22 Burst results for "Danish Government"

"danish government" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

05:52 min | Last month

"danish government" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"So I will tell everybody watching or listening. That I am certain that one of the reasons that we have such a close bond is that it is in our DNA not to accept what doesn't make sense. Yes. Yes, I've always been like that too. Exactly. I know that. I just surmised that. But I want people listening to understand how easy it is for people to say what doesn't make sense. And I go back to it because it's so ubiquitous. And so obvious, men give birth, men menstruate, allow men to compete against women, so long as they save their women, these things don't make sense. The issue isn't even just moral. And yet, people accept that the, that we will kick out of the armed forces two years after COVID, more than two years, we will kick out of the armed forces every single member of the army navy air force coast guard, marines, who does not take a vaccination, the healthiest young people, as you know, I pointed out a number of occasions, Denmark doesn't even give it to people under 50, except for the rarest of occasions. It's ironic at all, be heading to Denmark to give a speech soon. I'm going to raise this with them. I'm very curious how Danes feel about their government. You are being modest. I have to cut in. He's giving a speech at the parliament in Denmark. You've got to talk about that Dennis. You just said you're going to Denmark. He's one humble dude, everyone. But I'll brag on your behalf. Thank you. It's very kind, very sweet. I don't know if I read face can show through on the monitor. But you should raise this. I'd be very interested to hear what they say. I'm totally curious about how people react to that. But Julia, as I've said, I don't know if you've heard me say this on my radio show. Either Denmark is lying or Harvard is lying. Well, I mentioned this a few podcast episodes ago, but it's worth raising again. So I have a dear friend who, a few weeks ago, told me that she was going to get her fourth or 5th COVID vaccine. And I said to her, please, please reconsider that. We had to get three already to go for our last semester at Harvard. We were required to have two of the doses and then one of the boosters. So I believe on top of that, she got another vaccine, and this was her 5th. And so I said, if I send you some articles, can you just please read them and consider reconsidering? And to her credit, she said yes. So I called Dennis and Sue because they both have an amazing command of all of the research and information that is out there about COVID and any other topic. They're like my in-house encyclopedia. And so I called them and I said, what are the best pieces of evidence or articles I could send to her? And of course, Dennis said, well, tell her that in Denmark, they no longer offer vaccines to those who are under 50. So I passed along that information to her, and with all due respect to my friend, who I really adore. I thought that her response was so interesting. And so indicative of the naivete. Did I say that word right? Naivete. I'm conscious because I said it incorrectly the other day and my mom pounced on me. So I'm glad I said it right there. It does indicate to me though how ignorant people are. She said to me, well, Julie, you know, if the COVID vaccine was harmful, Denmark would specify that as the reason for them no longer offering the vaccine to those under 50. They've just said that they're no longer offering it to people under 50 because they want to prioritize those who are over 50. And my response to her was, are you really that gullible? Do you think that the Danish government or any government would admit that they were wrong to have vaccine mandates and force it upon young people? You really think they're going to say, oh, hey, we just forced you for months and months and months to get this vaccine. Oopsies. We want to retract that. We just want to be honest with you. No. They're going to do they're not going to be fully transparent. Of course, they're going to say that it's because they want to prioritize people who are over 50. What does the Danish government have a problem with the amount of COVID vaccines? They're certainly not lacking. It's not a resources problem. But can you, can you imagine, again, with all due respect to my friend, I love her. But can you imagine being that gullible? It shows what the education system has done to us. Anyway, why did they come up with this idea now? Exactly. To confine it to older people. What happened? They obviously have new evidence. It's useless. It's not harmful for people under 50. Yes. I eat harmful. I believe more harmful than useful. And I also sent her this article that your wife Sue sent to me that I didn't even know that the COVID boosters were not even tested on human beings. They were only tested on mice. And so what's interesting here is that, again, when I sent this information to my friend, she didn't really take it to heart and she decided to go on and get her 5th shot. Look, it's totally her prerogative..

Denmark COVID army navy air force coast guar Dennis Harvard Danish government marines parliament Julia Sue Julie
"danish government" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:29 min | Last month

"danish government" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"This month, Denmark's prime minister met the frederickson, announced a snap election 6 months ahead of schedule. With Europe embroiled in an energy crisis triggered by Russian aggression, it's perhaps no surprise that her campaign is focused on security. But in 2019 Frederick's in center left social Democrats came to power on an altogether different platform. Then frederickson promised two things to the Danish people, support for traditionally center left issues and a far stricter immigration policy. The latter at least is something she's delivered in her three years in office. Denmark is lionized as an egalitarian society. But its approach to non white migrants suggests equality is only for some Danes. Jonjo Devlin is a senior producer on the intelligence. The country stated long-term goal as outlined in a speech last year by prime minister meta frederickson is to receive no asylum seekers at all by 2030 and to achieve this the government is pursuing policies based on deterrence and externalization. Tell us a bit about those policies. What are those terms deterrence and externalization mean in practice? Well, they're interlinked ideas, but externalization essentially means finding countries to send asylum seekers to so they never set foot on Danish soil and their current focus is on securing refugee camps in Rwanda to house asylum seekers. It's a similar policy to that. That's already in place in the UK, but while that plan is underway, a range of other deterrence measures are already in place to make life hard for refugees. Take the jewelry law, for example. This was brought in in 2016 and legalized the seizure of valuables, including cash, family heirlooms, in some cases even wedding rings carried by asylum seekers arriving in Denmark. The justification here was that these people who had fled war and persecution should pay their way through the system. That's just the tip of the iceberg though. So tell us about the rest of the iceberg. Well, there are other controversial policies coming out of Denmark in 20 19, the government decided to revoke the right to remain of many Syrian asylum seekers from Damascus after deciding that the region was safe to travel back to. And this went against rulings from the UN and the EU. In some rural areas of Denmark, local governments have made pork and mandatory part of school lunches as a repudiation of Muslim communities and another policy saw the Danish government ordering underage asylum seeking couples to be physically split up on arrival. Now, that final policy was later deemed illegal and in 2021, the minister who implemented it in a stolberg was indicted in a rare impeachment trial. She was sentenced to 60 days in prison, but this year, ahead of the election, she founded her own party the Danish Democrats that is currently polling at around 8% support in the Danish population. Why has Denmark of all places adopted such vile policies? So in the 20 tens, gang violence was perceived to be an ever growing problem in Denmark, certain diverse areas like the node of district of Copenhagen became synonymous with turf wars and shootings and minority groups were seen as a large part of the problem. That drove political demand for some kind of government intervention, but the Danish approach can also be traced back to the Europe wide refugee crisis of 2015. The Syrian war and the devastation that came with that led to huge numbers of asylum applications across the continent, and that's when Danes really doubled down on anti migration policies. At the core of this, we're concerned about what Danes call social cohesion. And this idea has not only driven refugee law, but also bled into policies that affect natural born Danes. How so? Well, one of the most striking policies was what was originally termed the ghetto list when it was brought in in 2010. Each year since then, the government has scored neighborhoods across Denmark based on a list of negative criteria. So things like the unemployment rate, the crime rate, education and income levels. But there is an ethnic component here too, a neighborhood can only be designated to ghetto if more than half the inhabitants are descendant from non Western countries. So to be clear, it's not just migrants who are caught up in these numbers. Even second and third generation Danes who perhaps have parents who were from a non white European country are swept up in the definition of non Danish and contribute to the idea of a ghetto. And what does this ghetto designation mean for people living there? Well, there are a host of penalties imposed on people living in these areas. People convicted of misdemeanors, for example, receive twice the penalty if they live in a ghetto, various groups, including those receiving public welfare, faced restrictions on moving to certain areas too. But as of 2020, a new range of policies aimed at reading Denmark of ghettos altogether came to force. It introduced forced evictions into the mix, and I actually traveled to muon the park in a much publicized ghetto in Copenhagen to meet those affected by this. There, I met several people who have been handed victim notices in May, notifying them of plans for their removal by September. In the shadow of me on a park in this big housing block, I spoke to Sarah kadeem. Thank you. Would you like coffee or tea? Please, a coffee would be great. She monitors a staff playground and community center nearby, kids with skateboarding, playing basketball, and she had this incredibly sunny and open disposition, but actually told me about the effect that evictions were having on local children that changed. We were sitting here and there came 5 boys from yellow pang, and then one of the guys was almost crying and he took, can you write a letter for me? And I was like, for what? A lot of to who. And he said, I want to write it to the one who owns Muller pattern because I want to write that. This is my home, and I don't want to move. And I always get so emotional now because they talk like it's our home. I'm born there. I don't want to move. And then you just sit there and say, yeah. That's kind of hard. The Danish government says the changes are designed to create more diversity across the whole of Danish society and that residents will be rehoused in new areas. However, families facing eviction as soon as November told me it was still unclear where and when new permanent accommodation would be provided. Sanjo, that's a really bleak picture of the painting for us. How are these policies playing into the upcoming election? Migration is actually playing a far less important role in this election than in previous ones. Now one of the reasons for that is that economic issues facing Europe this winter are just taking up a lot of airtime. But another reason is that the anti immigration argument for the far right have been increasingly accepted and even co opted by some on the left like metaphor. And the effect of this could be seen in a recent televised debate between the leaders of the 14 parties running in the Danish election. When asked about the government's plan to start sending asylum seekers to Rwanda, all had varying critiques of the policy, but it was broadly supported. Even far left critics of frederickson, like radical ventra, the radical left, have found it difficult to find an alternative solution that would please voters. Of course, this trend has not been universally popular by any means, and one of the people I spoke to in mjolnir park and who did not want to be named said she was disappointed by the social Democrats. 6 years ago, I feel more safe with the social Democrat day. Today, no, but today it's like oh my God, I need protection everywhere. I'm really like this point in an angry and but that said, the social Democrats currently enjoy a healthy lead in the polls, which perhaps isn't too surprising, as studies show Danes are among the most intolerant Europeans when it comes to migration. In the 2019 YouGov survey, one third said they thought immigration brought only harm and no benefit to the country at all. And to what extent should these sorts of policies outliers compared with other countries in Europe? While Denmark stands out compared to its European counterparts in June, the EU published a report on Denmark's policies castigating them for their attitude and recommending a wholesale change in the way the country deals with migrants. However, there might be some interesting cultural similarities across the Nordics. In a recent study of expatriates in 52 countries, Denmark Norway and Sweden were all ranked amongst the hardest places to settle in. Now this study didn't look at economic factors or the size of the welfare state, but on a self reported sense of welcome and cultural openness in

