15 Burst results for "Danny Feldman"

"danny feldman" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on KPCC

"Somebody from the biggest breaking stories of the day to the important issues and trends with that this is an historic victory one is a very important change everybody's gonna pay a price he will everybody will I am just so happy to be home and to put my feet on this land again another huge development news from the BBC every afternoon at one eighty nine point three KPCC welcome to the frame I'm John horn the corona virus affect has spread into every part of our culture in New York all shows on Broadway have been canceled into April and concert giant live nation and AEG have suspended all tours here in California in an attempt to slow the spread of the virus state officials today called for the cancellation or postponement of public gatherings with more than two hundred and fifty people through at least the end of March the touring production of Hamilton at the Pantages is on hold and the music center in downtown LA has shut down as have most large venues throughout the region Danny Feldman is the producing artistic director of one of those theaters the Pasadena Playhouse Danny welcome back to the show thank you John thanks for having me so the state has called for gatherings of more than two hundred fifty people to be cancelled or postponed for venues that have current shows up or might have shows coming up what are the factors that might weigh in on the decision the theaters here in Los Angeles particularly the theaters and performing arts centers we've actually been in contact for several weeks now more contact that I think we've ever had I've ever had with our colleagues and discussing that exact question what what are the criteria for us making the change we don't want to make which is which is canceling performances on our stages and we really all have been guided together by looking to the government looking to the county officials Barbara Ferrer the health department to give us guidance on when public gathering will be limited the play house happens to be dark until late may but when you have the perspective of not having to make an immediate decision and talk to your theater colleagues about what they're facing what kind of perspective does that give you in terms of how you go about making this decision yeah while while we don't have a main stage production we actually have about fifteen in different events between now and then may when our next season show comes in so we were looking at it as well of all those individual events as well as community events but I mean it's not just about ticket sales on that side of it and serving our communities but we have a lot of people are artists are crew just the alley theatre community who make a living when we have shows and who don't make a living when we don't have shows and so these are very challenging complex decisions and we really were relying on the government issuing of a recommendation so I think you'll see a lot of motion now that that has happened so what you're touching on is a particular problem because if you're not getting the income from ticket sales you don't have the money to pay staff and actors and yet those actors and staff don't have income so what happens are people old just left in the lurch how can any arts organization go about paying people who are suddenly unemployed that's that's the question at a particularly nonprofit organizations right now typically nonprofits do not have reserves like many businesses to weather a storm of the very significant loss of income I'm at this point the governor's recommendation is through the end of March we don't have guidance beyond that we are planning for beyond that personally I've been through something not to this scale but in New York I was running an off Broadway theater at the time of the hurricane that that struck New York and we were down for quite some time and lessons learned from that about circling our wagons reaching out to our communities and to our supporters and and asking them to step up and away and I I see just sort of looking around the corner of what's to come I think that will be a hundred percent necessary in this case for our Los Angeles cultural institutions so there is the moral thing about what you can and cannot do and then there's the legal question of what you can and R. may be obligated to do have you looked at all about whether or not you're contractually obligated to pay artists for shows that might be coming up or might be canceled yeah I mean every I won't speak about how on on other theaters but most of the professional theaters you know have as little as two weeks notice of of saying we're canceling the show you think about our producer putting up a closing notice because the show's not selling tickets the business is designed to be flexible in that way with crew calls and all of that so there a couple weeks that that how are provided for flexibility but nothing longer than that we're talking with Danny Feldman the producing artistic director of the Pasadena Playhouse your next show on your main stage is a one woman show about and Richards and it's scheduled to open in late may governor Gavin Newsom said this morning that the closure recommendations will likely extend beyond the end of this month so how long can you wait before you make a decision on the fate of that show you know we're assessing that right now we're assessing we we've slowed down our set build in those kind of activities for that specific show we have a bit of time and we want to just see how long this will go we did anticipate this order coming in some form and we internally we all looked at this as something that could be here for one to three months or so but as you know this is a fast moving situation twenty four hours ago I thought differently about things than I do now and I think it's speeding up and we're really starting to understand what the impact is going to have in the LA art scene and in the community and particularly to the to the theater makers are the performing artists here in the community that make their living this way we're very concerned hypothetically if the theater had say a thousand seat venue does it make any sense to only sell two hundred seats to that show and get everybody spaced out or does that not even really pass the logical smell test you know I I I don't know if that's the X. patrons want particularly in this moment or to be in the theater I'm there some other theaters talking about recording performances and and transmitting it via the internet for ticket buyers and we're certainly looking at all of those different options of that this is an extended period how are performing arts community can still engage with our constituents in this in this temporary way but I eat you know we haven't gotten there yet in terms of conversations with unions and and all of that right now we're just really focused on the immediate and well and and how we're getting through this period in the next couple of weeks Danny Feldman is the producing artistic.

"danny feldman" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on The Frame

"In an attempt to slow the spread of the virus state officials today called for the cancellation or postponement of public gatherings with more than two hundred and fifty people through at least the end of March. The touring production of Hamilton at the pantages. On hold and the Music Center in downtown. La has shut down as have most venues throughout the region. Danny Feldman is the producing artistic director of one of those theaters. The Pasadena playhouse Danny. Welcome back to the show. Thank you John. Thanks for having me so. The state has called for gatherings of more than two hundred and fifty people to be canceled or postponed for venues that have current shows up or might have shows coming up. What are the factors that might weigh in on the decision? The theaters here in Los Angeles particularly the theaters and performing art centers. We've actually been in contact for several weeks now. more contact than I think we've ever had or I've ever had with our colleagues Discussing that exact question. What what are the criteria for US making change? We don't WanNa make which is which is cancelling performances on our stages. And we've really all I've been guided together by looking to the government looking to the county officials Barbara Ferrara the health department to give us guidance on when public gathering we'll be limited. The playhouse happens to be dark until late. May when you have the perspective of not having to make an immediate decision and talk to your theater colleagues about what they're facing. What kind of perspective does that give you in terms of how you go about making this decision? Yeah while while we don't have a main stage production we actually have about fifteen different events Between now and then May when our next season show comes in so we were looking at it as well of all those individual events as well as community events but It's not just about ticket sales on that side of it and serving our communities but we have a lot of people are artists or crew. Just the theater community who make a living when we have shows and who don't make living when we don't have shows So these are very challenging complex decisions and we really were relying on the government issuing a recommendation. So I think you'll see a lot of motion now that that has happened. So what you're touching on is a particular problem because if you're not getting the income from ticket sales you don't have the money to pay staff and actors and yet those actors and staff don't have income so what happens are people just left in the lurch. How can any arts organization go about pain? People who are suddenly unemployed. That's that's the question. Particularly nonprofit organizations right Typically nonprofits do not have reserves like many businesses to weather a storm of a very significant loss of income At this point. The governor's recommendation is through the end of March. We don't have guidance beyond that we are planning for beyond that personally. I've been through some thing not to the scale. But in New York I was running an off Broadway theatre at the time of the hurricane that struck New York and we were down for quite some time. and lessons learned from that about circling our wagons reaching out to our communities and to our supporters and asking them to step up and away and I see just sort of looking around the corner of what's to come. I think that will be one hundred percent necessary in this case for our Los Angeles cultural institutions. So there is the moral thing about what you can and cannot do. Then there's the legal question of what you can and are maybe obligated to do. Have you looked at all about whether or not you're contractually obligated to pay artists for shows that might be coming up or might be cancelled. Yeah I mean every. I won't speak on on other theaters but most of the professional theaters. You know have as little as two weeks notice of of saying. We're canceling the show if you think about a a producer putting up a closing notice because the show's not selling tickets the businesses designed to be flexible in that way With crew calls and all of that so there a couple of weeks that that are provided for flexibility. But nothing longer than that we're talking with Danny Feldman the producing artistic director of the Pasadena playhouse. Your next show on your main stage is a one woman show about Ann Richards and it's scheduled to open in late. May Governor Gavin. Newsom said this morning that the closure recommendations will likely extend beyond the end of this month. So how long can you wait before you make a decision on the fate of that show? You know. We're assessing that right? Now we're assessing we. We've slowed down our set build and those kind of activities for that specific show. We have a bit of time and we want to just see how long this will go. We did anticipate this order. Coming in some form And we internally we all looked at this as something that could be here for one two three months or so but as you know. This is a fast moving situation. Twenty four hours ago. I felt differently about things than I do now and I think it's speeding up and we're really starting to understand what the impact is going to have In the art scene and in the community and particularly to to the theater makers are the performing artists here in the community. That make their living. This way we're very concerned. Hypothetically if a theatre had say a thousand seat venue does it. Make any sense to only sell two hundred seats to that show and get everybody spaced out or does not even really pass the logical smell test. You Know I. I don't know if that's the experience of patrons watt particularly in this moment or to be in the theater. There's some other theaters talking about recording performances and transmitting it via the Internet for ticket buyers. And we're certainly looking at all of those different options of that. This is an extended period. How are performing arts community can still engage with our constituents in this in this temporary way But I you know. We haven't gotten there yet in terms of conversations with unions and all of that right now we're just really focused on the immediate and and and how we're getting through this period and the next couple of weeks. Dennis Feldman is the producing.

