20 Episode results for "Danielle Weisberg"

"I feel like I'm constantly preaching to people, no matter what you do, whether you're in media or other things, learn business."

Skimm'd from The Couch

33:09 min | 1 year ago

"I feel like I'm constantly preaching to people, no matter what you do, whether you're in media or other things, learn business."

"I'm Danielle Weisberg Kim from the couch this podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the Russ so I feel like I'm constantly preaching to people no matter what you do whether you're in media or other things learned business I'm carly's acres dinner looking at my resume doesn't actually reflect how much of a generalist I was I don't include all of it because again looks kind of crazy the types of things I used to write about editor in Chief of Allure magazine Michelle started her career and magazines working in publications such as parenting Glamour and paper today we are talking to Michelle Lee the fast forward to becoming one of the youngest editor in chiefs ever humble Brag Michelle was an early adopter of digital strategy within more traditional not at all how it was at first my first job was actually at a weekly newspaper so doing hard news and a look back and I think at the time I thought God I seem really arose about everything from cars to extreme sports to finance technology and now I think when people think about me think oh she's like a beauty and fashion person it is so many different multilayered interests anything that's really great and that everything does sort of intersect in a really interesting way and then not something that people need to know I got much more into women's publishing but then also into digital and into the business side so most recently before Laura I was the editor in chief and she from marketing officer at Nylon and then about four and a half years ago I got just a random email from conde nast and then I came over to allure about four years ago and that's where we are so long that if you go on my linked or something if I went into detail it would probably go on for like four or five pages so someone very early on in my career had said to me in order to move up I brought the definition of beauty we're GONNA get into that Michelle we are so excited to have you on the couch ladies high so let's jump in all print publications nearly tripling visits to Lord Dot Com since taking the lead there she's a champion for diversity and says she wants to change the world but we're GONNA come back to the first half of my career was very much spent imprint I worked like you said at a lot of different places I didn't necessarily have specific men's voice in women's publishing was very earnest and so- men's was very like snarky and fun and clever as I liked being able to stretch that muscle a bit and then flash words second-half may career really had a very vibrant freelance career at the time too so I always talk to my bosses at the time wherever I was about one to freelance other places that were not competitive with at that was so when I was at parenting wrote a lot for men's health for G. Q. At the time the women's voice was very different this is like more than twenty years ago the in the media world you have to move out and I think I took it too literally and I stayed in every job for like I said the first seven years for only a year and in some cases less you look at my resume it looks a little bit crazy so I'll give you the super cliff notes version of it so in the first like seven years I would say I was a major job hopper so that's why my resume is so it did help me move very quickly up but the problem is with that is that it starts to look very very bad and starts to be a red flag to people so I don't recommend doing that unfocused and I should probably pick a topic I know plenty of other people who started out in beauty and they stayed in that for me looking back though I think it was actually a really positive it be at the time I worked at parenting I was on the launch team of COSMO girls or worked in like parents teens also on the launch team of US weekly and how being a generalist certainly understand that if somebody feels so passionately about something I know plenty of people who when they were kids like elementary school level there's just skim your resume for us yes I actually thought about this in advance because I know you asked this question what I always half jokingly say to people's how much time do you have a lot of time eh why is something people should know about you that they can't find on linked in or googling you I think that looking at my list becoming editor in chief to be successful for the rest of my life I would have been setting myself up for failure so I knew at some point within the past ten years that I needed to learn digital I needed to learn the thing that I see myself as a generalist now because in everything that I do even though a lawyer is core beauty it's also about so many other things right as women we can have Liam I think it was like Dolphin Stadium because I lived in Florida it's time in Dolphin Stadium Lay said one of my friends was like do you want to go be an extra on this movie I was like okay so it was great partly so part of it was born out of frustration like I said I started out mostly in print and I was frustrated because the job that I was in my see radio social but then also to learn business so I feel like I'm constantly preaching to people no matter what you do whether you're media or other things learn business if I james because you get to see all these different industries even though like I can't say I worked in movie production I got to see what it was like to actually put together a movie and to see like some of the creative process I saw the behind the scenes of how a movie is made and the only other thing I really remember is having crispy cream donuts later and it's like and I was faking it till I make it because I didn't really know what I was doing I mean right now it's awesome because you can learn so much online so I taught myself. Seo I think about which is is it okay to be a generalist do I need to really become an expert at something and what are your thoughts on that yeah I mean for me obviously it worked out really had a lot of like odd jobs when I was a kid I worked concessions at a stadium also I worked at a bookstore and swept floors and think about now like those were some of the greatest time go into journalism I felt like that was my path and then within journalism you can make that so many different things but it also play within the past ten years or so realized that the Oh had no interest in digital whatsoever actually I remember I took like an eleven by seventeen sheet of paper and I was like this is what our website should look like and he was like well we shouldn't do it because it's had a really great discussion with my ceo where he wanted me to grow there and he said what can we do to kind of get you to that next level you're already an editor in chief like typically I started out in media being an editor in chief was completely one eighty degrees different from what is today so had I stayed on the path and just thought these are the only things that I need to do asking them too many questions and stuff so I was very open with my CEO and I said I feel really self conscious sometimes about not fully understanding the business side so he so once they left that job I taught myself how to fully design a responsive website I taught myself CSS. I taught myself video editing and production I taught myself like sales basically I taught myself so many different things at the same time you can only get so far with that too so when I was at nylon I remember cannibalize what we're doing in print so no interest in it whatsoever so after he left that job a very kind of famously took a pay cut in half and they went to a digital only place being done so he eventually promoted me to head of brand strategy also on top of being editor in chief and then eventually became chief marketing officer there too as the world well I wasn't expecting that as an answer on this thinking and of course I'm not GonNa put you touched on a lot of things just now about career path and about being yeah yeah yeah and so my husband used to work in finance so occasionally I would come home and say to him what does this mean can you explain this to me it's awkward sometimes with your spouse to of like generalist and moving around and I think it's a lot of stuff that we've thought about for our solves a lot of our employees have we've talked to them about and certainly I know a lot of our listeners you feel that way about something that you're GonNa go and you're going to live that passion for me I think that it's been really great for me being a generalist but then also once I decided when I was a sophomore prompted us to leave and start the scam they just felt this passionate for working in the fashion industry they stood there unclothed say just devoured every single fashion magazine and to me that makes sense then that if yeah I have done I don't know very weird things when I was younger I was an extra in I was watching something about Jim Carey recently and it made me think about when I was in college I was an ex was great and he has been an amazing mentor for me where he said Okay I'm going to include you in some more of these meetings you can come along with me and he understood that I was creative and away the we had a very specific aesthetic that was very gen z. like very cool that a lot of brands really wanted to hop onto and they weren't necessarily sure like who the right photographer go back to school I think I would either get my mba or if I could literally get on a time machine I would probably have a major in journalism and a minor in business or Kajing if you wanted to mail in the actual physical peace but I didn't WanNa touch my collection but you can preview the item online any frame style super easy off your first order just go to frame bridge dot Com Promo Code Skim again that's frame bridge dot Com Promo Code Skim of the business people were not so it was sort of mutually beneficial that he saw me as somebody who could be great on the marketing side and building the brand and away on a business side that wasn't really one of the things that we struggle with is running a company where we have a lot of people that are where do you go from there in like the old school media world that was like the pinnacle and you get put out to pasture after that so for me I was the thing I'm really frustrated in that movie Ace Ventura KS Mishra I don't think you can even see me so at the very end he's in like a State Hatha Journalists Ron and editors was not going to be the path forever right like when I was starting out being an editor reaching two full you know that for sure when kind of like hearing what we felt better articulated back to us because everything that you went through our things that in a free no picture me it's a picture of US something new and different because you don't have any what's it used frame bridge yet get started today go to frame bridge dot com and use Promo Code Skim S K I m M to save an additional fifteen percent you can teach yourself anything I think at some point in my own life probably in high school I told myself I'm not good at math and then I thought okay we'll businesses all math so I should just not even care about business with is that I sit and now these advertising sales meetings and marketing meetings and there are terms that people are using the I don't actually understand and I'll kind of nod my head and be like oh graduated from Duke with a degree in math but she's also an extremely creative person and my daughter is also the same way at eleven where see like she has very very like in branded content started to develop so kind of wore these two hats Manila's there where one of them was core editorial and then one of them was white labeling things for certain brands because at Nylon I how do you learn business were you in your previous jobs going to your bosses and saying can you teach me social can you teach me how to look at a p Anelle or redoing this in your own time isn't stylus where to do those things so we built this really strong branded content business and that kind of gave me this bug of wanting to work on the business side to it greener in their career who loved the creative aspect and we say to them you have to learn the business side and I feel like there is sometimes a S- talk about the separation of church and state and I think a lot of that also extends to our childhood that especially as women it's like a lot of say oh you're either good at math or your creative person our whole team behind was nodding it's not true not true we've been told that and then we start to convince ourselves of that and it's absolutely not true because Daghma of this insecurity right like if you're a creative that's kind of what you do when you want to be pure but it's only get you so far how have you it's from bridge who's our favorite it's so easy all I had to do with upload photos from our beautiful instagram account and I just went to frame bridge dot com they send you actual and very logical about things love math but also loves drawing and loves writing and reading and stuff so to me those are two examples of where you can have both of those things you been able to mentor people that are younger journalists I think it's so interesting and rare that you were able to play the part was the biggest most amazing just money flush magazine her job though was running a magazine I don't think was like super involved in the business side because that's not what the editor I've seen him Oh and also have been editor-in-chief yeah oh it's a very rare thing and especially anyone who grew up in the media industry at the time that I did because you know we always use it sheep did it was long before the digital world it was long before people were doing a lot of other business extensions so today I think the role of an editor in chief is almost more in a lot of it is leading by example telling your own story so that they understand that how you got to where you are is out by understanding the business side more we also our team does the company right now and so technically yes there is a business team and there's an editorial team if we were completely independent though as you guys are what I ever of like a CEO I touched everything and our business so we not only have the magazine we've got the website we've got social media video but also other businesses too so we're looking at consumer events we've got the beauty box And any other things too I mean I have so many meetings with brands we're very fortunate because in a world of being just the creative and not caring about the business side I wouldn't it makes no sense so even though I'm Outta Larger Corporation why should I act like that like we I think I was sort of forced into it in a way because I see this future of where the media landscape is changing I think that as much as I want to believe that the editor in chief role were allure immediate brand and now very much think of ourselves as we're not media brand were a brand when you look at your team today or even for yourself what is the scale we'll go on for one hundred more years I don't know if that's the case and even if it does it'll be such a different situation that the analogy is used as that I work at work on branded content so I think a lot of them are very interested in also because I think that they're seeing the in the world working for brands even if you're not a little or there's a lot of duty editors now that work at beauty brands we had someone who went to go work at Fendi someone who went to go work at glossy so it's that the media world is changing it's not the jobs are disappearing they're just kind of changing stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback we started the skin from a couch so what better place to talk it all out than where it began on account the beauty world right now is just exploding so much so even the media world has been pretty tumultuous in the past ten years the beauty world is exploding so much it's very now my very first editor in chief who ever worked with in New York was Ruth Whitney who was the longtime editor in chief of Glamour and so at that time glamour should all be acting like startup founders we should all be acting like entrepreneurs even if we're not and we're working on a more established company I do answer your question about the mentoring younger people to when you think about all the different ways that we can think about where you're can go when I first started here I think my first year I was trying to convince everyone we're not allure magazine so Danielle your birthday is coming up it is you know what I don't know where you're going to get you I got you something is it a picture of you know with the talented designers the prices start at thirty nine dollars shipping is free it's so nice to know what you spend my birthday she if you haven't I'm just going to be a creative and it's so we were now we can all share and commiserate my sister is the people skills enough and so I was saying to you before so I'm a mom got a fourteen year old an eleven year old and so my son Ethan who's my oldest every single year so sad that you would encourage people to get today so that they can still have all doors open to them ten years from now I think a lot of times people don't emphasize I am dot com to 'em for a little something extra there's some things that we could modernize and we can improve first of all it was very much known as just a magazine so we needed to really extend ourselves into other platforms and then it's kind of crazy to think was not diverse place at all and I don't just mean racial and ethnic diversity it was not diverse with body types with age with gender with anything secondly diversity which you mentioned in the Intro I think was a very big thing that it wasn't just a lower it was women's media in general and also the beauty and fashion industry in general that four years ago Sir how I have to deal with my bosses it's about learning how to be respectful but also being forceful enough and not being just a yes person you have seen in many thing like I think half of going to school is learning what you need to learn the curriculum but then the other half is navigating people and understanding how to work things interviewing and hiring and figuring out are they right for the culture so I do look at it as a red flag right now and definitely not a positive thing when you tation for them about how it changed the brand and obviously I was starting from a place of it was such a strong brand already had so much brand trust and everything but I did think that they're it was the hardest thing I was so nervous I remember the first day having to address the team and it was absolutely the most nerve I've ever been because Linda is a hundred you for a reason they want your opinion and I see this among young people all the time that they're too nervous or too shy to say what they actually think and I want to there's of my career people who have made their way to the top by being yes people and so we are very adamant with our kids that is not the way that we do things and I actually think that if you have a it's not easy though when you're coming into a staff where they're used to things running in a certain way and I think within media it's very easy to get kind of St hire people who have strong opinion and who are not going to be assholes about it I want to have people who I can bounce ideas off of what is your reaction when you see people and within the past two years I would say the industry has changed dramatically but that was not the case when I started so I feel like I came in with having these really exciting plans can a routine of saying we've always done the story this way we're kind of going to do it this way so it was a lot of constantly talking especially to my senior staff About percents total idol to me within the industry had been following her career for so long I love allure as a brand for such a long time but it

editor in chief ceo Danielle Weisberg Kim Russ editor ten years seven years four years thirty nine dollars one eighty degrees fifteen percent fourteen year twenty years eleven year two years
How Grassroots Marketing Built a Fierce Tribe of 7 Million Subscribers - theSkimm's Danielle Weisberg & Carly Zakin

Don't Keep Your Day Job

56:15 min | 2 years ago

How Grassroots Marketing Built a Fierce Tribe of 7 Million Subscribers - theSkimm's Danielle Weisberg & Carly Zakin