Denmark frederickson Danish government Jonjo Devlin prime minister meta fredericks stolberg Danish Democrats Europe Rwanda Copenhagen Frederick Sarah kadeem government Damascus EU Danish society UN UK Muller
"danish government" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:06 min | 2 months ago

"danish government" Discussed on WTOP

"Increasing. Thursday is your likely landfall. You're going to be seeing rain that is going to be just absolutely torrential for hours and hours a storm could make landfall in Tampa, which hasn't seen a storm this size in more than a century. Facebook says it's found and disabled a sprawling network of fake accounts that spread Russian propaganda about the war. CBS Vicky barkers at the foreign desk. Facebook parent company met her says the Russian based network used hundreds of fake social media accounts and dozens of sham news websites to spread Kremlin disinformation about Ukraine through much of Western Europe, investigative journalist a in Germany found it first by the time meta investigated many of the fake accounts had already been removed by Facebook's automated systems. They'd amassed thousands of followers by them. Evidence huge gas pipelines from Russia to Europe may have been sabotaged, here's corresponding cameo McCormick. The Danish government says military photos show gas leaks bubbling in the Baltic Sea. Earlier, it said the Nord stream pipelines may have been damaged by targeted attacks and it couldn't be a coincidence. If the pipelines are shut down, it would cut off gas deliveries from Russia to Germany and Central Europe and gas prices will surely go up again. Kremlin says early results from referendum show most people are in favor of annexing parts of eastern Ukraine. A day after entering the bear market, the Dow's bouncing back from its lowest level since 2020. It's up more than two 75 right now. S&P ahead 43. Lumber prices have fallen back to their lowest level in more than two years. CBS News business analyst Jill schlesinger says they had been helping to drive inflation. The price of two by fours almost tripled from the pre-pandemic record, which was a warning sign that inflation and supply chains would be a core issue in the COVID recessions recovery home prices cooled in July at the fastest rate in the history of the S&P's case schiller index. And Walmart's ready to offer insurance benefits to workers trying to expand their families. It's teaming

Vicky barkers Facebook Danish government Ukraine Germany Tampa Russia CBS Western Europe Baltic Sea McCormick Central Europe Jill schlesinger Kremlin Europe Dow CBS News S Walmart
"danish government" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

03:00 min | 2 months ago

"danish government" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Right. Well, Denmark, where I'll be going in November, Denmark, to give a speech at the parliament, by the way. It's an interesting thing. That's unbelievable. I didn't know that. Yeah, yeah. Congratulations. Thank you. Yeah, I'm getting a free speech award in Copenhagen. Obviously I talk about it when I come back. But I just reminded me because I'm going to tell you what Denmark thing. Denmark has just announced that they do not want people under 50. To get the vaccination. Oh, really? It is a government announcement. So here's a question. I want to say goddamn, but people don't like that term. Even though it's the opposite of damn God, it's made goddamn then. Yes. I never understand. I don't understand. These damn colleges damned they are damned and May they be damned. You can't come to our school if you're not vaccinated. These are average 20 year olds. And Denmark is just announced. Don't get it if you're under 50. So who's right? I want everybody listening to this to answer the question. Is Denmark lying or is your local damn college lying? One of them is wrong. They can't both be right. Either the Denmark, the Danish government, is wrong. Or every college in this country virtually is wrong. And hurting people, either Denmark's hurting young people, or you're college is hurting young people. It's so angry. I'm gonna bet on the college given how many other ways we hurt young people. Exactly correct. They don't do anything for young people. Why would this be an exception? You know, I was thinking recently. It's just unbelievable. And you know that there are many things I really liked about Harvard, especially my Friends, the people that I met. That's number one. But it's actually remarkable that I was able to become and remain a conservative in that environment. I mean, obviously it is because I was in that environment and I saw how loony things are that made me a conservative, but I think as a general rule. It's not always true, but I think generally it is. When you put a weak person in a bad environment, they become weaker. When you put a strong person in a bad environment. That's a good one. It becomes stronger. And I think I became stronger and that's why I think so many of these college students are becoming a weak gentleman reason. I love Julie. Thank you. Oh, no, wasn't even meant as a compliment. I guess it is, but I didn't mean it as such. I meant it sincerely. See, okay. It's going to annoy some people when I'm just going to praise you, but I don't care. Oh, just bring it on..

Denmark Danish government Copenhagen parliament Julie
"danish government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:33 min | 3 months ago