Los Angeles Danny Feldman director Pasadena New York Pasadena playhouse US Hamilton Dennis Feldman Music Center Barbara Ferrara Governor Gavin Ann Richards Newsom producer
Coronavirus pandemic: California calls for ban on large events

The Frame

04:13 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus pandemic: California calls for ban on large events

"In an attempt to slow the spread of the virus state officials today called for the cancellation or postponement of public gatherings with more than two hundred and fifty people through at least the end of March. The touring production of Hamilton at the pantages. On hold and the Music Center in downtown. La has shut down as have most venues throughout the region. Danny Feldman is the producing artistic director of one of those theaters. The Pasadena playhouse Danny. Welcome back to the show. Thank you John. Thanks for having me so. The state has called for gatherings of more than two hundred and fifty people to be canceled or postponed for venues that have current shows up or might have shows coming up. What are the factors that might weigh in on the decision? The theaters here in Los Angeles particularly the theaters and performing art centers. We've actually been in contact for several weeks now. more contact than I think we've ever had or I've ever had with our colleagues Discussing that exact question. What what are the criteria for US making change? We don't WanNa make which is which is cancelling performances on our stages. And we've really all I've been guided together by looking to the government looking to the county officials Barbara Ferrara the health department to give us guidance on when public gathering we'll be limited. The playhouse happens to be dark until late. May when you have the perspective of not having to make an immediate decision and talk to your theater colleagues about what they're facing. What kind of perspective does that give you in terms of how you go about making this decision? Yeah while while we don't have a main stage production we actually have about fifteen different events Between now and then May when our next season show comes in so we were looking at it as well of all those individual events as well as community events but It's not just about ticket sales on that side of it and serving our communities but we have a lot of people are artists or crew. Just the theater community who make a living when we have shows and who don't make living when we don't have shows So these are very challenging complex decisions and we really were relying on the government issuing a recommendation. So I think you'll see a lot of motion now that that has happened. So what you're touching on is a particular problem because if you're not getting the income from ticket sales you don't have the money to pay staff and actors and yet those actors and staff don't have income so what happens are people just left in the lurch. How can any arts organization go about pain? People who are suddenly unemployed. That's that's the question. Particularly nonprofit organizations right Typically nonprofits do not have reserves like many businesses to weather a storm of a very significant loss of income At this point. The governor's recommendation is through the end of March. We don't have guidance beyond that we are planning for beyond that personally. I've been through some thing not to the scale. But in New York I was running an off Broadway theatre at the time of the hurricane that struck New York and we were down for quite some time. and lessons learned from that about circling our wagons reaching out to our communities and to our supporters and asking them to step up and away and I see just sort of looking around the corner of what's to come. I think that will be one hundred percent necessary in this case for our Los Angeles cultural institutions. So there is the moral thing about what you can and cannot do. Then there's the legal question of what you can and are maybe obligated to do. Have you looked at all about whether or not you're contractually obligated to pay artists for shows that might be coming up or might be cancelled. Yeah I mean every. I won't speak on on other theaters but most of the professional theaters. You know have as little as two weeks notice of of saying. We're canceling the show if you think about a a producer putting up a closing notice because the show's not selling tickets the businesses designed to be flexible in that way With crew calls and all of that so there a couple of weeks that that are provided for flexibility. But nothing longer than

Los Angeles United States New York Danny Feldman Music Center Pasadena Hamilton Barbara Ferrara Director Producer
"danny feldman" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Dot com with your name phone number question or problem we will solve it right here on the air my next guest the managing editor of Pasadena magazines are small Horia I'm doing now I mean I love regional and local magazines well I love I love half of them the half that I don't like are the ones you know advertising for plastic surgery and and cosmetic dentistry and okay but if you really want to learn the flavor of a location you got to read the local magazines and yours is one of the better ones well because you're really dealing with the culture well thank you yes I actually oversee the arts and culture section and Pasadena as one of the richest cultural cities and I would say America and wanted to make that argument for me tell I'm a first of all we have the Norton Simon which has one of the largest private art collections ever assembled industrialists Norton Simon collected for over a period of years and actually has one of the second largest collections of day kat who knew right I saw a beautiful day god exhibit in in Denver at at the Denver museum and and and it's just I opening for me but I did but this the permanence of it yes and he actually has over a hundred works by day got its there's paintings pastels drawings prints is and there's also a little dancer and of course there's also of many other arts there's renaissance art there's twentieth century art as European artist a vast display of art however that's not the only museum we also have the USC Asia Pacific museum as well that's a relatively new museum yes yes in the U. S. C. bought them and so they've been kind of revitalizing that minutes it's been great to my favorite and I've talked about this earlier in the show is the Pasadena Playhouse yes yes the actually recently celebrated their one hundred year anniversary in two thousand and seven and when you go in there you go look around it's it's a beautiful building it is a beautiful building and it's so rich and culture as well and it was the home to the world premieres of play right such as Eugene o'neill Tennessee Williams it was also one of the first thing used to feature female playwrights as well in in those early years that wasn't always a reality for many so and and to this day your breaking a lot of shows there yes yes and it's it's just breaking boundaries overall and there's new premieres that had never been performed Danny Feldman recently took over as the producing artistic director and he one of his core missions is he's determined to make it a place of inclusion and a celebration of diversity which is really reflected in both the subject matter and both in terms of performance as well as the casting decisions not getting beyond the the Playhouse yeah I remember going to Orlando to please go to Hey we want to show the old town what could be possibly old town in Orlando how how far back do you go with like nineteen fifty nine is a stop but old town Pasadena is old it is it is you know there was a period in time where you didn't necessarily want to be an old town after the sun went down however and a few decades ago they did revitalize and now it is the plate is one of the places to be and Pasadena there's great shopping great restaurants it's just great to walk around for just for for giggles we're gonna take me for dinner well that depends in old town in old town you know what I'm more of a breakfast person I am a mom of toddler I do not do after six all right we're going for breakfast mom you know what I in old town I like a little place called roots in right there a relatively new they specialize in a do it yourself onsite evils and hosts it's very healthy however if you want to venture a little bit north of Pasadena there's lavender and honey north president is a little bit more of a gentrifying area too low case that sound a little precious are they you know what I can drag my husband there and even he likes them yes yes he he will he will eat that he's the one who actually will and says these he he was a little hesitant but he said you know I I really like this avocado toast well you know but not everybody and their mother is serving avocados are they are however in a I now sable's however they let you customize your toes you don't necessarily know a condo on it or maybe put a sunflower seeds on it not butter on it how about I have the avocado toast hold the avocado you can do that too they will do that you can just put some not better on it there also you will does have that you can do activated charcoal you can do cheer putting its unlimited toppings for one flat fee depending on your size and luckily for me your writing that's a compliment thank you okay yeah but the bottom line is you have a choice that you didn't have before yes yes and it's so it's it's so delicious it's fresh it's attainable the owner really wanted to make it inclusive he wanted healthy eating to be accessible no matter what your budget is it's really affordable as well but also really fresh bottom line is for raising a kid now yeah you made a choice to stay in Pasadena and you like it I love it I love it however he if you're gonna talk about my precious choices were quick to record I'm gonna talk about that Lincoln's own terrace restaurant right here right here okay please all right Sir small the managing editor of Pasadena magazine getting in that plug for the hotel restaurant.