"No one else is going to get you out of this situation. No one else is going to do this for you. You're at. It. I believe that the opposite of depression. It's not happiness its purpose. I believe that every single person has something unique to contribute to the world. And that's why I won't be critical called don't keep your day job. Don't keep your day job this about figuring out what it is that you were your to do in this world, that only you can do to make the world, more whole more beautiful and to stop selling yourself short. Stop sitting it out and to figure out how to take this thing you love, whether it's art or music or screenwriting for dance of baking in, how do you need this thing, love into a life that you get to contribute that you get to do what you love full-time, because it's not just about business. It's about contribution. It's about meaning that is what we seek that is what we truly want. And you absolutely are here to serve the world, and I want to help you figure out just how much value you have inside of you and every single week. We're going to be talking to people who have something to add to help. You get out of runaway to help you be more successful to help you be the truest expression of you. My name is Cathy Heller. I'm so glad that you're here. Let's dive in, thanks to experience boost for supporting this podcast experience, boosts, can potentially help you stab wish or increase your access to credit boost your FICO score instantly for free who is only available. Experience dot com slash dream job, also thinks the skill share. Skill share is giving my listeners two months of skill show for free and unlimited access to thousands of bosses good at WWW dot skill share dot com slash dream job to, to start your two months. Now for also supported by Lincoln knowing where to look is the first step to finding the right job Lincoln has twenty million jobs and the people who can help you find the job met for you at Lincoln dot com slash jobs. That's linked in dot com slash J. O B S. Hey guys, Kathy Heller. Welcome back to other episode of don't keep your day job. Today's episode is epic. I'm so glad you're here for this one. It's just so important for us to understand what it. Takes to build a business, how much action takes and what kinds of actions to take. And that's why I'm so excited for you to hear the story of these two music women and what they built because I think it'll really inspire you and truly. This is why I just decided to start this three month. Don't keep your day job accelerator, which is how to go from passion to profit. I can see it. So clearly when I'm talking to somebody, what they need to do in order to take this thing they love and monetize it. And I'm all for you guys making money. I wanna see you having ten K months. I wanna see you having twenty K months. I know as an artist that there used to be this belief that you're either going to do something that you love and not make money or you're gonna go sit at a desk and build someone else's dream in. That's how you make money. But it's been so amazing for me in my journey to have gone from working a desk job, where I was making not a ton of money, but I was making some money, and everyone kept telling you, that was the practical realistic way to go. And then I wound up quitting my job. Job. And yes, it was scary. And yes, it didn't happen overnight. But then through a series of inspired clear, actions and strategies I wound up starting to make half a million dollars a year. And then I wanted making a million dollars a year, and I went from working job that I hated where I felt like this is just the way it is, like people just are going to be depressed. And have all of these dreams dying inside of them to starting to see myself making twenty thirty sixty eighty thousand dollars a month doing only things I love doing and feeling like I was actually making tangible difference in the lives of other people, and I want you to be doing that. I wanna see you making a great living, so please hear me. When I tell you that I'm all about creatives being creative doing what you love having a huge heart and making a lot of money doing it, it is not mutually exclusive. It is not that you're either a good person with a big heart and you're poor. Or you are doing something you don't love. You're not a good person and you make money. That's not the choice that is not the only way that it goes, you can be a really good person who has a value of wanting to show up and give empathy and goodness to the world around you, and you can it good sushi and wear, nice jeans, and staying nice hotels. Yes, there is a lot of that available. I see that all around me, and I want to show you how to really deliver for your audience. I want to show you how to find your customer had a find the people who you really conserve, and I want to show you how to start making a great deal of money doing something you love. I know that you're thinking it's not possible, but then again you're hearing, the interview people every single week and they're telling you these stories, and so I wanna show you had a back up and look at what has been consistent in every person we've interviewed what's the through line. What action are they taking an I built this now into a method, and I'm going to show you step by step. If you join me for this three month accelerator I'm gonna show you how. To do this and not only going to do this, but I will be in there every single week on zoom video chats talking to you directly. We'll be doing hot seats. I'll be listening to you and helping you figure this out. So if you've been listening to the show, thinking, God, I want to be one of these people that Kathy interviews. I wanna be somebody who's doing this thing inspiring other people, I want to be making a million dollars a year painting, or drawing or sculpting, or baking. I want to do this, I'm gonna show you if you've been thinking, I'd love Kathy to coach me, I'd love to sit with our like she sat with other people that you've heard, and help them come up with their ideas and sometimes you have a passion, but you don't know how to monetize it. So we're gonna sit and we're gonna idiot, and we're going to think about all the various ways and the different incarnations of this passion project, and how you can actually start to make money from it. How you can show up every day getting paid to do what you love. So if you wanna be a part of this enrollment is closing June fourteenth at midnight. And if you go to Cathy scores dot com to sign up for this, accelerated and use the code dream job. You're going to get one hundred dollars off because you are one of my listeners. That's right. So use the code dream job go there before June fourteen that midnight. Now, also those of you who been listening to this podcast thinking, how did this girl go from being a nobody to starting podcast in her closet now she's got seven million downloads. She's on the chart with all these people like Tim Ferriss, and Jenna Katcher, and Rachel Hollis, and Sophia morosi. How did she do this? How, how is she building such an audience? How did she create such a successful piece of content over and over again, without a bestselling book already out there without her a famous last name without a trust fund? I am actually giving you my podcast course, for free when you take this three-month accelerator, so you're getting two classes in one, but you're really getting eight classes in one because in addition to me showing up and showing you step by step walking through getting you into action so that you start to see this actually start to take form and momentum starts to sprout. In addition, I'm giving you my podcast course because I think podcast. Casting is something that can be really, really, integral to helping you build your business. It's an incredible marketing tool marketing is all about giving value. Marketing is all about showing up for your audience, so you don't have to do podcasting, but if you're interested, and curious and you wanna learn from someone who's really good at this who loves doing it who's gotten results, you're gonna get my podcast course for free. In addition, also, you're getting several other courses Tracy Matthews is coming in to teach you story selling, which is all about. How do you sell through storytelling? And Suzy more is going to be coming in to teach you how to get publicity. She has a class called five minutes to famous where she's been teaching people, so successfully how to get results and had a win getting their own publicity, entrepreneur magazine. Oprah dot com mind body green, she's going to be coming in teaching you a masterclass and Laura Belgrade is going to be coming in teaching a class on copy so that you can really start to understand how am I going to say things in a way that really speaks to people souls, that I'm not sounding sales. I'm not sounding like just another add on the internet. Yet another blog on the internet. I wanna really cut through and speak to people's hearts. Because guess what words from the heart speaks to the heart, and we have to understand that casual is the new professional, we have to know how to get paid to be, who we are. So there's even more than that. There's like four other classes within this class that I haven't even mentioned, but these guests are coming in live to coach you over zoom video chat. Plus, they're going to be giving you, some handouts that you can really start to apply. What it is. They're gonna show you, it's going to be amazing. We've also added a payment plan, which is a twelve month payment lands because many of you said, you know, it's expensive or it's hard for me to afford it, and truthfully spending two thousand dollars and getting all of these classes in one is such a steel, plus meet coaching you one on one coaching is thousands of dollars a month. One of my coaches is ten thousand dollars a month for me at work with them one on one. So two thousand dollars is really really a steal, but it's still expensive for some people, and I totally hear that. So we created a twelve month payment plans, you can get it for one nine nine. Month. So I would definitely check it out. Go to Kathy's cortott com. Enrollment ends June fourteen that midnight, I would love to work with you, and inspire you and help you start to take action and help you start to see yourself profiting from the thing. You love so not. Only can you pay back. What you spend on the course, but you can get to that place where you are making five ten twenty thousand dollars a month doing what you love. Because guess what? It's happening all around you. It's happening. I'm talking to those people every single week. These are friends of mine, people who are making that living from doing graphic design hand, lettering, floral, designers, painters, photographers screenwriters dancers. Yes. It's all around me all the time. So as a doable, it's absolutely doable. But it's now about you deciding, it's having absolute certainty that this is possible, and then figuring out, what are you going to do about it, and working smart because success leaves clues. When you talk to people who've done it, and they can work with you. And someone said to me recently while I've taken online courses, and nothing happened. And I feel like it's a waste of time. Ask yourself. For those online courses where you were passively doing it yourself, just kind of watching videos, or are you working with a coach who's showing up over zoom video chat, and you are working this through. And you're having that direct connection where you can start to really be there. Live hearing this kind of training because that is a game changer super excited about it. If you guys want more information, if you wanna sign up, you can go to Kathy's course dot com and use the promo code dream job at checkout. You'll get one hundred dollars off. All right. Also, I am doing a free masterclass this coming Tuesday on how to overcome impostor syndrome in your business, so that you can start to profit if you wanna be part of that, there is a link in the show notes, you can find that they're I would love to see what that masterclass. Now, let's dive into today's episode I am so excited about this conversation today, we have onto amazing women Carly's Aken, and Danielle Weisberg. They are the co founders and co CEO's of the skim. It's a membership company, dedicated to helping us live smarter lives. They started this company literally. On their couch seven years ago. And now they have over seven million daily subscribers including Oprah it all began with their daily skim Email newsletter which has expanded to an app a production studio. Any YouTube channel among other things they also have a podcast called skin from the couch, which you might have already heard because debuted at number one within just a few hours of launching, and they have a book coming out tomorrow, which is called how to skim your life. It helps you take control in areas like personal finance your career stress management and lots more, you can pre-order it today, or you can fight it on the bookshelves tomorrow. I think you'll find so many helpful nuggets in there. I love their story. I love their too nasty. So without further ado. Please, welcome the incredible Danielle Weisberg, and Carly's Aken. Hey Danielle and Carly. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank you so much for having us. We're so excited to be here. Really looking forward to diving in finding out how you guys started the skim. So take us back and let us know sort of where this came from and, and take us through the journey of. How it got to be where it is. Now shahr. It's daniel. So we started seven years ago, while side it's surreal to think about what we had when we started. We were twenty five years old room mates. And we started the company from our living room couch. We had grown up in the news business loved getting our hands into any type of storytelling that we could and worked, our way up to be producers and absolutely loved it at the same time. We saw that our friends didn't have a new source that they trusted or that they felt really connected with them in the way that they live their lives in. This is an audience have millennial women that is leading in so many different ways and deserve to have news that fit into their routines. I'm so we saw a win the market and wanted to create a company all about this audience in making it easier to have mused fit into your day-today. Over the past seven years. We've raised funding we've grown our company in our products. We have an amazing team. Team. And we are creating a membership to living smarter. So awesome. Just the fact that you did this from your couch. I just love that in and of itself, the fact that it then became so successful, just all of those things, I know that Oprah has she said that she's one of your subscribers. Is that true? Yeah. That is probably the best Janice Carly. That was probably the best of my way. Tell us about that. It was crazy. We, we were flying to the west coast, and we landed in LA, and when you when you land you turn your phone back on, like your Email kind of takes. Yeah. Load washer. And so, I notice maintenance as being really slow and then I tried to get on Twitter and realize I had like zillion messages. And then saw that Oprah had tweeted about us, and remember, I don't Danielle and I weren't sitting like in the same row. And I kept trying to find her like Jamaica, I contact media, it was just it was crazy like, oh my gosh, it was a dream come true. It is a dream. It's amazing. That's an official stamp. Of you have arrived. Welcome you've arrived. So let's talk about being on this couch and having this idea and how you actually started to put one foot in front of the other and build this incredible community business entity all of the things we spent the first year, we really woke up every single day and had a idea of what we wanted to do, which is create a berry date, Email 'cause at the time, that's all we had a knew that it would just the two of us. We had about four thousand dollars saved, we had a great idea, and it was going to be up to us to make it into something. So we would do things like make postcards with the company's website. And with our logo, and a slogan, we would sneak into equinoxes bathrooms and leave them there. We would go into Starbucks and drop them off. We would basically just get kicked out of. Places. We spent that horse. You're trying to meet anyone that we could who had ever started something and just get advice and we did a college road trip. It's you guys at the time he could kind of pass still is college students, so we would try to stuff like these postcards under dorms than sit in the cafeteria with our skim shirts just like go up two random friends and ask if they would sign up for this new product called the dealer skin. So it was just grassroots marketing which was fancy way of saying, we did whatever we could to get people to know about our products. We printed up t shirts sent them to our friends around the country and just ask them to wear it at places in our neighborhood, and we really were able to network and to get different connections that ultimately led to us getting first round of funding a then being able. To hire a team at the same time we were doing all of this. We were writing the newsletter at all hours of the day and night, you're sleeping in shifts. So that first year is such a blur on. We've really did everything that we could to try to get people to know and sign up for this free Email. Gosh, it's so incredible because it's so unusual. I mean, this is what separates accessible people from those that aren't this much hustle. I mean you try to get people to subscribe to this newsletter and you're putting in all of this effort, and was that a free newsletter. Or did it cost money to be a subscriber? The daily est game has always been free. That was free that in it's free now. Oh my gosh. So here you are putting all of this effort to send a daily newsletter that you it was basically news. Right. It was filled with news and the two of you were creating all of it. You were right. An editing and making all of that content come to life. Yes. At the daily skimmed the premise of the daily scam is everything that you need to know to get through your day. So what is the key information that either happened yesterday is happening today in, but you need to know about tomorrow on? So the idea, you know, when we started seven years ago in still true today, is that you should be able to go to any work, or social event, and be able to talk to anybody about anything. Cool. It's really, really cool. It's like I saw written down. He said like to break breakdown important things in like an easy to today. Just read you said before your market was millennials true or not true. Yeah. That the company is all focused around on women and really thinking about what their challenges are in their day to day what they need to be informed on, what are some of the key stats around this demographic, and creating a company all around their lives. In creating information at the bay need to make the most informed decisions in there. Day-to-day. Yep. That's amazing. And so it's really so generous that you wanted to do this so much that you were working all these hours and barely sleeping and driving around to different college campuses, and doing everything you could to try to get the word out and you weren't even making money. And that wasn't even the business model right away. I just correct. Upper went on, which is that, while news always been our passion. We couldn't afford to leave her jobs for a passion project and we've always knew the business opportunity were sitting on, and while the daily skim was free, and it's still free, and that was our first signature products. We always knew our grander vision was to have diverse, I'd Rapin UN that we could create products at finish the routines of his audience on. And so we were very, very methodical and how he built the company. So while I'd love to say that we're generous, people I we were also Avary strategic from really Jayme one around how to build a big business. And how did you know that? How did you know at that? That age sitting on your couch, what would eventually be the products that you could you could eventually monetize, once you built a very engaged community, giving them something for free. I mean I would love to say, yeah, when you went all the products are going to be on me knew how the structure would work together. We didn't. We had a lot of ideas on how can evolve and a lot of ideas on what we wanted to create. But I think you know, the north star Ross has always been that it we have focused on this particular audience, an audience that has so many competing interests. For their time it, we created something that they trusted, and that they started off their mornings with than we would have this amazing gauge meant that would allow us to build other products. So I think at a time when a lot of other people went for scale, we just focused on meaning something to a very particular inside. After group of people that are hard to get in front of any if we could do that, in a big way than we would be able to monetize it in a lot of different ways. So we knew that we didn't want to be dependent on just advertising. We knew that we wanted to be able to do creative things on that meant that we would have to have openly audience that we could have subscription revenue that we could recommend digs chew. And so the decisions that we made about the future of the company, awkwardly went back to is good for audience and will they trust us? And what does this ad I love it so much. I wish I could take a highlighter or a red pen and just like under underlying everything said circle it and like draw arrows to it that is it in every time I'm asked like, what's the most important piece of building a business? I'm like, what you just said, so eloquently, if you can build engaged community of people and show up in front of their face where it's hard to get their attention. But do something that they find me. And they keep giving this and you create a community, once you have that it is gold is liquid gold and from that point. Absolutely. You're right. You're right. You've lived to see that. It's true. And you knew you knew. And I don't know how you knew that. But that is something that we do know that most people don't know that. Right. What you just said. We had no traditional business background. So it was a blessing in a way that we didn't know kind of what the status quo. What we just knew that we had an idea and we had no callback plan. So it was going to be on us to make it happen. And I think with that we were so laser focused and we didn't know what the odds were, we didn't know how hard it would be because we've never done it before. It's amazing. And so you did just mention a couple of minutes ago that because it wasn't grossing money from the beginning you needed to have your day job. So were you working and what point did you walk away from the day job and be able to do this fulltime? We quit our jobs, and then we started the company, and we tried to save up as much money as we could which wasn't much he weren't really getting paid much time. But we tried to save and it was a huge gamble for us q-quick our jobs and to start this. I mean there was no way we could do both at the same time and we felt just such a passion and this conviction to really get in start it at the same time, you know, we had to pay rent and we didn't have families. We didn't have the responsibility. So we knew that, although this would be really tough. There wasn't gonna be. Point where it would ever get easier. Yep. That's a good good way to look at it. And so how long did it take until the started to bring in revenue? It's actually interesting. We got offers to do to bring an advertiser's truly from month one and we, we said, no heart of why we said, no, as a bandwidth issue in part of it was also we were very focused on eulogised growing our user base. So we didn't start working with sponsors until about two years and are very for sponsors were the MBA at Turner, sports and chase. Well, those are great sponsors, and two years, though. Like, how did you manage for two years now? We raise we were able eventually after a very arduous process to take in venture capital funding. Otherwise, there's no way we could have done that. And how we were able to get along that far was we really went into credit cards. Add that was a personal decision that we made together as co found. On knowing the opportunity, that was front of us, knowing we had to be doing this full time, not knowing that we had something special. And so it took us a very, very long time. She raise money. And we, you know, we've been very public about hundreds dacas two thousand knows. And while continuing to grow a very, very aged loyal audience. Eventually, we were able to raise a seed round of funding in that enabled us to be in building a team, which Nabil's us to then start working with advertisers, earth's revenue stream. But we are very happy that it is one of many that we have. Yes, yes, yes, that is, it's really incredible dedication, it all worked out in the end, and that tends to be the case when you are really clear. But what you're doing and you really care about your audience which you do. I love everything you're saying and before we keep going, let's just take a quick break. If you're looking for a job, knowing where to look as the first step to finding the right one while Lincoln's got twenty million jobs. You know, often say that it's. So helpful to have a job that provides you with a stable income and acts as your investor. 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Find the job meant for you at Lincoln dot com slash jobs. That's Lincoln dot com slash jobs. So let's talk a little bit about how you built that audience. Like how were you as people were coming in? How are you engaging them? How were you? Making a feedback loop to really listen to them to serve that and better what they needed. And see really hit the Mark. So one of the big drivers for our growth in the beginning and also throughout the company's history has been our skin Basseterre program. So when we started we would get emails from people saying that they loved the products they do anything to help in. We were kind of amazed by it. And we would write back and just invalid this pen, pal relationship. And then one day we were sitting with an adviser who said, you know, have you thought about asking them to share the scam with ten friends Merlin than probably a good idea. I'm so we started doing that. And once you hear a scam ten France would be atmos-, Kim Basseterre. And that was a term that day actually coined an that haram grew into something that drives about twenty percent of our user acquisition. And now it's thousands of women throughout the country that are involved in the company that help us. Do things like launch our book help us. Register people to vote. They're really the grassroots force that has taken what we did in the beginning with grassroots marketing, a made it this amazing impressive networking group, something that has really defined he munity within a new company in an accompanying the themselves have actually helped to bills that is so great. And it's beautiful because it gives them more and more purpose. And they get to be part of something that they really love and believe in, and what are you give them back because this is such a great idea for people listening to think about. And I'm just wondering how you you're setting that up. Are you supporting them by getting on like zoom calls, just with them? Are you doing meet ups just for your skin Bassett? Or what are they getting back from you other than the pride of being part of it, which might be enough on everything you actually just named a step that we've actually done with them? So I think you know, it's, it's been an incredible asset to the. Company on one obviously, we're so grateful for and also, I think what's been amazing is how they really taught us what community should mean in what community at the scam with, with, they're looking for, and so everything from exclusive meet ups, which we call seven scams after one of our internal traditions. We've done X is a book clubs for them. We've done. They've actually been really, really key in being part of launch squads for us around our election work are occurred, but that's coming out. And we've also really provided a platform for them to connect with one another on, we've heard just the most amazing stories of people who literally met there now spouses through this program of people who've gotten jaw cool who've made lifelong friends, who travelled together people, you know, there was one situation where woman was going through a hard time financially in a group of skin Basseterre hitched in hell, pay for her bills revile on that is completely because of the connections made in this community not, because we're asking them to do that. Of course. And so what we've done it's been able to foster community on. That's taken many different shapes over the last few years we'll continue to evolve. That's beautiful. And I'm sure that, that plays a huge role and I don't want to overlook what you guys are doing on your own. What you've always been able to do which is really speak to your audience like they can only be embassador and help continue to spread the word and China Light on what you're doing because what you're doing is so good. And I would like to look at that for a second because creating quality content is so important and people here it, but we don't really understand what is it that goes into making great content, what have you seen as you've gotten better and better at it? That are the ingredients that make something really hit. I think that there are few things that seem really simple. But I think if you can answer them, it'll. Give you a much better focus for whenever you're creating. So the person is, who is your audience. The second is what's the value? What's the take away and the third as Hauer they consuming it? I think that some of the mistakes people make when they create content is just to think that, you know, more is better Morris just more if you don't have a strategy behind it. So I think that instead of thinking about, like a half to podcast, you're I should do an Email about what it is that you wanna create what's the message. And then what is the best distribution method for that an it seems simple. But I think it gets really overlooked. And I think that today, there's so much content out there that the race to just pre more is not the best way to win. I think it also at times, really stifles authenticity. And I think whatever you're doing if you come from a place of. Telling your story than that's something that is unique. I love it so much like this should be a class at Wharton. I hope it is if it's not the what it shouldn't. Yeah. You agree. So can we use your model as a case study for, for a second to answer those questions, who's your audience? What's the takeaway, that you want them to have and how you got to those answers? Sure. Well, I think our audience was in the beginning. It was our friends, and then we took a step backwards than it is the millennial women right now throughout the United States. That's our key audience. That's what our company has always. Yep. Yeah. And I think the value first of all we want to add value, the evalu- at, and that's something that we are very, very clear about. We want to be something that doesn't try to take up all of persons time. But create something that is additive when they have time. So we'll take three minutes that you have in trying to be the biggest value add that we can be in those three minutes where instead of trying to compete with twenty minutes for your time keep you on our site longer. We know that. No one has that amount of time were all busy. There are things that we should be doing at we want to make sure that your informed and get on with your day. Yep. So if you had to boil it down and say, this is the thing that you most want people to walk away with what was the thing. What's the takeaway that you're hoping that they're gonna get trust? I think that is the foundation or our company. I think you know. At Microsoft said this in really stack of news trust is the ultimate commodity. And I think that's so true. And at the end of the day as a brand you're competing for trust with an audience that is skeptical and is really saturated with all different types of information to what does that look like I mean, it's a really important word it's something that we all feel when you say, like hits us like in our chest. But what does that mean to you? What does that look like I think that trust, there's sort of an underlying understanding that authenticity is part of it, and I think that's that's word. That's kind of overused a lot. But really, to me trot, Carly me. What trust is it underscores transparency underscores that, you know brands are created by humans in the customers of those brands arguments? We are all people people make mistakes, people make Typos people attired around the same thing, people get passionate around the about similar things, or sometimes different things. And then how do you deal with those? Princes? But how you own up to those things. And I think as a brand, we've tried to practice that at leaders grinning company, culture, which is to practice that, and that's everything from being honest, when there might be, you know, tech glitch or when we're talking about the realities are like, building a business in sharing that, you know, on our own podcast or on our own channels. It also means having our audience truly understand what our mission is about. And how that can manifest is what our work has been with the elections that are no excuses platform, where when you are telling people cares information that you're gonna make a really important voting decision around, and that they feel that they, you don't have a hidden agenda around it, or you're not pushing them one way or another on so much trust in that, you know, I think the best example of how do we know that we have trust with our audience is the back the two hundred thousand people voted because of the skim in eighteen immigration election. But is so impressive that is amazing. Home. I gosh, there's so much good stuff here. I wanna talk about something that comes up for most of the people that I talked to it seems like this is a place where people get stuck. You know, they might have one of these pieces that we just talked about even to and along the way, they'll think about taking a step forward Bill. Think about doing this thing. They wanna do starting their business during their work, whatever it is. And then this little, like voice comes up. That's really not very kind. It's very critical and they feel like an impostor they feel like a fraud. There's a lot of self doubt and you have been able to push right past that. So how do you do when you're scared, you said yourself we didn't really know and yet you kept going. So how do you encourage people? What can they take from your journey that allowed you to stay the course I think that it's a lot easier said. Than done, which is something that you have to remember that anyone that is in a physician to give advice has had those moments of self doubt. I remember we had a moment when you're catching first-round of investors in just had heard no again, again any en again, and sitting on the kitchen, floor and curly was sitting on the floor in the living room and just thinking, like, what have we done one of the things that I think, you know, is, is helpful is to let yourself thanked that. And then move on, because no one else is going to get you out of the situation. No one else is going to do this for you. You're it and there isn't anyone else that is going to do this better than you. If you're the person that is starting something for the first time. So I think also a big contributor to our sick sess in terms of being able to push through it is that there's two of us. So we would have those moments. Have them at different times. So quite down in the other one would say, okay, great. You get thirty seconds. Get your shit together in. Let's be going citing finding those people in your life. Who can be those sure leaders for you and not the ones that are going to kind of indulge you with the ones are going to say. I hear you. I know this is hard at he'd going. That's so so powerful. And again, you know, this is what you were just speaking to a few minutes ago being authentic. But it was really generous of you to share what that actually looks like because people need to hear it. So we have a lot more to cover, but first quick outbreak. You know, the better your credit score the easier, it is to get the stuff you want, or the less, you have to pay. But when it comes to actually raising your credit score that can be a major struggle while now it will be thanks to experience. They've launched experience, boosts of brand new way to instantly increase your credit scores for free a higher credit score can help you jobless and get access to credit and preferred rates for the things you want and need in life people. 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I definitely try to keep credit tour up as much as possible, because there's always gonna be times where I might want to get something new like a new car or, or we might want to buy a new house, as we're talking about moving, and traveling or whatever else is gonna come up, so it's helpful to have something like experien- boost in case I need to raise my credit score for those kinds of things. Experience boosts can potentially help you establish or increase your access to credit boost your FICO score instantly for free boost is only available at experience com slash dream job. That's E. X. P. E R A, N dot com slash dream job. I believe so much in the idea that we're constantly growing constantly evolving, and lifelong learning is such a crucial part of that journey. That's why I love that. We're supported by skill share. Skill shares an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs and curious people every. 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They're offering you two months of unlimited access to thousands of classes for free. Decide of good a skill show dot com slash dream job to again, go to skill show dot com slash dream job to, to start your two months now, so I wanna talk about something else that comes up that's a struggle for our audience because it's something that you talk about and you help people with and that. It is personal finance. I think that in general, there's a lot of shame. There's a lot of oh, money's the root of all evil or you know, who am I to ask people for money or I don't wanna be sales, your sleazy, and that keeps people from committing to their dream because they're sort of, like either. I'm going to do something for money or I'm going to be a good person. It doesn't seem like people think that they go together, and I asked you about monitoring it, and there was no apologies. So I would love to hear you speak to the audience a little bit about money and the relationship with money and earning money from things that you love doing and how you've learned to invite money into your ecosystem like the person that we've learned about money is that it's something that people don't like to talk about openly, and that's something that we have from our audience. It's something that has influence the type of advice that we seek out and the people that have become our mentors. Because we talk about this from, you know how did we get? Out of credit card debt, Hugh. How do we negotiate our salaries to how do we figure out how to stave and all of those questions are actually things that we put into our book, how to skin your life, and it was a big impetus for actually writing the book because these are questions that we had even with great people who were generous enough to give us their time. I'm so we have these questions than they've got him universal. So I think that the biggest thing we've learned is that you need to talk about it in, you need to find people that you could talk about it with an, it's a heart operation to have, but you need to do it. I also think that we never say that it's the right decision for someone to quit their jobs and to jump into something. It was the decision that we made an we made it knowing that the trade off was gonna be credit card debt and it was gonna be all of these things that would be really tough and have long term effects for us. So whenever someone comes to us says, you know, I'm thinking about starting a business, but I don't know if I can handle the financial implications. I think that, that's a decision. You have to make for yourself or never gonna be the ones to make that decision for yo at he will talk about, like how easier her heart is I think, at the end of the day, it's really all on what you feel comfortable with. There's never going to be a best time to do anything. So it has to come down to your family your stat up and what's right for you. Yeah, exactly my stance on. This is build the bridge, build the runway before you take the leap. And so this idea of not keeping your day job to me works. I find often better when you have your day job as your investors so to speak, and you are having a side hustle, and as it's growing, and growing and growing, you start to see when you're going to actually be able to leave, but I wanna talk a little bit more about the money piece. Because energetically, I feel like there's a lot of shame around making money, and being successful, and that, if we're going to be nice people, it's not gonna work, and I don't see those things as mutually exclusive I feel like you can be rich, and be a jerk, you could be poor be a jerk like all everything in between. It has to do with the way you live your life, right? Thought about money itself. But I think that money has represented a lot of negativity for people. And there's some shame around having abundance. And I'm curious what your thoughts are on that he said it the right way, it, doesn't it doesn't? Have anything to do with, like your character. Obviously, you know, for us, we just got out of credit card debt like very recently in, we know what it's like to feel like you are living paycheck to paycheck. And I think that that perspective has allowed us to hopefully become the kind of employers that we want to work or almond to create a culture that we not only can be a place where we want to work, but also create products that allows people to have these conversations, more openly and to hopefully be able to negotiate for themselves in the workplace as well. That makes sense because you have that Pathy there you've you've been on that side in terms of where things were able to actually generate revenue. What were some of those projects that really led to a lot of revenue in the ones that you're most excited about? Yeah, I think that the most organic one is what happened was skim rate, so, you know, we started recommending books because it was just something that we felt fit into our brand promise of giving you in. Formation, that you can use during your lives, and so on a Friday of Memorial Day weekend, we needed to read than so we, we felt like if we needed that, that our audience probably use a tip as well. So we put it in the daily scam newsletter. And that's continued every Friday, since skim reads, one recommendation in a few lines of tax, we've been able as a company to move authors about, like three thousand points on the Amazon list, however argument is astounding. So then we were able to create a thing that was an organic recommendation and monetize it through affiliates on that affiliate program has grown. So we've been able to recommend things like casper mattresses posture devices, all sorts of things that fit into living smarter, and that you need to know about had a time meaning gifts. Mothers day, holidays. How can we make that process easier more streamlined? And that now has become a big revenue line or the company. So I think that's an example of how we've been able to grow revenue out of organic opportunities. That's awesome. And that's so so cool that you've been able to help people, especially in that first piece of it because selling books is a whole different game today than it ever was, and that's really, really powerful. So let's talk about how our listeners what your recommendation is for how to skim their lives. Now there's a few categories at one of the most important innings, and obviously, it's very close to our own personal story, the importance of networking on, and we talk a lot about this in the book now working is not something that you really have a choice in doing. It's a given. It is a skill set that we all need no matter what career path you go down. And we give a lot of tips in the book around how to approach it, how to stay organized with it how to really treat it varies. It's domestically will also not being a robot. The other part is I would. Say time management and how to make sure that you are literally breathing during the day and focusing your energy efficiently and some of my favorite parts in the book are different tips around how to conduct your work day in terms of, you know, kind of twenty minutes for of hard focused work than taking a break, or really actually breathing, techniques, and lots more just like that in the book, so cool and the last thing because I think that it's so important that I think we've touched on it a little bit. But at the end of the day, I think that eighty percent or even more maybe even ninety percent of everything that we do is collagen, and like ten percent is really the steps involved, one thing that you, you do deal within the book is how to deal with just managing anxiety and negative thinking in limiting beliefs. Would you talk about that for a second, like what some of your wisdom is about that? I think one of the things we've tried to instill actually at skim, h Q at is part of our culture is in state GRA time, which is you should have a blocked off time in your calendar for. You need to do what you need to do. So with other that means that you're going to therapy, whether that means you're taking a yoga class, taking a walk is that when you call home, we don't ask what it is that you're doing. But we Degnan observed that Danielle and I make sure that we don't schedule over that our selves and certainly don't infringe on anybody else's sacred time. And that's something that's very protected at our office in something that it took us a really long time to set boundaries around how to make sure that we were taking care of ourselves in, you know, working out and end taking those kind of mental breaks, even scheduling vacations with something that, like, I personally struggled with. So it's something very important to us in, we always come back to, you know, especially early on. If there's no there's no skin and you have to take care of yourself in nobody machine in can run with no brakes. Yep. Well, this was so in, like interesting in fun and helpful. Thank you for being here. Tell us where we can find you and we're where we can find your book this, skim dot com slash book, and we are. Are going on a tour throughout the country. Starting June ten all the information on how to skim your life and the tour is at skim dot com slash thank you so much. Yes, awesome great, great stuff. Thank you guys. The such a blast talking to Daniel and Carly. Their book comes out tomorrow. So definitely go. Check it out and here are the takeaways. Number one, give back by fostering community provide a platform where people can connect with each other number two to make great content ask yourself, who is my audience? How are they consuming it, and what's the value, number three authenticity and transparency, build trust? And trust is the ultimate commodity number four. Let yourself feel the doubt and then move on. No one else is going to get you out of the situation. Do it for yourself. Number five surround yourself with your chillers number six. No, the trade offs before you quit your day job. There's never a best time. So do what's comfortable for you? And number seven no-one is a machine with no brakes. So block off. That's sacred time on your calendar and make that self-care priority. Okay. One last reminder that I'm doing a free masterclass on how to overcome impostor syndrome, so that you can thrive in your business. It's going to be Tuesday, June eleventh at one PM Pacific standard time, there's a link in the show notes, also don't keep your day job passionate prophet accelerator is closing June fourteenth at midnight. If you use the code dream job, you'll get one hundred dollars off. This is your chance to have be coach you and show you step by step the same method that we're talking about here on today's episode and every other episode. What are we looking at what are the steps that all of these people Bobby Brown Jonathan Adler, Mandy Moore all the folks that have been on the show? Jensen shera. What are the steps that everyone has taken being able to do good things in the world making a difference? Having fun doing what they love and make a great amount of money doing it. We're going to talk about that imminent, put you into action. I'm gonna hold you accountable and Chopin coach if you wanna be there for this. I don't think you wanna miss it. You can go to Kathy's Corsa com. Use the code dream job to get. Hundred dollars off and enrollment does close June fourteenth that, midnight, you guys are the best and I wanna let you know, also I'm turning forty next week. Oh my gosh. June nineteenth is my birthday. I am turning the big four zero and I was thinking the best thing you could do. If you wanna give me a gift is to buy my book, you can go to don't keep your day job dot com slash book. It would really mean the world to me. You have no idea of every single one of you bought this book, literally, it would be a near son's a seller tomorrow. So it would mean the world to me, if you bought the book, if you like this podcast, you're gonna love the book, it's gonna cost you twenty some odd dollars, you can get the audio book, the book hard copy, you can get it from Amazon Barnes, and noble, whatever you like go to don't keep your data dot com slash book. And then when you buy the book, I was thinking to just say, thank you, if you take a screen shot, and you d m me on Instagram that screen shot, I will send you back, a voice note to say, thank you, in every single one of you who goes ahead and preordered the book before my birthday June nineteenth, and you send me a screen shot to let me know. I'm going to have. A special zoom video chat with you guys. It's a QA you can ask me anything you want about life, your business anything at all. It's going to be special just for those who priori book before June nineteenth one special QNA call, where we can just talk for a couple of hours. I'll be there to hang out, it's going to be super fun. And I will also send you back a voice note, a personal voice owed say thank you for going ahead and buying my book, and wishing me a happy birthday, because that is really truly the best thing you could do for me for my birthday of worked so hard on this book. It took two years. And I think you're going to love this book so not only will you get a book that you love. But you will be making my fortieth birthday, the very most epic possible fortieth birthday can ever have an it will mean the world to me. If you've been enjoying the show, enjoying this re content enjoying this podcast and you want to give back and wish me a happy birthday by the book. Go to don't keep your data dot com slash book by it before my birthday, which is June nineteenth. That's my fortieth birthday, and send me a screen shot on Instagram of your purchase. And I will send you back voice note, just saying, thank you from the. Heart. And by the way, I love chatting with you guys. There are some happy to start a chat because I'm always there to hear from you. If you're going through something hard. If you're celebrating a win, I am always there on Instagram you can write to me. Let's start the relationship I love to hear from you mean the absolute world's me by the book before my birthday June nineteenth and will celebrate together all be hosting a Q and A. And I will send you the details of that. And those who preorder will get in on this special QNA, and we can just chill for a couple hours on video chat and week, you could ask me anything you want will be there to support you and we can just hang and celebrate and maybe by, then we'll have hit a certain number, and we'll be celebrating not my birthday. But the fact that this is the New York Times bestseller, a love you guys worthy new. No. Thank you for being here. Thanks for being my cheerleader hope to see you at on Tuesday at the master class, and I would love to work with you guys those who are going to be in this group. It's going to be a small enough group that I cannot wait to do this intimate. Coaching in the donkey Pajau passionate prophet accelerator. So join the program before Thursday at midnight Alevi with a song of mine. Talk to you guys on Thursday. The podcast is a production of authentic. For more info on advertising in this show. Visit authentic shows dot com. Streams on made of paper. Let's make pay miss shea. Still fill the world together with our hands. This whole is made appealing, they'll be lack balloon. An flow a wooden stopping. Nothing. Given that easy. No, we wouldn't. Sun, said nine. Oh, god. Millions lands. Mr. Post straight. Can move to speak. Welcome sun without of sound. Little skiff. Wouldn't. Son. Million plans. Mrs sun tonight. God a million plans.

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Claire Babineaux-Fontenot, CEO of Feeding America: "I learned that I had cancer.... I was changed after that. It forced me to say, 'Are you living what matters the most to you?'"

Skimm'd from The Couch

38:21 min | 8 months ago

Claire Babineaux-Fontenot, CEO of Feeding America: "I learned that I had cancer.... I was changed after that. It forced me to say, 'Are you living what matters the most to you?'"