"danish government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Let's start with check radio as you teased in the menu. Yes, I'm super excited about this because I mean obviously we work in media where he beautiful studios in London and I've seen images come through of check radio's new headquarters in the city of ola mooch. It's a three hour drive east of Prague. And essentially the national broadcaster it's in the moving in process. So I did see the images early and that they are now having people actually move into these buildings into this building. It's been renovated by the architecture studio atelier 38. In a structure that was originally constructed in the early 1900s as a furniture showroom. And originally it had this beautiful or nature novo facade, but that was destroyed in the Second World War. It's been replaced with this sober tiled exterior. But inside, it's still got this art novo field. There's this beautiful airy atrium with lots of natural light that floods in. Hidden behind this unassuming frontage. And it's around this atrium that the new studios have been built, the new workspaces, a situated, and essentially they've had to because of the age of the building. They've had to work really closely with and I'm going to struggle with this word. A goose issues. So essentially people that are specialists in working with sound to ensure that the interior conditions weren't too loud for recording audio. So it's particularly a manager they're going to love that. No, you don't really own. That's just a little shout out to them there. But it's a really difficult obviously recording audio that sounds clear and really crisp without any outside noises it is incredibly difficult to do. Easier when you're building a building from scratch. But when you're working with something that's over a hundred years old and you're trying to retrofit, it's really, really a difficult task. And the reason I like this project outside of it being obviously a media headquarters and certainly very much up my alley and I'd love to get in those studios maybe I could even do a remote cross from there one day. What I do love is that because of the complexity of this project and having to go back and work with these acousticians, it reminds you that architecture is about so much more than just creating a nice looking space. It's really about working with all our senses. Thinking about how things are a space sounds, thinking about how noise travels through it. Even going so far as making sure that obviously natural light comes in, but also how it smells, making sure it, everything's kind of beautiful. You sneered a bit there on the smell, but making sure making sure that we've got airflow and it's not stale and stuffy. So all these sort of things are happening in this incredibly challenging building in the city of olomouc. Well, it's interesting. I can give a little shout out to our September magazine of monoclonal too. We do love to visit media headquarters, and we have sort of three, I believe that we've profiled in the most recent magazine. I'm sure you'll be looking for an invite to check radio very soon, but let's move on for now here on the show. There's an installation to mark the, well, we have the we had jubilees. It's like the year of jubilees frankly. We had the UK jubilee obviously as well, but the Danish queen's 50th jubilee is coming, what can we expect on the design front? So there's a host of big celebrations and I used the word big rather intelligently if I do this by myself. Because completely intended because the Danish architecture studio big has completed a new installation called 50 queens in the city's central square king square, which has been renamed quaint square for the occasion. And the inspiration back again later. I don't know. That's maybe one for the Danish government to work out where we can leave that. But the inspiration for the installation comes from the fact that there are a 101 statues in Copenhagen, but only 5 show women. In contrast, 26 showed animals. So you can see that women are vastly underrepresented sadly in the city, and obviously we've got this pioneering woman, this queen celebrating a 50th jubilee in Denmark. So what a better way to celebrate her in public space than by also celebrating other pioneering Danish women. So they've created an installation with 50 pedestals arranged in a circular form around the square. They chose 49 women who were leaders in fields, including literature, science, and education to be represented on these prints. And each pedestal's height corresponds to how long the woman in question lived and how long I guess she was able to contribute to Danish society. So it's a circular form of varying heights. But what I like is that the tallest one doesn't have a name on it. It's a mirrored surface so that everyone and anyone can see themselves reflected in it. And what's particularly beautiful about that is, you know, we're talking about representation here. We're talking about the fact that only 5 of a 101 statues represent women. It's a reminder installation as a whole, but also these mirrored surface that it's important that we can see ourselves in our public spaces. Cities are at their best when they're created by everyone for everyone. And it's also about making sure that that is clearly communicated in our public symbols in our statues in our buildings that we all feel included in our urban spaces. Absolutely, in this case, even literally with a mirror to represent yourself before we let you go, Nick. I'm gonna go look in a mirror to be clear of what that vein strike after this has just got me going. Absolutely we're just both going to do this right after the show. Before we do let you go though to look in a mirror Nick. You have news also from Zürich. We love, of course, this is where Monaco's own headquarters are as well. What's the news from there? So the theater spectacle festival in Zürich has been rebranded by the graphic designer Marcus craft. I'm a particularly big fan of previous campaigns for the likes of on running. But these new one is a series of poster posters created with a Parisian illustrator called mate Marquis. And they're essentially brightly colored designs with a thick typography that enhances the dream like images of my key. And the result is a set of visuals that kind of feel surreal, but they're also calming. And I think that kind of sets you up nicely to go to one of these kind of eclectic events. But the reason I brought it up and obviously graphic design is very difficult to communicate over an audio medium. It's a visual medium and we're trying to communicate it over audio, but what I liked is we interviewed markets for our monoclonal on design newsletter and he had a really which is out which should be hitting inboxes tonight, sorry. We interviewed him, but he had this great quote that I wanted to recite back to you because I think it really underlines what good graphic design should be. He said, a good campaign should work well on two different layers. The first layer must be bold and deliver the content that has to be communicated. But the second is made up of 20 details or a hidden message that you only discover on repeat viewing, which makes you want to look at it over and over again. And for me, that's what these posters did, I kind of kept getting drawn back to them first by the typeset for then by the illustration. And I think that's just a reminder that when we are or when graphic designers are working on a project, you've got to be thinking of things that are going to constantly give back to you. So it's not a singular viewing, but something that you want to want to come back and continue to dissect. And that ultimately is what will hopefully help embed the theater spectacle message in people from Zürich's brains. Well, speaking of giving back do be sure to check out Nick's monocle minute on design later this evening also the monocle on design podcast. But that is all we have time for Nick, thanks very much for joining us that was our deputy design editor. Nick manis and that is all the time we have for this edition of the briefing. It was produced by Rhys James, our researcher, was Thames and Howard and our studio manager was Colin McLean. The briefing is back tomorrow at the same time, but the monocle daily team will be here to unpack the days. Main stories at 1800 London time, I'm Chris turmeric. Goodbye, and thanks for listening.

Zürich olomouc Danish queen central square king square Danish government Danish society Prague Marcus craft Nick London Copenhagen Denmark UK Monaco Marquis Nick manis Rhys James Colin McLean Thames Howard
"danish government" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

07:25 min | 3 months ago

"danish government" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"What the left has done to the profession of journalism is exactly what the motto of The Washington Post owned by Jeff Bezos of Amazon. One reason I try to purchase anything over minimal amount of money from anywhere else on the Internet. It's nothing only reason. And what others to thrive and not just Amazon. Their motto is democracy dies in darkness. The darkness created by The Washington Post and the rest of the mainstream media. Is exactly what I fear will cause this death. That is in their motto. So I want to tell you something, then I'll get back to these issues. So let's see here. Yeah, LA county. Listen to this headline. LA county urges COVID protections as kids go back to school. 2335 new cases reported. Wow, that's really something they resume classes this Monday. So here's an interesting question. Who loves children more? The left in America or the Danish government. Which is, I presume a liberal, at least liberal government. So here's a headline. A statement from the Danish government, titled vaccination of children and young people under the age of 18. Children and young people only very rarely become seriously ill from COVID-19 with the omicron variant. Therefore, from 1 July 2022, it will no longer be possible for children and young people under the age of 18 to get the first jab and from 1 September 2022, it will no longer be possible to get the second jab. Quite a few children with a particularly increased risk of serious course will have the option to vaccination after an individual assessment by a doctor. Did you hear the words will no longer be possible? The Danish government is outlawing this so called vaccine. To children under the age of 18 in all of Denmark. They will note this when I go to Denmark and receiving an award in Denmark for free speech. In November, and in my talk, I will note this admirable decision on the part of the Danish government. But Barbara Ferrer, under the fraud in the name of science, Walt's children to be vaccinated. If you love your children, you don't you owe it to your children if you love them and most parents love their children. To research the issue, why are you a sheep? Now, if you have read up on this matter on the danger of the vaccine versus the usefulness of the vaccine, that is, after all, the only question to be asked about anything, what is the downside and what is the upside? Don't you owe it to your child to have done this research before giving them a non vaccine vaccine? Non vaccine is not an attack. It's a description. Vaccines prevent an illness. This does not. Since virtually everybody who gets the vaccine ultimately gets COVID, some form like the president of the United States. It can't be said to prevent the illness. So instead we get the line, it prevents you from going into the hospital. You will get it, but that was never what was told to us. From Biden to Fauci, to all the others. They lied into the camera and told you it will prevent you're getting COVID. Simple. Like they knew, like they knew. The most untested vaccine ever released upon the public. And they knew its effects. I think it's incumbent upon every parent in Los Angeles, county, and anywhere else in the country. To know what the Danish government is decided, it is forbidding children. From getting, I read it to you from getting the vaccine. Under 18. Schools were openly entire two years in Sweden for children under 16. Nothing happened. I kept very philosophical about life, as you know. I try to try to have clarity over life. Given the moral failure of so many teachers in so many principles and so many health officials, the utter and total, total moral failure of these people. It raised a question in my mind. That is difficult to answer. Do you know people. Unless they have been tested? Do you know yourself unless you've been tested? The moral cowardice of so many doctors in this country, the cowering under the rules of the American medical association, the sheep like behavior with regard to Therapeutics, the sheep like behavior with regard to vaccine, I can't tell you how distressing it is. There are some doctors who have passed the test, but most have failed. What am I then to assume? And I said, this is not at all rhetorical. I don't know. Do I say this is otherwise a wonderful person? But sheep like in his or her behavior? That's what I have concluded. I have not been able to dismiss the entirety of these people for failing the test. The ones who instigate the test, the Barbara Ferrer's, and the FDA and the CDC and NIH heads, that's a different story..

Danish government LA county The Washington Post Denmark COVID Amazon Barbara Ferrer Jeff Bezos United States Walt Fauci Biden Los Angeles Sweden American medical association FDA CDC NIH
"danish government" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