"danny feldman" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Peter Greenberg dot com with your name phone number question or problem we will solve it right here on the air my next guest the managing editor of Pasadena magazines are small horror I'm doing well I mean I love regional and local magazines well I love I love half of them the half that I don't like are the ones you know advertising for plastic surgery and and cosmetic dentistry and okay but if you really want to learn the flavor of a location you got to read the local magazines and yours is one of the better ones because you're really dealing with the culture well thank you yes I actually oversee the arts and culture section and Pasadena is one of the richest cultural cities and I would say America and wanted to make that argument for me tell I'm a first of all we have the Norton Simon which has one of the largest private art collections ever assembled industrialists Norton Simon collected for over a period of years and actually has one of the second largest collections of day kat who knew right I saw a beautiful day god exhibit in in Denver at at the Denver museum and and and assist I opening for me but the but this the permanence of it yes and he actually has over a hundred works by day got its there's paintings pastels drawings prints is and there's also little dancer and of course there's also of many other arts there's renaissance art there's twentieth century art there's European artists a vast display of art however that's not the only museum we also have the U. S. C. Asia Pacific museum as well that's a relatively new museum yes yes in the U. S. C. bought them and so they're been kind of revitalizing the am and it's it's been great see my favorite and I've talked about this earlier in the show is the Pasadena Playhouse yes yes the actually recently celebrated their one hundred year anniversary in two thousand and seven and when you go in there you go look around it's it's a beautiful building it is a beautiful building and it's so rich and culture as well and it was the home to the world premieres of play right such as Eugene o'neill Tennessee Williams it was also one of the first thing used to feature female playwrights as well in in those early years that wasn't always a reality for many so and and to this day your breaking a lot of shows there yes yes and it's it's just breaking boundaries overall there's new premieres that have never been performed Danny Feldman recently took over as the producing artistic director and he one of his core missions is he's determined to make it a place of inclusion and a celebration of diversity which is really reflected in both the subject matter and both in terms of performance as well as the casting decisions not getting beyond the the Playhouse yeah I remember going to Orlando to please go to Hey we want to show your old times it could be possibly old town in Orlando how how far back do you go nineteen fifty nine is a stop but old town Pasadena is old it is it is you know there was a period in time where you didn't necessarily want to be an old town after the sun went down however and a few decades ago they did revitalize and now it is the plate is one of the places to be and Pasadena there's great shopping great restaurants it's just great to walk around for just for for giggles we're gonna take me for dinner well that depends in old town in old town you know what I'm more of a breakfast person I I am a mom of toddler I do not do after six all right we're going for breakfast mom you know what I in old town I like a little place called roots in right there a relatively new they specialize in a do it yourself class I evils and hosts it's very healthy however if you want to venture a little bit north of Pasadena there's lavender and honey north president is a little bit more of a gentrifying area there are two locations that sound a little precious are they you know what I can track my husband there and even he likes them yes yes he he will he will eat that he's the one who actually will and says these he he was a little hesitant but he said you know I I really like this avocado toast well you know but not everybody and their mother is serving avocado are they are however in a I now sable's however they let you customize your toes you don't necessarily know what kind of one or maybe put a sunflower seeds on it not butter on it hello I have the avocado toast hold the avocado you can do that too they will do that you can just put some not better on it there also you will does have that you can do activated charcoal you can do cheer putting its unlimited toppings for one flat fee depending on your size and luckily for me your writing that's a compliment thank you okay yeah but the bottom line is you have a choice that you didn't have before yes yes and it's so it's it's so delicious it's fresh it's attainable the owner really wanted to make it inclusive you want healthy eating to be accessible no matter what your budget is it's really affordable as well but also really fresh what bottom line is for raising a kid now yeah you made a choice to stay in Pasadena and you like it I love it I love it however he if you're going to talk about my precious choices correct correct I'm gonna talk about that Lincoln's own terrace restaurant right here right here okay please all right Sir arsenal of the managing editor of Pasadena magazine getting in that plug for.

