now hacks targeting the 2018 Olympics Olympics could be seen. Maura's A fit of spite is dimmers Put it there. Russian athletes were banned from competing under the Russian flag because of a massive state sponsored doping scandal in Russia really runs the gamut. Let me ask you, lastly to the GR, you meddled in the 2016 election does this indictment say, or suggests that they're interfering in this election? There's nothing related to that in this indictment, and U. S. Officials said in announcing these charges that the timing was not tied it all to the political schedule that said, this is a good reminder of what Russian state hackers are capable of. On. It also makes clear that they didn't tone it down after the US called the Russians out for election interference back in 2016. In this case, none of the defendants eyes in U. S custody. It's unlikely that any of them ever will be Still, U. S. Officials say it is worth putting the way to the U. S government behind these allegations and calling rush out. Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks, Ryan. Thank you. Today, the space agency NASA will try to land a spacecraft on an asteroid ah, hunk of rock in space that is roughly the size of a large building on earth. The spacecraft only needs to stay there for 5 to 10 seconds just long enough to collect some dust and rocks, which is pretty cool. If it works, which it might not. Here's NPR's Nell Greenfield voice. The asteroid is named Ben. You It's about 200 million miles away, and it's a potentially dangerous asteroid. Our most recent calculations suggest that it has about a one in 2700 chance of impacting the earth. Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona is the principal investigator for a NASA mission called Oh, Cyrus Rex. He says. The good news is this asteroid wouldn't hit Earth for at least 150 years and part of the Cyrus Rex mission is to better understand that impact probability. What's more, asteroids are like pristine relics of the early solar system undisturbed leftovers from when the planets first formed. So NASA isn't the only space agency interested in asteroids. Japan's has already collected a tiny amount of asteroid material that's on its way back to Earth. It will get here in December. Lori Glazes, head of NASA's planetary science division, She says the agencies have been collaborating and of course, we'll be exchanging portions of each other's sample so that we can maximize the science, assuming NASA's effort goes off without a hitch. It's probe arrived at Ben knew a couple years ago, giving researchers there first up close view of this asteroid, Lauretta says they were expecting a smooth sandy surface immediately. I was struck by how rough and rugged and rocky the surface Wass, it's been a real challenge to find a relatively rock free spot where the probe could be ordered to briefly touched down. Later today, operators will send the go command. As the spacecraft leaves orbit and ventures down. The scientists will only be able to watch a trickle of data coming back. There's nothing we can do to change the course of events. In fact, by the time we get the data, everything that happened was 18.5 minutes in the past because that's how far away the spacecraft is from the Earth. The spacecraft, which is about the size of a big passenger van will head to a crater that's about the size of a tennis court. But it's Old with boulders. So we're actually targeting a site about half that size about 10 M. Across this is roughly the size of a few parking spaces in a parking lot. If the spacecrafts onboard systems decide that it's likely to hit a dangerous rock, it might call off the attempt. If everything goes just right. The research team will know right away if they have touched the surface, knowing if they've got a sample will take longer Bath. Buck is the mission operations program manager at Lockheed Martin Space. Our first imagery will start coming in on Wednesday, and that will give us a much better feel for whether we have a sample. Or not, and how the spacecraft is actually performing. With luck. They'll have collected everything from tiny grains to stones. Nearly an inch across Heather E. Knows of the University of Arizona is the deputy principal investigator for the mission. The best outcome would be that we would collect A mass of sample and we say we have a requirement of 60 grand or two ounces, but we have the capability of collecting up 2 kg and I would love for that capsule to be completely full. By October 30th. The team will decide whether or not to try another sample collection attempt in January, and in March, the spacecraft will start its two year journey back home. Nell Greenfield. Boyce. NPR NEWS This's NPR news. WNYC supporters include Geico insurance, celebrating Over 75.