07:22 min | 4 months ago

"danish government" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"The main argument in favor of strict intellectual property laws is that they spur innovation, making vaccines and medication takes a ton of time, research and money. Pharmaceutical companies say that without these protections, they just wouldn't have the incentive to develop new medical treatments. The COVID vaccine has been incredibly profitable for Pfizer and Moderna. We're talking billions and billions and billions of dollars. And so everyone says, well, look, that's the perfect example. They wouldn't have done it without IP. I mean, would you agree? You know, no matter how small or no matter how large the reform, the argument will always be you're about to kill innovation, how could you do that? So the kind of response to that, I think many different ways to proceed. Perhaps we'll choose a couple. One is that, of course, under the existing system, we understand that it's not just industry that's driving innovation, right? We understand that the public sector is playing this huge role in supporting and propelling innovation forward. And so for example, when we look at the national Institutes of health, that alone spans $40 billion a year on biomedical research and development, right? And so when you're talking about supporting R&D, it's important to be inclusive just of public sector R&D as well as private sector R&D. So that's kind of my first response. The second response is, of course, then the private sector R&D component, right? How do you sustain that? How do you maintain that? And it comes down to the question ultimately, I think, of what is the return, right? When we allow, for example, Pfizer to make $36 billion off of COVID-19 vaccines in the year 2021 alone, what investment do we actually need to induce that kind of research and development? To induce Pfizer to do this in the first place. IP laws don't just allow pharma companies to set pricing. They allow the companies to choose who they'll sell their products to, and when there's a limited supply of a vaccine, the company's largely get to decide where those doses go. Perhaps the most pernicious problem is the idea of monopoly control. Because really, it should not be up to Pfizer CEO to act like a sovereign in the world and dictate to national governments that, you know, you're going to get X supply. You're going to get Y supply. You're going to get Z supply. And I think that's what's really the core of the problem. So you're saying abolish patents, I think you're saying that. The term I wouldn't use is abolish necessarily, but I think the certainly need to be overridden for the public interest and the U.S. government has existing authority that are actually uses all the time in different sectors. And this is actually perhaps my most compelling point here, which is that the Defense Department doesn't care about patents, right? The Defense Department, when it needs the technology, it uses that technology, right? It'll get a contractor to use a patent and if a patent holder wants to sue, they can do that. There is a law that allows the patent holder to sue the U.S. government and get some compensation. But what the Defense Department does not allow to happen is for one contractor to get up and be like, hey, I have a patent. You can't use this invention. Now pay me. Right? For some reason, the Department of Defense doesn't do that, but the CDC, the NIH, HHS, and our public health apparatus. Can not stand up to pharmaceutical corporations in the same way. And so when we talk about kind of going beyond IP based systems of drug development innovation, we can look to actually what we do elsewhere as well. Yeah, one thing that really struck me in reading about vaccine sharing with COVID was the hoarding as an American at first, I remember we talked about this on another podcast I'm on and I said, well, it makes sense that the U.S. would want to hoard vaccines for the U.S. and be nationalistic about it. You want to take care of yourself first. But it really seems like that comes around full circle and hurt us because the U.S. had hoarded vaccines and the global north had hoarded vaccines. COVID spread like wildfire in the global south and we got these new strains. We got delta. We got omicron. So it turned out that hoarding wasn't even in our best interest. And I wonder if the same thing is going to happen now with monkeypox. The U.S. government from monkeypox is in a little bit more delicate position than it might seem. Because the factory is located in Denmark and not in the U.S.. And so had the Danish government taking the same response to monkeypox that the U.S. did for COVID-19, there actually would be no monkeypox vaccines in the U.S. right now. Because you could imagine that the Danish government, the European Union and others starting to hoard their vaccines. So really goes to highlight just the kind of need for that distributed global network. So Zayn, where do you see the monkey pox outbreak going? And future disease outbreaks, if nothing changes with the current IP structure. I think one thing we can say for sure is that this is not the last time this happens, right? We are living in an connected world where new viruses are emerging. There are new diseases, some old diseases that are making a comeback. And so we just really have to do a deep think on what we can do to prepare and respond to that. And our understanding is that one key component of that is this distributed global network of manufacturers, right? So there should be a vaccine manufacturer, for example, in sub Saharan Africa, in Latin America, in North America, all around the world that is capable of rapidly shifting and rapidly pumping out doses for that next new disease threat. And there are promising initiatives underway, including at the World Health Organization to set up mRNA capabilities around the world. So we can better respond to new outbreaks. But I think until we get there, and until really, we take public health seriously. Until we fund public health appropriately until we take seriously the idea of making vaccines and treatments global public goods, this is not going to be a problem that really goes away anytime soon. So we do need ways to manage it better.

Pfizer monkeypox Defense Department COVID NIH U.S. government Moderna U.S. Danish government pharma HHS Zayn CDC Denmark sub Saharan European Union Latin America North America
"danish government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 5 months ago

"danish government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Into the UK from farms at Belgium and France have jumped from 48 hours up to 6 weeks since the country left the European Union with rising up to 20%. What's more, any further delay in shipment of the highly perishable product sends it straight to the trash. Noma, the 5 time world's best restaurant winner, has lost money for the first time in four years, despite serving $700 per person tasting menus at lunch. The Copenhagen restaurant with its three Michelin stars lost almost a quarter $1 million after receiving over a million in COVID-19 supports from the Danish government. In the metaverse, the market for NFTs has fallen off a cliff. The JPG NFT index, which tracks a handful of blue chip NFT projects, such as board a yacht club, is down more than 70%, since its inception, in April. I'm Andrew rode, Bloomberg radio. What is dedication? The thing that drives me every day is a day is very annoying. We call them day to day for short. Every day he's hungry for something, whether it's attention, affection, knowledge, and there's this huge responsibility and making sure that when he's no longer under my wing, that he's a good person. I think the advice I would give is you don't need to know all the answers. The craziest thing was believing that your dad knew everything. So as a dad, you felt like you had to know everything. You had to get everything right. It's okay to make mistakes. As long as it's coming from love, then, you know, it kind of starts to work itself out. I want him to be able to sit back one day and go. We work together, we did a good job. That's dedication. Find out more at fatherhood dot gov. Brought to you by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the ad council. Some bonds last a lifetime. Some bonds inspire confidence, and some you grow to rely on. These are the bonds worth investing in. For over 50 years, pimco has reinvented

Danish government Andrew rode Bloomberg radio Noma Belgium European Union Michelin Copenhagen France UK U.S. Department of Health and pimco
"danish government" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

01:37 min | 5 months ago

"danish government" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"Thinking about giving you guys more equity and we're going to up our stake in the airline, eventually. So, you know, kind of in a not even in about face, but just a completely different take on the situation from the Danish government versus what the Swedish government has said. Interesting for a few reasons, most of which have to do with the fact that SAS is over the past few years, especially really built up its hub in Copenhagen. And so the Danish government has, if not more financial investment, which is also true, but also more of the flag carrier stability, riding on SAS continuing to be an airline that operates and carries people. So it really is the new alitalia, but with a multi country twist. Yes, yes, that's exactly what it is. They need money, they need it from a government, but they have multiple governments to go begging to. That's a nice benefit. I only had one. Yeah, and you just see the Norwegian sitting over in the corner going. We were done with you a long time ago. Yeah, we got Norse now. Yeah. Hey, that's private. For now. Norse will stay in Scandinavia, Norse began flights. Yesterday with the traditional two hour delay, with the traditional two hour delay, they flew Oslo to JFK and then back in the middle of the night, they left JFK 2 a.m.. I mean, who hasn't left JFK 2 a.m., really? I've been there only when flying Norwegian. I'd say the one time I flew overnight from JFK on Norwegian, I did. The more things change, the more they congratulations to.

Danish government Swedish government SAS Copenhagen Scandinavia Oslo
"danish government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:26 min | 7 months ago