"Cancer I went through chemo ahead surgeries etcetera I was changed after that I couldn't deny find out I was after that happened I forced me to say, are you living what matters most you? I'm Carl Sagan. I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome to skin from the couch this podcast where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch? Hey everyone. This show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. This game is still working from home for the time being because of Kobe Ninety today, Clare, Babbit. No fonteneau joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the CEO of feeding America. The nation's largest domestic hunger relief organization feeding America provides more than four billion meals to more than forty million people across the country Clare Thank you so much for joining us today. Welcome to skin from the couch what thank you so much for having me. We are. You've a fascinating stories. WE'RE GONNA get into it, but I gotta ask you what we ask all guests on the show skim, your resume for us. So I have a high school in my. To griped way Harrington graduate from high school. So everything I'm going to say a list of I. So I have an undergraduate degree I've that an limb in accession I'm a lawyer by training I worked in government in big for accounting in a major law firm or one that would be Walmart in northwest Arkansas and it's now Mike to be the CEO of feeding America as you just mentioned. something that we can't Google about you. that. Had My druthers by real fantasy would've been to sing background vocals for Luther Vandross. Do. You have a good voice. No. Not, really though my kids I think they seem like it but they not. So. We're GONNA talk about how you grew up and when we usually talk about people's professional story you know obviously, we're all shaped by how he grew up in our family dynamic and you know only children verses having siblings versus just different family structures, Daniela each have one sibling, and we talk a lot about that dynamic. You have more than one sibling and I would love for you. To to share a little bit worried about that. Boy Do I. Have More than one of laying. In fact unusually, ladies will use this to warm up audience what speech I'll ask them. To sue you have they never guessed one hundred and seven dams I. Say that one more time one, hundred and seven I thought it was a Typo as we were doing prep for this one, hundred seven. So your listeners will quickly say biology must not be the only thing involved fares. At birth adoption, Bostick theorem one of one hundred kids and I love that you early on asked that question because I do think it informs everything that matters about me was shaped by that fats. That is a lot of people and I cannot imagine saying that amount. If you bar blood in my family, let alone my siblings, I really want to understand. Like what that dynamic, wise and like your parents sound like extraordinary people that were able to give to so many individuals to really provide a home for so many children I mean literally just walk us through the very tactical how many people lived in the house like how many of your siblings names do you now? Okay I'm sure I, know all by siblings. Can and it's probably the reason that I remember he'll stories more than their names now because I used of all capacity. Sensitive, it's all that I've ever known. So my parents learned of two little kids neighboring town who were suffering for mcglasson abuse. My Dad was at work in bag. My mom was working from home and she got him in the Aren Ima. Ronald. So I'd never known anything this. It's through the ice of brands that I came to realize how bizarre was. So there were never more than sixteen Abbas several living at home at the same time but there were many times when there were six of us living at home at the same and what was something really unique about our family. Of course, the numbers are big but the other thing is that I love the way you talk about family because I. I've always had a sense of what it means to be family. That feel a little different than maybe some of the conventional thoughts around what it means to be family. So family for us in order mentally we were not biologically connected. So that's not what brother or sister in our household I had a lot more brothers and sisters I have a lot more. Than I have sisters. I was rough and tumble with my brothers and my sisters we engage the Lai in activities together. And often they were outside. Say Okay. It's time for you to go outside. So he went light up in Redondo outside and find ways to commune outside what are the things that really stuck out for one of my friends may be it might be something that would help you guys to have a sense of of we were so mad a Walton table. Table, we weren't. Typical in that sense that we didn't often all sit at the table at one time but just for us to eat and we ate big meal suffer not dinner but suffer in A. Rice etc. In order to cook enough for all of us we'd have to cook in. Across to burners on my wow. So imagine that we're GonNa talk about your career, but I haven't a question do you have a family group text? We do how many people are on? We have not been able to do all of them. There is no way to actually get all of us on one contact. So we've got family group tests, clusters Oh. My Gosh. How you think I mean obviously, this is not an environment that most people grow up in what do you think you took from it that you've put into your leadership style That you've noticed as different than other people, the two things that come to mind immediately. In one of MS that we had such a diverse household. So we had different races, different religions, different levels of if for one of better expression ability. If you will different challenges, not all of US started in the same place. So some things that naturally evolved from that was always had it's really really deep sense of gratitude have locked the flaws trust me hopefully, we won't. Cover most of those but among the my vices is not ingratitude because I've always had a strong sense of the fact that might fill-ins didn't earn what they were getting up before they got to our home. So I've always understood of all set this awareness of inequities. One of them another one is a power of diversity because we I grew up in a small rural town. In. Lack of things I didn't even know I was supposed to believe no society thought some of those things like I didn't know that society had certain is around ability like even something basic as I have a brother named Jonathan and he's never been very tall I did know that he wasn't supposed to be the person that I can the ball to in basketball in our family. Everybody went into the backyard and everybody I chance to play everybody. Got Them. All right. So I just learned things that just became a part of who I am and how I approached. The world's lake trying to give people opportunities working not to allow what I'm supposed to believe about people like this arson to influence how interact with that person alert all those things growing up in that family in another one. That was an invaluable invaluable thing that my mother taught me. So, well, was my mom had ranked expectations every single one of us most of my siblings and back suffered from again to become part of our family, you would have suffered from neglect abuse or some combination of neglect abuse. Many of my siblings had learning disabilities and sometimes people laugh mate. So you're a lawyer, how many of you are doctors and lawyers? And I usually I'll say something like, oh where But let me tell you something else is more important a one, hundred and eight only one of us is not self sustaining right now. Wow, that is extraordinary i. have one brother still lives at home. Wow. Wow. Expansionary exactly. That's huge. Learn about expectations in the house learn about my own privileges ellen about diversity alert about inclusion and I learned about help powerful. High expectations are, and then I went out into the world and learn about hell devastating low expectations can be too and I'm glad that I didn't know some of those things I'm glad society to get to teach me. For my parents did. My siblings it as it related to those I absolutely work really hard ash bringing each of those two but work that I do every day you end up leaving home, and as you started at the top of the show were a lot of I in your family and got your education started really making your way up the corporate ladder and you're in Arkansas and we're GIG for Walmart in two thousand fifteen became a really critical your in your life and I want you. To sort of paint a picture of kind of who you were in twenty fourteen and a who you were sixteen and what happened in the middle. Absolutely so perfect that you save twenty fourteen because Sin Twenty, fourteen that I took up running. So I never been a runner used to make fun of runners say, Oh, they say there needs from starting to give out on their forties fifties mine or like a baby's knees. I. Have some very much. But I started running. So I was in the what I believe to be the best shape of my life in twenty fourteen. And from a career perspective. I was like Baba when he won the master's and they asked him, I was going to be. To wear that that Green Blazer and said, I didn't dream that. I mean, my career had exceeded my expectations but I always was operating with an understanding that very early on about the want the world, the inequities in the world, the different cards people get dealt and also. On the side do something about that. So I'm moving along and every now pat myself on a backer for the fact that I had this full time job I was on the board of Directors or Casa, which is a fabulous national organization, but I had time I felt. So. I. Kept forgetting to go get my physical make -secutive fiscal Walmart Kmart and I could go anywhere. I wanted to get my second fiscal second forget him to get it finally decide I'm going to start getting like this go on my birthday weekend. then. I. Won't forget I'm going to get my birthday please everyone who's listening get physicals regularly so I went in to get my physical on my birthday weekend in two thousand fifteen. And what I hadn't thought about was that I might get bad nudes and I learned that I had cancer. and. I remember sitting there going. What. A runner. I'm in the best shape of my life. I'm young. What do you mean? So I had to confront my mortality in ways that were really profound for me and I'm doing so well in my career. and. A cap moving up kept getting more responsibilities and doctors told me because I'm so privileged. I had access to great medical care. Doctors told me that it had been detected early that my noces was going good and it is just five years by the way That's huge congratulations an accurate. The doctors explained that I went through chemo ahead surgeries etcetera but I was changed after that I couldn't deny a finite I was after that happened I me to say a living what matters the most you this is really the way you wanna live your life in fact I. Remember it's Selena asking myself what if The last thing that you ever get to do professionally is the last thing that you can do at Walmart. Would that be okay. Am I answering sell L. so I started leaving mark. And When I left a new that I was leaving a lot of behind and many people thought it was foolish a means to do that. But, one of my benefits throughout my career I've had this vary remarkable career always have passion for my work. I always was energized to go in. And I noticed that I lost the energy to go into Walmart and I don't think that was fair to them. And I didn't think I would ever get that energy back or that work. So as I said, I started the process I. I had very long Transition Palmer. Wasn't an anti or It was a pro be move and what I wanted to do with my life. I'm listening to you talk and obviously you had such a you know as you said, a profound encounter with your own mortality, know for those that are listening I wanna kind of takeaway that extreme situation. But I think everyone has different crossroads in in their life in career path different moments that just kind of make you go like what am I doing and I think it takes a lot of guts chilling identify be pro me how do you identify like what is pro you? What does that mean and how to find that? Yeah. I'll tell you that I think I think more often than not know they just might not like be answer. They might be afraid of the answer but more often than not people know and the people who knows them well not to. So as an example, it was from me from me to be a lawyer. How did? I know so go to my dad and I'm a little girl a daddy. A guy who didn't get frankly from high school whose whose. Parents were share. Daddy I'm going to be able you're. And he says. That makes perk accents little girl. Because, you argue all the time somebody pay to do it. I suppose to be an advocate I'm supposed to be a lawyer. So I think there's a voice inside of you the tells you what? To do. And then there's a little voice inside of you but tells you don't take a chance trying to do that so I don't think that your listeners. Are Likely to not know what? To do. I. Hope My story helps to affirm that sometimes it works out remarkably well when you listen. You obviously learned a really big lesson and taking care of yourself. To get the physical you work in hunger relief that is not A. Casual low stakes job. How to you make sure you're taking care of yourself now first context. I don't always do it well, but this mission needs me to do it. Better and better. All the time and I am getting better in back. At the beginning of this crisis, we have people out in the field who are putting their lives at risk in order to deliver to people need it and I knew that. So I didn't feel comfortable with sleeping. How can how can I be sleeping? There are people who are desperately hungry. Who are afraid they're cancer we're GONNA go to bed tonight unable. Bellies their parents were going to put their bits. Their event tonight would have been their belly and there are people on the ground trying to make sure that that doesn't happen. So it did have put in this layer of feeling responsibility that I had and I didn't notice that it was translating into me not sleeping. And keeping my phone right next to my bed. And Waking up at different points in the evening at night, jumping up and looking at by phone to make sure that no message came through that I needed to respond to win. So I had a lot of trouble. At the beginning but I am rather introspective I do know that part of my wiring is that I feel responsible but not. As a leader in my responsibility as a leader, a large part of it is to lead by example. So. As I noticed that pattern myself, I start paying attention back pattern was happening while our organization, all of the leaders around me and I referred leaders not just based upon title got a bunch of leaders, hundreds of leaders, thousands of leaders in this were. All of these leaders providing a terrible example for. An although I wasn't talking about how many hours working they could tell because I was sending out emails are I handled something and they're like, well, why don't you get a chance to do that or she must have done it overnight so the big thing that drove me to start working on self care. was actually not self as much. As the about what the implications were for this mission that suggest for the people that get to work with that I bronze love the people that I work with. So now with that revelation with that, slap in the face I, then had to start doing something about what have I done first off at feeding America we came together talk about whether I was the only one who ceiling. And I learn. Now we were all feeling like that. So we acknowledge where we were. Tried to be honest and transparent about where I am animal time. To make room retailer to be where they where we were and we actually got some experts amen and talk to us about self care about the meditative arts. If you will and people some people get to prayer and others. Young guys in different ways but this challenge that we need to by saying that works for us where do I find stillness whether give myself room to not be active? To be still so I'm a calendar center kind of person. On my calendar. Engage in self care I, mix it up or be different things at the time but I have to do something I took off and I had not taken off. I've worked at least sixty five consecutive days I stopped and I said, Okay No. And I unplugged completely for the weekend and. I had been so snarky on that Friday. My. Life these. Fat that person and yet I must be ruinous snarky like west non. Full decompression when I got back on the Monday I had returned to be. Hey Yeah. So I think I'm glad it happened that way. Sorry for the person that I was smoking on the Friday but I was Kinda glad it happened in such stark terms. that it was hugely different and my day was different and might impact was different on the people around me so. That's what I'm doing one day at a time one step at a time. Obviously, we're going a as a country and one of the big things we've been going through is food insecurity I. Think is being thought of in it in a much different way given the moment that we're in with Kobe. I cannot imagine how difficult your job has been. Being at the helm of feeding America, tackling these issues through a pandemic imminent ask this question, but it's such a misnomer. What do you think good leadership looks like at this time. Because, we've never had a time like this. So I feel. It's unfair to ask you but also everyone's trying to figure out a way through it and what you guys do is so directly linked to this moment a horse I start with a disclaimer I don't have all the answers. Would, actually say in response to that is leader aren't threatened by great leaders they surround themselves with a I have aspiration to be a great leader I have worked in the two years before this endemic. Eating year when it had ears I have been successful in recruiting and retaining some remarkable people. and. I believe that in these moments that one of the biggest mistakes we can make is to try to do it all ourselves heaven, the fifty, three, fifty, four, million people that we expect to be endemic. They're not gonNA just be counting on this one lady with a French name from China right? They don't have to. So I think surrounding yourself by really hard working dedicated readers, powerful people helping them, see their our empowering them to extend the An. That's one of the biggest things. I. In do so that moment of crisis even all together and. Eggs together, then emission gets the benefit of that collective instead of just one person. So I think that's a really big art of it and I believe it's been sustaining for us. You gave some statistics at the beginning. And I thought about the first time, I heard of statistics that we're feeding about forty million people that are about thirty, seven, million people in the country who will lead insecure that providing somewhere between four and five, billion a year. And when I heard those shocked by those numbers and that was what I join feeding. America, those represent. The first time that we return to premium session needs food insecurity in since the last session, those are not the numbers anymore I didn't think I look back and. All. Those who better days? When there were nearly or a million people were convinced your now we're looking at fifty four million by think about actually like what that looks like what that means it's like you can't believe that that is happening in the United States. What can our listeners do? How can people help people who are listening to this right now there's obviously you know we invited you on this podcast because you have an amazing career story and we wanted to hear it. But also like what you do every day is incredible and what can people do to Help Bay hand certainly help so let me go through a quick list of things that people can do on the first one is to choose to have your eyes open so educate yourself on what Looks like in this country, but it will fight what it looks like. Now decide it's unacceptable once we get we can do they're beating America artem network that includes two hundred sixty, thousand agency partners in two million volunteers around the United States if they went to feeding America Dot Org, you can be educated inside of that website I you can certainly make donations and we certainly need help in that department student funds can also find a food bank in the community that you care the most about when national and local. So you can go in and we've got a little food bank locator. Zip Code in it'll sell them. This is the Food Bank and serve your community air so much about and you can go the food you outreach to help in that community but the other thing is right now there's so many things that the been arguing about as a country there are certain things that just shouldn't be subject to debate. We should expect Congress brand since to prioritize whole communities, we should use our voices to ask that they do beating America's nonpartisan organization. When I say nonpartisan, this is what I mean. It's different than bipartisan. Nonpartisan for US maids. We have data informed way of understanding what tools are. That would be helpful to people facing hunger in this country, and we stand with them and their moments in time when people who suffer identify his breakfast and with ensue and when they do they stand with us because we stand with them and in time would be identify exit serving stand with them when they extend with us because we stand with them. So we are cells focus on the interventions that will help. Facing a number and that should be something that we can all agree on. So asking Congress to go to the table and talk together about how do come up with interventions that are going to be held things like snap, which often stance two quick data points about stand one for every one meal that are remarkable. Bank network and provide snack him provide nine or everyone dollar investments now according to the last recession or every one dollar invested. The return of the economy is doubt seventy cents. And you really think about it if you make if you give someone something. And it's only bound number one they're desperately. And it's only value is in its use, you can't put it in the bank stored away. Invested. Differently if it's berthoud economic, use it to get it creates jobs. So there's so many good reasons why we ought to be really really energized around interventions that we know are help those those are two quick one. So feeding America Org absolutely educate yourself aside hunger in America is simply not acceptable. In, go out there and do something about it. Last round favorite round our lightning round are you a morning person or night out? More versa. Was Do you wake up. For thirty am no UTA. Why Don't you don't had. I am wired to I married in my husband is not a morning person yet thirty two years were still together go figure. Or thirty in the morning rain shine were holiday with the last show you binge watched. I just finished binging eliciting. It's on the. Top of the lake is the name of it epic. See Them. One was awesome. Okay. What percentage of your siblings names does your husband now? All. Really going to have to go test them. I say there are about forty five of us get together regularly. So he knows they're right. There are some that. I haven't even gotten to see in a very long time. So. He wouldn't know them and on the forty five or so of us he knows them but it doesn't necessarily know every name. And around Christmas get together with something and and I know he wants to act like those all the names. So if I want something special for Christmas, maybe at what? We. Actually I have another I have a question from that Hammond Nieces or nephews do you have Omegas Brits? Hundreds and hundreds I do not have found. Oh you need to find that I didn't figure that out. I do not have account. I did not have account but on average also have kids and I'd say most of us who had if you have at least two does anyone have like a crazy number? Well, I know has the most grandkids I have a sincere who has like about thirty rapists feels the most we have nobody comes close Oh sunny. Okay. Ebony my brother. Anthony. Has. As of the last count he had twelve children. Wow. All biological children. As last count because every time he he and his wife, advocate. So you guys about done. and. One of the most mile and I like. I don't think they're done. Okay that is a great place Jan cleared. Thank you so. Being on the show. Thank you guys so much for having. Thanks giving me a chance to talk to you by the way on. Thanks especially for giving me a chance to talk about the work that we're doing his eating America. I everyone we're trying something new. During this time of economic date, we WANNA take a moment to spotlight some new female founded companies. We've heard from many incredible skimmers leading small businesses, and we will be introducing them to you each week on skin the couch see the Lincoln are episode description for how to submit yourself or print. Hi I'm Julie Bornstein. I. Am the founder and CEO of the Yes. The yes. Is a new shopping platform right now it's only for IOS and it is a store built around each person. So what happens is you take a quick Q. and A., and then basically you have your own feed and that feed is tied to the things. You've told us about the styles in your sizes and things like that and brands of and then as you shop you. Yes and no items you like don't like and it gets smarter over time the best. Analogy we use is it's kind of like spotify or Pandora for shopping for clothes. The problems we were looking to solve on the consumer side where for kind of the overwhelm of shopping online and so as we all know, we've spent lots of time on websites going through twelve pages of midi-dresses to try and find a one or two that are interesting to us, and you know whether you see it on page two or page twelve you sort of feel like I have to. Absolutely. See everything to find that right thing. So that is sort of the first problem we're trying to solve is why can't the shopping experience adapt to me and as it starts to learn the things that I like can't the mini dresses that I like show up on page one the second problem we're trying to solve is that the department stores are shrinking and the brands are looking for new ways to find customers and estimates are sort of WanNa. Make sure they know what's New and interesting, but it's exhausting to go to a million sites and you don't necessarily know all the new cool brands. So the idea of giving a brand new outlet to meet customers and vice versa was really the second problem we're trying to solve I have been thinking about starting a company for a long time and I had many different moments where I wanted to. So right after college went to work for Donna Karan, I was always really interested in fashion and when I was. Leaving I really wanted to start addenda bar, but it was nine, hundred, ninety three, and there were truly no capital markets for young founders female or male It just didn't exist and it was pre internet then I went back to business school I worked briefly in banking, and then I joined Nordstrom as Nordstrom was just launching ecommerce it took me about. Six months of begging dinners from the hire me but he did and it was a really fun couple of years when I left after five years I thought I had an idea to start something and Dan talk me out of it He said I l see I think I was pregnant with my second kid at that time and he said he is definitely. Do, not want to start a company. It's the chance of it working is so low and it's a horrible lifestyle. So we ended up instead moving to Philadelphia for urban outfitters where I have them building grow ecommerce? We found our way back to San Francisco when I went to join Sephora, and after I left Sephora I joined stitch fix and at that time I was at first a board member on an advisor and investor and then I joined full time for a few years as coo in I felt like when I started there Part of my hypothesis was I, wanted to start a business. So many times I'm going to work in a startup and see how it feels and learn what I needed to learn and decide if I actually wanted to do it myself and I would say that was a very confirming experience. We started the company in the beginning of two, thousand and eighteen. So we basically plan we raised money closed our funding in. February started hiring hiring the team and March and April. So we been working on this for two years and I knew that we needed to raise enough money to really build this highly complex technology product and also sign up hundreds of brands, and so I assumed, it would take eighteen months ended up taking two years. So we had planned to launch after all this work with a twenty engineers and four brand partnerships. in March and then Cova, has and we really we were ready but the world was not ready and the time was so clearly not right. So we made the call I was probably the last one to fall I just. To do this, we had put so much into this to hold off on launching. The truth is it allowed us to improve the product as you're never ready of course with your product, and so we ended up deciding to wait and watch. We decided that we needed to get out there. Even if it felt more like a soft launch, you know it was what it was. We needed to get people on this APP. We needed to get their feedback and we felt like Gosh. There's so much heavy news right now, and there are people a lot of people at home scrolling. On their phones and so you know it may not be sort of the right moment to be thinking about fashion as it relates to sort of the world at large but it certainly would get a lot of feedback and it was a a nice distraction in otherwise heavy times, and so we launched in May on May Twentieth. We know that business today is not like it will be post covid. Dressing for work and they're not dressing to go out because they're not going out but we are getting a lot of great feedback and we're selling a lot of. t shirts and shorts and comfortable dresses the skin community can find the yes. On the apple APP store and right now we're only we will be building web and android in the future and we would love everyone to try it and so to give feedback, and also maybe by one thing from your a brand, you love our brand you don't know because these brands need it and you can find us on Instagram at the. Thanks for hanging out with US join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch, and if you can't wait until, then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign up at the Skim Dot Com. That's the S. K. I. M. M. dot com Xu m's for a little something extra.

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Julie Greenwald, chairman & COO, Atlantic Records: You have to outwork everybody else.

Skimm'd from The Couch

37:43 min | 10 months ago

Julie Greenwald, chairman & COO, Atlantic Records: You have to outwork everybody else.