"danny feldman" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

09:28 min | 2 years ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on KPCC

"Not more than that. I was completely taken by it was unlike anything I'd ever seen before. So when I got this position at the playhouse, it was very high up on my bucket list of things I wanted to do seemed quite out of reach because of the size and scope of it. But it it's really had a special place for me back then and seeing it today or revisiting today as I did about a year and a half ago, the relevance of it was was sort of overwhelming and overpowering. I wanna talk about that nineteen Ninety-seven production. The LA times did a breakdown of how much it cost to mountain. It was ten million dollars back then fifty parts the car budget with thirty thousand dollars advertising, marketing promotion, one point seven million dollars. That makes me feel so much better about our budget. I gonna say it sounds about similar to house. So let's set the historical context. This is adapted from the novel by L doctor. Oh, the story takes place in the early twentieth century more than one hundred years ago. And I suspect I'm not the only person notice this, even though it was written much much more recently, there are lines and themes in this show that feel us if they could have been written yesterday. I remember vividly driving home from work one night listening to this. This would be last October or so over a year ago. And I got to a moment at the end of of the first act where police officer has a line in the script. I thought she had a gun or he says, I saw gosawx gone. And I remember what was going on at that time the stories that were going on in the news at that time, and I was sick to my stomach of of hearing that line because that line was was very present in our world at the moment. And that started a snowball. Effective deep dive into the show. I think it's also worth noting that in the text of the play that line is delivered. But what is not written in the play? Is that a police officer plants a gun next to this person who has been shot unarmed? I mentioned this is some of my cast mates earlier. I think that it's very easy to related to specific events in at any given time and or any given epoch I feel like twenty years later still going to be assuming we're still a nation at that point. It's still going to be relevant because I think at the core of the story are things that I think America's specifically and nations in general, I think are are always going to be thinking about changing demographics and immigration socioeconomic an industry industrial conflict, and I guess I use the word warfare racial strife anonymous, and what it means to be American. And and in some ways you can look at. The, you know, the powers of the state police force or br- bureaucracy. And and how those fail citizens and individuals in different ways. So there's so there's a great many things that that I think will always keep the story and the and the piece relevant and even though the story is set in the twentieth century. It has his idea of there's different reactions to how you deal with an oppressive society that won't give people of color, equal treatment and certainly not equal treatment under the law. What's funny is that a lot of these eras, you have sort of opposing ideologies among a quote, unquote, black leadership Booker T, Washington famously clashed with w e b two boys at the time and Booker T Washington with someone who was viewed he was denigrated as being more complacent, his attitude was learn how to work pick up a trade, and and work for yourself where it whereas w e b d boys, and, you know, people listening will correct me if I'm wrong, but he was more, you know, to get educated. You know, we have a talented tenth is the term that he that. He coined. So I think they were both right in their own ways. There is a sense of coal house is a is a self made man. These he grew up in Saint Louis, which was a hotbed of black culture at the time. And he worked as a stevedore, which is hard, you know, hard labor to to finance his music lessons and in the novel. There's attitude of him being a self created individual and the way that he speaks the way that he carries himself. You know, there are many many black Americans who, you know, if they carry themselves a certain way, or if they are trying to achieve academically, then they're accused of acting white. And it's so it's not other white people doing that. It's it's actually other blacks doing that. I feel like my particular training background with all the Shakespeare and everything really lends itself. Well to cold how sue someone who speaks in the sort of heightened way. And then when he gets later on in the play where the stakes are really heightened it really helps to be able to carry that sort of language through and make it sound like. Human being saying it, and he's very much like Shakespeare, a tragic figure, but he's a tragic figure who starts in a place of great optimism. Call house and Sarah. Have this great song in the first act where coal house says the wheels are turning for us girl. And the times are starting to roll any man can get where he wants to. If he's got some fire in his soul will see Justice, Sarah. And plenty of men who will stand up and give us our do. Doesn't quite work out that way. No, it doesn't, you know actually struggled for a long time with. With those lyrics, but also co house sort of ideas, and initially I looked at it as naievety like how could someone who's obviously so intelligent and obviously. So I mean, you know, he talks about reading Booker T, Washington. He seems to me to be someone who's really tuned into what's going on. And a really smart guy. Like, how could he be so naive to think that, you know, in nineteen oh six or whatever he's going to be know Jim crow still alive, and well, this is alive and well at this time, you know, how's he so sure that that things are gonna get better for for both himself and his people we're talking with Clifton Duncan, and Danny Feldman about the production of ragtime at the Pasadena playhouse, Danny? There's a concept in retail called the loss leader, which is basically you sell milk at a loss because you know, that when people fill up their grocery cart. They're gonna pay for that loss familiar with that. Something similar at the Pasadena playhouse explain how you are positioning this play within the play house season to its subscribers. And what it means as quite honestly, I financial roll the dice. Yeah. Absolutely. We have Pasadena playhouse has in the past had financial troubles. As people know. It's public information on that. I came in about a season and a half ago too. You know, after a long term artistic director coming in with a new vision of the of the playhouse, and I'm fortunate enough to have worked with the board of directors around me who understand that we are a not for profit member supported theater very much lucky. PCC Vega members support a radio station. Our job is to enrich the lives of our community to create great work and to to be bold and ambitious and ragtime is probably one of the most Bolden bishops things. This theater is ever done. We still have to act responsibly. So for this production. It took about a year and a half to put together and a quarter of the budget was funded through philanthropy, and we looked at our entire season budget and built it around ragtime. And we knew that this show had the capacity to have the impact that we are feeling now that it's actually having the other thing that I think is important to note that this is a show that honors ragtime music, and even though they're characters who judge music that is performed and created by African Americans the show itself celebrates that music. Well, I mean, jazz, you know, is sort of a a successor to that. But I I think of it in terms of of hip hop. I I used to be a huge student of of Asia NRA that art form. And when you read about ragtime genre of music was at the time. It was considered radical and dangerous and a musical. And a weird thing at the at the end of the the the show talks about how ragtime sort of vanish as quickly as it came. Now me hip hop is different is that it's been around for decades. If they're like, this is a fad at first. But now, it's still here. But the, but I love the idea and again with coal houses. Well, in this added to my or this influence, my interpretation of the character is that, you know, you have this dangerous art form that that people haven't really heard before and people just don't know what to what to do with it. And and I think they call how sort of takes pride in being a a central pillar of of this of this community of this music, and sort of an ambassador to other people anywheres it as part of tragic flaw, actually, it's a his pride and his ego. Like, you know, he wears right here on his sleeve. I you know that this is ragtime. This is not one of the characters, you know, asks him if he knows any Coon songs, and I have to school him about, you know, Coon songs are from minstrel shows and those were performed by white people who wearing black face. You know, black face has been in the news, by the way recently. You guys have noticed. What's going on down there? In virginia. My home state, by the way, Clifton Dunkin plays Cole house Walker junior. In the Pasadena playhouse production of ragtime. Denny Feldman is the producing artistic director at the passing of playhouse. Dan clifton? Thanks so much.

Pasadena playhouse Booker T Danny Feldman officer director LA Sarah Pasadena Dan clifton Clifton Dunkin Booker T Washington America Washington Coon Shakespeare Saint Louis Asia NRA PCC Vega virginia
"danny feldman" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on The Frame