"danish government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Yorker radio hour I'll talk with Ukraine's ambassador to the United Nations Sergi kissa The United Nations is not an ideal institution by design And why should it be ideal I mean the United Nations was conceived by three fathers Roosevelt Churchill and the pure evil Stalin That's next time on The New Yorker radio hour Listen tonight at 7 on 93.9 FMW NYC or get the podcast Onision the next 30 minutes after another senior U.S. delegation visits Kyiv what chance Joe Biden's huge Ukraine aid package will now speed through Congress The Afghan father tried to give his daughter a future with schools still closed by the Taliban And why the full return of the proms is a source of wonder and joy to music fans around the world After this summary the news BBC News civilians are being evacuated from a steelworks in the besieged Ukrainian city of Mario pole It's a complex operation involving the United Nations and Red Cross so far at least 80 people have left the plant Some are expected to reach the Ukrainian controlled city of abyss on Monday A video released by Russia's Ministry of Defense shows others being bused to a camp in Russian controlled territory Russian forces are continuing to bombard a Ukrainian positions in the east of the country People have been advised to remain indoors in parts of the kharkiv region The governor of Luhansk again told civilians to leave while they still couldn't The Tunisian president says he intends to rewrite the country's constitution Kai sayyed who is dissolved government and parliament said a committee would be established to redraft the existing framework and would conclude its work within days He said it would usher in a new republic The Brazilian president jair Bolsonaro has joined a demonstration in Brasília for what he says is a defense of the constitution It comes after he controversially pardoned an ally who had been sentenced to jail for inciting violence South African demonstrators of stormed the stage at a rally being addressed by president ramaphosa and forced him to leave the protest was linked to a long strike at a local mine The first international tourists for more than two years have arrived in New Zealand after the removal of coronavirus measures People from more than 60 countries including Britain and the U.S. can now visit The French singer credited with inventing the modern discotheque has died Regime silberberg was 92 famed for replacing jukeboxes at her Paris nightclub with discharges playing records regime went on to build a global nightclub empire BBC News Welcome back to NewsHour Denmark has welcomed thousands of Ukrainian refugees since the start of the Russian invasion At the same time though the Danish government has been in talks with Rwanda to set up a procedure to transfer asylum seekers to the East African country a process which a government spokesperson has told the BBC will only apply to non Europeans And that's prompted human rights groups to accuse the government of discrimination From the BBC's Arabic service as this report If you take a stroll through the streets of Copenhagen these days you can not avoid noticing the blue and yellow Ukrainian flags everywhere A clear symbolic sign of the support to Ukraine against the Russian invasion And the support is not just symbolic Denmark has so far welcomed around 40,000 Ukrainians with more on the way I visited one of the reception camps just outside Copenhagen where hundreds of Ukrainian families are staying temporary Through its outdoor hallways that link dozens of individual rooms together residents smoke children play and some write their bicycles I met Allah with her husband and kids In the secondhand shop full of donated clothes that she helped set up after she and her family arrived for Ukraine She explains to me how she got the idea to organize this shop after donations from Danish people started piling up We ever thankful for Danish people they give us roof to leave food to eat and all the clothes we have a lot of donations It's very very nice But as Allah prepares to make this country her home other refugees here have been feeling less welcome around 35,000 Syrian refugees have arrived in Denmark since 2015 but recent laws have made it harder for them to settle here These chants are from protests that broke out last year in Copenhagen They followed the government plan to revoke the visas of over a thousand Syrians claiming that it was safe for them to go home I sat down with a group of Syrians to hear the thoughts Phase a father of two told me that it's not about the support Ukrainians are receiving Syrians are the most sympathetic to the Ukrainians We endured the same attacks and weapons but we object to the way the government is dealing with it The Danish government has recently announced it was set up what it calls Ukrainian towns where schools and services will be provided in the Ukrainian language in order to cope with the large numbers of refugees coming into the country I've spoken to Rasmus stockland the asylum and immigration spokesperson of the governing social Democrats party who said they can not help everyone We are a very small country compared to most other countries in the world But it seems that your small country for the Syrians but you're not a small country for decreasing No and that's why we think that we have responsibility in Europe If I have been refugees here and we think that people in the Middle East have a responsibility for helping refugees there There's no doubt about the warm welcome Ukrainians have received from everyone in Denmark including Syrian refugees but that welcome has left Syrians and may be other refugees wishing they could be treated the same In Copenhagen.

United Nations Ukraine Sergi kissa Roosevelt Churchill Luhansk Kai sayyed Danish government jair Bolsonaro Brasília president ramaphosa silberberg BBC Denmark Kyiv Copenhagen Ministry of Defense government of discrimination F Joe Biden kharkiv Stalin
"danish government" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

02:36 min | 7 months ago

"danish government" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"Full member of the team alliance. So we'll see if that changes, but so far S 7 is the only change. And then the other thing, we've briefly discussed this as far as longer roots and things like that go. But there's been over the past ten or so days, some really interesting flights. By the Russian government, around Europe to collect diplomats that have been expelled from various European capitals. The Spanish government, the Greek government, the Danish government, the French government, and I believe the EU or I'm not sure if it was the EU or the Belgian government, the Belgian national government. But they been expelling Russian diplomats, either saying that these diplomats aren't diplomats, they're actually spies or by saying because of the actions by Russian soldiers in Ukraine. We're expelling your diplomats as a sign of protest or a combination thereof. So the Russians picked up their Spanish diplomats and their Greek diplomats on the same flight. Instead of kind of a relatively short few thousand kilometer flight from Moscow to Madrid, they flew up and over as all flights have done since the airspace bans went into effect banning Russian flights from EU airspace. And made a 3400 kilometer flight from Moscow to measured, takes 7000 kilometers. Then to get to Athens instead of taking 23, 2400 kilometers, 3700 kilometers, and then the journey home because a straight shot from Athens to Moscow would take them directly over Ukraine. That one had a much longer went from 2200 kilometers to 40 300 and change. I mean, at some point, we did a blog post about this just to run the numbers. And the comments were either good, make them go around, make them go the long way. Or make them take the bus, which doesn't sound feasible at the moment, or that's not great. Because these flights are so much longer. And that's not a good thing for a variety of reasons. Most of which deal with environmental reasoning. So I thought some of the responses were interesting and I'm kind of a mix between good and maybe not good. I don't know. It's a one time thing..

team alliance Russian government Greek government Danish government French government Belgian government Belgian national government EU Moscow Spanish government Ukraine Athens Europe Madrid
"danish government" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:56 min | 10 months ago

"danish government" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"How many times must a man look up before he can see the sky. That's a quote from a famous song by Bob Dylan. I love that line because it reminds me that sometimes what we need is actually right there in front of us. I will argue that that is also the case with climate change. We can actually replace some of the biggest sources of the problem, oil, coal, and gas, with something we have in abundance. Wind. In my country, Denmark, we are doing just that. Now we are a small country with a small population. If you haven't visited yet, please do so. We are all friendly people. As long as you don't criticize our national football team. Nothing makes a Dane proud like the knowledge that something we have done makes a positive difference in the world. Historically speaking, we've made a difference before. 1000 years ago, countrymen of mind controlled most of Northern Europe. I'm sure you've heard of them. Big strong guys, helmets, beards, long hair, the Vikings. Now, I will make the case today that in order for us to fight climate change, we actually need to learn from the Vikings. But before we get to that, please indulge me. We have to go somewhere else. I have to take you back in time, not all the way back to the Viking age and the heydays of Harold Bluetooth. But to the 1970s during the oil crisis in Denmark. Not to a Viking fortress, but to a small workshop in a barn in a farm, in a village in Denmark. Meet hand like Steve Steve, he's not an accomplished experienced engineer. He's 19 years old, a young man. He set himself a challenge. He fought. What if I could make a wind turbine that could produce electricity? And you know what? He did. It says M1 on it. That stands for Muller, one. Which translates into turbine number one. And of course, this was just the first one he made later. He managed to build a big one that could supply his family with cheap, affordable electricity in the middle of the crisis. Soon after that, other farms asked Henrik to build a turban for them as well. And he did. And eventually, he actually sold the sign to a company called vestas. You might have heard of them because they had the biggest turbine producer in the world today. So this is how Hendricks invention. Became a sort of the prototype for many, many of the wind turbines that you'll see all over the planet today. Now, a lot of things have happened since Hamlet and other pioneers took the first steps back in the 1970s. In 1991, we built the first offshore wind farm in the world called vanity, 11 turbines, 54 meters tall. That was considered a landmark. They were huge. Today, of course, they seem pretty tiny. The biggest offshore wind farm in Denmark now is clear flock, 72 turbines, 188 meters tall each of them. To give you a comparison, that's twice the height of the Statue of Liberty. Every time one of those turbines have one rotation of the blades, it creates an awful electricity to charge more than 1400 cell phones. The park itself covers the electricity demand of 600,000 households. So the story of wind power and Denmark is the story about how one turbine on one farm sparked a transformation that influenced the whole country. We, of course, now hope small as we may be. That we can spark a transformation that will also affect other countries. We are a green FrontRunner. But we need to do more. Because at the same time, we rank number one in the EU or at least as one of the biggest oil producers in the EU. This has to change. And it will. Last year, the Danish government and the Danish parliament made an important decision. We have decided to put an end date on extraction of oil and gas in 2050. And immediately cancel all future licensing rounds. That wasn't an easy decision. When we made the decision, we were the biggest oil producer in the EU. But the reason we made it, even though it was expensive was because we need to show the world that there are actually alternatives to oil and gas. Now, some of you are probably thinking that sounds very good, but how will you do it? What do you do today when the wind doesn't blow? And what about the parts of our energy system that can not be electrified? Surely you can not fly a jet plane without jet fuels, surely you can not sail a bit container ship without bunga oil, but actually you can. The electrolyzer transforms electricity into hydrogen. And that Friends, that's the game changer. Because it makes it possible for us to solve two problems we have with wind energy. One, we can now store the energy for window wind is not blowing. And two, we can now decarbonize parts of our energy system that we couldn't decarbonize before. Because the hydrogen can be transformed into green fuels. Imagine that. The wind in the North Sea is transformed by a turbine into electricity. The electrolyzer transforms that into hydrogen and the hydrogen is then made into green sustainable fuels that we can use to sail our ships and file planes. I know it sounds like science fiction, but actually, it's just science. Now, in all of us to do that, at a scale that we need. We will need a lot of renewable energy. We will need to massively expand our offshore wind capacity. And in Denmark, we're doing just that. A very important part of that strategy is to build the world's first energy island. 80 kilometers out in the sea, the size of 64 football fields. The biggest infrastructure investment in Danish history. We're changing literally the map of our country. Hundreds of wind turbines around it. When fully scaled, it'll be able to generate ten gigawatts of green electricity. Now, ten gigawatts, that's enough to cover the demand of 10 million households. That's far more than we need in Denmark, which is good news, because then we can use it to make the hydrogen to make the green fuels and we can export it to other countries and thereby help them decarbonize their energy systems. Some of you are probably thinking,.