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay Lauder. The nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first. Let's get into the episode. For those people that really want career in one to get to the very top. You have to work everybody else. That's it and I'm not saying it's GonNa be the longest hours. It might be at work with the best ideas. I'm curly's Aken I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome skin from the couch this podcast where we go deep on career advice from women who have lived check from the good stuff like hiring and growing team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch, so what better place to talk it all out than it began on a couch. Hey, everyone, the show might look and sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches, the scam is working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today joined by a powerhouse of the music industry, Julie Greenwald she is the CEO and chairman of Atlantic records during her time in the business. She's helped. Advance the careers of Bruno Mars. Kelly Clarkson at Sharon. Just to name a few chewy were really excited to have you with us today. Welcome to skin from the couch. They you for having me so truly. We're GONNA. Jump in, ask you to skim your resume for us. I went to two lane university go graduated in nineteen ninety wine, and then I did a program called teach for America where I taught in the calliope projects, and then I started working at Rush Management With Lear Coin Your Cohen's assistant from ninety two to ninety. Re Unwind Ninety. Three moved over to detmer hurts and became the promotions coordinator, and then from ninety three to ninety nine worked my way up industrial records, and then ninety nine took over island records and became the head of marketing for island addict. Jam. Then I'm not quite sure when I became president with now it's not to get causey with my dates, but I do know in two thousand four I. I came over to Atlantic records online I've been at Atlantic records since two thousand four Julie with something that is not on your kind of official bio that we should know about you I. Don't think I officially. put down. That I am a mom with two kids by that is probably my most favorite part of my life is that I am a twenty year old and a sixteen year old. That's great I want to kind of just start with the elephant in the room that we're all dealing with which is how to run companies amid stay global pandemic, the music industry is interesting, because in some ways you know, it seems like you have a lot of talented people who are at home, and a moment of reflection in some sorts and I'm sure they'll be a lot of good hopefully music to come out with it. But how are you thinking about this time? So for the artists that have been able to continue to give us, music is been business as usual in terms of. Thinking of Creative Marketing and promotional. For these artists rollout there songs, obviously facing different challenges, which is. Creation of music video photo shoots. We've sent artist green screens. We've sent them ring lights, and so been really just trying to keep everybody focused on the fact that the world is listening to music right now to help through such a terrible time, and so many artists are giving great music to continue out there. They're a bunch of artists that still need to get into a studio. Need a collaboration and those artists. Were just trying to be really good partners and friends to down and tell them that you know. Hey, it's okay. Take this time, maybe just right in a notebook and try to just be you know thoughtful, and in good partners to our artists that are staring at the fact that they may not be able to tour. You know for the. Future and so we're just trying to make sure that they see the light to buy you know. Streaming has really offered us a way to share their art and music and doing these live streams social. That, they can stay connected to their hands. I think we've been incredibly lucky. In terms of all the businesses that are really been affected were continuing to. Market and promote during this time. And as a leader, how have you been trying to set your team up remotely and keep them focused at a time when there's so much uncertainty? So, I personally jumped writing at first and I do weekly email. It's very personal. Email to my whole company every Sunday night to talk about okay. We're about to start in next week. Know Week two week three and I share my stories and I let them know that. Now I'm in a house with two crazy kids and husband and a dog just diagnosed. Diagnosed with cancer and Chemo and and so you know I let them know that I to going through you know challenging situations, and then also set up a time for every department where I call it either morning tea, or after key, where every assistant coordinator manager director on up gets an opportunity to see me on the screen and talk to me in. In us. We questions so I can kind of let them know what we're talking about. Upstairs and keep sharing the fact that we don't know when we're GONNA. Come back when it's okay because we're working. How can I help you and in really like? Let them see that they can. Individually email may call me facetime with me and I'm right there in the. The canoe with them. I feel like I've actually gotten more facetime award. Talk Time with every person on the staff in. It's great because you know. Sometimes, it's the meetings where assistance in coordinators don't really WANNA speak, and now I think I've given them all voice. If you'll really comfortable to talk with me and asked me style for share ideas, maybe they. Feel comfortable being in the big room because they feel so intimate. I think people have gotten so much more vulnerable and more creative, and we're open with me, and so I actually personally feel like I'm GonNa. Come out of this a better reader because I've got so much more individual time with the staff and I think the staff from what I'm feeling back from their emails and their conversations. They're feeling like they're building a closer bond, not only with me, but their peers and other workers from other departments that they don't normally engage with, because everybody is so You know talking regularly every day with each other. I. WanNa. Go back in time. When did you think you'RE GONNA? Be when you were growing up. Very clear path, so I was always going to law school. I was always going to become a lawyer. My parents involved in politics in always were involved in many clamper beats, and so when I went to college, or read about being a lobbyist, and then I was like God is definitely for me I signed up to be Senator, John Bruce in turn of Louisiana I date again true drives and volunteered soup kitchens. That's why when I read about teach for America. I was like Oh my God I don't have to go to the Peace Corps I don't have to leave the country. I could do good in the United States and I turned. Turned Management I work at a to a law school admissions office guided rate with Dean of admission is I was like okay? He's gonNA write a letter of REC. Law School and I was like I'm GonNa? Do teach for America. Get this amazing hands on experience on because I felt like on God I could be either children's rights, advocate or women's rights advocate. I want to go to DC politics. I'M GONNA. Do teach for America. I'm the go to law school. I knew exactly when I was going to do when I took a summer job. Lee Are after teach for America I was I to with me into his office every day the. Study Guide so I'm. GonNa I'M GONNA? Pass you because who is leader? Okay, so you're calling was one of the founders of Def jam records in one of the most important people in hip hop music in terms of your driving Def jam records in driving hip hop into mainstream music in. He's gone on to become the chairman warna music real. And then he went to become the chairman of Youtube Music Right now, and so he's A. A major player in the music business, and so when I took a job as his assistant, it was just a summer job so I could be in your city in steady for the L. Sats Weiner. Mind boyfriend I never really thought. I was going to stay music business. You know I needed to help pay the bills and he saw every day. I had this. Book on my shelf in. What are you doing and I was like I'm going to Moscow when that's. When he yelled at me and he was like everybody is a lawyer miserable. You don't want to be a lawyer. You stay in music business and that's when he said you know you should go to. My other company learn another side of the business is I was on the management side with him. To the records I am assuming growing up. Did you have any connection to the music industry? Not to the industry I did I did like music, but you know I just like music in the car and music. You know on the radio in uneven. Know about the business you know I. didn't know anything about. It didn't even think it was an opportunity for me or I. Honestly never thought it was a creative type of person I was A. We's a great speaker. I knew I was going to be a lawyer. That's what I thought. I was built for. How did you discover that you had to create a side? was a you the discovered a first or leader? So I was sitting in promotion meetings in I would be like. Hey, why don't we do this this this? Would this artist and why don't we come up with this kind of concert? I? Remember with onyx on its was the rap band. We're trying to break in early nineties in and they had a song called Slam. And at that time we were getting a lot of heat from the government about our lyrics being too aggressive in videos, being too aggressive, and that's when they were first introducing the we needed to stick. Our product is a parental advisory. On it and so I, did a whole continent equalled slam censorship where brought run DMC Onyx Redmond to perform in DC to say you can't censor their music just because you're offended what they're saying, but this is why. This is the stories that they're telling you. Rap Music was under attack you know. In the early nineties. People were stared at it, and so I kept coming up with all these different ideas and Leo was like a moving from promotions to marketing. You have great ideas and then when they handed me the art department in Video Department. That's kind of exploded in terms of. Brainstorming ideas and it really opened up in me was whole other side, but I was like. Wow, this is amazing, dishonest interesting back. In early day we were small company and you had to wear many hats. Just you guys when you started your company. I'm sure you were designing mats and figuring out your logo and all the kind of good talking. When you're a small company, you gotta do seventeen different jobs, and you know sometimes all of a sudden these things inside of you that you did not have become you know your passion and you're like. Wow, I'm ended it when I hear you. You talk about being at two lane and you're like. Yeah, so you know. The Dean of admissions for the law. School was gonNA. Write me a recommendation and then I'm an intern. Who has this kind of casual interest in music? But we are takes notice of me. You say it so casually, but there had to be something that makes it so that these people are drawn to you or they see something in you. Is it a sense of fearlessness? Is it that you kind of knew what you wanted and you went after it? What do you think got you that foot in the door? So, I I can tell you from a very early age I've always been confident. I always known. I wanted things I wanted to get good grades. I knew I wanted to go to good college. So I set myself on a path to be involved in a lot of organizations I. always knew that Lake I needed to work. To move myself forward. I saw how hard my parents worked I saw that they were involved. In many things I had the greatest role bottle of life. My Mom was my dad's partner in the built a giant business, and she was also involved in many philanthropies, not just with money, but personal time, and she seemed to make dinner like five nights a week, and she was the greatest cook in the warmest person I three sisters, and yet we all thought she loved us the most. You know when you have a role model like that, I set my sights to be like her. To be you know a major contributor back to society, not just have a job, but also do some good in the world you know. I always just wanted to do the best job for people. No matter if I was an intern or just a part time job, you know I always gave it two hundred percent, and I knew my own work ethic was going to be the thing that propelled me forward. You Know I. Think the confidence that you're talking about is obviously propelled you forward, and we talk a lot about faking it till you make it on the show and we'd certainly done that ourselves I'm curious. Is there something that you professionally have not been confident about? So I think. The beginning when I first got into hip hop music because I don't claim to be a hip hop Aficionado I just love the music and I fell in love with the culture and the art and artists. I think. I've always known what I. Don't know I've never been afraid to ask for help and I've never been afraid to hire people that actually are Jenner than me and are more informed. Better educated whether it's been technologies. Social media understanding their culture hip hop were alternative music so even when I don't know something I'm confident, I don't know it and that like. Let me surround myself with really good people do know it. I mean there's a lot of things I don't necessarily good I, but I know it I know I'm not on it so I bring in those people that really help me get better and to learn from it when you started off in the music business, you've been open about paying your dues as I think most people. People do when they get into the industry I think that there's been a lot of conversation about what paying your dues should look like and you know when we interview people, especially young people starting out, there's definitely at times you can recognize the person that just hungry and they'll do whatever and then there are the people that are hungry, but they want to know what the job path out of that entry level position looks like. How do you as now the boss bank about people starting off, and what that path around paying their dues should look like. So I definitely employees a lot of young people right out of college, and we have a giant intern program where we really try to make sure keeping an eye on superstar interns that could then become our assistance to work their way up I don't fault anybody with A. And I actually appreciate people, especially young women that come in and sit with me. An WanNa know what is their path forward, and is there a real clear half-forward here? You know so many people know my story, but in a very small company so I had I think an easier time to move very fast of the ladder, and when you're in a very large company, it may not be fast, and it could feel daunting in the one thing I. WanNa do is make sure people know that you can row here and that it might be a slower pace, but there's real opportunity to grow, and it's my job to make sure that the young people feel like I'm. I'm going to provide them with a path forward, so it doesn't bother me when people have edition as long as they come in in their super respectful to their immediate bosses, and their co workers in the all understand that you know everybody isn't going to be the Alpha, but it doesn't mean those people are in great and contributing to the company to I, just want a very healthy respectful workplace, but as you guys know you're going to be people that leapfrog people that have been there much longer at your company because they're giving it to million times more in, they have way better ideas and they're you know burning those hours as a really showing you that. They WANNA come. Take you out of your chair, and like the one thing you don't want to do is you don't want to stifle that. We want people to feel like they can really thrive because they could be the ones that are going to add some extra thing to your company and make your company that much more better invaluable. We are all in a period of working from home for the foreseeable future. Thanks to covid nineteen. And if you're like us, it means that the workday just kind of goes on and on and on because there's no sense of routine, and we're already home, and there's a lot of screen time and screen back back is not good for anyone. We recognize how lucky we are. Stay at home, but we're trying to focus on a little self care so fortunately. We found a great way to put that. into practice, and that's with anr Estee Lauder is advanced night repair serum? Use it before your moisturizer. E fast penetrating serum helps can maximize its natural ability to repair by night and protect by day like a superhero, but for your skin when over five hundred women tried it eighty percent noticed more rested healthier, looking skin in four weeks their skin felt more hydrated and had a radiant glow had to estee lauder dot Com to learn more. That's E. S. T. L. A. U. D. E. R.. DOT, com start tonight with estee lauder advanced night repair serum. I WanNa talk about bringing people along division. You made the switch to run at records you help define def jam, and then you move to a legacy label top rebuild in a conic brand. How do you bring people along with you without scaring them? Oh! I definitely scared them. I'll never forget the first when I came over in two thousand four. I left the number. One label in the country island def jam was on fire. Jay De AMAC's Commie ludicrous job will shanty killers fall out boy, some forty one who is staying I mean we wrong fire again. Confidence is not something I lack. I came in in said to everybody. First of all I had a be hundreds of hundreds of people, and I had a fire, hundreds of people, and so I was scary person because they knew I was deciding if you're gonNA, stay go, and so you know. As I was meeting people. I was really trying to understand. Are you a bow becoming a new culture and a new company or you going to be gripping, and are you going to be a problem for me? But, how do you create a culture? Fear Paralyzes People. And instead motivates them. Because what I did was I got rid of a Lotta People's I had hundreds and hundreds of people to choose from and I interviewed a bazillion people and I said Hey, 'cause I had electron Atlantic in my said. Hey I'm not trying to come over here and be all the lecturing, nor the old Atlantic and by the way I'm more trying even the island gesture I'm. The company left on coming here to create a new company with. With a new culture or you down, and if you were down for this new mission, because honestly, it's going to be hard. I tunes had yet really taken off now. Stir was thriving. He was scared for their jobs and I was like listen. I will lead you to safety, but I need I need to know that you are not going to be gripping and that you're gonna be down to do things new different way and that. That are going to be a company where it's all about development signing artists in however long it's GonNa take. It's GonNa take an on patient for greatness, but I need you guys to be patient. Understand the hard work. It is to start over in really come along with me and based on the interview. You know if you were down felt it kept you and on five felt like they were like looking at me like Oh, you young! Young thirty four year old. You never know what you're talking about. Then I said you know I'm GonNa, let you go and when we started you know I. Let people know like listen. I am a vision for this place. I want to hear people's ideas. I had an openness in meetings. Like Hey I. Don't know everything. Give me your marketing ideas, but I was also very vocal that I thought the idea was not a good idea. Said? No, and that's what leadership is is having envisioned driving it and. Being open to people helping you with the ideas the creative, but when things don't feel right or smell right, you also have to. Just you have to assert yourself and not be afraid to say no. We're not going down that path. This is how we're going to do it and I outworked. Everybody you know. It's like I was in their morning noon and night showing everybody what my commitment was. was to the artists, and then I was taking this very seriously, so no one could be like. Oh, she's an armchair quarterback. I was in it and they saw me meetings that I really wanted creative thoughts. I wanted to create a company I just didn't want to do it the way because the old way was getting put out in his new time called digital music I to this new. New thing and that's why honestly Atlantic records was the first companies across the digital divide. We were making more music more money from apple than we were physical next, because people came along with me and we're not afraid to embrace this new thing called Apple, and then when streaming happened, my company was first company to actually make more money from streaming the digital, because one time we embrace streaming. Streaming we were like. How do you market to it? Hardy macaroni rounded an huggy. You market on the platform. I've always been interested in the know what's out there. And how can we better because our John? Lewis and Clark eight for our artists to go back and educate the artists and show them it was this promise land over here, and this is how we're gonNA. Get you to safety. When you talk about that period where you're starting off building in, and it's going to be a New Vision, and you also have the chance to build a different culture. You said you didn't have a personal life for a long time, and you talked about wishing that you had taken a longer return ity leave. How do you think back on what you've built in the culture today, and now having the opportunity to be both the boss and the mentor? What is your advice to people in that position? Who are trying to find what works for them? While I I definitely in way, more sensitive to young parents who are just having children or starting their families in I'm really encouraging them to make sure that they don't miss out on so many of life's wonderful moments that I missed out on. You know I look back and that's the only part that I. Regret like that, you know. I chose so many times to stay at the office and not go to a soccer game or go. Gee, a volleyball bulky because I didn't reschedule meeting. On end so I definitely Wayne more sensitive to folks to say. Hey, you have a cell phone. You have a laptop. Go home. Go be with your kids on. Then he can finish your work at night. Because obviously we need people to not fall behind, and you know our artists count on us to deliver endure we need to do they don't WanNa hear that we left the office at five o'clock because they were different hours than us. I let people know that it's hard i. Let especially the women. Man It's really hard to juggle. It all end that there's no such thing as. Stop striving for balance. Just do the best job you can give yourself a break every so often. Stop beating yourself up, but you know for those people that really want a career in WanNa get to the very top. You have to at work everybody else. That's it and I'm not saying it's GONNA. Be the longest amount of hours. It might be out work with the best ideas it might be having. The relationships move talent that working harder exactly. You gotTA outhustled. People because that's who gets the ring at the end of the day or the people that are putting points on the board in showing their. Valuable, you know that's why it's really important. If you want my chair, come for it. You gotta come for it because there's one thing I learned is no one gives you anything. You got to really create your own path while. You're not only in the music industry. You're also in the talent industry. And you have to manage a of different personalities artists. One of ours capacitors had a question. I actually was thinking about so thank you Catherine F for asking Miss. But how do you give honest feedback to people in artists who are typically stereotypically surrounded by men or women? So I always felt really good about my role, because I was never on the artist payroll, and so you know I always felt like they knew I was coming from a different place and I just. You know felt like they knew always where they stand with me when I would court then to sign them I always say never gonNA mean more honest and direct person with me, but it's always gonNA come from a place of love and wanting to just see you have a career in the future. If you establish that day wine from the first moment you have to deal with bomb where you see video, where piece of art or a song and you say. You know what like I liked the song? I, don't it? I think the video is just okay can you could have done better if he don't bullshit them from day? One than they understand the relationship with you know, this is the thing if you remember, you have the opportunity to really get in with an artist from before they were famous to athlete were famous. And, so you said you know the tone of what your relationship is going to be. And so when you very honest and direct relationship with them from day one inch eaten when they turn out to sell hundreds of millions of albums, they still no I'm that exact same person. I haven't changed for me. I'm GONNA business where there's no right answer. Right music is so subjective in so there's always the it's just my opinion. And I'm giving you my opinion with love, respect and as much knowledge and information that I have about the situation, but it's my opinion, and at the end of the day. The artist needs to make your decision of what they wanNA. Do we always know where they stood with me? You are one of the top players in a traditionally male dominated industry. What's your advice for? Specifically women who are trying to negotiate and I asked this because when I met you, we were at dinner, and it was all talking about negotiation, and you were just so blunt and confident, and it was really refreshing. It definitely gave me some confidence to think about negotiating in it it in a different way. When you're negotiating. You have to know what your values and look the if you think you're worth. A million dollars a year, but you have been done anything to deserve a million dollars in here. Little crazy. You also have to know where you are in the career path to and what you're delivering and how valuable you are, you have to understand the marketplace. You have to do your homework. You have to be informed. You know we have a business where at least in the music business in where community you can reach out to you, but you also have their peers in your friends that. That you know it's an uncomfortable conversation and I don't think people necessarily warranted share. You know what rates are, but there is some homework and diligence that you gotta kind of do. If you're moving up the ladder, just so you have an understanding of what the marketplace is going to bear, but if you're a superstar, and you're not asking for it than you're missing out on. You don't have to look at it like you're being obnoxious or you're being. You know wrong in the matter you just. Have to say you know what this is. My worth and I'M GONNA. Go for it, but you know in so many situations. You got to be willing to put your neck out on the Y. You ought to be able to say you know. Hey, if you're not going to take care of me, somebody else well, or maybe this isn't the right industry for me. I'm going to go into a different business. That will you know respect? My creativity were this or by, but you also have the know kind of what the on environmentalists I just was having a conversation the other day with somebody about their contract and you know timing is everything. In was like twenty million people are unemployed right now, and we're about to face the worst recession after and my job is to keep his many people employed, and keep all my people employed, and so you know in my handing out giant raises right now no I'm trying to make sure everybody got gigs and so you just have to understand what the environment is to and be thoughtful about it because like I, said if we're going into recession, and you're standing there, asking for Brazilian. You by Galvin Gig just period. You've got to be smart. You do your work, but you also have to know what your self worth is, too, but if you don't put points on the board, don't ask for. A move to our lightning round. Julie New Green ask you. Questions. You have to respond as quickly as possible. Yes morning, person or night owl medium. Just a normal person. Yeah! No, it's crazy. Because Bill Corentin has turned me into a night owl I wasn't morning. Person in the Korn teens turned me into a night. Adults I'm obsessed with supremos now. Are you watching it from the beginning or have? Yes, okay by kids. Can you skim your nighttime routine for us? I make dinner I walked the dog I either depending on the night of the week. Play monopoly. Were we watch the Sopranos until finally on exhausted in the morning and go to sleep. Is there an artist that you've passed on that? You were like. So we had post Malone and we ended up not doing the deal. I every time I see him than heroes. Music I WANNA kill myself. We we had. We just didn't end up making the deal. One of our skin Basseterre Kyla wants to know what is the most bizarre request. You've seen an artist writer. I remember. I did have an artist. Everything in the room had to be white. White eminem white flour is white candles. They on this whole white by everything had to be his beautiful white environment. What is the best concert you've ever been to? All My. Dance I am too I. Am too many I give you. Some of the target is three tops on. The hard knock life, rough rider, red man, but the man. I, giant hip hop concert got was insane in everybody was exploding in. We were just breaking down the barriers. That hip hop is not gonNA. Be Giant or Music that's wine seeing. Ed Sheeran Sleigh four nights at Madison Square Garden. When we started off him in Qatar at the Mercury Lounge eighteen months before that to all of a sudden, we ended the cycle with like four sold out nights at Madison. Square Garden so much work in love on. It was emotional amazing. Might for me, and then and then probably Bruno Mars first concert at bowery ballroom when you just saw that this guy is going to be a worldwide global superstar and It became so clear from this one little show. I was like forget I knew it. I knew how big he was. GonNa be. Unbelievable. Last question. What's your shameless plug? My shameless plug you mean for like one of my artists now can be anything. Right now in the job. interesting time right now because the coronavirus where I just want everybody to be kinds of charter, women especially can make this world a better place right now I think we. are inside organizations in companies. I think we're super thoughtful and I think we can make the world a better right now. Because the world is so scary, we need to make this a better place, and we need to be so much more compassionate anomaly inside organizations, but what we do at home and outside communities eight Hugo match. Core was nice seeing you. Everyone. We're trying something new. During this time of economic uncertainty, we WANNA take a moment to spotlights, a new female founded companies. We've heard from many incredible skimmers who are leading small businesses, and we will be introducing them to you each week on skimp on the couch. See the Lincoln are episode description for how to submit yourself or friends. I'm Dr. Sarah Feldman. I'm a board certified behavior, analyst and Co owner at the Helm Aba and the hell. Maybe a focuses on decreasing problem behavior and increasing communication and improving quality life for children and families affected by autism. We do that I providing in home in center, based therapy and supporting local school districts throughout North Texas. This year we are celebrating our year in business. We started as a small team of two people with three hundred dollars in. In our pockets, since then we've grown to a team of over fifty therapists, and we serve seventy five families for us. When covid nineteen hit, we had literally just gotten the keys to our third clinic, and so at that time we had to shift really from this growth mindset of Henry. Continue to grow and serve more kids more families to how do we create some safety and security for the team that we already have? We really were dedicated. Dedicated to trying to figure out how to get our staff to stay as employed as possible. We were a lucky few that we were able to be considered an essential business, because we provide medically necessary therapy for the families that we serve. We didn't have time to make it perfect. We just switched to tell a hell for as many kids as we could and to provide that supports, and then we switched back to in home, which was our route. Route it kind of felt like you were taking ten steps back, but we were also able to continue to employ as many people as possible. We feel really proud because every family. That's wanted services in every employee. That's one into actually come to work has had a job throughout the whole time for is what can help most is if people take it seriously. We have a lot of kiddos that don't know how to socially distance. They don't know. All the rules and regulations about keeping space or keeping their hands out of their faces in the more that we all take this seriously, this is uncharted territory for everyone, and we have grace for one. 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Tiffany R. Warren, SVP, Chief Diversity Officer at Omnicom: Being a microphone for people who can't be in the room is an honor and a power that I take extremely seriously.

Skimm'd from The Couch

45:07 min | 10 months ago

Tiffany R. Warren, SVP, Chief Diversity Officer at Omnicom: Being a microphone for people who can't be in the room is an honor and a power that I take extremely seriously.