"When it opened on Broadway more than twenty years ago. Ragtime was not a runaway. Success the musical about immigration and race relations in the early. Twentieth century did win several Tony's. But it was completely eclipsed by another musical that opened at the same time a little show called the lion. King ragtime has just been revived at the Pasadena playhouse the theater's new managing artistic director. Danny Feldman fell in love with a show before its Broadway. Opening and Feldman says that without changing a single line of ragtime dialogue or any of its lyrics. The musical somehow feels as if it were written today Feldman and actor Clifton Duncan who plays Cole house Walker junior in the show visited the frame to discuss not only the financial risk in staging ragtime. But also, it's modern relevance. We started with any Feldman telling me when he first saw ragtime. I was in highschool here, Los Angeles. And I remember going to the Shubert theater, and I would buy rush tickets. I'd buy student Russia, and I must have seen it close to twenty times of not more than that. I was completely taken by it. It was unlike anything I'd ever seen before. So when I got this position at the playhouse, it was very high up on my bucket list of things I wanted to do seemed quite out of reach because of the size and scope of it. But it it's really had a special place for me back then and seeing it today or revisiting it today as I did about a year and a half ago, the relevance of it was was sort of overwhelming and overpowering. I'm going to talk about that nineteen Ninety-seven production. The LA times did a breakdown of how much it costs to mountain. It was ten million dollars back then fifty parts the car budget with thirty thousand dollars advertising, marketing promotion, one point seven million dollars. That makes me feel so much better about our budget. I'm gonna say. I was gonna say it sounds about similar to the plan. So let's set the historical context is adapted from the novel by L doctor. Oh, the story takes place in the early twentieth century more than one hundred years ago. And I suspect I'm not the only person notice this even though it was written with much more recently. There are lines and themes in this show that feel us if they could have been written yesterday. I remember vividly driving home from work one night listening to this. This would be last October. So over a year ago, and I got to a moment at the end of of the first act where police officer has a line in the script. I thought she had a gun or he says I saw got a gun. And I remember what was going on at that time the stories that were going on in the news at that time, and I was sick to my stomach of of hearing that line because that line was was very present. In. Our world at the moment. And that started a snowball effect of deep dive into the show. I think it's also worth noting that in the text of the play that line is delivered. But what is not written in the play is that a police officer plants a gun next to this person who has been shot unarmed. And I mentioned this is some of my classmates earlier, I think that it's very easy to related to specific events in at any given time and or any given epoch I'd be like twenty years later still going to be assuming we're so a nation at that point. It's still going to be relevant because I think at the core of the story are things that I think America's specifically a nations in general, I think are always going to be thinking about changing demographics and in immigration socioeconomic an industry industrial conflict, and I guess I'll use the word warfare, racial, strife, and animus, and what it means to be American. And and in some ways, you can look at the. You know, the powers of the state with the police force or bureaucracy. And and how those fail citizens and individuals in different ways. So there's so there's a great many things that that I think will always keep the story and the and the piece relevant and even though the story is set in the twentieth century. It has this idea of there's different reactions to how you deal with an oppressive society that won't give people of color, equal treatment and certainly not equal treatment under the law. What's funny is that a lot of these eras, you have sort of opposing ideologies among quote, unquote, black leadership Booker T, Washington famously clashed with WBZ boys at the time, you know, and Booker T Washington with someone who was viewed he was denigrated as being more complacent. You know, his attitude was learn how to work pick up a trade, and and work for yourself where whereas W E Douala's, and, you know, people listening will correct me if I'm wrong, but he was more. You know, get educated. You know, we have a talented tenth is is the term that he that he coined so, you know. I think they were both right in their own ways. There is a sense of coal house is a is a self made man on these he grew up in Saint Louis, which was a hotbed of black culture at the time. And he worked as a stevedore, which is hard, you know, hard labor to to finance his music lessons and in the novel. There's this attitude of him being a self created individual and the way that he speaks the way that carries himself. You know, there are many many black Americans who, you know, if they carry themselves a certain way, or if they, you know, try to achieve academically, then they're accused of acting wideness. So it's not other white people doing that. It's it's actually the blacks doing that. I feel like my particular training background with all the Shakespeare and everything really lends itself. Well to coal house who someone who speaks in the sort of heightened way. And then when he gets, you know, later on in the play where the stakes are really heightened it really helps to be able to carry that sort of language through immigrant sound like a human being saying it, and he's very. Much like Shakespeare, a tragic figure, but he's a tragic figure who starts in a place of great optimism, coal house, and Sarah. Have this great song in the first act where coal how says the wheels are turning for girl. And the time starting to roll any man can get where he wants to. If he's got some fire in his soul. We'll see Justice, Sarah. And plenty of men who will stand up and give us our do doesn't quite work out that way. No, it doesn't and you know, actually struggled a long time with with those lyrics, but also co house a sort of ideas in initially, I looked at it as naievety, you know, it's like how could someone who's obviously so intelligent and obviously. So I mean, you know, he talks about reading Booker T, Washington. And he seems to me to be someone who's really tuned in to what's going on and end, a really smart guy was like how could he be so naive to think that, you know, in nineteen oh six or whatever he's going to be, you know, Jim crow was still alive and well at this is alive and well at this time. You know? How's he so sure that that things are gonna get better for for both himself and his people? We're talking with Clifton Duncan and Danny Feldman about the production of ragtime at the Pasadena playhouse, Danny? There's a concept in retail called the loss leader, which is basically you sell milk at a loss because you know, that when people fill up their grocery cart. They're going to pay for that loss. I'm familiar with that. Doing something similar at the Pasadena playhouse explain how you are positioning this play within the play house season two subscribers and what it means as quite honestly, financial roll the dice. Yeah. Absolutely. We, you know, Pasadena playhouse has in the past had financial troubles is people know, it's public information on that. I came in about a season and a half ago to you know, after a long term artistic director coming in with a new vision of the of the playhouse, and I'm fortunate enough to have worked with the board of directors around me who understand that we are a not for profit member supported theater very much KPCC Vega member support a radio station. Our job is to enrich the lives of our community to create great work and to to be bold and ambitious and ragtime is probably one of the most bold and ambitious things. This theater is ever done. We. We still have to act responsibly. So for this production. It took about a year and a half to put together and a quarter of the budget was funded through philanthropy, and we looked at our entire season budget and built it around ragtime. And we knew that this show had the capacity to have the impact that we are feeling now that it's actually having the other thing that I think is important to note that this is a show that honors ragtime music, and even though they're characters who judge music that is performed and created by African Americans the show itself celebrates at music. Well, it's it's I mean, jazz, you know, is sort of a a successor to that. But I think of it in terms of of hip hop. You know, I I used to be a huge student of of genre that art form. And when you read about ragtime Visger of music, it was at the time. You know, it was considered radical dangerous and a musical. And in a weird thing, you know, at the at the end of the the the show talks about how ragtime sort of. Vanish as quickly as it came. Now me hip hop is different is that it's been around for decades. And they're like this is a fad at first. But now, it's still here. But the, but I loved the idea and again with coal houses. Well, in this added to my or this influence, my interpretation of the character is that, you know, you have this dangerous art form that that people haven't really heard before and people just don't know what to what to do with it. And and and I think the coal how sort of takes pride in being a central pillar of of this of this community of this music, and sort of an ambassador to other people anywheres it, you know, as part of his tragic flaw, actually, a his pride and ego is like, you know, he wears it right here on his sleeve. I'm you know, that this is ragtime. This is not one of the characters, you know, asks him if he knows any Coon songs, and I have to school him about, you know, Coon songs are from minstrel shows and those were performed by white people who are wearing black face. You know, black face has been in the news, by the way recently. Guys of noticed. What's going on down there in Virginia? My home state, by the way, Clifton Dunkin plays Cole house Walker junior. In the passenger playhouse production of ragtime. Danny Feldman is the producing artistic director at the passionate playhouse, Dan Clifton. Thanks so much for coming in. Thank you very much. Ragtime is at the Pasadena playhouse through March nineth coming up on the frame, the confusing run up to the Oscars and what to expect from Sunday's ceremony. Other

Pasadena playhouse King ragtime Danny Feldman director Booker T officer Clifton Duncan Los Angeles Shubert theater Russia Tony Clifton Dunkin Dan Clifton Douala WBZ Sarah America Coon Booker T Washington Washington
"danny feldman" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

08:08 min | 2 years ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on The Frame