Denmark Harold Bluetooth Steve Steve Vikings Bob Dylan Northern Europe EU Danish government Danish parliament vestas Muller Henrik Hendricks football Statue of Liberty North Sea
"danish government" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"danish government" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Biden calls it the challenge of our time Democracy is at risk around the world he says is called leaders from around the world who are virtual conference The White House summit for democracy telling them this morning Democracy doesn't happen by accident We have to renew it with each generation and this is an urgent matter on all our parts in my view Because the data we're seeing is largely pointing in the wrong direction China is slamming the summit one top official calling it a joke Two lawsuits seeking $100 million each have been filed against a Michigan school district after four students were shot and killed at Oxford high school The lawsuits were filed on behalf of a student who was shot and wounded and her sister who was with her when she was shot Ethan crumbly a 15 year old sophomore at the school is charged with murder The CDC says they've only detected about 40 or so cases of the new omicron coronavirus variant in the U.S. nearly all the people who hadn't got only mildly ill The AP's Sagar Meghani with what else the CDC director is telling us CDC chief Rochelle Walensky notes a year ago there was no vaccine We have fully vaccinated 200 million people But that comes and made a troubling spike in virus cases nationwide even in areas like highly vaccinated New England a daily average of nearly 119,000 cases this week up from 95,000 about two weeks ago The nation's approaching 800,000 COVID-19 deaths December 2021 we're certainly not where we want to be right The increases are almost entirely due to the delta variant The number of Americans applying for unemployment fell last week to the lowest level in 52 years About 2 million Americans are collecting unemployment This is AP news Overseas now to Denmark which is battling a surge in COVID cases The AP's Charles De Ledesma with what they're doing about it Denmark's ordering eateries to close early and is banning large concerts The Danish government wants school students up to the tenth grade to study remotely in the lead up to Christmas and is ordering like clubs bars and restaurants to close at midnight in an attempt to counter an uptick in COVID-19 cases Prime minister mette frederiksen is also recommending people to work from home is banning concerts with more than 50 people standing and insisting on face masks in eateries when not seated speaking of the variant fredericksen says it's expected that this will mean more infected more sick and thus potentially more hospitalized patients I'm Charles De Ledesma Gas prices still lower gas is three 34 gallon this morning says the triple-A down four cents in a week I'm Rita foley AP news This is a 20 a.m. WC PT willow springs and streaming worldwide at 8 20 dot com We are Chicago's progressive talk where facts matter Now your 8 20 Chicago traffic update And leman to LeMond road remains closed between 101st and 99th with a crash Also this morning in northwest Indiana I 65 northbound at ridge road There's a crash taking out the two right lengths That's causing a solid delays back to 61st Also closer to home on the inbound Eden's it's heavy from Cicero to the junction Kennedy inbound heavy from nagle basically into the burned interchange with the express lanes heavy from the junction to Ohio as well Inbound Eisenhower heavy from 17th to the burn interchange and the Dan Ryan heading inbound heavy as you go from the 57 split to the skyway and also slows from 47th to the burn interchange with the express lanes heavy right now from 51st to the Stevenson That's traffic.

CDC Michigan school district Oxford high school Ethan crumbly Sagar Meghani Rochelle Walensky Charles De Ledesma AP Biden Danish government Denmark COVID Prime minister mette frederiks White House Charles De Ledesma Gas China Rita foley
Denmark orders eateries to close early, bans large concerts

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Denmark orders eateries to close early, bans large concerts

"Denmark's Denmark's ordering ordering each each reason reason to to close close early early and and he's he's banning banning large large concerts concerts the the Danish Danish government government wants wants to to school school students students up up to to the the tenth tenth grade grade to to study study remotely remotely in in the the lead lead up up to to Christmas Christmas and and he's he's ordering ordering not not clubs clubs bars bars and and restaurants restaurants to to close close at at midnight midnight in in an an attempt attempt to to counter counter an an up up tick tick in in covert covert nineteen nineteen cases cases prime prime minister minister met met take take Frederickson Frederickson is is also also recommending recommending people people to to work work from from home home is is banning banning concerts concerts with with more more than than fifty fifty people people standing standing and and insisting insisting on on face face masks masks in in eateries eateries when when not not seated seated speaking speaking of of the the Omicron Omicron variant variant Frederiksen Frederiksen says says it's it's expected expected this this will will mean mean more more infected infected more more sick sick and and thus thus potentially potentially more more hospitalized hospitalized patients patients I'm I'm Charles Charles de de Ledesma Ledesma

Danish Danish Government Gover Denmark Frederickson Frederickson Frederiksen Frederiksen Charles Charles De De Ledesma
"danish government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"danish government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A very strong ambition and then you need to find a way to get there just like when John F. Kennedy said that they wanted to put an end on the moon That's been mortenson from state of green an organization which is a showcase for Denmark's green transition The island is Samsung has been at the forefront of that change It produces more renewable energy from wind turbines than it uses Its residents are adopting all kinds of new technology For instance giving up oil burners for heat pumps and that's affecting the work the island's tradesmen are being offered My name is Ali hemingson and I'm a blacksmith and plummer here on Samsung have lived on some say all my life How has the job changed What were you doing when you first started your business When I first started the business it was manufacturing tractors and the farmer stables but today 90% plumbing doing heat pumps and servicing district eating and in the houses and people and the only 10% blacksmith A lot of plants coming to samsa found it special that we do so much about the green technology And they see the possibilities in more green jobs and all of them are now it's more normal and the government gives you a substitute to change from fossil fuel to heat pumps So it's coming all over them But on Samsung we actually first move us and they're much more heat pumps over here per house than in other parts of Denmark You're wearing black but do you feel like a green plumber Yes I do I have an installed one heat from this morning So I actually do it from today So you're feeling very green today Yeah I think so Thank you so much Oh samsu the local council now has a fleet of electric cars powered by solar panels The Danish government wants about half the cars on the road to be electric by 2030 It's an ambitious target but it means if you're a mechanic you need new skills.

Samsung Ali hemingson mortenson John F. Kennedy Denmark plummer The island Danish government local council
"danish government" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"danish government" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"All over the world. The pandemic has introduced what is frequently referred to as a new normal but in denmark. Today people are getting used to a new new normal which is for the first time in a long time very close to the old normal on friday. The danish government lifted all domestic covert restrictions more than seventy percent of the population is now fully vaccinated so government officials say covert no longer poses a critical risk doctor. Anders foams guard is the chief corologis at the state serum institute. We reached him in copenhagen denmark. Dr foams guard if you end on stroll shoe. Your city copenhagen what would you see. How close is is. Is it to sing. Life back to what it was before the pandemic. It's pretty much back to normal. I would say nobody's wearing bows protections We don't have to keep distance. We can have big events in the weekend here. There was a big rock concert with fifty thousand participants watching The mindset ninety nine rock group so we only have to wear protection in the airport. Why traveling other than that. We don't have to people listening to this are wondering what's that like being able to live like that again. Oh yeah well. I guess as long as we keep inside cook then market. It's a okay You can into all restaurants and bass and all which after the government has. The friday said that this disease. It's no longer of concern. And that's take because they is lifting or restrictions so it's not like people are behaving Very much different. i think. Actually it's so it's so allnutt to kind of keep this sense and To take care to clean your hands with these infections in shops and most shops to have the healthy customers so It's it's kind of being an you. Happy people feel more comfortable with that but giving a hawk and kissing your family and friends that has comeback is a price to me but or that this back So it's it feels like a relief. An i guess. People are celebrating by rock concerts and then big parties even at our institute doing the weekend and that's a hugging and kissing. Yeah well. I felt that hugging kissing a little awkward also to shake hands but in fact that's all back we can only envy situation now. The reason why you have What you say the virus which is of no longer concern which is which government is said. Is i understand. Because of the high rate of vaccination if people being vaccinated. And that's you have seventy three percent of your population fully vaccinated. What was what's that given that. Other countries that have access to the vaccine are so far behind. What has been behind denmark. Success in getting people vaccinated think The vaccination is seventy seven percent of everybody about twelve years of age. Have got the two five al-mudej on the only two vaccines that use Well i guess it's trust for For the government is just for the health authorities that they keep explaining and also we have had a very efficient tracing of infection chains A very tight surveillance and We have also done a lot to go into minority marginalized groups people on the street being vaccinated and both the vulnerable people we used to the and and people with some diseases so we don't see an increase in Hospitalization on the contrary That's all going down so all the vulnerable groups have been vaccinated and it's only the the younger population from thirty to thirty nine years of age that we see sometimes hospitalized even going down also and what about the variants have you had. What other countries have had the third wave now moving into the fourth wave. What was it like during the third wave period and delta variant. It's been introduced. Yeah we got the delta variant Most mostly this summer and What we did that was having a very intensive contact tracing of people having the delta variant and we could do that real time the same day people were tested and the so context of contracts has to be isolated. And that's postponed. The increase of the deals are very for one and a half months and join that one and a half months this summer. We intensified the vaccination of everybody. That's you know you could. We'd had cars driving around in front of grocery show stops in and jim nations in schools and so on and vaccinating and even the communities that are foreigners at i think they are in Contacted on their own language. Send being vaccinated intensively wide. We were postponing the fourth way for one and a half months because of this intensive care. I'm sure you have seen what's happening in many other countries. Where there are these anti vaccination rallies do you have the that movement at all in your country. We do have billionaires seen some cars with With the speakers on the top trying to tell people not to get back in it but actually there's not a movement away protests like in france. the You know demonstrating every saturday for the last five saturdays in a row so pretty much people are happy by getting the vaccination in it's been inspiring through the social media influences if you said a lot and Explaining in popular programs in radio and tv. And it's all voluntary. And i think this voluntary people kind of listening to that and do not want to. You know hurt the neighbor by bringing the in fiction. Well hats off to your country for for doing this and having your people Respects the reasons for it Dr thumbs guard. And i hope you all stay healthy. Thanks for speaking with us. Welcome good night. Dr anders guard is the chief virologist at the state serum.