"Being a microphone for people who can't be in the room is a honor and a power that I take extremely seriously actually humbles need to the point where I get emotional, because I know that all my hard work in everything done primarily since I was three. I've been made for such a time as this. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch, so what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch? Hey everyone! This show might sound a bit different today because we're still skimming from three different couches. The skin is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen. Today. We are very excited to have. Tiffany are Warren. Join us on skimmed from the couch. She is the diversity officer and senior vice, president at omnicompetent. Wannabe biggest marketing and advertising networks in the world. She's also the founder and president of at Color, an organization that champions and advocates for diversity in the creative and Tech Industries Tiffany Bank you for joining us today. Welcome to skimmed from the couch KIO. This is special treat Dan Yan I notes have e- separately from two different organizations that were involved in that tiffany's both involved in Tiffany's involved. Involved in a lot of different things and we're going to talk about how she she spends her time like we east you one of these are easily one extracurricular, and you're in both of them, and not only are you in both of them, but I'm sure that. At least one I go to like the the Ad Council boardings tip knows everyone and I'm like I literally only know you. When you're I, mean it when I saw your friendly. Immediately just like. It was. It was actually pretty cool because you know like sometimes when you go into big meetings in, there's a bunch of tables. You feel like high school. You're like. I still feel that way. I may know a lot of people, but I'm like okay. The cool kids sitting and I saw your face. Sit over there. That's how I felt, too, but you are just one of those people I see you work. The room and I am always like out so anyway. We are very excited to having here. We're going to start out with a basic question. Skim your resume for US oh. My God wow. Actually I do this. Sorry, this is easy. While I came into the world's the advertising world as an account executive at Hill holiday song from Boston Boston, Strong Boston girl, and from Bentley University, and knew immediately almost upon graduation that I wanted to work in advertising, so I cut my teeth in in the Boston advertising agencies that we all know in love, Arnold worldwide. He'll holiday, and then upon being part of that I realized that I was a very small group of multicultural professionals, not only in the Boston advertising scene, but in the agency that I worked so I wanted to work. Outside to fix what was inside and so I went to the fore as in headed up diversity. I was twenty five years old I. Got The job on my twenty per day. I not only got the job on May twenty fifth birthday also signed a lease. Chevy when said either you had a guardian, Angel, or someone preyed on you prayed for you. but I signed a lease for a beautiful, Brooklyn walkup in Fort Green and spent my formative early years. In New York, they're working for the forays and a lot of cases at least the first couple of years. The interns that I was responsible for managing were only two to three. Three years younger than me, so that was surreal to be able to turn around my experience like right away and provide them with an opportunity to learn, and then I went back into the agency, particularly the one that gave me so much of what I feel like I. Come to learn about management arnold worldwide, so I took on the job as head of diversity there and then. That is where I grew. Add color informed, add color and Ben was recruited to have diversity for a bigger network called on Congress. What something that knows about you? We wouldn't find it any of your professional Baya's Arlington. I think what you don't find in BIOS maybe. Certain like pain points that have happened in your life I think most people say hobbies I believe by I think what isn't it my bio, but his informed me in everything that I do is that you know when I was to my parents divorced, and so I grew up to some extent without a father, he then passed away when I was really know I was twenty six had just started at the four, as but then upon him passing. I found out I had seven younger brothers and so it isn't my bio that have oldest ten I think people think they always congratulate my mom when they meet her. My Mom's like well I only had three condo. So? He found out I had seven brothers, and so my the Warren tried route from three to ten overnight I. Never knew that you found out at that point in your life. I found out. I had seven siblings at twenty six achiever relationship with them. They really on some of them were really young. When my dad passed it I'm close to many of them, but I. Think in a big family like you have ten siblings and eight of them are are men. They're all very unique personalities in so I think the younger ones I have strong formative relationships with busy eight nine. When he passed in the older ones. We're kind of in their teens and sort of on the way on into launching their lives, but you know I'm close with a variety of my siblings I. think Anyone can attest to that siblings are. Special People But, yeah, you know to find out at twenty six. I was old enough to appreciate the gifts that I was given. Because of these new relationships in so I took hold of it super quickly. My mom was I dived into being older sister. You dive into like you know creating add color or project. You wanted to be the best at it I'm so I work on it every day, but I'm really grateful for almost blades. That's amazing I really I. Thought you all up together. That's incredible I will have to. To I was like. How could you be fain and grow up in a house with ten kids, but I'm glad that you had a little bit of a buffer now you know what's interesting. It's so three east coast than the other seven or west coast, so personalities could not be any more different, but what I told people is I didn't know my dad I didn't have a relationship, but. But through talking with the boys and getting to know them, and seeing them grow into men like I. Really Actually know who my dad is. That's been the biggest gift because I always wondered what I get from my dad and getting to know my brothers I know exactly what what gifts I I got my dad, and certainly I guess. I got from my mom. Sommese cow, so I wanted. Wanted to dig in a little bit. You are known as such a thought, leader and diversity space, and you know when our team saw that we were speaking to you this week. Everyone freaked out like we're talking. We're talking to celebrity and a think what I'm actually most fascinated by. When we go back to like the twenty five year old at this huge job. Even go back before that. How did you actually carve out a role and a position for yourself that many companies didn't have roles for there weren't really many examples to look for I. Really want to understand how you took an interest in a passionate I think he called it like a calling around working in diversity inclusion and turn it into your career. Yeah, I mean that's a pretty straightforward answer I. I have been a recipient and or participant in some of the biggest national diversity programs, and then my education was informed by scholarships received. Because I'm a person of color. So since two and a half years old and I still have the progress report. Where they're talking about me, they're saying you know. Tiffany likes the quiet ones you know I'm. I'm thinking of like two and a half three year old tiffany like walking around head. Start trying to I know. was I starting to protest I? Don't know what I was doing with the way that the proper support made it seem is I. I pretty much had that early age of understanding in questioning. Why am I treated a certain way because of my color? So when your whole life is informed by that? Maybe it wasn't even informed. Where I was in the hospital in the seventies, I don't know but I was born across the street from the school. That I eventually went to so to think of my mom holding me while looking out the window at. The manicured lawns. The Windsor School, not even thinking that her daughter day is going to matriculate there and and seven years of her life. Growing into this diversity professional and I do think that they were key pivotal moments in my my life that really informed me was almost like lights in a room, and I just had to follow them, because I knew even when I was in inroads, which is an industry internship program that places young people of Color in business marketing. I had my internship at Verizon. And I knew even being part of Inroads I. Love The way this feels. I love the fact, this woman. Her Name Was Sandy banker at inroads at Bryson had the job of making us feel important special within a corporate environment. She was energetic. She was excited to come to work, and so I was like okay. That's what I'm GonNa, do I don't know how I'm GonNa get air because I want to feel like she feels when she comes into work, and so I always had it in the back of my mind, and so even when I. Started working in agency I questioned why there weren't more diverse people, and I went directly to the president had the conversation, and now people would grasping their pearls like how can you just go and talk to the president and set up a meeting I'm like Whoa? Why not because that that idea of speaking directly to authority empower about things that are not going well, are people not being accounted for with something I had been doing apparently since I was three, and so you know stories from my family and my mom I put i. put the pieces together that. Basically had a blueprint for this and was destined for this even the first second generation of my family were there. Teachers nurses were all in some sort sort of service, so my calling happened to be diversity in corporate America someone else my family would be. would be a teacher or nurse, so it's it's kind of. It's kind of generational and Some would say genetic, but I knew probably at eleven that I was going to do this work. I just didn't know what it was called I am hearing this an in so many ways just kind of struck by the confidence that you have. Did you define yourself as a confident person growing up? Not. Absolutely did not like I kept journals and now i. go back and read them and I like because. Someday. You'll pay attention to the. Women that I am. And I moved from writing the the journals to doing voice diaries. I melt when I listen to myself and I want to yell at myself. Being like you are so dope, you are amazing. This was like twenty one I'm. I'm doing these voice diaries in had so much angst and so much concern about the gap in my tooth in so much concern that I cut my hair and it made me look like a boy, and no one would love me I mean I look back now like girl you you. You were head of your time. What tell myself? I want to contrast that with. With the fact that you were in college, you're the president of the black united body at Bentley. You call it quarter. Give you an MBA leadership. Yeah, and I think for a lot of people listening. It's like you know that sounds like. Oh, my Gosh! She knew what she wanted to do, and she had no problems going forward. How did you even at that young age? Where did you have? was, it support system was just kind of like this internal drive to not only make a difference, but do it in terms of a leadership position. Yeah I mean it was a couple things so superfan of Oprah and she always said helping others is is your path to success in that never left me. And so I took it literally out like. So helping others leads to success in so every time that I've applied bat. I've come out the other end stronger more defined better leader. My leadership development really happened in high school and connecting with other amazing first generation college goers, even first generation Americans I grew up in Roxbury apart of the city that is a melting part for shore, but people may think about it gets predominantly. African American, but I grew up with hey. Shan Cape Verdean weekend. The sounds the music the food that all surrounded me and then in my family that was touches of the Caribbean heritage that my grandmother came from, and then I would go visit my other grandmother in Dorchester she's decidedly. From the South so Collard Greens in Curry, goat like that is my upbringing, and then you know being a black Catholic, which is you know apparently a cheaper copper. You can't when I say. I'm a black cat. Catholic real is black people in the Cath. Yes, or and I went to charge for thirteen fourteen years until I went on a quest of self discovery, but I say all that to say is that I had a lot of leadership opportunities along the way I met my best friend from picking up a fly off the ground for a Catholic Youth Convention and And I. It was five dollars to go. I begged my mom to give you the money a went, and I met my friends who thirty years thirty something years later. I'm still friends with, and they have gone on to become senators. The CIA Chief Economic Development Officer for the city of Boston an emanate lawyer, and we all came from a place of making our parents proud, but being the first generation to college. So when you have no choice, but you don't look back, move forward, and you have no choice but to bring your whole family along leadership is like. I don't know leadership. It feels like it's your constant companion and I've always told people I got asked this question before. What's your constant companions I'm like accountability and responsibility being oldest. Those are my two best friends that I carry with the everywhere, but then the leadership comes back that I've always maintained this way of I'm seeking out leadership opportunities for myself, but also in the meantime figuring out when I get in this position. How can I bring others along with me or gift? People any sort of wisdom, so that they avoid the land mines that I stepped on. You know what does it chief diversity officer would, isn't it? It's like well in advertising. I was one of the first three, and so I took the hatchet hide a gardener, who was the first and then Sandra Sims Williams I came into the role knowing that I was part of a group of women. Who would define and change how people see diversity, equity and inclusion in an industry that is super, powerful and super responsible for changing the world I mean that's a heavy burden to bear, but I knew that immediately so a chief diversity officer particularly as it. It probably changed within the last few weeks. Primarily, our responsibility is to create a culture and look at it systems of inequity within a corporate structure. And now the spotlight on corporate America's even hotter because there's articles that have come out in the last few weeks that have been really consequential about has corporate. America failed Black America. have these programs just really been back in what the next steps in what do we do next? And so part of my role to is to evolve as a CEO and not just focus on what it used to be what it can be a power at can have and being able to be at the at the table. Of Power within organizations whether it's Ad, council glad the boards that I serve on and being voice for not the voiceless, because people are not weightless, but being microphone for people who can't be in the room is a honor and a power that I take extremely seriously actually humbles me to the point where I get emotional because I know that all my hard work and everything had done primarily since. Since, I was three. I've been made for such a time as this and that phrase alone is the thing that keeps me strong every day. You are made for such a time as this and this role is for such a time this and I appeal to all the studios to step up and be unafraid to use that seat that they've been given to create more seats at the table. We're recording this about two and a half weeks nearly three weeks after the murder up towards floyd and we're all going as a country through a much-needed reckoning, and we SEO's are taking a much needed hard luck at where we have failed, and where we need to do better and one of the things that I'm really trying to understand a note. The only company trying to understand is how do you? Create, diversity and inclusion programming that is not dependent on the one person in that role. Like like you. You oversee thousand agencies. The thousand agencies roll up into into you. How do you put the onus on leaders and everyone in the company, while also actually creating the programming within a company? And how do you strike that balance I? Think the key really is. One of the huge stocks that have come to my mind is what is this role actually? Or does it actually mean what I'm actually doing and then I had. This is just wrote down. This phrase that just came to my mind is like. Am I teaching people? To teach? Them how to treat me like a human. You get to the base of it. Is that what I'm doing because if that's what I'm doing, that's not okay because my thing is, we use the word diversity inclusion inequity. It's it's a nicer way of saying. Is that what I'm doing? My teaching people to treat me like humid I think when you take a stop in, you're creating systems, or you're creating things that stop people from achieving their goal. Make them feel comfortable on a culture. It's really simple to take a look at those things around your company and say is that a best practice or is that holding people back? Is that something that's made by one person that's making ten people feel a certain way. It's hard to root out in point. Know those that don't share the same values if you could. You absolutely didn't start your company saying I want people not to succeed. You started at so that. Women can have voices. That information is power a mat. Everyone deserves a chance to to be their best selves, and if that's what you think, then you have to work backwards and make sure that every part of your company winds up to that value if it doesn't then you have to be strong and figure out a way to change that or to get that out of your out of your system, literally because a company I say is the one chance. If you think about the way the work week goes I know that shift to because of Kobe. But if you think about the eight hours that you spent physically in your company at sometimes greatest chance. Or integration and for equality, because when you leave you, go back to your neighborhood, you go back to places that everybody may look the same, but your work environment and depending on where you work is the greatest chance you have to really solve for diversity and inclusion in terms of the way you spend your time Sunday you go to charge. You have specific religion on that could be diverse or not, but that's why getting this right within the walls of the company is so so important because people will take from that, and then may changes hopefully in their personal lives in A. A way that they interact with people that come across, tell me if I'm wrong, but I would imagine that a job like yours can be maybe the ratio changes, but can fluctuate from inspiring, and as you said like emotional, and really just like feeling. You're making a difference in probably some of the most frustrating days you've ever had in your life. How do you see sane through? That had not least patients I. asked the same question of anyone who's living in what they think is. They're calling because when you're. Can you're calling and I never knock emotional what I talk about this? But when you're in your calling, people have said this cavalierly. Oh, it doesn't feel like work. It literally does not feel like work it. I don't know who gives me energy. What gives me the energy why I have a crazy amount of it? You know I read. This book called the Corporate Athlete House like. So maybe I spent forty thousand hours at. This is why it doesn't feel like work more than forty thousand hours, but in all truthfulness, the one moment that changed my life in Abu I talk about it incessantly because I'm still in love whether you know by my niece when she was born, when new life happens when you get a chance to be part of a new human light when she was. Was Born I swear to. I'd like. Something just switched on me and I was like. Oh, no I'm not going to have her inherit a world where she has to fight like her aunt did is just not going to happen and I know that people when I was born, said the same thing. No tiff is not going to inherit a world where she has to fight as hard as I did. And so I think it's incumbent upon every generation to make things easier for the next, and I think we're really truly seeing that. With the protests, there was a march with a bunch of ten year. Olds and I was just like that blew my mind. It also made me really really hopeful because if I had one tenth of what they've been exposed to. They've had generation of nine eleven of the two thousand crash of a pandemic, and now you know a really defining moment in racial equality, the kind of leaders they're going to be like. ME. It makes me so happy, and so that to me is what is my fuel is generally even with the naysayers you know not surprisingly I guess, but I have hater that people who. Certainly don't get my way of doing things. I should occupy this lane. I should be more radical, but I know in my heart, and when I wake up my highest level on my hierarchy is integrity. Integrity is the first thing and I sleep really well, because I know that what I'm doing is contributing to. What is the Promised Land of equity, but I'm doing it. My Way and others will do it there, right. The fact that we're all doing it together at the same time. Hopefully will lead to that. You know that day of true equity I have to believe that that's coming because it feels what I'm doing now going back to when you talked about. Questioning if your role is at the most basic form. Teaching people how to treat you as a human. Varies so much behind that and it is not just how people show up professionally. It's how they grew up where they came from. How do they think about themselves? Personally? There was an article today or this week about CEOS and executives being kind of like this therapist and chief real. How do you navigate the professional and personal part of people in your role because it is so tied in? To D. E. I and what's your advice honestly for leaders who are trying to? Navigate that yeah, it's something that has come with my job ever since stepped foot in a corporate structure even as an intern I remember because people saw this young black woman in put me in A. Honestly. Desk in the middle of all these cubicles, so I was pretty out there and open literally, but people would just come by important to meet and talk to me, so I've never not known the role of just listening and observing and heart of the questions that I think we should all ask and be okay with reciprocating insensitive. If you can ask the question you can answer, it is like in this moment. What the three things that I? You know if anybody comes I just kinda grounded with what are you feeling? What are you seeing? What are you hearing? We in an industry questions, you get insight. What. Am I hearing they ought to talk about what they're. Co workers are facing in telling them what they're feeling their own personal feelings particularly in this moment, but it's a question that I've asked for the last like twenty years. And then what are you seeing in? That's being an eyewitness to microaggressions or are being parted are having indicated that bay have themselves caused microaggressions or done them and I? Think what this time is is when we hear the word reckoning, it feels like they're supposed to be some corporal punishment at the end of it, reckoning, even in a spiritual setting is just south directed reflection. What can you do to be better? Add releasing an article today about so you WanNa be an ally. It's not. Can you be so? You want to be an in that article? It's really discussing this is heavy work. I think ally should has been glamorized had been has been made to be very superficial, but a true ally to advocate get in to the trenches with individuals and comes out better on the other side, and so I've said this time and time again. It's not a new concept, but be comfortable being uncomfortable. I think that we want to have a one two three four step kind of program with this and then come out the other end stronger better as an ally, but it's GonNa. Take an education because even myself. I said that there's two sources that at least in the last three years probably more, but one recently has helped me on, and then in cases learn about what it means to be black in America than I ever received in my twenty two years of public and private education. And I go back and think about my history lessons which spent all of? Maybe one class on the contributions of African Americans to America and even native Americans I remember one time specifically, it was art history class. We were supposed to dissect a photo and I think it was just mainly supposed to be about the painting itself like with campus. Was it with what are the textures? But I noticed in the painting, and it's an kicking myself for not remembering it. It was a pitcher of conquering soldiers, taking over native Americans, and had to be in the mid west, or out West, and in the photo itself that the soldiers were the sun was shining down upon them bright as if to indicate what they're doing is great. The. Native Americans in the photo were in the dark. That's what I questioned was the use of light and dark, and that got me additional meeting after the class because I may have embarrassed the professor, but art history is about critical theory. It's about learning how art is made in our is in the eye of the beholder, and so those are the kind of moments where I think. You know you get comfortable with being uncomfortable. And if he did it right, it would have been. Thank you so much for that critical point of view. Let's class discuss what that actually needs. But. He had to prepare himself in a reckoning for himself to understand and take away the shame I wasn't talking about him. I was talking about the painting, so I think that happens a lot when you talk about this time. Is that people? Who Shame Gill and say it's not my fault happened. That's not what we WANNA hear. What we want is the self directed learning to become a better ally. Remove all of that, and just be open and transparent and I promise you come out on the other side. A better friend mother sister daughter coach CEO in any of the roles that you have. You can't unsee it, and so once you see it. You will become a better person and I myself always evolving and relearning myself because the same system that makes you feel that way makes me feel a certain way that I have to unlearn as well. So we're all doing that learning now. One of the things that we hear a lot when it comes to mainly white people talking about this is imagine say the wrong thing. And I think that really stifles conversation. What's your reaction to that? When people say that they don't want to speak up because they're scared of saying the wrong thing yet, that comes from fear. I think the right person you know I. Think anybody in Your Life. Who is a Color Odyssey? There's a very complicated mix of questions, but I have spent the better part of the week unpacking that question that I've received absolutely from my white allies I mean obviously. There's something hugely different about the last two weeks more so than maybe a month ago, but these problems existed for as long as you've known me. There's no wrong way to have a conversation about this. I think when you couple this kind of conversation. With privilege, even privilege I. Mean I remember having a conversation about we need to talk about privilege. Add going this year right now. Because what I was seeing is that privilege was was being co opted to equal white nationalism, and people are deeply ashamed to talk about it, but we brought privileged to the stage in a way that was given the opportunity for allies to understand that you can give away your privilege on Tuesday and you can wake up on Wednesday with the same amount of privilege. You can spend it. The whole week, and it's renewable you know and I can spend now I go into a room where I may have some economic privilege over somebody else and understand that completely, and I had to check even my privileges, but this is the thing. I have some power, but not power power, and I think privilege when coupled with power for the use of keeping people down. That's that's where the fear comes from. That's where it's like I'm GonNa make a mistake. Because I'm being lumped in with this group, privilege can be spent. It should be spent in one of the key parts of privilege is saying I have a question. It may seem crazy. But I'm going to ask it, and then listen, and then you're never gonNA. Make that mistake again for ask that question again because you got you. You became educated. I think people fear education. They fear being called out. A fear canceled culture. These are all things that are part of. The fear of not just asking the question to begin with so I personally because I've been. I literally feel I. Didn't put on his to do this I. I've. Over the twenty two years of my career have answered some pretty crazy questions, and when I think about the the people who ask the questions and I look up look at them now, and how strong of an ally they are, because I fear has been removed I. Think what's the endgame she want someone to. Feel free to ask you the question and continue to be in silence. Be Ignorant. Know what you want is to create stronger. Into your point. You know the other part of it, too. Is it my job to educate you now? But in that moment if I'm your friend in if I'm your colleague. It's important for me to share You know my response to any question that you have. I, WanNa talk about negotiation. We spent a lot of time on the show talking about how hard it is at times for women to negotiate and the best advice when we talk a lot about that, it's coming from the fact around pay inequity, and we all know that women make less. Than men but black women make about forty cents less to the dollar than white. What is your best advice for negotiation in the workplace with just What was the hardest negotiation you had to do? You've got a fancy job. I'm very curious. You know what's interesting like been negotiating. Truthfully sense my first internship. I think part of it is I grew up with a family that taught me. Self-awareness taught me to love myself to honor lion to honor the value of my intelligence and then inroads. The program I was an gave the tools in language to do that, so it was like this amazing thing that came together at the tender age seventeen. So, I. Had Roles where I've accepted? Certainly you know I. Talk About My my first role in advertising where I think I made like twenty four thousand. But the summer before I made eleven thousand so I was rich doubled by the summer before so I was like you can't tell me nothing I am making twenty four last summer I made a Levin Mind you. This is in the late nineties. And then I went to my next role in it doubled, so it's like I didn't know what I didn't know. Okay. The doubling was great, but could I have tripled. Could I have asked for more because I was just thinking about my trajectory, and unfortunately have had the opportunity because of what I do, which is very singular to say, this is what I'm more. And, then, when I went to Omni one of the things that I was adamant, about was that I. Just started this not for profit. It's a baby. Only two years old and I said I cannot do this i. have to do this and do this role and I put that in my offer. Letter I said I. have to concurrently do do both because it was that important. Important to me and I'm glad I did that because now when I look at you know next year will be celebrating our fifteen year, and how important it was for me to be able to have the autonomy and know that I had expertise in doing the role that I was hired for, but then I, had this. Calling to do is other role that would help industry. Then hopefully. Help the company that I'm a part of an and I think it's done both, but yeah. That was the one negotiation when I have. This conversation asked a question. That I'm most proud of 'cause. Some people don't want to bring those other parts to them in the role. It was important for me that they knew all parts of me. They knew that I also. Also brought with me. All these boards seats that I was on, and so I've brought those those organizations with knee. Each job that I've had in have added more, but it was important to say. I not only started this not for profit, but I sit on the board of the ghetto. Film School the American Advertising Federation Pieces Super Important to me. I don't want to. Divest from them I don't WanNa. Get off the board and so I made that part of the conversations while so I have one final question everything you just said you listed. Things that take up your time and that you care a lot about and you're really busy and we opened this conversation by saying. We know you through two different organizations that you didn't even name so I also in in researching. You've read the and tell me if this is wrong, you mentor how many people year while it's not a year. It's more like over a lifetime, and it's over a hundred twenty, a hundred and twenty people that you have given your time to. How do you take care of yourself? How do you say no, and how do you say? Yeah I think I think my mentor, who coaches and they are. You Know Connie, frazier and March to Sean would. Connie's been known since I was a junior in college. Mark has known me since my first job in advertising in new. York, and both of them are so important in my life or one of the things they said is they loved my energy in the beginning I still have that kind of energy, but the thing is I'm bound I balanced. Balanced up really well, I think what I want to be better at is the spiritual quadrant because I do have my former spirituality, but I think I can pour more into that with family. Everyone knows if you look at my social media, family and work is life inter like you can't separate the two you know. If you look at your social media, it's work family your knees, your like heroin channel Yes she she actually. She has her own channel so. You got a media robust behind. It was like really. Do you run this channel now? Her mom does. She's a content machine, but I am able to balance all aspects simply because each one of them informed the other and make give me fuel for the other. When the outside opened self-care was really big for me, it still is I take care of myself meditate. I'd sleep I try to get as much sleep obviously when I'm hanging out with my knees that get that goes down to three hours. Probably to being a really good daughter to my mom is super important to me. She's my best friend. She had me at twenty in, so we both kind of grew. Grew up together and being a sister, but being a mentor is been released special, because I started peer mentoring in high school, and I got so much from that and I. Still Do that and people look at the number nearly contest someday, maybe Can you write them off whatever the case may be I can because these individuals, and for me and I'm still learning so much from them I don't even call it mentoring. I feel like it's coaching. Because it could be a one hour conversation or it could be. A problem may have for week I'm not. Raising, my hand to consistently solve everybody's problem, but if the wisdom and you give me a problem that you have and I've. Gone through it or I can offer you something. I can't hold back and I think that's why the number keeps growing. Because I can't stop talking about helping People Annabel. And Party my wisdom, but yeah, a hundred plus is crazy in a wad of them came from my time at the four as running mate program. There mentally then and just reminded. So an interest of your time, because that it I'm amazed in also stressing me out I'm like Scott things to do so let's see. Let's go to our lightning round now that most of us are working from home. What's replaced your morning commute? My morning commute has been replaced with an I never had this a routine where I, probably consume thirteen vitamins. It's crazy over time developed this really great vitamin protocols so I do that and have coffee honestly I watch. TV that takes my mind off world. Binge watched Hollywood. L. I didn't watch it yet. You like it unbelievable. You know I'm biased because Janet is a good friend and she is. She was one of our first catalyst honorees and she's. She's so important to the culture. She's amazing, but our work was incredible so bad. I just got lots of metronet for several hours. Insecure is one of my favorites, so watching TV that feeds me and takes me off world. Bag It right into meetings and one of the things that I discovered. Is that used to just fill my days with meetings and did it free? covid was doing it in Kobe. And I said. I have wanted to meetings a day that said I need time to think to strategize to come up with stuff to actually execute, and I think many of us get caught in that vortex of meetings, so I really taken the time to to look at that and reevaluate that, but that's that's replaced by making you. What is one word? A direct report would use to describe you. It's two words gentle, push This technique where I'm like yeah I think it will be good for you to speak in front of a thousand people. It's totally cool. You're GonNa do this and you're gonNA. Be Great and you got it. I'll be in the audience I. Got You so I? Have this. You know my my meant. He's will. Be Like tiffin her gentle push. It really isn't a gentle push actually throwing you off the cliff. Is your emergency phone. Call how God WanNa? Get in trouble with this, so I'll say what is expected. Mom and my blue, all by my boyfriend of eleven years, but certainly it's like emergency. Call late at night like I have to talk through things that might be Khania mark air so talking after it's part of what should be patented. They're so good. What's the worst piece of advice you've gotten? Oh is a good one. That's Q in All with. Add color, but you're going to run out of people to award. Because you know. There's not a lot of people of Color in advertising. You're run out like you. Guys are not gonNA pass your three. I'm adding in a new question. Who is someone? You think we should have on this show? That's amazing I. Think someone who I highly regard in his super super special is John Dory. So every two weeks, I get on a call with, and maybe you can have all of them. Are All of us but I? Get on a call with. Female founders black female founders. We actually the group's call. So in this group, it's black female founders who founded? Consequential movements in the last five six seven years, so it's. Amani Ellis from culture con it's. All the incredible ladies from Carly Girl Collective John Daugherty. Who? Founded the wellness summit particularly addressing issues of wellness for women of Color. She also has this incredible product line called organic bath Tori, and Victoria or Elizabeth of York from the colored girl and. All of them fundamentally Randy's Daniel I'm Harlem Fashion Ron saying all their name, because I want to say their names, because they're also special, the laughter and the fun, and just like not thinking about the movements, huge movements that were responsible for and just having conversations as black women is what I most appreciate, so it'd be interesting to have a skin moment with all of them. You'll laugh so hard. You'll make new best friends and you. You're giving a platform to women who are really doing extraordinary work and building communities and building people up. I love that tiffany. Thank you honestly feel very honored to know you and have you on the show. The name Keel who love you guys and I'm so excited that all my my roles have come together with you guys now I am now. I everyone. We're trying something new. During this time of economic date, WE WANNA. Take a moment to spotlights, a new female founded companies we've heard from many incredible skimmers, leading small businesses, and we will be introducing them to you each week on skin, the couch see the Lincoln are episode description for how to submit yourself or front. Hi, everyone, my name! Is Trinity Masan Robert and I am the CO founder of goes. We are a Brooklyn based health and beauty brand powered by superfoods. I started my business actually sort of inspired by my own experiences in the wellness space I was feeling really caught between that Kinda like crunchy granola stuff that I had grown up with, and then the other side of the ease, ultra prestige offerings that were more locks and didn't really resonate with me. Certainly I couldn't afford them. So I really believed in this idea of keeping wellness and making it approachable and easy for everyone navigating cove nineteen has presented such an interesting set of challenges both the business in for myself. Personally you know on the business side. It's interesting because we certainly saw some of the hardships that a lot of businesses have seen. Mostly tied to a lot of our retail partnerships, so obviously a lot of our retailers down their operations temporarily. We sort of lost that revenue channel for a bit. But what was interesting is that we saw because were in this sort of wellness at home. Sell Care Space. We saw a jump in demand for our products D. to see on our website, so we really had to just very quickly pivot our were focused. We previously were about fifty fifty retail partnerships to a selling direct consumer on the website, and so falling over nineteen. We really just had to dive into the more direct to consumer strategy, so that's been an interesting piece for us. professionally. I think personally I co founded the business with my life partner my now, my fiance as like six months ago, which still feels very fresh? But so we already worked from home, and we had a remote team, so a lot of those transitions were two. Toss for me a asking for my favorite gold product is definitely like asking a mother choose a child. I would say the one that I really recommend folks start out with is our cow tumor superfood lots of land. It's basically like a healthy hot cocoa and I personally really loved that. That in my morning coffee, so if you already have that morning coffee ritual, it's a really easy thing to do you're not you know having to create this whole new wellness routine, so you guys can find gold on Instagram our largest channels at gold, G. O., l., d. e., and then our website is just gold dot. Coz, you can shop. All of our products there learn more about our stories. Thanks for hanging out with US join. US, next week for another episode of skin from the couch, and you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information. You need to start your day. Sign up the Skim Dot. com. That's the SK I M M dot com. M's for a little something extra.

Tiffany Boston America president US officer intern Warren Arnold worldwide Brooklyn CEO founder and president Ad Council Chevy Carly Danielle Weisberg New York Bentley University Caribbean
Coach Monica Aldama from Cheer: Sometimes I have to mat-talk myself.

Skimm'd from The Couch

33:37 min | 1 year ago

Coach Monica Aldama from Cheer: Sometimes I have to mat-talk myself.