Ukraine Justice Department Russia Ryan Lucas NASA United States NPR News NPR France Nell Greenfield Steve Inskeep University of Arizona U. S principal investigator Ben U. S. Officials South Korea North Korea Dante Lauretta Olympics
"dante lauretta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:14 min | 3 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at Enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn Maurizi three. Dottie, I And by the listeners and members of the public radio. I'm Dave Freeman at 5 35. Good morning. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. Good morning, The Justice Department has charged six Russian intelligence officers in connection with hacking computer systems around the world. The US, France and Ukraine were all affected Other countries and some companies, too. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here with details. Good morning, right. Good morning, knowing how significant were these attacks? These attacks are a big deal, officials and experts say that there's some of the most damaging cyber attacks that we've seen in recent years. And the indictment spells them all out. It starts with cyber attacks that targeted Ukraine's electricity grid. Back in the winner's of 2015 and 2016. Here's how the head of the Justice Department's national security division, John Dimmers, described those These attacks turned out the lights and turned off the heat. In the middle of the eastern European winter as the lives of hundreds of thousands of Ukrainian men, women and Children when dark and cold Now the defendants are also accused of a really nasty cyberattack known is not Petra. That initially targeted you targeted Ukraine but very quickly spread across the globe. It caused billions of dollars in damages included in the United States. The indictment says that it knocked the hospital system in Pennsylvania offline, including its critical systems. On one company in the U. S. According to the indictment spent half a billion dollars. Dealing with the fallout from that attack was that's a lot of money and also in the case of Ukraine. A lot of people are a lot of people hurt. Absolutely absolutely. And there's more in the indictment, more attacks there allegedly conducted a hack and leak operation in the run up to France's 2017 election that targeted the campaign of the now president of France, Emmanuel Macron. Then there are cyberattacks heart targeting the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. There's an interesting thing in the indictment here, saying that the Russians tried to leave digital fingerprints behind the frame North Korea for that one on. Finally, there are hacks that targeted the investigations. That British and international authorities were conducting into the poisoning of a former Russian spy in the UK with a nerve agent. Who are these guys that the Justice Department is charging? To the department says that all six men who are facing charges are current or former members of Russia's military intelligence CH intelligence agency. That's the GR EW. It's the same Russian intelligence service that was responsible for some of the hacks that we saw targeting the U. S election back in 2016. Interestingly, one of the defendants here was also charged as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation Back in 2018. But this new indictment and the allegations that are in it, it shows what Justice Department officials say is really Russia's reckless use of cyber attacks Here again is the Justice Department's John Dimmers. No country has weaponized. It's cyber capabilities as maliciously and irresponsibly as Russia. Wantonly, causing unprecedented collateral damage to pursue small tactical advantages and fits of spite. Now, the DOJ says these attacks pursued Russia's G of political goals. Take Ukraine, for example, Ukraine and Russia have been locked in a worn out for several years in eastern Ukraine. Now hacks targeting the 2018 Olympics Olympics could be seen. Maura's A fit of spite is dimmers Put it there. Russian athletes were banned from competing under the Russian flag because of a massive state sponsored doping scandal in Russia really runs the gamut. Let me ask you, Lastly to the ER, You meddled in the 2016 election does this indictment say, or suggests that they're interfering in this election? There's nothing related to that in this indictment, and U. S. Officials said in announcing these charges that the timing was not tied it all to the political schedule that said, this is a good reminder of what Russian state hackers are capable of. On. It also makes clear that they didn't tone it down after the US called the Russians out for election interference back in 2016. In this case, none of the defendants eyes in U. S custody. It's unlikely that any of them ever will be Still U. S. Officials say it is worth putting the way to the U. S government behind these allegations and calling rush out. Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks right. Thank you. Today, the space agency NASA will try to land a spacecraft on an asteroid, a hunk of rock in space that is roughly the size of a large building on Earth. The spacecraft only needs to stay there for 5 to 10 seconds just long enough to collect some dust and rocks, which is pretty cool. If it works, which it might not. Here's NPR's Nell Greenfield voice. The asteroid is named Ben. You It's about 200 million miles away, and it's a potentially dangerous asteroid. Our most recent calculations suggest that it has about a one in 2700 chance of impacting the earth. Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona is the principal investigator for a NASA mission called Oh, Cyrus Rex. He says. The good news is this asteroid wouldn't hit Earth for at least 150 years and part of the Cyrus Rex mission is to better understand that impact probability. What's more, asteroids are like pristine relics of the early solar system undisturbed leftovers from when the planets first formed. So NASA isn't the only space agency interested in asteroids. Japan's has already collected a tiny amount of asteroid material that's on its way back to Earth. It will get here in December. Lori Glazes, head of NASA's planetary science division, She says the agencies have been collaborating and of course, we'll be exchanging portions of each other's sample so that we can maximize the science. Assuming NASA's effort goes off without a hitch. It's probe arrived at venue a couple years ago, giving researchers there. First up close view of this asteroid. Loretta says they were expecting a smooth sandy surface immediately. I was struck by how rough and rugged and rocky the surface Wass, it's been a real challenge to find a relatively rock free spot where the probe could be ordered to briefly touched down. Later today, operators will send to the go command. As the spacecraft leaves orbit and ventures down. The scientists will only be ableto watch a trickle of data coming back. There's nothing we can do to change the course of events. In fact, by the time we get the data, everything that happened was 18.5 minutes in the past because that's how far away the spacecraft is from the Earth. The spacecraft, which is about the size of a big passenger van. We'll head to a crater that's about the size of a tennis court. But it's filled with boulders. So we're actually targeting a site about half that size about 10 M. Across this is roughly the size of a few parking spaces in a parking lot. If the spacecrafts onboard systems decide that it's likely to hit a dangerous rock, it might call off the attempt. If everything goes just right. The research team will know right away if they have touched the surface, knowing if they've got a sample will take longer Bath. Buck is the mission operations program manager at Lockheed Martin Space. Our first imagery will start coming in on Wednesday, and that will give us a much better feel for whether we have a sample. Or not, and how the spacecraft is actually performing. With luck. They'll have collected everything from tiny grains to stones. Nearly an inch across Heather E. Knows of the University of Arizona is the deputy principal investigator for the mission. The best outcome would be that we would collect A mass of sample and we say we have a requirement of 60 grand or two ounces, but we have the capability of collecting up 2 kg and I would love for that capsule to be completely full. By October 30th. The team will decide whether or not to try another sample collection attempt in January, and in March, the spacecraft will start its two year journey back home. Nell Greenfield Voice NPR NEWS. This's NPR news. All things considered touches down at 4 30 Today, the.