denmark danish government state serum institute Dr foams copenhagen Anders jim nations france Dr anders
"danish government" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"danish government" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington. Korva coleman president biden is emphasizing his decision to impose a vaccine mandate on millions of american workers federal employees and contractors and healthcare workers will need to be inoculated and some private sector. Employees will have to take the shots or get a weekly corona virus test. The president spoke at a public school in washington. Dc last hour and says part of stopping the pandemic includes vaccinating eligible children or schools. Follow the science and they are here and implement safety measures like vaccinations testy. Maske children can be safe in. Schools safe from covert nineteen biden is calling on governors to mandate co vaccines for teachers and other educators to protect children last night. The board of the los angeles school district voted to require students aged twelve and older to get a vaccine if they want to attend class in person while many countries are grappling with rising virus cases. Denmark is lifting the last of its pandemic restrictions teri schultz reports. The country is also planning to hold a massive musical event on saturday. The danish government was the first in europe to start using corona pass proof of vaccination negative test or recovery from cova nineteen which allowed people to enter indoor public spaces but after achieving a national fully vaccinated rate of nearly seventy five percent and a very low rate of virus transmission. The pass is being discontinued. The requirement to wear masks indoors and limitations on the size of public gatherings were dropped on september first on saturday the largest concert to be held in europe since the pandemic began. We'll take place in copenhagen with a sold out crowd of fifty thousand people for npr news. I'm teri schultz in brussels. Americans may be among those aboard another flight leaving afghanistan's capital today. The bbc's yoga loemaa says it would be the second such flight out of kabul in as many days. We're not sure who's going to be on it. But this is significant for all foreign nationals who've been stuck in afghanistan and afghans were permits to fly out to foreign countries at the moment. These flights are special chartered. Flights we know that khatri technicians have been working a lot with the taliban to open the kabul airport and the taliban has said that regular commercial. Flights will also begin soon. The bbc's got to the maya reporting qatar airways flight out of kabul. Yesterday landed in doha with about two hundred people aboard the state department says that included ten us citizens and eleven green card holders. The justice department is suing the state of texas over. Its new abortion law. The agency says it. Let's so-called bounty hunters. Sue people who help others get abortions and federal officials say that idea could be used to attack other constitutional rights on wall street. Stocks are mixed. The dow jones industrial average is down one hundred six points. The nasdaq is currently up about ten. This is npr news. Kentucky's republican led legislature has voted to block any mask mandates in schools. Lawmakers met to pass the bill in a special session yesterday. Democratic governor andy bashir immediately vetoed it but the kentucky lawmakers quickly overrode his veto any decision to require children to wear masks in kentucky schools now passes to local governments for days maryland residents outside washington. Dc have been doing double takes as they spot several runaway. Zebras npr's amy held reports. Authorities have been on the of the animals that escaped from a farm late last month. The zebra crossings are riveting residents in prince george's county. Paul curling was at work when his wife called. She's a resource. Zebras and i said zebras as i go. You show you saw zebras. ciba's five got away from a herd known as a dazzle or zeal of zebras. At a privately owned nearby farm the animals evolved to evade predators on the african plains. Perhaps explaining why animal authorities outside. Dc have so far been outrun. Rodney taylor is chief of the county animal services division. Fast they run. They won't let you get near so if you spook them you just pushing them further out in a forty year career taylor says zipping after zebras is a first. But there's a plan lure the animals to a feeding station than confine tranquilize and get them back to the farm..

npr news teri schultz Korva coleman Maske biden los angeles school district danish government kabul washington yoga loemaa afghanistan europe taliban bbc Denmark andy bashir copenhagen qatar airways brussels
"danish government" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"danish government" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"This means shifting away from traditional carbon fuel sources to more earth friendly energy like wind and solar as industry giants like bp and look to write their next chapter the lead innovation and of course capital to make it happen as well as motivation. one place. that seems success is denmark danish oil and natural gas. The country state oil company wants. Did what many other big oil companies do it pumped hydrocarbons out of the north sea. It's transformed itself into the world's largest developer of offshore wind energy. It rebranded as erstad in two thousand seventeen. So could the efforts in denmark serve as a blueprint for other oil companies and their future plans for some answers. Let's bring in w s j senior energy reporter. Sarah mcfarland station sarah to the show. Thank you sarah. Can i us back in time. When the danish oil company was focused on drilling and not the renewable side of things what sparked this transition sure so. The company was established by the danish government in the nineteen seventies when oil prices spiked because of unrest in the middle east and at the time denmark was heavily dependent on oil imports and it generated much of its electricity from oil so the government was really motivated source oil from closer to home in the north sea and to also try and switch to other fuels for its electricity generation and then if we fast forward to the two thousands or stead as the company became known merges with several danish utilities. And through that it inherits. What was the world's first off shore wind farm so it already had some experience in offshore wind but this really boosted its foothold as far as making that shift toward wind energy. Can you give us a picture of exactly what they did. How long did it take and are they where they want to be well. Initially it was really hard. They needed to invest a lot of money to boot up the nessin business but it was at a time. They were having problems in their oil and gas operations and this combination saw the debt balloon. They also face skepticism from the main shareholder. The danish government given offshore wind didn't have long proven track record for being profitable yet and it was around two thousand twelve when a new ceo was appointed. So this new. Ceo reviewed the twelve different businesses which the company was in and decided that it really only had an edge in one of those businesses which was offshore wind so they should really double down on so the companies sold off assets cut costs and at boarding some external investors it boring goldman sachs and two danish pension funds to scale up and really stopped bringing down the cost associated with offshore wind. Sarah so many questions about money. This is a substantial transformation. Businesses and investors will want to know how this change. The company's bottom line is the company able to contend as a global competitor. Today the company is now logic than some oil majors. Such as italy's in i and occidental in the us it's worth noting that subsidies would definitely key component to this success and today subsidies for offshore wind energy is shrinking or even non-existent in some markets. It's also worth noting that returns are lower and so that's an adjustment that investors have to make to their expectations and also you know inside. Oil and gas companies where management used to targeting returns of say around fifteen percent. You compare that to what allstate targets which for some of its projects. It's looking at returns of seven to eight percent you know. That's really quite an adjustment in expectation. Big picture sarah were in a moment. Where companies like exxon shell. Any carbon intensive company for that matter are looking for some guidance. What could they take away from the story in denmark as they establish a guidebook today we all saying companies like bp and shell invest more in lacob analogy. But they're not giving up on oil and gas and we're seeing a pretty broad array of the sorts of things they're investing in whether it's electric vehicle charging stations wind and solar power or carbon capture and storage. I think one of the main things companies trying to transform can take away from ostad is how they really had a laser focus on offshore wind. They actually completely sold out of oil and gas in two thousand seventeen and haven't looked back having said that they were much smaller than the likes of shell and bp. Which might.