"I try to separate the coaching part and the nurturing part at let me sometimes talk myself to separate the feelings of I'm going to break this kid's heart because I'm not going to put them all. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. I welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating. Oh shitting your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it out than where it began on a couch today. We have a very very very special episode of skimp on the couch. We are joined by Monica Alabama. In case you do not know this name. I don't even know what you've been watching what you've been doing. She's the coach of Navarro College College cheerleading and has fourteen national championships under her belt. We are so so so fucking excited to do this. Interview or team team is the focus of the new Netflix documentary series. Cheer if you haven't seen it I just don't know what to say. Stop what you're doing and go watch it. The series defies as traditional stereotypes about cheerleading as it follows them through the physical and mental challenges of the sport. My God what they do you got to watch him. Also Showcases Monica's coaching style and the impact. She's had on her athletes on and off the Mat. Monica in case you have a notice. We're literally obsessed with the show. We cannot wait to talk to you. Welcome to skimmed from the couch. Stink you thank you for having me. Okay so we want to jump in which is just want to ask you to skim your resume for us. When did you start working? Just kind of walk us through each job you've had well. It's not much because I started really young. After I graduated from College I moved to Dallas for a year and worked at a computer company but it was really just just a job out of college. Just put something on the resume and I really wasn't happy there and a friend of mine that I had gone to high school with was the assistant baseball coach at the college. Judge and his mother happened to be mature coach when I was in high school so I had helped her some when I was in college and he called me one day and said that this job was open and I should apply for it so I did. It wasn't really something I thought I would ever do. And our only I think twenty two when I applied for it so twenty five years later and I'm still still there. What did you think you're going to be doing? I have a business degree in finance and then I have my MBA. When I was in college I really thought that I wanted to move here and maybe work work on Wall Street or do something in the finance industry? That's what I thought I wanted to do but God had other plans so I mean so much better. Yeah Yeah everyone in our office has everyone we know is absolutely obsessed with the show and part of I think why it's resonated so much is actually actually your role in the show specifically you represent the mentor coach. We all wish we had in our life and one of my friends at this me recently and I was like. It's a perfect way to describe you. It's like Tammy Taylor coach Taylor and I'm very curious g you see what other people see about your role with these kids. I don't you know I mean we're when we film this documentary were just opening up our lives to people and I mean I know the impact that I have because these kids tell me and especially after they're gone a lot of them reached back out to me and just let me know how much they appreciate a lot of times. They didn't realize how much that they should have appreciated me at the time but they really learned a lot so over the years. I think that's why I'm still here because because of the kids and the reassurance that I'm doing something right you know in their lives. I'm just there to in my job. I didn't really know that this was going to be so big. I WANNA start off before we get into it with just some and clarifying questions. That every time I talked to someone about share and I've been asking people and friends. There's a baseline of questions that they want to start off with just from the show. The first one is do four year colleges have cheerleading programs. That just are not as good or is it a different division. It's a different division. We're in junior college. Division and over the years division has really dwindled because for one reason number one they created what was called an intermediate division where you could do lower lower level skill so like the teams that were not able to really compete against us. Move Down to those levels. If we don't have the highest score we normally have at least top three are- out of the whole competition over the past mini mini. Since we've been winning and so a lot of people wanna go to division where they can have a shot at winning. A lot of people jump ship in our division is really small now. I have seen online. Some people confused about that but because it's so small people that are not in the world are like. Oh that's all that's all you be was one or two teams or whatever we always have the goal of going and getting the highest score there that way. If people ask we can say well we had the highest score. We beat every team. They're really that just validate says even more because the division has gotten so small. That's our goal and when we go out there and put out the best routine that we can and just get the highest score that we can the second clarifying question is. There's been news after the show aired that. NCA hasn't been so pleased with Netflix. Following this show Joe or just the publicity. Is there any update on that part. Yeah I mean I I went to La last week and we were working twelve hours a day. So I didn't really have time to get on social media much but as soon as we got down I got on the the van to go back to the airport and my phone had just Bologne up. People texted me my social media. People tagging tagging me a new store like actual actual news stories and the college was calling because we had news reporter showing up to the college about this big story that was breaking about how they had changed the roles and we can no longer do the show and compete. We'd be disqualified and none of that's true at all I have a great relationship with NCA in Varsity. They've always been very supportive. Supportive of me and what happened with that kind of news that Kinda got crazy. They had updated a rule in their stunts. Just some wording just verbiage and so anytime anytime they update anything they put the date that it's updated so they put up dated January. Whatever the day was when I guess someone decided to go and actually look at the rules roles you know because most people don't dig down deep until that really boring part of the rules but always read them all? So there is a clause in there that talks about documentaries and filming and and stuff like that printed that off last year gave it to the producer. Already knew that clause in there and it didn't say anything that we couldn't it just it's really more so about about you. Know they don't want something protrayed as reality. Yeah they say guidelines you know it just. It's not true at all. I have a great relationship with Varsity versity a great relationship with NCAA. They would contact me if they had a problem with things. Any updates on what the kids profiles are doing out they show 'cause I know we kind of caught Jerry in the hallway and the plan was to go to Louisville. Is that still the Navarro. He went to Louisville in the fall. And that what's his dream school. But when he got there I think he just didn't feel like that was really where he was supposed to be and so he had reached back out to me a few months ago and just said Hey. I really feel like that that I'm supposed to be back at Navarro and of course there's always a place for Jerry to be back at Navarro. Morgan came back for a third year. She actually graduated but she's doing like a dual partnership program with the university that we have a partnership with and Lexi Lexi. You know she got kicked off and the charges against her were dismissed but she did go to another school in the fall. Because I told you can't come back. she was cheering there and she also did not feel like that it. Was You know where she was supposed has to be. She finished school that semester but she quit cheering in the middle and her coach and her mother and grandmother all of course wanted her back Aveiro zero when they reached back out to me about giving her a second chance. I said you know. I feel like she's had enough time to reflect on it. Learn from it. I mean do people taking chances. So she's back and she's just just really doing incredible. I think this show was so good for her. Just to fill the love and support and just to build her company her story just breaks your heart when yes but she's doing great. I have a clarifying cautious. You before coaching was your level of cheering at the same level as these kids. Oh no I mean keep in mind. I'm old so what happened over. The years is people started putting their kids in all star. Cheer from like the age of birth or three years old and and so these kids became really Ali. Talented incredible growing up and being trained in the whole world of cheerleading. Changed tremendously since you know. I was in school until now and it's continues to just push the limits cheerleading. Just in general is a way different because it's a lot harder. Yeah people my age did not have those kinds of opportunities you you know. This podcast has a career podcast. We talk about people as managers. We talk about people when work. It's tough how they overcome challenges and what's so fascinating about the show and reading more and more about you. You have any job. You are very clearly a really strong. COO CEO why say that is because it's very clear that you you break down the information in a quantitative way you'd constantly in the show talk about cheering smart and really looking at from a numbers perspective and you also are very clear with your expectations. And you're tough I wanNA understand what's made you stay at Navarro. Do you feel your best. When you're like the big fish in the small pond or the small fish in the bigger pond? I think the a small fish in the bigger pond because you have goals and you always want to move up to the next level reach the potential of the people around you but you know and always intended for this to be a temporary temporary steppingstone. I mean at the time. I just didn't like the job I was in and I grew up in course of Canada. So okay I'll just we'll go back home so you know it was a good job. Aw because I had summers off could be a mother of course Canada's a little bit smaller towns so there's not as many opportunities but I still felt like I was gonNA move move even to that finance filled at some point. That was always my goal and every time I would think about it it was just hard. I felt like I created this program. It was my baby and given it up with going to be hard and the attachment to the kids. The longer I was there I just felt like I said I just felt it was God's plan that I was there there's many years I've thought should i. Should I think about next year you know move into different career moving and I just never did a lot of people that are listening into this and a lot of people are audience. Think about the decision of do I go to Grad School get an MBA knowing that they might not know what they want to do with it how do you think about your decision to get an MBA. Now I'm very happy about that decision. I mean I wanted to teach them classes at the college. I needed to have my masters to do that number one. Do you teach classes says outside of I did. I've taught Algebra for a long time. I just stopped doing that. I says yet another way that shows that we have a different skill. Set My life's too easy at all but I did it for a long time like probably twenty years and allocation too. So I would I even consider going back and get my doctorate degree but I just the time factor of it was just too much. I'm very happy about getting my MBA. and not tell these all the time you know before you have too many responsibilities go and finish school because you may not need it. You don't have to have a degree to be successful. There are plenty of people. Oh that do incredible things that don't have a degree. But what if that one job you want is the minimum requirements the degree. It's always harder to go back. And because because obviously so many doors are opening to you and to the students and I think some of those opportunities I assume would require them to maybe not finish tomorrow. What advice vice would you give them? I think this kind of opportunity is only comes around once in a lifetime. I mean this is a very rare opportunity to have this kind of exposure and in this situation I would tell them you have to take the opportunity you know I mean I would love for them finish school but there are ways especially Ashley This Day and age that I didn't have which you know you could take an online class here there. I mean you could take a couple and still manage all sorts of opportunities so I don't think that they need to miss any opportunity. This could be lock changing for them and take them into a career that they didn't even know would you know would be an option for them and of course their the future is one of my top priorities. I want to get into your management style. You talk a lot and it's clear from the way that the kids kids react to you that you set expectations. How do you actually do that? When someone's on your team do you give them a list? I think a hard thing for newer managers or even for us is is. How do you set expectations? How do you hold people to them? Well you know we have a big talk at the beginning of the year about expectations and what those are and their kids south Dr Ahmad Lem often. I've learned as I've gone along you know because you can't treat everything the same kind of deal with every situation differently depending on what it is but you know go to class these. These are easy things you go to class. And if you don't we have a simple rule the whole team runs because it makes them both man. Yeah A- and I've learned that over I mean I've had different roles before but that's kind of the thing. The one thing that I have found works the best because they don't want to run because their roommate is asleep so whereas before they might just walk out and go to class and let their roommate stay in bed now. They're gonNA make sure that that person for mad and they do get mad if someone's not there yet when classes about start they'll start texting them it just. It keeps us all accountable and like I tell them. I'm the one that gets called in to the Athletic Director's office this or wherever if y'all get in trouble and that's not fair to me because I'm not the one that did it. I need to feel accountability. Feels you know to each other because at some point you're probably going to be held responsible for other people's actions and you know you need to be accountable for yourself so you're not the person that makes people run or messes up in a job or whatever ever and and showing up some big thing to try to teach them if you have a job. Because I can't stand it when someone calls in and because I just thought going to work because it puts other other people out and to me that's just not fair. That's just a big thing for me like self accountability. If you have a responsibility you show up for it. If it's class you show up for it if it's practice you show up for it if it's a job you show up for it. If you made the commitment to do it you show up so it's interesting you know or two co founders. Who are like in so many different ways except one important way which is one one of us were robbery days one? That's true and today I am wearing third love. It's a great day I love third. Love also currently likes it because it helps you identify what your size and shape and find styles that fits your body body. Yes it does set my body so third love is designed with measurements millions of women. Their bras styles are made to fit. Whatever your body type is they have over eighty sizes? My favorite thing about them is that they are are tag less that is scratch free no itching. It's amazing and no slip straps. I'm wearing their t shirt broad today right now and Dan it's really comfortable and no itchy tags. Third Love knows there is a perfect proffer. Everyone so right now they are offering listeners. Fifteen percent off very first I order all you have to do is go to third dot com slash skim to find your perfect fitting Bra and get fifteen percent off your first purchase. That's third love dot com slash skim fifteen percent off one of the things that I think we both struggled breath as relatively new managers in her life is how to push people but not push them too far. We want to avoid burnout. People have limit. Then you want to protect them from themselves. Would I was really just fascinated by watching the show. Is You clearly push people. They look exhausted. And you're GIMME PUSHUPS or they're literally injured. Heard especially because you yourself hadn't necessarily done those same cheer moves because she was just in a different state when you were coming up. I'm really curious how you find the balance to push them and not only. Do you do that but rather than showing any resentment there like. We don't want to disappoint Monica. We don't want to disappoint Monica. So I'm just fascinated needed by how you've been able to balance as a manager. Yeah I'm not crazy so another show looked crazy. I mean the kids get to sit out if they are injured. Our athletic trainer trainor makes the decisions on. If they're able to go in her out on the show. I'm like Oh what does she everytime stars like she's GonNa say they can't minded. Where is she needs to give them more research and we have a great staff and they're really good at having a treatment plan for every individual whatever their their needs are so we do take good care of the kids and we follow whatever? The protocol is for each person. But my thing is I don't yell you know they talk about a net Shields she gonNA get. But I don't I like to have a respectful conversation and speak to them the way I would want to be spoken to you because I need them to still be confident in themselves and to want to WanNa do it for me and so I need them to know that I care about them but what visit that. They need to do better or work on whether it's an attitude or whether it's a skill or whether it's whatever I try to show them compassion but still be strong in the expectation and still be there cheerleader. Because I thought that's how you get people to want to please you. Do they have to know that you care about them. You don't go in and just yell. People want to feel cared about. They want to make people happy if they know that. There's a reward not necessarily necessarily physically but just even a feeling that they get that yes. I've exceeded that expectation. And just like it's a way you talk to people and you make them feel feel like you care. How did you learn to be a manager like this is a common sense? When I started I was very young? I didn't know anything thing. I didn't know anything about coaching. And that's really why I used my business degree because I was like. Okay what is what's the ultimate goal to win. And so I kind of started from there. Okay let's work backwards. What what I need to do to win? And it was very black and white okay. There's a score sheet. I need to get a score. How am I going to get the score and I really started there but then quickly realized? Oh there's a whole nother coaching. I think that has nothing to do with the score sheet. And it's these kids that are bickering or they've worked with her boyfriend or okay. Now have two psychologists have to be an adviser have to be counselor. I have to be a mother. Her and I didn't realize that because you know when you're young you think everyone's like you. Everyone had the same upbringing. So that really opened my eyes to okay. I need to lrn myself. I've learned to be more empathetic and really try to put myself in other people's shoes and think about how they might feel because you know a lot of people they don't WanNa hear here they want to think about what they're going to say back as the response instead of actually hearing what is being said the thing that I keep coming back to is. How do you balance caring so much about these kids and all so many of these kids have just really come through hardship and tough times? How do you set limits? When I was watching watching the show I was like how do you not try to become a mother to each of these kids? And how do you do that year over year over year. I mean I do. which is why it's hard? Yeah you we know but I try to separate the coaching part and the nurturing part at let me sometimes I have to talk myself shelf because it's hard. Let's give us money just like to separate the feelings of I'm going to break this kid's heart because I'm not going to put him on that and I love this kid more than anything and I know what they've overcome you think about that but you know that they don't have the skills that this other person does and that's where it really Ali pulls at your heart strings and that's where I have to like Monica. You can do this. It's fine just separate it just separate separate it and I do. I always try to still circle back around and make sure they know like you're still good. You're still good enough. It's just it right now is not your Tom. Yeah we see your kids on the show easier husband and are they as in to the team in that or is it a home. You're totally separate and that's the way you know. No I mean they've they've been my biggest cheerleaders for me me. So I'm I've done this since before my kids were born so this is all they know and my kids have gone to competition since they were old enough to go and watch their my biggest supporters. I mean just. It's the other day I mean because we've been working so many hours trying to practice and still do the pr for this and stuff. I mean I think I worked like a thirteen hour day the other day and my husband called and he was like all Auburn. You food so that you can then go to the next thing and he just ran in and dropped off foods. I could eat while I was working and he knows he knows. There's Tom's when I'm going to be really stressed out. And he knows the the Thomson not talk to me just like going to step back and let her decompress. So let's talk about those times. Oh well Annette is my middle name and and I don't really like my middle name so many many years ago someone decided that that would be ma alter ego sasha fierce yes and and so I don't like to yell I like to have a conversation but what does it feel to get. There's no bar sale all all out. What one brings a net out usually? It's something big or it's a buildup where I've kind of let something go and like tried to really work work it out and they're just not getting it one time I can think of all the time ahead. Recently one of the guys was trying to get one of the girls trying to make her do a basket toss that she wasn't ready ready mentally to do and to me that someone in danger and a net popped right out and made sure he knew really fast. That was not acceptable. Yeah I mean. She doesn't make an appearance. It's very often but when she does. It's a statement and I think that keeps everybody in line you know. Are you a crier. nope not much. No there are moments in the show. That really Paul at the heartstrings. Like your relationship with Morgan is one of them. She very clearly looking for that and needed maternal figure in her life because she had such a hard childhood. When when you go home are you just thinking about that all the time? Are you like Morgan. Come over for dinner were like what are you doing for Thanksgiving. How do you kind of emotionally handle that for you? I mean we just have such a great connection sometimes with them more than I'm with my family so I don't have to take it home because I know she's taking care of my phone. Young is going off twenty four hours a day. I mean these kids that don't sleep. They'll call me at two o'clock in the morning like I'm supposed to be a way to answer that phone call. Do you get annoyed by that. Are you know I don't get annoyed. Oh you guys boundaries. Oh no no no no no no. It's just like my kids. If you call me not that I'll be awake to answer but I usually do. I feel like there's an open enough relationship. I don't have to carry that stress because I know that if they need me. They're going to call me. These kids are part of the family. Yeah a big aspect that I think comes across is not just how physically Siklie taxing the season is but emotionally as well one thing that we really have to take care of is watching for mental health and when when people bowl reach that point where there too overwhelmed or they're too burnt out. How do you encourage the team to take care of themselves? And then how do you take care of yourself as someone. That's working all all the time balancing family. Have you been able to find anything that works for you. I'm not really good balance for myself. I mean I know I should be better at that but I'm On I just need to get things done that need to get done so whatever that takes you know but I do have summer a few weeks in the summers off. And that's really my personal motivation. If I can just just keep pushing until then then I know I'm going to have a lot of time to decompress. Just get myself back mentally where I need to be in order to start all over and do it again and with the kids leads. You know I can tell. Usually when they're getting too stressed out first of all just try to pull him to the side and have a conversation with them. Give them a hug. What do you need? We just figure something out and Gabby was having a hard time last year and I said let's go to dinner so I took her to dinner and we had a good talk and she felt a lot better afterwards. Just it's really more of an individual individual thing I can usually tell when someone's having a hard time or sometimes they'll come to me without maybe I don't even know and they'll come to be careful that you don't look like you're playing favorites. I'm sure they think I play favorites. I tried to really spread myself out but some kids they come to me more. They need more from me and so it's not necessarily me going out out there in given more to someone it's someone that really just needs me more. That's wanting that from me and of course going to be there wherever that's needed. What's the dynamic on the rest of the team team? Obviously there's breakout stars who were profiled in the show. You know you're doing publicity tours right now at them. You're just sounds like you have really strong personal relationships with each. How does the rest of the team feel? We've been that question a lot first of all when we were filming this documentary. We had zero idea that the whole world is going to watch it. I mean you know. We thought got small little documentary. Just open ourselves up to the community and and we knew that they were doing home visits with certain kids and I mean everybody was fine with it. There was never any jealousy or anything. Now that it's out a still haven't seen any jealousy I think everyone's just in all that the programs getting so much exposure that they're they're just really happy about that but we're learning as we go so this is very very new to us and to you have a Monica in your life. Who's your coach in life and first of all my family is like I said my biggest cheerleader but I did have a mentor? When I was starting out coaching his name is Louis? Houston shout out to Louis. I talked to him still still all the time. He'll call me check in on me. But he was a businessman he worked for Shell Oil Company. We just really could kind of connect on how we see things and stuff and he really really you know to me as a young person and kind of gave me a lot of direction and advice. What's your help for the program? My hope has always been just to continue and you to be successful and to make it a place where it's impactful on students and you know with the show. Our goal goal for that was really just for people to see the hard work that athleticism of these kids you know. Because I don't think that that was really no so I just really was hoping to you. Know see see that these are true. Athletes The athleticism. The grit determination. What I think is one of the most passing parts of of all this with cheer? And it's really emphasized in the show is that there's no professional professional. Cheer to go onto after these kids graduate. So you're right. They are incredible athletes and just caliber. That's just extraordinary right. How do you feel about them? Pushing themselves emotionally and physically giving all their time to this giving their body to this. Do you want them to become athletes and other sports after they leave. What what do you hope that these kids get out of it? Well I think anybody. That's ever been in cheerleading. We'll tell you it's truly teaches you so much more than just physical things it teaches you responsibility self accountability. How to work with a team? How did not give up how to push the hard times? How dedicated to something and show up? When you're supposed to there's just so many lawf- lessons it teaches you and I want to teach them that and more but cheerleading is just if you've ever done it addicting it's the feeling of just having the advantage of flip all day flip all day? When I was young I thought I'll I'll do this till I'm eighty? I don't think that we need more but for some of these kids. That's where they go. Oh and just release all their problems. You know it's where they can go and just do what makes them happy and I think just having that goal like this is our goal we want to win this championship or or whatever it is and then you work so hard and then just that feeling of achievement for pushing through. I know it sounds crazy. It's just a little trophy. It's just a little piece of metal but it's beyond that it's just the feeling of accomplishing something the NC Double A.. Doesn't consider cheerleading a sport. And because of that athletes aren't protected under their safety guidelines. Do you think that should change. The cheerleading community has got lines and they're probably way more knowledgeable Jabbour about cheerleading than if it were to move over to NCWA. I'm sure that if it did it would they would coordinate that somehow but I mean there is a safety board. They overrules all the time. I mean our safety lines have changed. I've been here for a long time and I've seen them tightened up over the years so I know based on that six hours you got to see. It looks looks very dangerous and it is. I mean it's it's cheerleading. But they have tightened up the safety guidelines in hopes to lessen the amount of injuries from a management perspective. One of the things we talked about at the Schem lot is what it means to manage up and one of the things I was really struck by was jerry kind of learned the lesson of how to manage up. He was not put. But I'm Matt was friends or like go. Ask Her why go ask her. Why and he didn't want to be disrespectful or annoying and all the millions of excuses that we all kind of make ourselves when you see something like that because you've seen enough to know he probably should've asked you and eventually he dead? Why am I not getting chosen for this? Do you see your role as ultimately a manager to be like. Hey Hey you should be asking me this or wait till they come to you. Oh No I definitely let them know. I'm I'm very honest with them. And with Jerry and I even said it in the documentary Henry felt like he was not putting himself out there and tell them you know then then I feel like maybe you don't want it as badly as someone else or you don't have that fight in you. which makes me worried about? Are you going to have that fight. When go Tom? I will let them know. pull them to the side. I'm very honest because of how are are they going to know how we're going to mature lightning round last segment. I feel like we should do some matt talk you think so. Do you WANNA go. Gosh I don't know. Do we want like our studio audience which are team right now to do some mytalk guys. Are you ready give all right. We're not we're not known for about talk here. Okay Weitz the first call you make when you get good news now husband. What about bad news? How many days till Daytona you know what I don't even know because I haven't slept much? It's probably sixty seventy seventy. When was the last timing negotiated for yourself? It's been a while. Are you going to negotiate now that the show is such a success. We hope so do it. I'm working on that. WE WE WANNA see Monica's all star Jam. I mean you WanNa Line of Mahe sure. What's your biggest vice like when you re? I wanted to ask when you get home from a bad day at practice. Or when you guys lose our you know past time no gee you gave me that bottle of wine. Are you like a chocolate chips. And Salsa Okay Okay Yeah. I don't drink alcohol really. I mean maybe every once in a while but more so just because I'm old and I drink too much. I don't like the way of fill the next day and then I've also gotten so old that I like deigned. I want to eat that cookie or don't always use the cookie. Do you have any pre tournament rituals. That are good luck terms. We're very superstitious. And like I really liked the knuckling in the water. Yeah totally respect that we have. It gets ridiculous sometimes all the things that they'll do before but like right before they hit the stage in Daytona. Are you like always bring up. There's been times I've gone out to the Alabama. Oh my God. I didn't do it. I need to run back in and you would do something I gotta do that and then I just took it breath and then I just walk away. I don't want to be near them. I get nervous and I don't want to let that news out into the biggest pet peeve not being accountable for your actions not owning it season two. We're just happy to be here. Will you let us try out for. Yes yes yes you think that I with. No no experience could do a basket. Yes we just taught someone why why the other day you have like back issue. The first wine which enters I would be fine and the right coach. We'll be teach anybody any thank you so much I look forward to seeing. You can thank you Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign about the scam dot com. That's S. K. I. M. M. Dot Dot Com M.'s. Per a little something extra.

Monica Alabama Jerry Dan it Netflix Louisville Morgan baseball Ali Navarro College College Navarro Tom Canada Daytona Danielle Weisberg Carly Dallas NCA Tammy Taylor
#126 : CROSSOVER: No Limits x Skimm'd from The Couch