Ukraine Justice Department NASA Russia NPR News United States NPR Ryan Lucas France John Dimmers Nell Greenfield Steve Inskeep University of Arizona U. S principal investigator Dottie Dave Freeman U. S. Officials South Korea
"dante lauretta" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:21 min | 3 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on KCRW

"Dot It's 5 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm No well King. Good morning, The Justice Department has charged six Russian intelligence officers in connection with hacking computer systems around the world. The US, France and Ukraine were all affected Other countries and some companies to NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here with details. Good morning, right. Good morning, No. One How significant were these attacks? These attacks are a big deal, officials and experts say that there's some of the most damaging cyber attacks that we've seen in recent years on the indictment spells them all out. It starts with Cyber attacks that targeted Ukraine's electricity grid. Back in the winner's of 2015 and 2016. Here's how the head of the Justice Department's National security division, John Dimmers, described those thes attacks turned out the lights and turned off the heat. In the middle of the eastern European winter as the lives of hundreds of thousands of Ukrainian men, women and Children when dark and cold Now the defendants are also accused of a really nasty cyberattack known is not Petra. That initially targeted you targeted Ukraine but very quickly spread across the globe. It caused billions of dollars in damages, including in the United States. The indictment says that it knocked the hospital system in Pennsylvania offline, including its critical systems. On one company in the U. S. According to the indictment spent half a billion dollars. Dealing with the fallout from that attack was that's a lot of money and also in the case of Ukraine. A lot of people are lot of people hurt. Absolutely absolutely. And there's more in the indictment, more attacks there allegedly conducted a hack and leak operation in the run up to France's 2017 election that targeted the campaign of the now president of France, Emmanuel Macron. Then there are cyberattacks heart targeting the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. There's an interesting thing in the indictment here, saying that the Russians tried to leave digital fingerprints behind a frame North Korea for that one on. Finally, there are hacks that targeted the investigations. That British and international authorities were conducting into the poisoning of a former Russian spy in the UK with a nerve agent. Who are these guys that the Justice Department is charging. So the department says that all six men who are facing charges are current or former members of Russia's military intelligence CH intelligence agency. That's the G R U. It's the same Russian intelligence service that was responsible for some of the hacks that we saw targeting the U. S election back in 2016. Interestingly, one of the defendants here was also charged as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation back in 2018, But this new indictment and the allegations that are in it, it shows what Justice Department officials say. Is really Russia's reckless use of cyber attacks. Here again is the Justice Department's John Murmurs. No country has weaponized. It's cyber capabilities. Has maliciously and irresponsibly as Russia. Wantonly, causing unprecedented collateral damage to pursue small tactical advantages and fits of spite. Now, the DOJ says these attacks pursued Russia's geo political goals. Take Ukraine, for example, Ukraine and Russia have been locked in a worn out for several years in eastern Ukraine. Now the hacks targeting the 2018 Olympics Olympics could be seen. Maura's a fit of spite is dimmers put it there. Russian athletes were banned from competing under the Russian flag because of a massive state sponsored doping scandal in Russia. Really runs the gamut. Let me ask you, Leslie. So the grou meddled in the 2016 election does this indictment say, or suggests that they're interfering in this election? There's nothing related to that in this indictment, and U. S. Officials said in announcing these charges that the timing was not tied it all to the political schedule that said, this is a good reminder of what Russian state hackers are capable of. On. It also makes clear that they didn't tone it down after the US called the Russians out for election interference back in 2016. In this case, none of the defendants eyes in U. S custody. It's unlikely that any of them ever will be Still, U. S. Officials say it is worth putting the way to the U. S government behind these allegations and calling rush out. Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks, Ryan. Thank you. Today, the space agency NASA will try to land a spacecraft on an asteroid, a hunk of rock in space that is roughly the size of a large building on Earth. The spacecraft only needs to stay there for 5 to 10 seconds just long enough to collect some dust and rocks, which is pretty cool. If it works, which it might not. Here's NPR's Nell Greenfield voice. The asteroid is named Ben. You It's about 200 million miles away, and it's a potentially dangerous asteroid. Our most recent calculations suggest that it has about a one in 2700 chance of impacting the earth. Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona is the principal investigator for a NASA mission called Oh, Cyrus Rex. He says. The good news is this asteroid wouldn't hit Earth for at least 150 years and part of the Cyrus Rex mission is to better understand that impact probability. What's more, asteroids are like pristine relics of the early solar system undisturbed leftovers from when the planets first formed, so NASA isn't the only space agency interested in asteroids. Japan's has already collected a tiny amount of asteroid material that's on its way back to Earth. It will get here in December. Laurie Glazes, head of NASA's planetary science division, she says the agencies have been collaborating and of course we'll be exchanging Portions of each other's sample so that we can maximize the science. Assuming NASA's effort goes off without a hitch. It's probe arrived at Ben you a couple years ago, giving researchers there first up close view of this asteroid, Lauretta says they were expecting a smooth sandy surface immediately. I was struck by how rough and rugged and rocky the surface Wass, it's been a real challenge to find a relatively rock free spot where the probe could be ordered to briefly touched down. Later today, operators will send the go command. As the spacecraft leaves orbit and ventures down. The scientists will only be able to watch a trickle of data coming back. There's nothing we can do to change the course of events. In fact, by the time we get the data, everything that happened was 18.5 minutes in the past because that's how far away the spacecraft is from the Earth. The spacecraft, which is about the size of a big passenger van. We'll head to a crater that's about the size of a tennis court. But it's filled with boulders. So we're actually targeting a site about half that size about 10 M. Across this is roughly the size of a few parking spaces in a parking lot. If the spacecrafts onboard systems decide that it's likely to hit a dangerous rock, it might call off the attempt. If everything goes just right. The research team will know right away if they have touched the surface, knowing if they've got a sample will take longer Bath. Buck is the mission operations program manager at Lockheed Martin Space. Our first imagery will start coming in on Wednesday, and that will give us a much better field or whether we have a sample. Or not, and how the spacecraft is actually performing. With luck. They'll have collected everything from tiny grains to stones. Nearly an inch across Heather E. Knows of the University of Arizona is the deputy principal investigator for the mission. The best outcome would be that we would collect A mass of sample and we say we have a requirement of 60 grand or two ounces, but we have the capability of collecting up 2 kg and I would love for that capsule to be completely full. By October 30th. The team will decide whether or not to try another sample collection attempt in January, and in March, the spacecraft will start its two year journey back home. Nell Greenfield Boyce NPR news This is NPR news. It's 5 42 on K C. R W A number of coded 19 cases is surging across the United States coming up, you'll hear from the director of the National Institutes of Health about the latest therapeutics.

Justice Department Ukraine Russia United States NASA NPR News NPR Ryan Lucas France Dante Lauretta U. S. Officials Steve Inskeep University of Arizona principal investigator U. S South Korea North Korea Olympics Nell Greenfield Boyce UK
"dante lauretta" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

08:14 min | 3 months ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Welcome to the science podcasts for October two thousand twenty. I'm Sarah Crosby. Weekly feature the most interesting news and research published in science and the sister journals. First Up, we have staff writer, Paul Ryan, he talks about the. Rex Mission to. The asteroid venue. was has been there since two thousand eighteen and will finally a sample on October twentieth few weeks away. What have we learned so far? We also hear from researcher Hubert Lamb about a new treatment for Tinnitus. What used to be called ringing in the ears the team uses by modal stimulation, laying sounds in the ear and buzzes on the ton to change the brain and turn down the Tinnitus. Now, we have staff writer Paul Loosen. He wrote a story this week on a stack of papers published in science and science advances on the OH. Cyrus Rex Mission to the asteroid Banu Hi Paul Hello Okay on the podcast we last checked in omnia Cyrus Rex Mission in December twenty nineteen, the craft had been orbiting and surveying this asteroid for quite a while and some surprising things that popped out. For example, there are small ejection events, tiny rocks, jumping off the asteroid and surprisingly big boulders littering its surface, and that's meant a change to plans for a sampling from asteroid. What's changed about that? Paul before the spacecraft reached do they had thought it would look like this kind of. Plane like a beach was kind of the infamous term that Dante Lauretta. used. Had all these boulders kind of shocking. These polders are safety hazard and there's no spot that reached the criteria for a safe approach from the original plans. So they've had to reduce the area that they will sample by ten times. So much smaller sample area they had to pick a site they had to figure out if the crash could actually land there, but it hasn't happened yet. We're not there sampling is coming up in a few weeks October twentieth. In the meantime, we have this package of six papers. They tell them more detailed story of the asteroid surface. It's gravity or about these boulders what did you find particularly interesting in this in this new information about the asteroid one big question with sampling asteroid and bring it back to Earth is why are you spending one hundred million dollars to get a sample when we have all the stuff on