"From the Mon broadcast center at KP. See this the frame, I'm John horn on today's show empire actor jussie smollet is formally accused of staging, but he said was a homophobic and racist attack. Then Danny Feldman demanding artistic director of the passing of playhouse on what inspired its revival of the musical ragtime. Our job is to enrich the lives of our community to create great work and to be bold and ambitious and ragtime is probably one of the most Bolden vicious things. This theater is ever done. And we've got one last preview of what to expect at Sunday's Academy Awards all that coming up on the frame. Actor and musician jussie smollet became known for playing an openly gay musician on the FOX drama empire. But after claiming the two men attacked him in Chicago while shouting, racial and homophobic slurs. He's now facing a felony charge of disorderly conduct for filing a false police report following small let's bond hearing this morning. The assistant state's attorney share the prosecution's evidence against the actor, including the testimony from an eyewitness his witness indicated that she heard nothing at the time of the stage attack. Despite the fact that defended small let told CPAP detectives that his attackers were yelling, racial and homophobic slurs at him, and he in turn was yelling at them too much of the public including politicians and Hollywood figures smollet story at first appeared credible in November of twenty eighteen the FBI reported a seventeen percent increase. In hate crimes from twenty sixteen to twenty seventeen. But now smollet story seems to be falling apart. Gene, Mattis has been following the story, he's an enterprise and investigative reporter for variety. And I asked him to fill us in on small. Let's arrest. So he was charged yesterday with one count of filing a false police report. He was arrested this morning in terms of the motive they are saying that he was dissatisfied with his salary, and I suppose that this event made him more prominent person, and then you know, perhaps that fame equates to a larger salary it's not entirely clear that this was well thought out to police conducted what looks to be an incredibly thorough investigation. What did they find? And how did the case start coming into focus that it was actually orchestrated in not a hate crime? The key thing is they found the the two people who are in the vicinity of the event. Video of brothers able and Ola awesome. Daro buying ski mask, gloves and baseball caps items. The pair appeared to have used in the alleged attack on empire star jussie smollet, and they were able to track them on surveillance cameras and track them into a taxi and then follow the taxi around and get images from inside the taxi and interview, the taxi driver and then through phone records and other things sort of connect them to small it, and they'd been in Nigeria that came back. They were arrested as soon as they got off the plane, and they were interrogated for two days, and you know, initially were not cooperative. But then it sounds like at the very last minute before they had to let them go. They they were able to sort of get them to confess that this whole thing had been staged. And so that seems to be the primary evidence. But obviously, there's a lot of secondary stuff in terms of, you know, surveillance video of buying the the masks and all that sort of stuff that makes for a very it. Looks like a very strong. Case at this point week ago. Jesse small let went on good Morning America where he talked with Robin Roberts about what he said had happened. Let's listen to what he said, then, you know, I I it was a thing like this. And if I tell the truth, then that's it. 'cause it's the truth. Then it became thing of like, oh, how can you doubt? That like how do you? How do you not believe that it's the truth? And then it became a thing. Like, oh, it's not necessarily that. You don't believe that? This is the truth. You don't even want to see the truth. I think one thing that's worth noting is that what he's talking about. More broadly is an actual problem. And that is the number of hate crimes have accelerated, according to the FBI and three out of five people who are tacked in hate crimes were motivated by race or ethnicity. So it does feel like if what the police are alleging is true that Jesse small let was factoring in the rise of these kinds of assistance. I mean, he sort of took a real phenomenon racially motivated violence, and everything is a real thing. That happens, you know, too frequently and put himself at the center of that drama and kind of made himself. Into the victim here, and obviously gained a level of notoriety and renown that he hadn't had previously. I mean, he was you know, TV star. But like not a household name. The the allegation is sort of like concocted this thing for sort of selfish, you know, financial motive, but also sort of fame motive and political dimension to it as well, and it all sort of mixed together in this sort of horrible situation. I wanna ask you about empire the show itself. This is a show that had been a huge hit its ratings have declined. Is there any news out of FOX, which is the producer of the show about what they're gonna do with jussie smollet in the series? I mean, they were standing by him very adamantly for the last three weeks only, you know, recently, the last twelve hours or so they've started to back off and hesitate and say, well, we're sort of trying to figure out our options here. I mean one option is to suspend him and say like he's not gonna be, you know, coming into the set anymore until we figure this out. And you know, he could be fired, obviously, it's a major show for the FOX broadcast network. You know, so they're not gonna cancel the show over this. But they very well could write him out, but it's you know, complex corporate thing, and they're going to have to get everybody on the same page and that takes time. So we'll see we'll see what happens. I would expect something, you know, relatively soon though. So what are the next steps? In the case what happens potentially either in the next couple of days over the next couple of weeks. What I've heard from lawyers who've penalty sort of cases is that very often these plead to a misdemeanor a we will see if they're willing to be generous on that front. There's also the possibility that there could be federal charges. The police believe that he sent the letter the threat letter to himself that was investigated by the FBI that could be charged with wine and the or of phony terrorist threat or something along that line. So we have to wait and see on that. But this is pretty serious stuff. And and it will sort of take a while to sort out, and what have his lawyers said over the course of this investigation. Well, initially, they were very offended that anyone would suggest that he had concocted. This Marie cently the one that charges filed they said, you know, we're gonna fight this. And we're going to do our own investigation. And so you would think at some point there might be some sort of contrition and apology right now, we're not in that mood. We're in a very sort of. We're gonna fight these charges and this is false kinda mode. Gene, Mattis is in enterprise and investigative reporter at variety, gene. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you. There was one more unfortunate twist in this story last year, smollet hosted an episode of a documentary series called America divided which was about truth and reconciliation in our nation's racial history. Coming up on the frame, the musical ragtime gets an ambitious revival at the Pasadena playhouse. When

FBI jussie smollet Gene Jesse small FOX investigative reporter America Mattis Academy Awards Chicago Pasadena playhouse Danny Feldman Bolden Mon John horn smollet director Nigeria
"danny feldman" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Seventies for the mountains and mid nineties for our desert communities if you think it's going to be hot today it gets even hotter as we head into the next few days saturday and sunday temperatures will be up by couple degrees and then monday tuesday and possibly into wednesday that's when temperatures really start to peak before things start to slowly cool back down by the end of next week was other california's most accurate dependable forecast i'm cbs to meteorologist and umbrella for knx ten seventy newsradio right now in corona it's seventy five degrees but klima with seventy six degrees studio city right now seventy seven santa monica has seventy one degrees it's eleven seventeen this portion of the news on knx sponsored by all the home one hundred years ago a group of people in pasadena came together to open a world class theater the pasadena playhouse has enjoyed international acclaim since it opened at the time it served the entire los angeles region because it was the only theatre of its size and prominence this side of the mississippi in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven it became the state theater of california prestige it still holds today in the late twenties hollywood came knocking here to ask theater to open one of the first acting schools in the country producing artistic director danny feldman dustin hoffman gene hackman in the later years went to school here since it's always been a place where people have gathered he says they decided to celebrate its one hundredth birthday with a free block party which happens tomorrow for everyone who wants to join in margaret caro knx ten seventy newsradio marlet noon a serial bank robber in southern california who.

california corona knx pasadena pasadena playhouse mississippi hollywood gene hackman los angeles director danny feldman margaret caro knx seventy five degrees seventy one degrees seventy six degrees one hundred years
"danny feldman" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"For that they got into it they say she jumped in front of their car to block it and actually punched one of the cops in the face a girl who's normally very careful to stay hidden from the sun has received a lot of love and support during an outdoor graduation ceremony at the dinner hills high school in dana point her name is rodney mccoy she does make sunlight trigger terrible burns ruin deadly skin cancer but she was determined to attend the graduation with her classmates so she wore a special protective who is she went to accept the diploma and here's her father even her walking across the stage it was like the assistant principals there to help her at one point and then the principal takes her down the ramp and insisted them guiding her through the last chapter and it's just been incredible issued previously been elected homecoming queen and changes were made to the graduation ceremony to make it easier for her to take part suspect in a double murder in las vegas in custody in the inland empire after being arrested at the end of a car chase in chino the chase was yesterday came after two vietnamese tourists were found stabbed to death in a room at circus circus in las vegas police think the victims were killed during a robbery the suspect is expected to be extradited to las vegas hundred years ago a group of people in pasadena came together to open a world class theater the pasadena playhouse has enjoyed international acclaim since it opened at the time it served the entire los angeles region because it was the only theatre of its size and prominence this side of the mississippi in one thousand nine hundred thirty seven it became the state theater of california prestige it still holds today in the late twenties hollywood came knocking here to ask theater to open one of the first acting schools in the country producing artistic director danny feldman dustin hoffman gene hackman in the later years went to.