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

#126 : CROSSOVER: No Limits x Skimm'd from The Couch

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast. Hey, everyone. It's me Rebecca, I'm currently on maternity leave. And while I'm away we picked out some of our earlier episodes from the no limits vaults that you can get caught up and enjoy while I'm off and just so you know, I prerecorded this. So I actually am spending time with my baby right now. I. I was twenty five at the time when we were talking about this originally to no it's twenty four and. I remember just like literally being like, okay. Now, a cliche I'm having a quarter life crisis. But I felt like time was running out, and it had this Buea gut instinct like this knob the career up supposed to beat it. It's an out of body experience on, but I really just like felt it. And so I think there there was no talking to us truly like we were going to sink or swim. But like there was no talking us. It felt like we have no money, which we really didn't. And we just quit our jobs, and we're going to start something. And I think that fear is actually what made us put in twenty plus hour days. Is that we didn't have a plan b from ABC? It's no limits. I'm Rebecca Jarvis. In each week. We're talking to the most bold and influential women laying at the top of their game trying to demystify success, and what it really takes to get there and all the trade offs. Whether you're looking for answers, or you just want to hear a good story. You're in the right place. Hey listeners. Welcome to the latest edition of no limits. This is Rebecca and this is a special episode. It's a crossover with the skimmed from the couch team, Carly's Aken and Daniel Weisberg. The two women quit their jobs as news producers and launched a newsletter in twenty twelve it was called the daily skim, and it became the fastest growing newsletter on the market since then they've built a media empire, which now includes their subscription app and video productions skim studios every day, they reach more than seven million people Danielle and Carly had us over to the skim headquarters in New York for the interview, and they take us back to the beginning when they were two girls in their mid twenties trying to build the skim from their couch. I really enjoyed this conversation, and it's an important one about finding that right co-founder that partner to build something with don't forget after this interview, you can head on over to skimmed from the couch where Danielle and Carly turned the tables. And interview me, okay. You're the skin founders, Danielle Weisberg and Carly's Aken. Carly's Aken and Daniel waste virg-. Welcome to no limits. Thank you so much for having us for excited. This is weird to be on the other side of the Baptist. Well, I'm really thrilled to be here at the skim. And we just did the skimmed from the couch podcast, which you as ask great questions. You guys are doing a great job with the podcast. Thank you for having me. Thank you for having us coming on our show excited. Yeah. Me too. Well, there's a lot to get you. So I to kind of go back to when you initially got started and U2. met in Rome on we did we? Know, startups are very competitive and one thing that we win hands down every time is the origin story. So we met in college in Rome, we randomly were there on the same study abroad trip. We went to different schools grew up in different cities and connected there. And then we went our separate ways after eating a lot of pasta, and it was going to say more pasta or July to- pasta for sure. And we reconnected when we were both working fulltime for NBC news after college, and we became friends is to people starting off in the industry and bounced around the same cities from DC and New York and wound up roommates twenty-five years olds in a very small apartment in New York City working at sea and trying to figure out how we could stay in this career that we loved when things were. Not good in the media industry after the recession. We started off being really cheaply ver-. We learned a lot. And then when we weren't sue cheap anymore. And we're starting to think about how do we really build a long term career for ourselves. Although we wanted it to be there. There just wasn't a clear path anymore. So in a lot of ways we felt like the idea to start our own company was a safer decision. Did you like your time and NBC or was it frustrating? I loved my time there, and I think we both felt that we we had amazing mentors who were both still in touch with all the time from like intern through fulltime jobs, an amazing co workers I personally like loved corporate America. Like, there's a lot of people you need like I can't wait till you were like 4._0._1._K. I didn't have that. I also do not have health insurance. The under there like freelance Ombrella, which is the way that you can. I think they changed it. But it was a way that to make it cheaper labor. Really? So I did not like that not having those things, but I liked being part of something bigger. I liked getting just up for work. I like seeing the talent. Like you like I liked. I just I loved being where all the magic happened. And I think the only time that I ever felt frustrated was really towards the end of my time. Which was you know, it's easy to to kind of look back in trying to like, you know, diagnose yourself with like, oh, I was feeling this this happened. But I think what was happening when I look back is that something like within me had other interests. And it was it was business. It was clearly entrepreneurialism and entrepreneurship, but I was trying to navigate my way. And there was no way to do that unless it was like purely aditorial. And so I think I think a lot has changed since we've left, and obviously the industries have dramatically changed. But that was really what was frustrating to me. You're living together and working together. So you're living in this tiny little apartment was that difficult at all. Because I I mean, I love all of the roommates. I've had over the years. But I think back, you know, not it didn't always work out. So we don't endorse starting company with your friends or with your roommate. We worked on different shows. So we hide drastically different hours. So we actually didn't see each other that much Carly had more normal hours and I had like late prime time hours. And so it was kind of this weird. Check each other. When Carly would be leaving for work. I would be just getting up, and it was kind of like, oh, you're doing it again. And then when I would get home credit would be going to bed, and it was like, oh, how is your day? And it was like, okay. You were this shack each day to keep pushing each other about this idea that we had. So who I had the idea who for said, let's get out of here in start our own company. I truly could tell you, honestly, I think like, I honestly, I think part of our partnership is great is that we constantly say we, but like from honest to God, I actually don't know. I remember a lot of stoop conversations. But even before that I remember when I lived in DC still Yaron New York used to text a lot about like this idea of. And we end like a phone. There was no idea TVD or whatever it was. But I think I'm like my point with that is that there is no magic moment in wasn't people are always like what was the Hommant. I'm like there wasn't one. It's not easy to quit your job. It's not easy to leave an industry that you've loved or leave. It's not like we were unhappy. So it was harder. And a lot of ways to be leaving these jobs that we had not only gotten our foot in the door, but moved up really quickly. So it was just kind of time that I think ultimately led us quitting and trying this. Well, and so you were twenty six when you created the sorry. She couldn't hear you twenty-five. I was okay. Okay. But, but but to some extent, I think about that. You know, it's when you start a company at at that stage. And this is something we talked about. On your podcast what you are giving up. Yes. You had this incredible job. And I'm sure family and friends said to you, wait, wait like why would you leave that job to do this? They think you're crazy. Right. But at the same time you recognize I'm still young. I can like worst case scenario this thing goes bust, but at least I tested the waters, and I could figure something else out. It's really funny because when I meet with, you know, people in their early mid twenties, and you see this hunger about them. And sometimes like you're on a give critical feedback as a manager. Sometimes you wanna be like sold out like so down. And when I think about that. I try hope I don't say that too much because I that was me most annoying thing for us to hear like, I remember, I mean, I I laugh at myself like we were I was twenty five at the time when we were talking about the originally to twenty four and. Until I remember just like literally being like, okay. I'm now a cliche I'm having a quarter life crisis. But I felt like time was running out. I just felt this like the ticking clock. And I was like I'm not doing the job. I'm supposed to be doing. And it had this really like gut and saying this is not the career. I'm supposed to be it. And that's why like a lot of times. Like, we said, it's an out of body experience. But I really just like felt it. And so I think there were there was no talking to us truly like we were going to sink or swim. But like there was no talking us. So you talk about the file that you had the TVD file, and that's really that'd my skin folder. My computer still says project TVD. That's awesome. How close to what's in that folder is the skim today. I don't actually know if we ever put anything in the folder. It was just like we need to meet actually, I yeah. I'm the I would say people always athlete. How do you divide and conquer clearly listened to mentor? You're also the archivists. Yes. So I actually have organized the folder for us over years to make sure that we have. And what I can tell you is. It's actually really similar idea. Like, our vision has gotten so much bigger. I mean, I remember like the first deck that we ever put together. Like we've surpassed also much of it. And we think so much bigger, but the mission around what we do the focus on the audience and how we really describe our value like we could read an today. Wow. And you reach now seven million plus subscribers. That's incredible. So you back at this point had saved collectively between the two of you four thousand dollars. Yeah. And I think that when you asked us earlier about being young and kind of like if this doesn't work out, then we'll find something else. I don't think that was my attitude. I mean, we were both terrify. Yeah. But I think in retrospect that makes total sense to me. Right. Like, yeah. I would have found something else at the time. It didn't feel. That way at all. It felt like we have no money, which we really didn't. And we just quit our jobs, and we're going to start something. And I think that fear is actually what made us put in the twenty plus hour days was that we didn't have a plan B. And I think that's actually something I'm torn on now when I talked to young entrepreneurs who are like, oh, I'm just gonna start something. And I'm like well. But how how are you going to hear bills are like how you can pay rent? And it it always kind of kills me a little bit that that's my reaction now. But I do credit that as being a big reason why we were so hungry for those first two years because there was no fall back. It was like we will will this to be a success. And I think that's something that we tend to recognize in other entrepreneurs like one of our advisers, we talk about all the time that he will will his company into being. A success? And there is no doubt in my mind that even if everything in the business failed. He would just magically push that company in to a success. And I think that that's how we got it to even start. I think you raise a lot of really interesting and important points there one about this adviser that you bring up. So obviously advisors are really really important and useful finding the right advisors is really important and useful. I'm assuming some of that comes from when you're raising funds. And then the people who ultimately put money with you become your advisors, not necessarily actually really. Okay. So let's you're about how you've developed those people. So I think that there are so much that we didn't know, and that was like we've messed up, and you know, kind of all these sort of stories that we can kind of half laugh about now. But I think what we were really good at because and I'm sure you couldn't Nick appreciate from our journalism background. We're really good at networking like. We literally, you know, used to fighting interview subjects, and we're like this leads to that which leads to that person. And that kind of puzzle is actually very thrilling for us. So we before we really did anything we started creating a network. I mean, I remember like yesterday like we made a list of the companies that we admired that we felt were in. There was something similar about them like to us and like they ranged from the time daily candy to Oprah. Like, we were just like, you know, we really shot big. And we then made a list of who invested in those companies, and then we made a list of who's involved in those companies, and we I mean, we really built our network like from day one. We did not know a lot of people to help advance the company and we did a ton of called outreach. And we just figured out how to get in front of people. And I remember honestly, one of the best moments where I would truly be remember being like, I'm so proud of us was. It was like two three years, and we looked at that list. And we had met everyone on the list, including Oprah. And that was just I was like, wow, we like really crossed it off like I'm not. I mean the list of got bigger now emission. But it was I think that that helped us build a network of supporters and mentors that we could really go to for the most basic questions, and when you were cold reaching out to these people what was the pitch. What did you say to the that got even the door archivist? I remember. No. We used to say, I remember, it was quit our jobs to start a company, and would you mind used to our subject line would be like former NBC IRS start new business? Yeah. And we used to say like, dude like, you know, ten minutes to me in the next two weeks would love to tell you what we're doing. And then maybe sometimes like align why we thought they'd be interested, and how many times did you go back to people in order to get in front of them. So actually, I was thinking about this is not going to be the worst piece of advice. I have. But thinking about that when I was at NBC when I was at MSNBC, and I was trying to get a job there. Finally. And I was really both of us are very persistent about following up. And this guy told me that there's a fine line between following up and pushing it and that basically I crossed it. But I don't think that I actually learned from that. I think we still followed up a ton. What we did. Learn was to find advocates for that intro. Yes. So like we would still try to follow up. I think three to four times if we don't hear back. I mean, we still do that the people who haven't responded that are dream people. And I probably Email them like once every three months. Yeah. I like once a month like who are the people that like again stock. I'm yet. And then we would there. So one of our first investors we actually spent a year trying to reach and that was through all different connections. And he took a phone call with us. And then was like, okay. You know next. I'm not interested every time someone connect with us. It was like he's on interested. He's not interested. And I think it was from the third or fourth can. Action. He finally took a meeting and he wrote a check on the spot. And I think that was the biggest lesson that we had which is sometimes about showing that you won't give up other times. It's about getting an endorsement, and maybe you need more than one or two or three when you're just starting out. I think that's a great point. Because actually one of the things I think I did early in my career that I mean, I'm not sitting back in regretting it. But I think I missed took early on not wanting to bother people and then not getting in front of them as a result. And now looking backwards people who want to get in front of me, unfortunately, they have to be two nations, and they have to get, you know, I'll tell people if you don't get me on my phone, the first time don't even leave a message. Just try me back in two days because you're more likely to just grab me in that way. Then to get me. We it doesn't even necessarily have to do with interest. It just has to do with k. And in many cases, if you want to reach someone who's really busy and on your list of people to reach you just have to be aggressive about can you Asli calling them totally. I think that I actually the thing that kind of angers not angers news. That's the wrong word. The thing that I get annoyed about is when I don't see that like to now city or persistence and people, and so I actually make a rule like I don't usually respond to the first Email and someone asks for advice. I usually wait to see if they're going to follow up which part of that is still like try to be mindful of my time. So that I'm actually meeting with people that I think have that grit, and it's like a good filter. So I totally agree with that. So you kick off the company when one of you is twenty six the one is twenty five at what point was there? And. Oh my God. What are we doing moment? Hear more from the skims Danielle and Carly after a quick word from our sponsor when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot com. Get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast. So you kick off the company when one of you is twenty six the twenty five at what point was there? And oh my God. What are we doing moment in a good way or bad way? Either. The next morning. I was so what was the moment of kickoff. Was it the first skim Email that went out? Yes. And how many people did it go out to invest the first mail? So we sent an blast Email to our holy network. We basically gather all these Email addresses. We had like fifty five hundred people we Email to please lineup. I believe the Versi Email went out to like four hundred people. And then we had a few articles come out about us that day. So I believe remember correctly. We ended the day at about eight hundred and I remember with those first articles we cause quite a debate on slate. I think it must have been a slow news day. And it was the first time we'd ever been on the other side and that was hard. And I don't think either one of us intimidated that that was going to be hard. And that was the first moment where I was like. Oh, wow. We started a company, and we kind of were just like, oh, we're going to right? But that was the first time, I realize we're. Business owner, and we put our names on this and swell 'cause I just remember we were going to launch an honestly. Yeah. Literally until the eleventh hour like we were lodging anonymously, and we we decided we don't we don't still don't have our names on the side. But we decided like for press like we will say who we are. And, you know, talk about our story. I'm very glad we did that. But I think as soon as we made the decision to not be anonymous. I mean, we're both really like interested people, we're both very private. And we were like, oh like what did reach two and sleet was basically critiquing the content and the two of is actually a debate. Why you should skin was one article in the next article is why you shouldn't skim. I think so we were like, okay, they're talking about us. And then I made a little bit of noise get, but that's the thing probably on the one hand being new to it. It was really hard. But on the other hand, it probably drove people to check you out. Yeah. I think it was also a great lesson to have on your first day business, which is you can't. This get out of the game. And so I think that was the first time where one of the things that I had to definitely overcome in my career early on was I would have a really really tough skin in the newsroom, right? Because when you're in the thick of it people yell, and so you kind of get used to being yelled at all the time and all the time all the time. It's just a big you'll that Doug all of you do. Yeah. All the time. And it's not pointed it just how it's the language, right? But then when I would have reviews, and it was out of that environment. I never knew how to take that feedback. So seeing it printed and having our names associated with it. I'm like, well, if they had called and yelled at me, I'd be like, okay. Bye. It was just kind of learning that I needed to toughen up in a different way. And that was the very beginning of that. And now, I look back, and I'm like thank God we that lesson day one actually remember when of because we had a few articles that came out about us. And one of the reporters said is there anything else that you want to add which is like a very standard thing and any interview? And so we started talking and as soon as we did that we were like that was wrong. You're never supposed to really answer that. And so the people like mess up and like say something they regret we didn't even say anything bad. But I remember we called like we called someone like a friend who's best friend worked in PR. And we were like, oh my God. We totally ruined the interview. Oh my God. What do we do what we do? And I just sick to my stomach and she was like, it's fine. You didn't say anything bad? And now you will next time. Don't you never have anything else to add? And I just remember being like, wow, we really don't know anything anymore. And you're learning. I mean every day you're learning, right? Your voice, and the voice of the skiff newsletter has been so much a part of its success. So much of a part of its identity your no longer twenty six and twenty five years old. So has that would you say, that's evolved. Is that something that's really important to you to the identity of the brand stood the voices. Not my voice. It's not curly's voice. It's a voice in identity that we created together. And the identity is always evolving, and as this female millennial generation grows up. That's something that we want to consistently look at and reevaluate. So we're looking to grow with this generation as they move through different life stages. So do you see yourselves than remaining a a source of content and a touch point for women, you know, in college just out of college, or do you kind of see that audience growing with you as you grow in your lives? I don't think. Mutually exclusive. So we have products that I think are great for people when they graduate college like the newsletter. I think is the perfect way to opt in. I think our social channels offer that when we think about creating products and really diving into more of a membership driven philosophy which is where the company is going. We certainly think about following this audience as we grow and counter different challenges at our core. What we do is we connect the dots. Where people we make it easier to live smarter. And in the beginning that was how do you keep up with what's going on in the world? And we think about it as how do you continue to do that over your life as decisions get more complicated? And you never get more time. How do you think about your role and responsibility? This is something that comes up a lot in my world as well around fake news and accuracy and. Is that something that is a conversation? That's happening here where the responsibility is really clear in this moment. I think that obviously EMMY any company that in the new space like I can't think of one that we wouldn't have had a conversation about, you know, the trends in the conversation topics that we've all seen in zeitgeist over the last few years for us, you know, from day one we made a decision having come from a background in breaking news and coming from alive control room that we we were to no interest in being in breaking news. We didn't ever needed to be. I we need it to be right. And I think if you had asked us really until you know, I would say until the the last election. What what we thought about what we did? We would say it's a privilege. We would say, you know, we really like refilling avoid I think that what we saw in two thousand sixteen and a carryovers from the midterms this year is that we. Haven't incredible ability to activate this audience and truly reach a politically diverse audience. And there are really not a lot of places that can say that. So in two thousand sixteen we got over one hundred thousand people registered to vote and in two thousand eighteen for the midterms we got over two hundred thousand people to actually show up in vote. We know that what we do is a responsibility. And I think we take that incredibly seriously, which is we've always from day one and still really rigorous back. Checking in really have always put your unlisted integrity. I when you look back. What do you wish you knew when you started the company, you know, I love this question because I think the answer is that it was the biggest blessing that we didn't know how hard it would be. So everything that has come up is kind of like a surprise and not necessarily delight. But the learning experience I think that if we had known how hard it would be. I think we would have been. Potentially too scared to try. So I think it was great that we didn't have any previous baggage. We couldn't say oh this time. You know? This is what last time. This is what went wrong, it was kind of this naievety in this fresh thinking at a time when so many of the media companies that we started off with had completely different perspectives. I feel like we may not have stayed true to our vision. If we had done it before because we probably would have been like, oh, well, you know, what are we going to win this blowing out? What are your eyes? To do that. When you get that kind of pressure as I'm sure you do how do you handle it when something is antithetical to your mission statement, but it might be coming from a respected source or somebody who has clout because their investors in the business. I think we handle it two ways. One is from. We were never the hot thing when we were fundraising. So the people who are around the table now are all people that really believed in the two of us when we were starting and believed in the vision that we had so they didn't invest in us because they thought that we would be, you know, fantastic creating the most amount of video content. They believed in us because we knew who are audience wise, and we had a very specific focus, and we knew what we wanted to mean to them. So I think that there's a respect there. And I feel very lucky that at times the fundraising process, especially in the beginning dragged out what it less. Us with is people that have an unshakable belief in the company. I think the second way is by having advisers who play devil's advocate. So our advisers are from people who are in different parts of the media industry or tech industry, and they do have different philosophies, and I think we really use them to push us and to say like, hey, here's you know, what we've been thinking. And also there's two of us. And so we try to stay away from a group think mentality, and I think that that's where advisors really come in. Also, add that we look at the advice of our advisors. We look at let's say market tread market data, and like, those are all data points. I think for me like what I always think about is. No one's ever built the skin before. So we have the most experience building at that's far. And so at the end of the day like I think it's just a good kind of reset for us to remember that that, you know, there's no there's no grass. Book recipe book about how to do this or an instruction manual, and if it was easy, everyone would do it. And so I think you know, we use those data points. But I think we also we have a cheer north about what our mission is. And I think that's also really easy to come back to and how does the skin make money, and where in the trajectory of the skim did that become because for so many companies it's about subscribers, and how many people are looking at your content wearing the trajectory was it. Okay. We've got we've got the eyeballs now. Now, we need to monetize this. So. Like literally week one. We had advertisers reaching out to us. We did not know how to have those conversations nor do we have the bandwidth to have those conversations. So we said no unbeknown said no now did that hurt a little bit. I don't think he knew what you're doing. Okay. I don't I don't think I've read disturb what we were doing what we did. Find out what you were doing was actually creating market scarcity. We were making ourselves hard to GATT and people wanted to meet with us. So it was a very good thing that we did not we when we raise our first round of funding. Our first investors gave us the advice. They said focus on growth, and it's a very Silicon Valley piece of advice probably from the soda Silicon Valley. But they said focus on growth don't think about the revenue that we focused on growth, we really quickly achieved scale in the millions of our daily readers. And then we were able to think about how do we want to integrate brands into the experience that it felt native to reading? The scam. It felt like it was a brand enhancer and that it was a value out to our audience. So we started opening the door to working with brands a few years ago, but what we knew really early on. And even you know, when you ask like is if you looked at your early materials, what would be the same or what would change we knew early on that we were not going to be a solely advertising based company we knew you're gonna have diversified revenue. We knew subscription would be part of it. And we knew advertising would be a component of it. And so we're really proud that we've from day one we're able to diversify revenue so today. Yes, we have a great advertising business, but we have an incredible premium subscription business. We have a great commerce affiliated business, and we also do content licensing and so that diversified revenue. I think has been a huge differentiator for us. Honestly in the marketing, and it's an interesting point coming from your background seeing a business like NBC that really does run on that ad revenue. Was that part of what made you say? We shouldn't do. This all ad revenue, or you know, because a lot of companies that launched around the same time as you really spent almost everything on at revenue, and they based a lot of their business around Facebook and being active on social media, and then getting advertisers to get involved. I think it was a few different things that went into that the first and you brought up Facebook Saul start there. I think that when you look at the types of content that did well on Facebook when they first you know, when publishers really I started going there. It was freaking news, which we one hundred percent knew we didn't want to do because we knew the resources that you need to do that. Well, and do it responsibly. And we didn't feel like there was a void in the market there. So we knew we were going to do that. So it was like, okay. If we're not going to create the mass amounts of content that are so timely that they're going to keep up there than we're not going to try it the other thing that did really well on Facebook video. And I think honestly that was just we grew up as video producers. And we know what goes into it do it. Well. And. We didn't see it as being a huge part of our audiences daily routine. So the idea when you know video started becoming a thing of of kind of doing this well produced video and that everyone was going to be on their phones watching it. I think that obviously it's trending that way. But we weren't there yet and as a startup you have to make decisions about where you're gonna focus and that wasn't even hard decision. It just didn't fit in with our philosophy. We looked at how we wake up every day. We look at what we really use and shack every day, and it is our phone, but it's much more Email tax message, calendars and audio and those are all of the distribution mechanisms that we've pretty much gone big. And so your co founders and co CEO's a very important relationship. Also, the fact that you're legitimate friends. How do you manage it? When you have a really sick. NCAA disagreement about your shared, baby. You know, we get us like all the time even by friends, they're like to still get along. Like, you know, and we're like this is, you know, we're like, of course, I think that we we've always been aligned around what success looks like for us personally and for the business, and you constantly do check ins around that at different stages or phases of the company. I mean, when you raise money, especially venture money, which we've done now a few times, you are committing in a different way, a renewed commitment to the company's trajectory and the stakes around that. And so we always had these very I think healthy, check ins and conversations to make sure we're still in the same page. I think we both have gone through a lot of ups and downs personally in the last few years. And I think we both feel that there is literally no way we could have done this without the other. And there is no skin without the both of us. And I think that were. Very protective of that relationship. And I think that, you know, our family, we're so a family. I mean, like our families know Joe there now, and like I think that that's it's something really unique to us. And I do think like the interesting thing is when people come to us for advice a lot it's a lot of times for co-founder relationship. And I would say almost all the time. I'm like, I don't think you should work with this person. Or I'm like that does not sound good. And what are the what are the signs that you should work with someone and the signs you should not work? Let's you and you shouldn't work with somebody. Okay. I recently gave you advice to someone who tally. I asked the person. I said do you at hundred percent tra- hundred ten percent trust your co founder, and they didn't answer. And they're like I can't answer that. And I was like that just tells you everything I think one day, I don't know if you get this. But a warning signal for me is when you're leaving your job to start something together. And you're not equal partners. And from the gecko when people say that I'm like, well, you're already evaluating each other differently. There's also small things we'll go to conferences or events where we know that there's a co founder. Yeah. Cove hundred do behind the company, and we'll see a name tag in its founder. And I'm like that's a signal that you you are putting yourself for whatever reason in front of the other person on his on a partnership. And I mean, we're crazy about it. Like, we will not do heloc appearances without the other. We will not do radio show. Like this talk visit out the other. And you know, it's early important to divide and conquer some definitely a proponent of that. But I think we are very protective. Like, those words means something like co-founder means something co CEO does mean something, and I think we've always been really clear with our board, and our investors about what our red lines are so important I've seen so many of those relationships that didn't work out because there wasn't clarity. At the end of the day running a business is so hard and tiring. The thing that like should not be stressful part is your co founder if that's what's giving you the drama and the headaches and this leafless nights like something's off. Yup. An- and ultimately, not just your co founder, but your employees. That's always going to be. I think number one when it comes to building a company, how do you guys differentiate between the people who should be working for this game in those you should not. Well, I think it's an answer. We've learned a lot about and it's probably been different things at different times. I think one big change is when we started we were looking for all around athletes. That's the termi would ask people like how are you an all around athlete and some for them. Right. Citizenry Sean there, Jim. Like, I can't do anything about her. We actually have a lot of athletes. So I guess it works. We we were looking for people that could be good at one thing. But most of all could pitch in and would pick up an area of the business that they had no exposure to and just try it. Yeah. And I think that that was the way we hired for a really long time. I think now we are at the size where we're looking for people that are more specialists, which is a great thing because the company is at the point where we need someone. That's really great at this specific type of marketing or really great at, you know, this specific type of data analysis, but it also gives some of our earlier team members people to learn from, and I think that that's been something that we really aspire to built in our culture, which is professional development opportunities. And I think that's something that is really hard for start up to be able to do in the beginning. So that's something that we're focused on now. Just gonna say, I I think for me like, I'm the guest all of those things, but I'm always looking for the people that will roll up their sleeves. Yeah. And we'll get it. We'll we'll do it. We'll get in it. And I think there been so many times that there's warning signals of someone who want to take a job here for very much their own reason. And we're very hands on the ios for about are worse. And we're learning how to scale ourselves in that. But we are were hiring a team like you need to be able to roll up your sleeves usually sit on the floor of your laptop and like gets done. When like when stuff is intense. I think that's also we've made changes in our hiring process that I think have been helpful there. So when we look at executive or senior roles, we'd like to have employees who are more entry level also being that process, and it's really telling how someone will treat the two of us. But then when we're not in the room, and they're in a meeting with people that are at a junior level. They treat them in one of our core values is you know, if you have if you have a great idea, it doesn't matter who it's from. And it certainly doesn't matter. What level the person that? It's from so really living that day to day is what we look for. What's the toughest lesson? You've had to learn along the way hiring. I think it's always hiring. And it's always the same lesson. Which is listen to your got every time, and it is every time. I don't listen to it. It turns out. I was right. Okay. I'm the worst advice you received along the way. So we have we have good answers for this thought about it off. Yes. One piece of advice that we got very very early on when we were thinking about how we find the business was to get rich boyfriends. No, yes. Yes. Right. Wait who told you this? I you're not gonna tell you. But it was somebody who is going to finance the business. No. Yeah. They were looking to invest. Oh my gosh. You're right. Yes. Yes. And and what did you say, I think we didn't respond? Yeah. I don't think we knew how to respond, and it was also very serious. This was not like a, you know joke. Mine we were I think one of the things people don't realize is like when you are a CEO like you reported to aboard and your salary has to be determined by the board, and we had never had to negotiate ourselves before. And that was really hard to to fight for yourself, especially because there's two of us, and it's a different conversation. And we were really struggling with how to do it. And we went to someone that we really looked up to and they're very well intentioned. But what they said was well, I usually say my wife needs a house, so you should say I need a house or my significant other needs to house, and I was like, I don't understand. I don't eat a house, and he's a, but you need a house, and I was like, no, no, I I live in an apartment don't eat a house, and I really like did not understand. And he goes, you're not understanding what I'm saying. The board will not want you to have an unhappy like life. So you need a house. Your significant other is very unhappy. They don't have a house. And so literally we said I need to move apartments. And I it was not why any like we got our compensation or had that discussion. But I think that it was a really really old school jarring thing to hear that we would only be deserving of compensation increase if we could kind of. A significant other as a as a tool much to get it. And that would be the only reason. But it's also what's shocking to me about that advice? It's antiethical actually, I mean even just on its face. But you guys did you said you needed to move apartments and that worked we didn't. They like that. No, okay. In my experience. If you look at every negotiating one, oh one every everything around negotiating a salary. The thing. You don't do is tell an employer, and I get it. This is a little different. But you don't tell an employer I need this raise for myself. Personally. You talk about the value that you yourself bring to the table. And that's why you are worth phthalates that it was the approach that we took which was hairs market data around. What we've done word. I think that the advice that we were given which is why I say, it's the worst advice came from a very old school way of thinking that we have all read too much about in recent years, and it was you know, very much like happy wife happy life. And I it was it was jarring. I just remember being on the phone and like just putting the phone down. I mean, what what I don't wanna house, but I'm so confused. Well, it's just shocking to even think I mean, yes, I don't think I'm ignorant or naive to what may have happened or still does happen. But that's like shocking to hear I would never expect that to work in a negotiation to your point, though, about the wealthy significant others, you did rack up a lot of Tredegar debt. We did. And I did get married, but that was not I would be hind my collecting the or connecting things. But, but it is it is something that I think for a lot of listeners right now that whole idea of taking on debt. I mean for the most part that is not something that anybody would or should be or is advocating for credit card debt as it. So high interest we also don't advocate for that. But I do think for us. It was the way that we could start the business and could afford to quit our jobs, and you know, it took us a long time to pay that off. And it's not something that we feel was the best decision. But I don't think we would have been able to start the business had we not done that. All right. So ten years from today. What is the skim a very big company, a very big company and the most imprinted brand for this generation of? Email millennial. Thank you so much to both of you, the great conversation, vein keel. I hope you enjoyed that conversation with the skins Daniel Weisberg and Carly's Aken. Remember, you can head on over to skim from the couch for the crossover episode where they interview me. And finally a shout out to our team here that helps make this happen each week. My producer Taylor done editor Brittany Martinez. Research assistant lane win and the ABC radio teen Elizabeth Russo. Josh Cohen, Andrew kelp and Steve Jones. Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast.

Carly NBC Danielle Weisberg co-founder CEO Rebecca Jarvis co founder ABC Daniel Weisberg Rome Facebook DC America NBC New York City New York intern EMMY
"When you learn how to navigate a cofounder relationship, you become better at every relationship." - Jen Rubio on mastering communication in a work partnership

Skimm'd from The Couch

33:10 min | 1 year ago

"When you learn how to navigate a cofounder relationship, you become better at every relationship." - Jen Rubio on mastering communication in a work partnership