earth we have tons of meteorites on earth kind of the volunteer sample return. These papers really show examples of several things that could be caught these samples that you just wouldn't be able to learn from a meteorite thing that really stands out to me the mess of carbonate veins in these boulders. At the parent body, the kind of planet testimony that venue Brokaw from once this major water system, Moeen through it as an ancient water world. When you save veins, you mean, there's just like you know what does that mean? Exactly this bright slash linear slash of mineral that deferring from the rest of the rock it's different than Iraq and you think it's made of something that indicates water y. so these carbonates are known to perform from water from hot water in precipitate out that water, you just don't get them. So the same things are evidence of water on Mars as well, and it's not just a little rock in of water it's like a little river of water. Yeah, so the ideas from meteorites they'd always, yeah, there's on these asteroids, but there's only little tiny pockets that don't around you know a couple of millimeters or something like that. But this is kind of showing that these. Mike had at least the parent body of Ben New had water flow in throughout the whole asteroid and probably a lot more water than once thought this definitely connects to the main this mission. What can we learn from asteroids that we can't learn for meteorites, but it also tells us something about the formation of the solar system. Then like what was going on way back when when we had has mills running around the have there's there's also the story of the Solar System? Merged even as Cyrus rex was launching, they realize that asteroids like Ben New Form Beyond Jupiter and migrate all the way in this is something only emerged meteoroid stays in the past decade realizing they have these two separate pools of asteroids and the samples from Ben you might be able to actually say if that's true does finding this carbonate, these veins of carbonate support the idea that asteroids delivered water to Earth definitely in this is a fairly well accepted ideal already with this further bolsters that claim provides institute remote-sensing evidence of Hey these probably had a lot of water. So maybe this was one source of the water it's not. Definitively rule something out because who knows. Yeah, it's definitely a major support for that one. Sad. But here is the boulders aren't the exact target for sampling was ours rex is not going to land on a boulder if it's just not possible, but we'll still be able to tell us more about these veins more about water content more about carbonates from the sampling that a new. Yes. So the this instrument that they used to detect this carbonate I that came from a close fly over the sampling site earlier surveys have shown that it's covered in carbonates. Or carbon burying molecule. So that could be like organic compounds like amino acids, other stuff stuff that they expected to see but there are signatures of that throughout the asteroid. So even the pebbles will have some stuff we mentioned earlier that the parameters for where the sampling can happen changed. Once the crafts had reached asteroid what are the risks here as we get closer to the date? Is there still big questions about whether this would be successful or or how much you can get the definitely they've created this hazard map. Of, the sampling sites, this kind of pure circle of green there's a chance they come in to this red area that is hazardous, and then the spacecraft students. Autonomous Louis will waive itself off and kind of retreat back testing that five meters away, or there's the chance says, hit a boulder a little bit and skews needs to press flat against the surface to be able to suck stuff up. So there's a chance that doesn't happen. They've the ability to says, and then try again at a backup site in January. If it doesn't work out. There is a chance that these boulders are very soft, but we don't want to find that out by landing something on them. You know they're really curious why they got what Ben will look like. So wrong what the surface would look like one of these papers try and figure that out and it finds that a lot of these boulders are so porous that they're kind of fluffy. So they always look like what a beach might look like in the radar or infrared signal that they got. Of Ben who explains why they had this kind of signal suggesting a beach the spacecraft could probably crush these borders if rammed into them, but they don't WanNa do that. That makes sense. So l know how much they got, but we're GONNA have to wait for the analysis for quite a bit. It's due to arrive in twenty, twenty three in Utah. We should mention why it's autonomously sampling to near Earth asteroid but right now it's not near Earth and it's much farther than Mars from Earth right now, there's a about an eighteen minute lag between what happens there and wheel here. So all has to be done a ton misleading because of that is there anything else you think we could learn from the sampling? There's the question of these one of the sources of life, this kind of chemistry and that was going on in the. Early Solar System for these organic molecules that men were delivered to Earth. Maybe there's some way of teasing out what this looks like for the altered on impact with Earth could be something that holy surprising when you get those samples back. All right thank you so much Paul. Thank you haul in as a staff writer for science you can find a link to his story and the related papers and science and science advances at science mag dot org slash podcast. Stay tuned for an.