mississippi danny feldman director california los angeles principal dinner hills high school gene hackman hollywood rodney mccoy pasadena playhouse pasadena robbery circus circus chino las vegas murder hundred years
"danny feldman" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Innocent in dna is a remarkable tool for us in the case of the nine thousand nine hundred rape and murder of young stacey napn burger the case went unsolved for almost three decades until the killer was finally tracked down by using dna and the district attorney says he wants to see more families find closure through an effective cold case investigation hey forty eight ed knx man from burbank has been convicted of wounding to la county sheriff's deputies and trying to kill others gun battle after taking off from dui checkpoint bellflower a couple of years ago he's now facing a sentence of at least two hundred years the family of a sevenyearold boy lost a leg in a hit and run crash and book is holding a fundraiser today in an effort to pay you growing medical bills the driver recalls the accident is still on the loose and police want to find him the driver hit another car this was on may fifteenth laurel canyon in montague avenue which then pushed the second car into the child as he was walking nearby these state theater of california's celebrating one hundred years it was built in pasadena by a group of residents and there's going to be a block party tomorrow wanting a world class theater a group of pasadena residents came together to make it happen that's how the pasadena playhouse was born when hollywood came knocking it became home to the first acting schools in the country hoffman gene hackman in the later years went to school here producing artistic director danny feldman says some of the greatest american playwrights of the twentieth century premiered their work on its stage from eugene o'neill to tennessee williams the man behind the glass menagerie and a streetcar named desire back then this was really the only theatre of that is in providence decided the mississippi to celebrate its one hundred years he says everyone is invited to the block party on saturday which will include performances chalk murals food trucks booths and more margaret caro knx ten seventy newsradio.

gene hackman margaret caro tennessee director la county stacey napn mississippi eugene o'neill danny feldman rape hollywood pasadena playhouse pasadena california laurel canyon burbank murder one hundred years two hundred years
"danny feldman" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on KPCC

"To the frame i'm john horn the latino performance troupe culture clash is known for its a approach to political and social issues twenty years ago the troops founders richard montoya rick salinas and herbert gwenda created bordertown a comedy theater piece about the us mexico border now they've joined forces with actress sabina zuni governor and director diane rodriguez for a sometimes funny sometimes sobering reimagining of their original show the update is called bordertown now i will do anything to be with nathan breaking the united states law if i if i have to of course i will do it but can you see a legal path to us citizenship join i can see a pass but it's very dark the pasadena playhouse under the new leadership of danny feldman premiered the play last week it tackles issues such as president trump's proposed border wall the two thousand twelve slain of a sixteen year old boy in mexico by the us border patrol and the perilous journeys taken by many mexican immigrants through the southern arizona desert to inform the new play interviews were conducted along the border with militiamen shirty workers and even with controversial sheriff joe are when i spoke with culture clash co founder richard montoya he started with the questions they tried to answer in this updated version of bordertown how could we really super try to understand what a fully armed militia guy is doing at the border what's going on in sheriff joe or piles mind who are the actual people at the border working both sides and gathering souls or the idea of christian charity and that's where we met the latter day saint missionaries the sisters of mercy the the jesuits at the commodores were they feed not just a mexican immigrants put central american immigrants we had our work cut out for us and i think that we pretty much had to leave the sketch comedy guys behind and even the activists in the poet's behind just a bit so we could get i guess as you might say behind enemy lines one of the central stories in the opening scene involves you and your colleague rick selena's conducting research for the show mostly along the border near arezzo and the two of you run across or confronted by an american vigilante he's played by your other colleague herbert's gwen zoff caller anyway you want if protecting my country puts a blackout on me i'll gladly wear it.

mexico gwen zoff co founder arizona president nathan sabina zuni arezzo rick selena richard montoya john horn trump danny feldman pasadena playhouse diane rodriguez director us herbert gwenda richard montoya rick salinas sixteen year
"danny feldman" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

11:37 min | 2 years ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on The Frame

"Katie see podcasts are supported by free forms, the bowl type produced by universal television. Any eligible in all categories, including outstanding drama series and free forms grown ish produced by ABC's signature studios. Any eligible in all categories, including outstanding comedy series, outstanding lead actress in a comedy series for Yara Shahidi and outstanding contemporary customs episodes available at free form dot com. The free form app and Hulu. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn. The Latino performance troupe culture. Clash is known for its tirico approach to political and social issues twenty years ago, the troops co, founders, Richard Montoya writ Salinas. And Herbert Seguin's created bordertown a comedy theater peas about the US Mexico border. Now they've joined forces with actress, Sabina, Zuni, governor Ella and director. Diane Rodriguez for a sometimes funny, sometimes sobering reimagining of their original show. The update is called bordertown. Now I will do anything to be with Leeson breaking the United States law. If I have to, of course I will do it, but can you see legal path to US citizenship, Jim, I can see pass. But it's very dark, the Pasadena playhouse under the new leadership of Danny Feldman premiered the play last week. It tackles issues such as President Trump's proposed border wall, the two thousand twelve slain a sixteen year old boy in Mexico by the US border patrol and the perilous journeys taken by many Mexican immigrants through the southern Arizona desert to inform the new play interviews conducted along the border with militiamen shirty workers and even with controversial sheriff. Joe Arpaio. When I spoke with culture, clash co, founder, Richard Montoya, he started with the questions they tried to answer in this updated version of bordertown. How could we really super try to understand what a fully armed militia guy is doing at the border? What's going on and share of Joe or piles mind, who are the actual people at the border working both sides and gathering souls or the idea of Christian charity. And that's where we met the latte. Today, Saint missionaries, the sisters of mercy, the the Jesuits at the Komeda otas where they feed not just Mexican immigrants, put Central American immigrants. We had our work cut out for us, and I think that we pretty much had to leave the sketch comedy guys behind and even the activists in the poet's behind just a bit. So we could get a guess as you might say behind enemy lines, one of the central stories in the opening scene involves in your colleague, Rick Salinas conducting research for the show mostly along the border near AirAsia and the two of you run across or confronted by an American vigilante as played by your other colleague Herbert's Gwenda color me any way you want. If protecting my country puts a blackout on me, gladly wear it. Well, when you strip away due process from Brown suspects, only it collision, Bagai ego, got nothing to do with. I'm only white guys say that he's trying to protect the border from drug runners and people that he doesn't want coming in the country. But it turns out to be a much more complicated. Figure once we get to know him, is he in amalgam of real people? Is he somebody that you actually encountered? Where does that come from? He comes from many sources, but yes, we set with a group of vigilante and police officers and border agents and tried to walk in the boots of that that sort. And how in the world would we make a fully armed vigilante a human being while it turns out, like I felt with Joe Pyo that we had some uncommon commonalities that frankly surprised us. Another character whose prominent in the story is sheriff, throw Pyo, who is famous for racial profiling. And last year he was found guilty of criminal contempt illiberal writers you journalist you like to come in my office, all those decades. Find some find some dirt on me some sexy stuff in my background, but you never could find anything. Could you and the only way to go after sheriff, Joe was still I about him say he's racist. He's a so and so. He's all this and all that, but you couldn't find anything. Nothing stick. So here I am. I'm still standing baby smoking, Joe. Why is our Pyo important story in? Did you actually end up interviewing him in real life because there unless it's doctored unless it's fake news looks like you actually got a chance to meet with our pilot. Well, we kind of tricked are weighing in sheriff are Pyo thought that we were film students from ASU because we had a partnership with ASU film students in your twenty fifth year. Okay. Kids in or who are, you know, and we walk in and we're in our fifties in and he looks at me. I had my Stetson hat on in in the gambit. There was, let's go in no flip flops, no shorts. Let's meet the sheriff on this professional level. And in a sense, you know, leave the activists and leave the put. I had twenty things to nail him on, but we went in and we were told, you know, fifteen minutes the sheriff's only got fifteen minutes and the amount of time that we're there, his guys are googling me and. You know, I've only been in a few movies, but he knew what they were and my father fought in Korea, and he fought in Korea and that my mother's very Catholic and his wife is very Catholic, their bios, and I begin to look around in mixed the softballs in with the hard balls. But if we went into tacking him head on, he'd probably shut down and we would have been there fifteen twenty minutes. But I think by plane a little bit on his eagle in plain a little bit up to, we were able to say, hey, let's talk about the federal indictment that's coming down and we're not your parents talion immigrants. What's the difference between them and the immigrants coming in and each sort of squirmed and and hemmed in hot a bit. But we just kept him talking in the four hours. He, you know, people say the darnedest things when when you keep them talking, how much of that conversation is verbatim in the play truth is were dramas and on stage we take some a minor liberties, but I have to say, eighty five ninety percent of. Of the pile interview on stages is true, and then the other ten fifteen percent is things that we've read. You know, Joe is very different in his office. I became Ritchie, hey, Richie come over here and he separated me from the pack a very good tactic. So he was playing to my sensibilities to Richie come over here. You had a pinky ring and any plate for me on his desk, a little old spool reel to reel, and it was my way it was a Frank Sinatra singing my way an is like if I hadn't stopped myself, I wanted to have a drink with uncle Joe, you know, but but you forget that his actions have led to extreme situations and even death among people. In that part of the Aaron desert. The show also includes a lot of topical references to journalists and to Mexican citizens who've been killed on the Mexican side of the border by border patrol officers. Why is it important that you will straight those stories of those people who were killed on the Mexican side of the border by US border patrol agents, I stood in the home of Jose. Tonio Alena Rodriguez the kid that was shot in a very bizarre case of US border agents. You know, putting those long rifles through the slats of that particular part of the Nogales USA Nogales Mexico part of the border to shoot inside Mexico is seemed very unusual. And this kid Jose Antonio a good kid. The eldest of all his siblings had a basketball in backpack in his hands and standing in the home of his grandmother. I was struck by when she was looking at us as as a kind of a film crew that had come from the US. Her husband having kicked out the BBC the day before looking at us like I don't have much time to talk to you. My husband will be home soon and he will not like this, but the wariness in her eyes in the hope in her is that we might carry the story forward impacted me or talking with Richard Montoya. He's a member of culture clash in the co writer of bordertown now are references in the show. Oh, to things that are incredibly current, like Roseanne Barr. At what point do you stop adding stuff and just say, we gotta put on the show and we can't update anymore. Well, I think we swap out, you know, and that's, that's the the diligence and the duty of of culture clash and the freedom that Diane Rodriguez our director who directed a tight and beautiful show is not a night of improv, but should something come up and should the Roseanne a situation become old news should Rudy Giuliani say something new and intelligent and should President Clinton say something, you know, surprising, which we're trying to keep up with the news. There's a line layment. We used to do satire and that echoes through the canyons because we're not doing sad tardy more. We're kind of doing stark reality. Now, let me ask you the stark reality question. A lot has changed about the border from nineteen ninety eight to two thousand eighteen. How have you and your colleagues changed in how you think about it and the. Stories that you wanna tell about it. I think the empathy has changed our understanding. I mean, twenty years ago, it was really trying to to to get that laugh into to keep moving in. And I think that we weren't reflecting enough, you know, we don't have to gun for the laugh. And I think that we did that twenty years ago is it was all about the laugh was our measuring stick, and now the measuring stick is, is that distance thunder that distant gunfire, those things that happened in the desert. You know, the Suguira desert that that place between Nogales in Tucson is the most visited desert in the world and it for its beauty, you know, and the beauty is unmistakable and the amount of death in that desert has also mistake Ables measuring stick somewhere in there that baffles us. There's a piece of video that I found incredibly disturbing and that is that good Samaritans leave water behind so that people don't perish in the desert at their crossing, right. And there is video image of. People kicking over those water bottles so that anybody who comes along in desperate need of a drink. Well, actually not have won the desert is serious business. We also met scholars and to hone Odem native of that area, authors of so many of those water stations that drive around filling up the water, and then those that are destroying the water. And so the rationale is those people that come across an empty bottle WADA will be forced into civilization and giving themselves up, but there is record of people perishing out there because there simply is no water and so that information is real and and not made up, and we were out in that desert. It seemed like for months and trying to understand the rationale of those that would destroy a water station for those crossing and trying to find sustenance. Richard on toy along with her. It's Gwynn's Enrique Salinas. Our culture clash latest show bordertown now which is directed by Dan Rodriguez is at the passing play house through June twenty-fourth. Richard pinch coming. Thank you so much man. Now