Sarah Ceo nineteen seventies seven Today today twelve different businesses eight percent two thousands danish government exxon shell around fifteen percent one one place earth first off shore wind farm two around two thousand twelve Sarah mcfarland erstad
Covid Infections in Animals Prompt Scientific Concern

BBC World Service

03:53 min | 2 years ago

Covid Infections in Animals Prompt Scientific Concern

"News that the Danish government is putting down millions of men because of concerns the animals could act as hosts for Corona virus and potentially spread new mutations back to humans. Well in Uganda. There's a similar concern for the famed chimpanzees of Kabbalah National Park Nelson become BA is a wildlife veterinarian with the Kabbalah a chimpanzee project and I spoke to him earlier straight from the forest in the National Park. There was a report before alone. 2017 National Park where there was a human being chimpanzees in that particular national park in court diva with investigations because confirmed that tickles human coronavirus. So what happened is that what we have in current over 19 is part of the two which happened like something backing 2030, but we suspect that they are because being able of human 29 they can concoct. This is a concern, isn't it? So this is a real threat. So what are you doing to safeguard them from a potential infection? Will you got like authority have been working together with the National task force on they have come up with quite a number of regulations as their way of getting The fact ofthe 19 in most of the excites that body National Park on green, Impenetrable forest for any individual is coming to such a talk with the camps where these Has gone away. 14 days are parenting before the 14 days, counting five, accounting for any video, where someone has to come and then undergo isolation on current in 45 days notice anything like cold or in stomach upsets, and there were problems. But for 14 days we are pulling up with the exhibition period of 1940 notes off the fullest and he's coming to the come on. If it's going to the forest has 14 the current include you on then you also have the temperature then which are sufficiently different side around the national park, where by old individuals who are Going into the forest to pick their temperature measures all in the morning before going into the forest. Part of that also involved the official part whereby we used bleach for gambled should not attend of growth. So the club is that when you could have come from the court is that you use outside It sounds as if you're being incredibly thorough here. What is the plan, though? Should the worst happen. Is there any way of treating them at this stage? Actually, I've been covered 19 been having ongoing monitoring on civilians Programs Walla well, Great mint on when the West comes to us when we see that this trip really invested to the community and everybody's Linda, isolated populations of chimpanzees. So we have that window. Well, we come into position and for 19 because they don't ongoing monitoring surveillance. We are collecting samples from sampling from these individuals. From a from a vehicle from off Buring, which is an ongoing investigation in Alabama. So any suspect 1930 to a group? Of course. You have to put our hands on ground could make sure that we do our best in comes off. Protecting the chimpanzees of Kabbalah National Park in Uganda. Here we just heard from Nelson Lukamba are 99.9% of us, which is why they especially need protecting from Corona virus. He's a vet working in the Tamale Chimpanzee project.

Kabbalah National Park Danish Government National Park Uganda Nelson Buring Linda Nelson Lukamba Alabama
North Denmark in lockdown after mutated coronavirus infects minks being farmed for fur

The World

01:02 min | 2 years ago

North Denmark in lockdown after mutated coronavirus infects minks being farmed for fur

"The little country of Denmark, population less than six million, is the biggest producer of mink fur in the world. But now Danish for farmers are worried about going out of business forever. Facing a government order to exterminate 15 Million minx to stop the spread of the Corona virus. Tom Carson has this report from Copenhagen. The Danish government has made its decision. All the country's minx must be put down the prime minister made if Alex and sits on a press conference held on Wednesday, So you should know that The press conference was held in an unusual way. All the ministers and public health officials were not physically in the room but talking to journalists via screens. This is because a number of Danish politicians have caught Cove in 19 and are in isolation. Most mink farms are in the north of the country. After the latest outbreak there, people were told to stay within the borders of the local towns. All pubs, cafes, restaurants and sporting events in the region were shut down. These authorities say that mink are now considered a public health risk.

Tom Carson Danish Government Denmark Copenhagen Alex Cove
The Problem With Banning Plastic Bags

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:54 min | 3 years ago

The Problem With Banning Plastic Bags

"You were just telling us about your deep and abiding love for plastic bags. This is coming up a lot lately though because a lot of states have been banning plastic bags, California did and here New York. There was just a plastic bag man that was passed since two thousand seven I believe it's over two hundred and forty states and local governments have implemented either been or some sort of fee, and I remember seeing that and thinking like oh. Oh, like us too, many plastic bags that would be good. It would be good. If I just couldn't even have the option to use a plastic bag. But in fact, like when you started looking into the economics of this and the economics of bands, particularly like, you found some pretty interesting stuff, and you started really going into it. So so tell us what you found. Right. So a talk to the economists name's Rebecca Taylor. She's at the university of Sydney, she's actually in American so Taylor recently published the super interesting study about bag bands in California since late twenty sixteen California's had a statewide ban on plastic bags, but she was doing her study before then and this is there was a whole wave of cities impose the policy themselves. So I'm using stores in California both those with and without fans, and I looked to see what happens before and after the policies gone to fat tiller uses to sources of data. The first is on what people buy at the store. So it sales later are they buying like eggs or diapers? Or cereal, but that data didn't capture the kind of bags people use it checkout actually visited stores within a team of undergraduate. Researchers weekly data on what people were doing in the store for this observable to hell long were you in there and with undergraduates by collecting the statea, we were there for about six months, we made visits on weekends three. You're spending your weekends for awhile at grocery stores killing people's bags. Yes. So she crunches data and she wants to see what happens after plastic bag bans into affect when I was that sales of garbage bags actually skyrocketed after plastic bags were banned. So people reuse their bags like line trash bins at you. Use them to pick up dog poop because other comments. I don't I don't either. either. Yeah. That would be weird. No. I don't. But. But yeah, that would be another way that I would consider using plastic bags had I adore. So all these people who reused their plastic bags they still needed bags small garbage banks which about the same size as traditional plastic grocery bag. They went up by one hundred twenty percents their sales did medium bags up by sixty percents. The seems logical. I can see that I would end up buying little garbage bags if I couldn't use a bag even like sales of large trash bags went up. So here's the crucial thing that she told me like garbage bags are actually thicker than shopping bags with a us more, plastic and makes this increase even worse. I find that about thirty percents of the plastic that was eliminated by banning carryout bags comes back in the form of thicker, garbage bags. But here's the thing. The bins. These. Dan's didn't apply to paper bags. Okay. And that led to a huge increase of papers. In fact, I have a paper bag. So here we go. Here's a paper bag. Yes. It's not. It's just not as good like the survey. You can recycle these okay, please. Do not hate me for pointing this out. Okay. Actually, there are multiple studies. And these are these are good studies there from the British government from the Danish government there from other places they all show that actually paper bags are worse for the environment than plastic. Yes. So much believing that I always get paper grocery bags. So let me let me just start with. There's the one there's one area where plastic bags are clearly the worst offender, and that is that they're not biodegradable paper bags have this one really great thing for them, which which they are biodegradable they will eventually break down. And is it like true the chopping down of trees like how are people possibly worse for the environment? So yeah. So paper bags are you have to use a bunch of water. And like all these studies find that you have to use way more energy to to to create them. So these are showing that actually the carbon foot. Sprint a paper bag is four times worse than a pass. So bag bans, California had these two big unintended consequences. We have a major uptick of trash bag sales. And then we have a major uptick of paper bag use. That's why Taylor says banning plastic shopping bags and increasing greenhouse gas emissions. So I would say this leaves us with nothing, but they're the kind of bag that I use all the time. I've got like a million of them at home, and you know, this is public radio. So we cannot have this conversation without bringing up the noble tote bag, Stacey, no, I don't wanna have to say this. But I have to because of impressed into a corner. And I have the study here from UK government bag. There's a study from the UK government. They did back in twenty eleven and they've found a person would have to use cotton tote bag a hundred and thirty one times before it was better for climate change than using a plastic grocery ones now. So that's just climate change, by the way. Okay. Then there's the overall environmental impact of tote bags the Danish government looked at this look at things like water us. They look at things like damage to ecosystems these factors may cloth bags like way worse. So they find you would have to use a conventional cotton bag seven thousand one hundred times more than a plastic grocery bag to make using it better for the environment. Well, what about organic to- bags? They're even worse. The Danish government estimates. You would have to use it in organic cotton bag twenty thousand times before it's better for the environment than a plastic shopping. Bag. Okay. Great. But like we can't just carry things around in our arms like what what are we supposed to do with all this? What's the best solution? The main thing took away from this research is that the most environmentally friendly thing. You could do everybody agrees here. You should we use the same bag over and over again now that bags should probably not be organic cotton us one that's like polyester somewhat durable plastic. So that's kind of what you can do in your personal life. But then there's kind of the broader policy question teller thinks a fee is smarter than a band. That's because they're both equally effective when it comes

California Rebecca Taylor New York UK British Government University Of Sydney DAN Stacey Six Months
Aena, Danish Government And Denmark discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

00:14 sec | 4 years ago

Aena, Danish Government And Denmark discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Denmark is withholding millions of dollars worth of aid to tens Aena. Because one of the African countries senior politicians has made unacceptable, homophobic, comments, the Danish government didn't name the official, but added the remarks put gay people in Tanzania

Aena Danish Government Denmark Tanzania Official