Ben New Banu Hi Paul staff writer Rex Mission Tinnitus Cyrus rex Sarah Crosby Paul Ryan Paul Loosen Hubert Lamb Dante Lauretta. researcher Iraq Brokaw Moeen Mike Utah Louis
"dante lauretta" Discussed on On a Mission

On a Mission

09:35 min | 1 year ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on On a Mission

"When an asteroid passes a spy. We can't just breathe a sigh of relief if they often come back there orbiting the sun just like we are but at different speeds and on different paths so when astronomers determined and asteroids is odds of hitting us they have to not only consider this loop around the sun but all of its future loops as well. JPL Scientists Steve Chancellor eslake keeps tabs on where asteroids going for tracking asteroids data source are these telescopes bitter constantly plowing the skies looking in for objects a whenever they find something they send it in and we update the orbit so we don't update the orbits necessarily when we want to we. We do that when we get more. Data sometimes objects are so interesting that we'd say. Hey we need to know where this is. Maybe because it's threatening the earth or maybe because of space mission wants to go there so then they will point to telescope where it's supposed to be now if those predictions for were supposed to be are. You're very approximate. They might have a lot of work to recover. The asteroid the fun thing and asteroids. Is You can do that in the past you can kind of do time travel. Because everybody we saving their images and even film from the Nineteen fifties all been digitized dope if you have an asteroid you wanted to where it was sometime in the past you can go to those files and update the that way. It's not as simple. Connect the dots exercise though because asteroids. Don't follow straight lines. Through the solar system sunlight that warms the surface of asteroids can steer them in unexpected directions. This is known as the are Kofsky. Effect Rusi see your Kofsky. Effect is very cool on a NASA web series. The robot astronomy talk show that actress Cameron Diaz schooled the robot host post about the your Kofsky effect. So you're saying that when an asteroid absorbs sunlight on one side that side in its infrared energy that pushes it out pitch normal orbit the exactly the more sunlight it's able to absorb the more infrared energy. It emits and the further it gets pushed asteroids all experience this effect in fact a different degrees in Steve says figuring out how it changes and asteroids orbit around the Sun can be difficult when asteroids. I discovered we really don't know even which way the asteroid is being pushed. Could push ahead or behind in its orbit. That can be a very complicated effect on Earth Hazard prediction for many the asteroids and now we have on the order of one hundred near Earth Asteroids for which we can see an estimate the amount of the aircraft offs key affect. But they're still twenty thousand more your asteroids for which we have no insight of what the Husky effect is doing to that buddy. Radar measurements can help narrow down. How an ashtray? Deviating from its expected path but such measurements can only be made when an asteroid asteroid is relatively close to us. Radar also can provide better details on an asteroid size and shape. which is good to know if you're trying to figure out house? Sunlight is heating their surfaces in asteroids. Come in a medley of forms. Some look like dog bones or walnut shells others are irregular jagged. Give Mishmash one Halloween. An asteroid with features like a human skull flew past us a wicked cosmic joke. Some Asteroids Zor enormous and some are very small they come in different colors and flavors metallic stony icy but why are the asteroids also different. Why are they even out there in the first place to answer such questions? NASA has sent missions to investigate them. The Galileo Mission to Jupiter was the first to fly by An asteroid back in nineteen ninety one. The first mission to orbit and land on an asteroid happened seven years later with the near Shoemaker spacecraft's visit to asteroid right arrows at nearly seventeen kilometers in length eros is the second largest near Earth object six kilometers bigger than the asteroid that led to the dinosaur extinction extinction luckily for us. Eros is not heading our way the asteroid Benue is another story. Benders orbit around the Sun. Brings it close close to Earth every six years and there's a small chance it could hit us in the year. Twenty one ninety. Six Banu is five hundred meters in diameter taller than the Empire Empire State Building. If it hit us the impact would unleash eighty thousand times energy an atomic bomb. This threat is enough to have motivated a recent study. Study about the best way to steer Ben off course hammer an acronym for hyper velocity mitigation. Mission would be a battering Ram of spacecraft. We have to throw a lot of hammers banner to move it between a dozen to eighty depending on the amount of time we have before it hit. But Ben you might not respond spawned the way we think it will. We need to learn more about it with that in mind. Nastase Osiris Rex mission is currently orbiting Banu and sending US images ages of it's rough craggy surface. Astronomers Think Banu is shattered fragment a remnant from a collision between two larger asteroids that impact Banu off and tossed it out of the asteroid belt the region of space between Mars and Jupiter that contains millions of asteroids. Ben Who still bears the marks of being being a crash survivor. It's a rubble pile of rocks. Loosely bound together by gravity. The lead scientist of the Cyrus rex mission. Dante Lauretta the university diversity of Arizona says they hadn't realized just how loosely bound some of those rocks are so yeah. The asteroid is regularly tossing material off into space. This certainly was unexpected. By surprise a lot of them are falling right back down and landing on the asteroid surface. Some of them are actually getting trapped in orbits around the asteroid which is really exciting because it allows us to track them over many days and even weeks and then start to learn something about the detail. Gravity field the asteroid and then some of them are at high enough philosophies above what we would call the escape velocity of the asteroid. And they're leaving Benny going into interplanetary space. There is no concern for spacecraft