US uncle Joe Richard Montoya Mexico Joe Pyo Diane Rodriguez Herbert Seguin founder Joe Arpaio ABC Salinas director Yara Shahidi universal television Pasadena playhouse John horn Katie Nogales USA Nogales Mexico Aaron desert
"danny feldman" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on KPCC

"And astounding company of death and hearing impaired actors def west which is based in los angeles has been part of two shows that went to broadway and were nominated for tony awards big river in two thousand and three and spring awakening in 2015 as with all deaf west productions every line is delivered in american sign language and deaf actors are paired with speaking actors the director of our town is cheryl keller she recently visited our studio does and i began by asking her if she has previously worked with death actors i'd never dennis chela jeff west but when i first started working again i had directed at play for national theatre if the gaffe that toured the country and the whole process of incorporating a s l n chief a play was always very evocative for me because as how is such a lyric call descriptive locational language which speaks everything to wipe people stand onstage so when danny feldman got the artistic director get the plan house in he said what he wanted to do i said i wanted to our town with jeff west and he said cool and after god gave out i wanna ask you before we talk about working with jeff factors about watching deaf actors because as you say a cell is a very expressive language so even if there are people in the audience who don't understand the language what does an audience who is a theory member of the audience cnn performance by assigning actor that a speaking actor might not necessarily give them they say in theater you have to get it passed the foot lights and still feel intimate and i think a s l is a language that is just naturally drawn to that in that if you think about a deaf person they're missing at complete sense so what happens is everything that one would think about hearing is put into their hands interestrate hands has therefore there is a synergy and a beautiful intimate largess to the language i saw the original production of spring awakening directed by michael mayor on broadway and then i saw out of the wall as the production that was a collaboration with jeff west.

los angeles director cheryl keller jeff west danny feldman michael mayor broadway tony cnn
"danny feldman" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"danny feldman" Discussed on KPCC

"Hello everybody and welcome we've got another great show for you today we're going to be the artist behind the mean this is fine you know the comic with the dog in the house on fire and danny feldman the new artistic director of the past in a play house tells us about his plans for the venerable all theater the role that i believe the passing of laos has in my vision for is not as about presenting it's really about creating i'm very interested in creating theater oven by the community for the community but first apple has a new version of its tvs dreamy device but will it have the movies to watch through at next month the tech giant plan to release a new apple tv device that can stream ultra hd programming but of having a pretty hard time negotiating a lower price with hollywood studios for the ultra hd films that will be sold through i tunes apple wants as offerings to be competitive with the likes of roku an amazon but in the crowded digital movie market apple the gosheh and empower could be dwindling according to one independent study apple's marketshare among high resolution media players drop this year to fifteen percent from last year's nineteen percent earlier today i called up ben fritz he's a foam reporter for the wall street journal and i admitted that i wasn't even sure if you needed an ultra hdtv to watch ultra hd movies as always happens it acknowledged you have to have it i am yep yep at watch for it so if you have a fourteen tv irrefutable there but you know obviously apple joe was a huge shot company in their new apple eat at a loss this fall at announced at a couple of weeks we've got to enable forte counted well i don't beat the bottle in need a fourcolored at which means i won't be studios provide movies that are a mastered an ultra high definition for equality yeah which utter added it's quiet except to say iniquitous high definition look like a cartage fill so if i am apple i want to make sure that i making money on the content that i am creating a movie studio ought to make sure that i making money by selling i'd content to apple where is the difference of opinion at the price what is.

the house director laos apple hollywood studios roku amazon media players reporter wall street journal danny feldman nineteen percent fifteen percent