safety. It's a small enough amount of material and overall moving relatively slowly so even if one of these were to hit the space craft it. It wouldn't cause any damage that would impact our ability to achieve the mission the dance of rock particles around Bhanu is just one more challenge for the spacecraft were navigating in in a microgravity environment and that has a lot of unexpected in small forces that act on the spacecraft so in addition to the gravity of the asteroid Royd. We're also getting pushed around by the solar wind material outgassing from the spacecraft heat radiating off from the asteroid all of those have a substantial impact on the trajectory victory the spacecraft so we're constantly taking images and updating the position and figuring out where we're going to be in the future and that drives a very intense operational final timeline for the team basically within twenty four hours of making a science observation. We have to do a navigation. Solution determined the position and velocity of the spacecraft relative to the asteroid and then get that up on the spacecraft so that it can accommodate the differences in where we're actually going to be versus where we thought we would be when we first meet the design. Uh the difficulty of navigating spacecraft around and asteroids suggests that moving one could be a tough task but of Cyrus. REX is not there to move. It's goal is to gather a sample from it. Even though rock particles are drifting off. Banu your Cyrus. REX mission wasn't designed to capture them like the stardust mission. Did for comment built to instead a device at the end of a long arm extending from the underside of the space craft will collect material from the asteroid surface surface. After the device touchdown for five seconds springs will bounce the spacecraft. Backup kind of like a pogo stick. In those five seconds the device will gather asteroid dirt in a unique way touch and go sample acquisition mechanism or tag sandwiches device that we place on the surface is basically A vacuum cleaner working in reverse so with a vacuum cleaner. You create an area of low pressure and it pulls the air and the dirt through a filter with tag Sam and we actually bring our own air because the asteroid is an airless body and we blow it down into the regular or the soil on the asteroid creating region of high pressure Asher underneath a filter and then it grabs the gravel and rocky material and pushes it up into an air filter. The TAG SAM is designed to pick up a minimum of one hundred fifty fifty grams of material and its capacity is over two kilograms. One hundred and fifty grams is like a `Grande starbucks Coffee Cup. The samples styris. Rex will bring to Earth will reveal more about Banu and they could help us better understand the history of our solar system asteroids or leftovers from all the material swirled around our young son and came together to form the planets so we're really interested in the earliest stages of solar system formation. And there's no geologic nick record of that period on the Earth or on the moon or on Mars if you want to understand how planets formed then you need to go back to the small bodies the asteroids and comets.

Banu Ben Who NASA Shoemaker spacecraft Steve Chancellor Kofsky JPL Cameron Diaz Dante Lauretta US Rex Arizona Asher Empire Empire State Building Bhanu
"dante lauretta" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

09:35 min | 1 year ago

"dante lauretta" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"When an asteroid passes a spy. We can't just breathe a sigh of relief if they often come back there orbiting the sun just like we are but at different speeds and on different paths so when astronomers determined and asteroids is odds of hitting us they have to not only consider this loop around the sun but all of its future loops as well. JPL scientists Steve Chancellor Ashley Keeps Tabs on where asteroids going for tracking asteroids data source are these telescopes bitter constantly plowing the skies looking in for objects a whenever they find something they send it in and we update the orbit so we don't update the orbits necessarily when we want to we. We do that when we get more. Data sometimes objects are so interesting that we'd say. Hey we need to know where this is. Maybe because it's threatening the earth or maybe because of space mission wants to go there so then they will point to telescope where it's supposed to be now if those predictions for were supposed to be are. You're very approximate. They might have a lot of work to recover. The asteroid the fun thing and asteroids. Is You can do that in the past you can kind of do time travel. Because everybody we saving their images and even film from the Nineteen fifties all been digitized dope if you have an asteroid you wanted to where it was sometime in the past you can go to those files and update the that way. It's not as simple. Connect the dots exercise though because asteroids. Don't follow straight lines. Through the solar system sunlight that warms the surface of asteroids can steer them in unexpected directions. This is known as the are Kofsky. Effect Rusi see your Kofsky. Effect is very cool on a NASA web series. The robot astronomy talk show that actress Cameron Diaz schooled the robot host post about the your Kofsky effect. So you're saying that when an asteroid absorbs sunlight on one side that side in its infrared energy that pushes it out pitch normal orbit the exactly the more sunlight it's able to absorb the more infrared energy. It emits and the further it gets pushed asteroids all experience this effect in fact a different degrees in Steve says figuring out how it changes and asteroids orbit around the Sun can be difficult when asteroids. I discovered we really don't know even which way the asteroid is being pushed. Could push ahead or behind in its orbit. That can be a very complicated effect on Earth Hazard prediction for many the asteroids and now we have on the order of one hundred near Earth Asteroids for which we can see an estimate the amount of the aircraft offs key affect. But they're still twenty thousand more your asteroids for which we have no insight of what the Husky effect is doing to that buddy. Radar measurements can help narrow down. How an ashtray? Deviating from its expected path but such measurements can only be made when an asteroid asteroid is relatively close to us. Radar also can provide better details on an asteroid size and shape. which is good to know if you're trying to figure out house? Sunlight is heating their surfaces in asteroids. Come in a medley of forms. Some look like dog bones or walnut shells others are irregular jagged. Give Mishmash one Halloween. An asteroid with features like a human skull flew past us a wicked cosmic joke. Some asteroids are enormous and some are very small they come in different colors and flavors metallic stony icy but why are the asteroids also different. Why are they even out there in the first place to answer such questions? NASA has sent missions to investigate them. The Galileo Mission to Jupiter was the first to fly by An asteroid back in nineteen ninety one. The first mission to orbit and land on an asteroid happened seven years later with the near Shoemaker spacecraft's visit to asteroid right arrows at nearly seventeen kilometers in length eros is the second largest near Earth object six kilometers bigger than the asteroid that led to the dinosaurs extinction extinction. Luckily for us. Eros is not heading our way the asteroid Benue is another story. Benders orbit around the Sun. Brings it close close to Earth every six years and there's a small chance it could hit us in the year. Twenty one ninety. Six Banu is five hundred meters in diameter taller than the empire tire. state-building if it hit us the impact would unleash eighty thousand times energy an atomic bomb. This threat is enough to have motivated a recent study. Study about the best way to steer Ben off course hammer an acronym for hyper velocity mitigation. Mission would be a battering Ram of spacecraft. We have to throw a lot of hammers banner to move it between a dozen to eighty depending on the amount of time we have before it hit. But Ben you might not respond spawned the way we think it will. We need to learn more about it with that in mind. Nastase oh Cyrus. Rex Mission is currently orbiting Banu and sending US images ages of it's rough craggy surface. Astronomers Think Banu is shattered fragment a remnant from a collision between two larger asteroids that impact Banu off and tossed it out of the asteroid belt the region of space between Mars and Jupiter that contains millions of asteroids. Ben Who still bears the marks of being being a crash survivor. It's a rubble pile of rocks loosely bound together by gravity. The lead scientist of the Cyrus Rex Mission Dante Lauretta. The university diversity of Arizona says they hadn't realized just how loosely bound some of those rocks are so yeah. The asteroid is regularly tossing material off into space. This certainly was unexpected. By surprise a lot of them are falling right back down and landing on the asteroid surface. Some of them are actually getting trapped in orbits around the asteroid which is really exciting because it allows us to track them over many days and even weeks and then start to learn something about the detail. Gravity field the asteroid and then some of them are at high enough philosophies above what we would call the escape velocity of the asteroid. And they're leaving Benny going into interplanetary space. There is no concern for spacecraft safety. It's a small enough amount of material and overall moving relatively slowly so even if one of these were to hit the space craft it. It wouldn't cause any damage that would impact our ability to achieve the mission the dance of rock particles around Bhanu is just one more challenge for the spacecraft were navigating in in a microgravity environment and that has a lot of unexpected in small forces that act on the spacecraft so in addition to the gravity of the asteroid Royd. We're also getting pushed around by the solar wind material outgassing from the spacecraft heat radiating off from the asteroid all of those have a substantial impact on the trajectory victory the spacecraft so we're constantly taking images and updating the position and figuring out where we're going to be in the future and that drives a very intense operational final timeline for the team basically within twenty four hours of making a science observation. We have to do a navigation. Solution determined the position and velocity of the spacecraft relative to the asteroid and then get that up on the spacecraft so that it can accommodate the differences in where we're actually going to be versus where we thought we would be when we first meet the design. Uh the difficulty of navigating spacecraft around and asteroids suggests that moving one could be a tough task but of Cyrus. REX is not there to move. Its goal is to gather a sample from it. Even though rock particles are drifting off. Banu your Cyrus. REX mission wasn't designed to capture them like the stardust mission. Did for comment built to instead a device at the end of a long arm extending from the underside of the space craft will collect material from the asteroid surface surface. After the device touchdown for five seconds springs will bounce the spacecraft. Backup kind of like a pogo stick. In those five seconds the device will gather asteroid dirt in a unique way touch and go sample acquisition mechanism or tag sandwiches device that we place on the surface is basically A vacuum cleaner working in reverse so with a vacuum cleaner. You create an area of low pressure and it pulls the air and the dirt through a filter with tag Sam and we actually bring our own air because the asteroid is an airless body and we blow it down into the regular or the soil on the asteroid creating region of high pressure Asher underneath a filter and then it grabs the gravel and rocky material and pushes it up into an air filter. The TAG SAM is designed to pick up a minimum of one hundred fifty fifty grams of material and its capacity is over two kilograms. One hundred and fifty grams is like a `Grande starbucks Coffee Cup. The samples styris. Rex will bring the earth will reveal more about Banu and they could help us better understand the history of our solar system asteroids or leftovers from all the material swirled around our young son and came together to form the planets so we're really interested in the earliest stages of solar system formation. And there's no geologic nick record of that period on the Earth or on the moon or on Mars if you want to understand how planets formed then you need to go back to the small bodies the asteroids and comets.