"Today's skimmed from the couch is presented by a._c. Hotels by mary it. It's a global hotel brand. That's dedicated to perfecting the essentials when you learn how to navigate a co-founder relationship generally thank you become better better at every relationship. I'm like a better friend. I'm better fiance. I'm like better with my family. I'm carly's aken i'm danielle weisberg iceberg welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating associating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch so what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch. John rubio is the co founder of away be suitcases and brand so you see absolutely everywhere we love them. We use them. We have tried them in every single travel situation and they do not disappoint jan. I and her co founder stephanie corey started away in twenty fifteen raising thirty one million in seed financing making away. One of the highest funded female back startups. They performed the amazing feat of securing twelve hundred orders before they even had a prototype in hand in the three short years since then they have scaled their business to travel empire that is currently valued at over one point four billion. It's no wonder that was stats like this. They've been recognized. Cnn is by fast company as one of the top most innovative companies and have been featured on the forbes thirty under thirty list <hes> jen. We are so excited to have you here her and have this conversation thank you. I'm so happy to be here so jen. Welcome to the couch and let's get into it. Let's do it all right. Skim your resume for for us okay so it is all over the place. I don't know if i would have hired myself but i started out <hes> doing supply chain for a big c._p._g. Company then went to tweeting for taco trucks <hes> i was at an a digital agency working for big brands and they did social media for for an ira started up and retail innovation for like a traditional fashion retailer and now we're here away so i know none of that makes makes a lotta sense but it it. It got me to where i am now. Was there a common thread. When you think about all of the experiences that you've had yeah i love the idea of a common thread right because in hindsight you can find one after i kind of left the logistics and supply chain world the common thread was i wanted to do things that connected to people so it was really fascinated by how people interacted with brands by their those brands or products are restaurants. I was really fascinated with how to reach people in new ways. What is not on your linked in profile that we should know about you. <hes> actually a lot so you know to make a lot of those careers which jazz <hes> i had to kind of do other things on the side so at one point i was a personal assistant to a big hollywood director under personal assistant i was i was very good which is very high standards for personal assistant and actually that almost led into me working on a film so this gone and it's only different direction <hes> yeah i had a i had a lot of like weird jobs and jobs that didn't pan out like after after <hes> after i left all saints right before starting away. I actually headed three month stint as a c._m._o. Fruit juice company which was really bad at cal well and that's why you don't know about it just a casual c._m._o. Interim seattle did you always want to be an entrepreneur no not at all and and i have to think staff my co-founder for guiding me into that because it was one of those things where i called her and i was like there's such an opportunity here <hes> there's no great luggage brands grads. There's no no one even really talking about travel the way i think they should be and she was like well. Why don't we do it and that that little thing at the end like never occurred to me. It was just like let me just vent to her. So what what does your day like. What is the typical day for. There's no typical day. I've been been very intentional over the last year about getting to the place. I am today where my day consists less of actually doing the work more spending time with the people to guide the work that they're doing <hes> and that's really really hard for me. Like a way is kabibi. We <hes> we just started. You know it feels like <hes> but now we're in the place and at a size where if i'm the the one doing the work it's probably not very good so i spent a lot of my time with my direct report just like talking about the vision for the company the vision for what they're doing and like really really empowering them to make their decisions <hes> which is really rewarding but i think when things are tough can what makes me feel really helpless so i wanna go back to kind of the curiosity in you because <hes> i think we both started smiling when you talked about side hustles because we're we're big proponents of that i i it's clear that curiosity has kind of been the connective tissue for you throughout your career. We had to choose one and i wanna talk about the transition of how you left sort of corporate route retail to turning. What was you know frustration around what you weren't seeing in the marketplace to obviously the launching point of away so we're gonna go back to the aha moment <hes> first of all. How did you meet staff just kind of walk us through that while steph actually work together at where parker i was the eyewear yeah exactly the unnamed irons i wear startup clutch hurry whereas actually great because she was my work doc wife at worby and we we actually didn't work together on projects which i think is how we establish a friendship you know she was wanna coffees with and got lunch with and went to happy hour with but i also was in meetings with her and like we understood how each other worked and we understood each other's work ethic and what was important to us and we also kinda got trained at the same place so we had the same context going into this and i can't tell you how important that was. It just made it so easy to decide to start the company company together because there was none of that lake getting to know each other to clara's. There's always like oh. That's that's how slowly respond to emails that this but she knew that about me going. You know <hes> and i knew how fast she was. This is a perfect match but i think <hes> having worked together for a few years really helped and <hes> we kind of had no doubts going into it so i want to go back to the partnership part it because obviously the it hits close to home for us but just talk about the idea like how what happened that you were like no one's really doing interesting and travel to this is a really good idea. Yes <hes> so i was in an airport. <hes> i was in between jobs is traveling trying to figure out actually what job i was going to take next and my luggage breaks in the middle of the airport. Are you going <hes>. I was in zurich heading back to london rose still living at the time <hes> think of the end of the trip and it was kind of like this very like cartoony dramatic. I guess the zipper had slowly started ripping apart as i was walking and i turn around and there's a trail of like underwear on so i was like not only do go back and pick up all your stuff so i have this broken bag and i'm asking my friends for suggestions on what bag i should get. You know all my very well traveled france who obviously bring a bag with them. Every time they travel. No-one had a suggestion like half the people. I didn't even know what brand they use found really really <hes> interesting given the nature of the people that i was asking so <hes> it got me thinking about why there wasn't one prevalent recommendation and really dug into the industry a little more super fragmented. There's no brand love. It's like something you need had been totally commodities but i think what got me site is that obviously there's a huge opportunity to talk about travel experiences and the places you're going and all of these things passionate about an nobody in luggage was is doing that like every luggage company that existed was talking about what the nylon was made out over. You know the wheels zippers and the just wasn't interesting interesting. It's been such a short amount of time from. It seemed like when you had that too where you guys are today <hes>. Did you think think about testing the idea did you when we talk about like those twelve hundred orders that you secured before it even really was at market <hes> how did you. I know that this wasn't just a flash in the pan idea but that you could actually build a huge business off this. <hes> i mean i could have been just a flash in the pan. We didn't know until until it wasn't but i think we went into this feeling really confident for a few reasons. I think a lot of people think when you're designing a product starting company you're kind of like two people at a table being like what should it be. We were like we have no idea to really get this right. We we really believe that. You have to go the customers. We obviously didn't have any so we started like survey every single person. We knew we have friends of friends. <hes> stuff was in business school. She would like walk around columbia with like surveys and stuff and we basically just talk to i think eight hundred people to figure out what they need in a bag or and we even went beyond that as people like with their travel pain points were her <hes> and one of them at the time it's less so now was that people could never let people's phones rose diag and couldn't find where to plug it in which is why <hes> original bags like had the battery inside and it was just learned a lot about people needed and what they actually were willing to pay for so by the time we actually developed the product ought. We were really confident that it was meeting the needs and that it was better than anything else out. There versus like an idea that the two of us had i wanna talk about my favorite part part of the away bag. Which is the jail side. Hustle is a spokesperson for away visa travel laundry bag because i still say that <hes> ah yeah. I love that you say that so so big about this. I got a lot obviously for people who've never heard of away. They're like well. What's so special about it and in in some ways. I'm like the world's worst market because i'm just like it's just luggage but like but you'll see because i'm just so yeah it was very because we were so thoughtful in designing it. There wasn't like one gimmicky thing that that's like easy to talk about but what i love about our products is that if you have ten different people in a room mm-hmm who love their way bags you'll get ten different answers on what their favorite thing is about it and i address marking team crazy because never gonna advertised ties laundry by putting that on even know what was their delight factor and that was something we didn't. We didn't thank of like i sure but if you think about it everyone like seasonal hotel you you end up with dirty clothes. I would always feel like the hotel on everybody. Let's yeah <hes> and we're like oh. This is something we can build it and it becomes like a delightful will detail and i think that's kind of the same thought that we put into every single product that we make we have this everywhere bag that fits perfectly on top of the suitcase <hes> somebody wrote in the other day with the most passionate email about how the justice covered the umbrella pocket. There's an umbrella on on the bottom wait. What if you there's little zipper on this little hidden zipper on the side yeah. It's like a a wet bag like umbrella pocket it yeah i put like i just thought flip flops in there. I i need to work. We'll get back to that in a minute but first. Let's talk about something that every guest on this show deals with including us and and that's traveling for business we calculated we are on like twenty three flights a different hotel every night for the month of june on and it was amazing book tour so happy we did it. One of the biggest takeaways is learning about what helps on the road and a great eight hotel is like the only thing we wanted at the end of the day and we found that with a._c. Hotels by mariot <unk> hotels they really built the hotel with designer's eye so every hotel is equal parts just really beautiful to look at seriously look at their instagram but also functional everything from the guest rooms to the lobby to their lounge are designed assigned to know what you need before you need it. It's intuitive which is really really helpful in the u._s. A._b._c. hotels has over forty five locations and cultural hubs with plans to double that not to mention their global expansion so visit a._c. Hotels a._c. Hotels dot marietta dot com to learn more okay. I want to go back to your story. I want to talk about the co founder stuff. How did you guys decide. Who does what it's one thing to have like. You're my wife and i really like brainstorming with you and i like getting coffee with you going to happy hour versus willing to put everything on the line in now you're my business partner and i say that because we have done that we know how intense that is and that it is a marriage in a way and you have a pre-nup in a way and you have all the that stuff so i always fascinated. I stated talking to other. People and other co founder relationships yeah well. It's actually really funny because i <hes> i wrote staff kind kind of a love letter before we really decided to do this being a level at her rouse nationally not it's never too late <hes> now. There's just love notes everywhere but i basically was like here's why i think it makes sense like all the things we just talked about but it's also it was like we're friendly but not too close we were. We fully jeopardizing anything. You know what i mean. We're like we were. We're friendly enough to be friends and enjoy each each other's company but also not so friendly that it would be hard to have tough conversations like the little things like that. <hes> you asked why how we kind of split the things up. I mean for us. It was so obvious. I have everything i'm good at steph. What does it like to. I'm i'm that <hes> confused right brain left brain and the more creative right brain via right brain and she's like the more analytical and <hes> it was actually so obvious list that when we kind of rolled out on post. It's like everything we needed to do to start the company. I was like oh this this this. This is what i'm good at. I've experienced in this and she did the same thing and we ended up with exactly the same amount of posted somewhere and there is not a single posted that we both tried to grab that i love like so i mean obviously our roles have evolved change has the company has grown but it's always been really obvious and i think because of that. We have a really special partnership because as if you know somebody is very good at and focused on the stuff that you're not it. Lets you be really really good at what you're good at <hes> you you know and it's not like we're not capable i can. I can do the things excess doing but can't do that well and for me to to have to kind of focus. My energy genre like wouldn't be that productive. I give that advice a lot because i see a lot of co founder pairs. You know they may be mad at work doing the same. I'm exact bay and what they run into a bunch of stuff that nobody wants to do. It's interesting because we are sort of that but like we've figured out how to navigate. That's that's like. We have the same skill set and background on paper. We you know we had the same vocational training. If we had done the posted game we would have grabbed the same ones by we've we've always like divided and conquered and we're very eager to hire around the areas that were not strung out which for us worthy more financial and analytical parts <hes> <hes> and so it's interesting because i actually totally agree with what you're saying but for whatever reason we were able to navigate it but if i was giving somebody advice i would go with saying yeah i mean it's been amazing that you've been able to successfully navigate that because i also think that <hes> you guys obviously have a good enough relationship or you can have that conversation and a lot of people daunte and it really is like marriage and <hes> we we do couples therapy and when i say that it's executive coaching surly. Actually i am a huge proponent of couples therapy and my fiance started going to couples therapy like when we first started dating and he was like this is so so weird like no no trust me. If things get really good like you'll be happy. Things got really bad then. We'll already have a therapist. Nobody's actually just been so that with <hes> with with staff. We have inexact coach. She sees each of us individually and then <hes> like every few months. You'll see both of us together. <hes> and we also <music> gave her permission to like no in case like he does he have to communicate and it's been amazing when you learn how to navigate a co-founder relationship a generally thank you become better at every relationship. I'm like better friend. I'm a better fiance. It's a training ground for all of the other big relationships. One thing i've been dying to ask you is how you get the name in the copyright for away. It was truly a gift from marketing. God's people ask how we came up with the name away and i'm like what so obvious aways like the perfect name that she please hold her name that we were using we had like shared <hes> google and in all caps away we'd never really talked about it and then when the time has come to register. The company got trademarks stuff. She was like okay well. I guess we have to to come up with a name and i'm like no. What do you mean like this and she was like yep. No we can't we can't get the trailer for that. I'm like we'll just ask she's like i don't thank you how much lawyers cost but shirl ask them and the lawyers literally laughed at us and <hes> we're like please just check and they came back a week later and they were like <hes> somehow away is available like these nineteen countries. Can your category the <hes> so go for it. Oh my god. Let's talk about marketing god's marketing. You scaled this business into an empire. It's it's amazing even just taking step out of just the travel category what it means for female entrepreneurs founders what it means just in the investment world is extraordinary. You also are known as one of the most innovative companies and the way that you launched was incredibly innovative data and really leaned in to influence our marketing and social which again think about this was just a few years ago. It was a different climate then so these are kind of things we take for granted right now on who how did you figure out how to launch. How did you figure out how to build buzz before you had product and the first product was a book right. Yes so i'll get into that. I got this question a lot and i get this question a lot from companies that i've now invest in. It's like i don't know how to launch a company today. Hey i knew how to launch a company then but i think that goes back to the question no matter when you're launching a company of how do you get people to talk about it. I don't have like some secret. Powerpoint dak cures how to launch a company and make it successful. It's like who's your audience how they find out about you. And how do you make it something that people wanna talk about and that's really been ingrained in us from the beginning. We were like everything that this company does has to be interesting and exciting enough for someone to like wanna tell her friend over drinks. That's a hi bar. You know no one's going to talk about your like influenced sir marketing launch <hes> so we kind of looked at it through that lens which means that we kind of avoided paid media in the beginning we were just like people talk about our brand our story and our product when it comes out <hes> and one of the things that happened was that our product got delayed and we had like kind of been setting ourselves up for a big <hes> a big push before holiday. It's an amazing time orange company <hes> we were trying to kill these gift guides and when we found out the product wasn't going to be ready. Steph locks me in a room and she's like okay. What are we again. Do instead and i was like what do you mean. Are we just going to delay the launch and she's like we can't delay the launch and we also just made up these shelves like and i think that's a thing we were just very like. You're ready really ready to do it pushes. Will we just had these crazy ideas of how we needed to do it and no one to tell us that it was wrong. <hes> <hes> so we're like okay well. Why don't we write a book. Read up what garcia actually much around do publish. This was august like end of august. It was like today's before. I was going to go to burning man. I don't know how she still let me go. <hes> and i was like i got this and i called my friend alexis. Excuse an incredible writer. She was like reading tea magazine. I'd met her a few jobs ago. How can you help us write a book and i gave her list of like forty. The people that i thought were cool and influential and like taste makers and is just <hes> just interview them about their favorite replaced travel and she does all these many interviews and it's like an as told to book. We had no money and like no. I didn't even know about that photo right yeah so we're like what are we going to do do and so we asked ever took literally. Send us their vacation photos again. Everyone who was just like kind of did a severe <hes> but now there's like there was this amazing saying like hard bound book with beautiful photos like martha called the places he returned to and it came in this like little gift box for the door like we just like the experience he ends and inside the book. There is a gift card for two hundred twenty five dollars which is the price of the carry on when <hes> it would eventually launch. Thank you know what there is. No reason we couldn't have delayed the launch but like in our heads. We're like we're gonna launch this year and sometimes. I think it's nice to kind of. Put these like weird. Fake deadlines on yourself. Did you read feature anyone in the book that you didn't know and had to reach out to cold yeah definitely like i i would say we knew half the people in the book and then we what we actually did is for everyone. We interviewed viewed. We're like who's one person that you can introduce us too. I'm sure you've got asked us all the time of people who are thinking about starting their own company and they're thinking about different marketing tactics ex <hes> obviously one of the challenges in in starting companies building on a network so if you don't have friends who happen to have businesses or could be the influencers what what were the strategies that kind of helped you develop that influence or network yeah. I mean that it's a great question. I think that if you can start with just one and i think whether it's a cold email or your best friend y- there's one person that you can start with the kind of kick things off and i think you you know despite everything people really are willing to help and if you ask that one person to reduce you to one other person i mean so much of a of what we've done is is based on like referrals and friends telling friends and like the power storytelling connections and all of that so if you get that first person to talk about your product like ask them to to tell someone else or asked them to introduce you. I think that's a really easy way for someone who doesn't already have that built in network. You know to to create one. We talk doc a lot about brandon storytelling. The product really is at the center of it. We sat down on day and we're like okay once. We run out of friends to buy our luggage like how are we actually again do this so that the products really has to be at the heart of it and if what you're doing is that good like it will continue to grow beyond ah beyond you just reaching out you know so we're talking about marketing god's. There's obviously because gave you away you. Also are an early adopter personally a to a lot of the social platforms were able to get handles literally with just your name which a common name for comment and so i i mean it makes me smile. When i look at your twitter. It's like at jennifer. It's crazy that you've got that not all. It's cracked up to be every time i like notifications every time talk to jennifer lawrence o. Jennifer lopez like wings has died aged. Everyone is there are so many famous like how did you get that. That's insane so twitter's fine because i was just i was at south. Stop by south west of two thousand seven and everyone was talking about it. Was i think when they launchers vowels may i that was like cheryl sign up china for <hes> and they actually didn't start using it like two years later finally signed up because i was there yeah. Everyone's talking about it. <hes> thanks same thing with instagram. It's funny. Somebody asked me what my biggest accomplishment was at worby parker and i was like oh i signed up for instagram. Why is like no you don't understand to make a business case and there was no business case for it but i wanna know what it is like for you. When you travel personally early and you're walking through an airport and you look around and everyone around you has the product that you create it and it never gets old but here's the thing this this is the the entrepreneur and me i had never look about and say oh wow everyone has it. I look around. I'm like wow. There's so many people that don't have you know and i think it's probably the same for you guys where it's like yup. There's millions of people who read this and then you think about the million people who don't read and i think that's like a fish like a mindset that comes when you start a company like there's always more to do you and it is really fine and it's been a specialty fund the last couple of months because we're on the cover of ink and they're like where do you see magazines in their ports. It was amazing like a few times this mime. I'd walked past like a new stat and there'd be someone with an away bag in front of the house. How's your perfect also when you travel and they make the announcement about the batteries in luggage make you cringe. It doesn't really happen that much anymore and there was this weird phase where it was like a round holiday like twenty seventeen beginning twenty eighteen and and there's a silver lining to everything right so there's all these smart bags not anymore. We got lumped into that category because some of our bags did have the batteries and our batteries have always been removable so they've always like abide by the rules but there's something that happens when you're like a first mover in the space and you're like the most well known brand where gate agents would be like if you have an away the brand awareness credited like will this is kind of amazing because we're like like a one year old company and they're calling us by name but also the co founder me was like this really sucks. It's horrible <hes> but yeah i mean. I think it's fine. I think that was something that was like for sure. Maker break be made a lot of decisions when the battery band came that i actually think gave us more momentum because of how how we handled it with our customers with airlines i think now once in a while when <hes> when people say you know if your bag has a battery of take it out and like i all see people at the gate being like oh yeah just pops right outlook educating other memo about it and like basically during our marketing vats that's amazing so we're going to mature our last segment which is our favorite and it's called the lightning round. It's very difficult. I know you have to answer as quickly as you can. Dan and we're going to run through some questions. Okay first job reception. Is that a car dealership worst job. I worked in a dining room at a retirement. I'm at home. Oh yes what's the worst professional mistake you've ever made some very aim for an emails that i did not respond to the kevin great opportunities but i didn't know it didn't respond to them for like a year later just because you let your inbox get follower yeah. I'm just really really bad at that so we don't have this on the list today but i'm gonna say your inbox zero person. I'm not either now i. I'm a big fan of <hes> inbox bankruptcy zero like what you're you're my inbox soulmate asa lead at all like you know what if i had responded three months followed adop- i'm just going to start over and i always think i'm going to start fresh and be an inbox zero person but now that doesn't work <hes> that gives me. It's like this is staff inbox foxborough so yes. Everyone knows that was crazy. I think we're very smart. I strong call and you get good news my fiance what about bad news also him to get nervous when you fly no no. What color is your away luggage. You know it's funny. I should've just have an answer for this but i try all of our new products. I literally don't <music> own a bag. I'm taking stuff from the closet which drives the team crazy. If you get three sixty feedback what is the theme of your critical feedback like what are you receive sore subject or just out mine pack <hes> that i could would be better at giving feedback. Do you know what i mean. Yeah like i just <hes>. I expect everyone to know what i'm thinking yeah without actually communicating it so i'm working on it guys. <hes> what's your favorite place to return to a british columbia. I have a little like surf shack in two pheno vancouver island the best place whereas awesome <hes> who's your mentor. <hes> is a cheesy to staff know that amazing using answer. Why do you say things saving. Write me a letter of what would steph do. When was the last time you negotiated for yourself off every day. When you're co-founder you basically are your negotiator nurse salesperson and if someone had told me that in the beginning i wouldn't have done it but like you just spend your whole day like selling and negotiating by their you're trying to recruit someone or you're like trying to sell partnership. You're doing anything it's <hes>. That's a whole job with what's the destination. You haven't been to yet that you want to go to <hes> really wanna go to namibia. I've heard exp- beautiful last question <unk>. At what is your shameless plug. What's coming up with a way we should know about. You know. There's not enough time for all the stuff i'm excited about but <hes> i'm a big meeting. I have right after this is redoing our first review of our apparel collection. Oh and i'm super excited about this because this is just the first step in like kind of creating all of the things you need for your journey and there's it's like it just kind of answers that age old question like what are you were on the plane on the train on the road trip so that you don't have to wear athlete is feel good and look good impact so we're really really sad about that and for me personally. I'm excited about it because it gets me back to the building and creating read in part which is which is what i love what i'm better at jan bean you congratulations amazing. We love watching it. Thank you guys so much. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join us next week for another episode of skin from the couch and if you can't wait wait until then subscribed to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information. You need to start your day sign about the skim dot com. That's the s. k. i. M. m. dot com to 'em spur a little something extra.

co founder co-founder instagram steph Cnn personal assistant jen twitter John rubio carly ira seattle danielle weisberg stephanie corey namibia google pheno vancouver island clara
Maria Sharapova, tennis champion and founder and CEO, Sugarpova: "There were so many times when I stepped on the court and I wasn't the better player, but I won that last point because...I was just mentally a little bit stronger."

Skimm'd from The Couch

06:21 min | 3 months ago

Maria Sharapova, tennis champion and founder and CEO, Sugarpova: "There were so many times when I stepped on the court and I wasn't the better player, but I won that last point because...I was just mentally a little bit stronger."

"There's so many times when. I stepped on the court and i was a better player but i won that last point because i knew that the momentum of the match could swing my way if i was just mentally a little bit stronger. I'm currently. I'm danielle weisberg welcomed to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it. All out than where it began on a couch. He everyone it's carly today. My guests is the tennis champion in entrepreneur. maria sharapova. She has been rained. The number one player in the world by the women's tennis association and won five grand slam titles and olympic silver medal. So almost it's athletic as me. Maria has also built a career off the court. She is the founder and ceo of sugar polka her premium. Candy line she also an investor and strategic advisor for a number of companies maria. Thank you so much for joining me will welcome skin from the couch. Thank you for having me. So we're going to jump in with our standard first question. Skinny your resume. Oh well let me start with. I was born in siberia. Wow how did i end up in california and the story is really crazy. It's incredibly unique. Because my family was from belarus ensure noble exploded they fled to russia and siberia happened to be where i was born at the age of four. I started playing tennis. And at that time we'd already moved to the south. The russian I love the game. I loved everything about it. I loved how individual and focused driven. It was at the age of seven. My parents thought russia wasn't the place to develop tennis talent so they moved to the united states. I went there with my father. I spent the first two years without my mom as she couldn't get a visa. And that's really where my tennis dream developed from the junior days i became professional at thirteen or fourteen years old. Just quite crazy to think about so. It's still very much a child at seventeen. I won my first grand slam in london. I went onto win many titles had a lot of beautiful moments. I had a lot of tough injuries in a very difficult setbacks. Along the way in that process i learned a lot you know. Bmi business developments. I learned about really businesses. That i appreciate it. Companies that i felt really inspired by and their founders. The way that they came out with ideas and we're able to execute on them. And i learned a lot along the way of being tennis player and spending so many hours in hotel room. I was curious. I learned a lot and i guess that's where we kind of developed this A little bit of a business acumen throughout the journey. I wasn't very good skin. I have to say that that's a very difficult question to begin with. What's fun fact about. What can i go go about you. Oh i'm incredibly stubborn. I i'd say stubborn. And and good and then stubborn and very difficult ways like when when we say stubborn. Like i was stubborn and my work ethic and i something when i wanted something really bad really strive for it and do everything i can. But sometimes stubbornness takes you out of something. That is better for you so you don't actually see the other side of things so that's probably not so really go back. Obviously in your skinny talked about this. You were born in area and again to be raised in russia and then you family made a huge change when you were about six touch me a little bit about what you remember about. That move mentioned that you were separated from your mom. Just won't that environment for you like. Where did you go when you came to the us when my parents were very young when they had me my mom was just twenty years old and all they knew was that they had this little girl next to them and that they just wanted to protect her. So i actually didn't spend besides being around my grandparents and some other family members. I didn't spend too much time away from my parents. I was constantly under their their wings and their guidance. And so i'd say the move when i was just six and a half years old United states and leaving my mother was incredibly challenging for her. Because that's all she knew for those past six years for me. It was slightly different. Because i was this little girl that was packing a suitcase. And that was bringing some books. And i was going on this journey and the idea of america. It's hard to paint that picture when you're really young you just. You don't know the difference of america or or another continent you just know you're going to be on a plane and land destination and that for me was miami. The miami international airport which is full of palm trees and just this exotic location. That i'd never seen it's hard i think for my mom. My mom's perspectives a very different experience. How quickly did you and your your parents realize you know. It's one thing when a kid picks up a tennis racket or any sport equipment. Nearly oh good. You like touch the ball. Did they realize that there was something there that you had a gift. I had this focus from a young age. That i think set me apart from some of the group activities that i was doing back. In russia there was a coach in and sochi and he. He was a very like technical coach so he he taught things about the grip and had a forehand and backhand and not so much about anything else. Just like the basics. The foundation of what. I think a young player really needs at that time and he noticed that i had this ability to just want to improve and not get distracted on other activities and other things and as a young girl tried to hit the strings with the ball. And if it doesn't go your way you have a little bit of a tantrum and you move onto something different. And i think what you know. What was exciting. As i saw little improvements and they kept me coming back for more and i think that's what they saw because it's really. It's so hard for me to personally see true talent.

tennis danielle weisberg women's tennis association sugar polka siberia russia maria sharapova america belarus Maria olympic maria california london miami international airport miami
Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook: Resilience its like a muscle, which means you build it.

Skimm'd from The Couch

29:58 min | 1 year ago

Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook: Resilience its like a muscle, which means you build it.

"Today's episode is brought to you by Sephora. They've got clean makeup. Meaning the beauty you on minus the ingredients you do not will explain in a bit but first let's get into the episode. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it? All out than where it began on a couch. Hi everyone this show might sound a bit different today. Because we're skimming from three different couches. The skin is working from home for the time being because of Kobe. Nineteen so let's get into it. Our guest today needs no introduction. Were excited to have. Sheryl Sandberg joining us on skimmed from the couch. She is the chief operating officer of Facebook as well. As a best selling author and the founder of the leinen organization her groundbreaking career in tech along with her advocacy for women in the workplace has made her one of the most influential women in business and in the World Cheryl thank you so much for joining us. Welcome to skin from the couch. Glad TO BE. I have to admit though I am not uncapped well we. We'd always voting per catch. But do you can do so before we start i. Actually I was thinking about how I met you got connected to you and I think it's a funny story. I wanted to share which was think five or six years ago. We were having like attack Glitch Mirror. Trying to set up our facebook group and this was the earliest days and we reached out to a friend of the company and said you know anybody facebook who can help and he said sure and just added. This woman named Cheryl and I was like that can't be Cheryl and share it with you. You immediately fixed or tech glitch and became somebody who was so generous with time in offering to be there if we had questions as we were going through scaling a business and am. I always laugh at that moment. I remember looking Danielle being like am I. E Mailing V. Sheryl Sandberg Right now so. This is a full circle moment for us. Well I mean from my point of view. A friend sent him. I loved it from the beginning. Of course you can talk to me. I wasn't fry bar and I just loved it and then what I saw was to amazing women. I got chance to meet early to amazing women. Trying to start a business. I will always try to reach out and help them glad I did. But it's been nice to know you both and to see the skin grow and to come full circle from me. My daughter is twelve. She's in seventh grade. She actually very active in good baiter translated that in life me as much in news and she should and she not relief for Venda I on the way I normally started reading the news. It's your because I think it's you know it's written in a language that she finds more entertaining than you have helped my daughter today. I love that so Cheryl. We're GONNA start with an easy question. Skim your resume for us. Holly studied economics. Harvard where the World Bank as a research assistant and unless I need in fact business wall at Harvard worked at McKinsey for a year where the Treasury report and a half years as Larry Summers chief of staff went to Google. Our somewhere along the way women get skin. What is something that is not on your bio or Wikipedia? Page that we should know about you know. Well let's take a fun factor. Something that's just not not as known about you when you teach aerobics for ten years. Nineteen eighties silver tight all MAIKA. Dan is amazing like Jane Fonda error and then when the time so funny I got twenty dollars an hour. Five days a week in college took Tim. I love it. So we're GONNA switch gears and We normally like to start with your career journey. But it's hard to do this interview and not talk about the world that we are all in right now. There's a reason that we're doing this interview remote. We are all dealing with the global pandemic of Kobe. Nineteen and I WANNA START BY TALKING ABOUT WHITE. You've done at facebook internally for your employees to to help them get adjusted to the normal. I think a lot of our listeners. Right now are either managers. Small business owners themselves or working companies and trying to figure out how to adjust and you guys have really taken a lead on that so would love to hear from you on that. We've done everything we can and I say this knowing that not every Hindu. What do right we are me? Me Are not worried about not making zero next month but still get an attitude. We did move very quickly and very effectively to me at this point and had every snore worker. Who could be at home at home with a small number of people critical absence? Still have to go in your think about data centers. We're doing all. We tend to have them in the fact that we sent everyone else. Home really helps protect them. We're also came everyone paying Oliver Contractors paying all of our workers whether they can't work with each other they can work from whether their offices closed. We're paying every month but again we recognize. We're big company so the other thing. We're really focused on helping. Small businesses me announced last week. One HUNDRED MILLION DOLLAR FUND TO HELP SMALL BUSINESSES WITH CASH GRANTS. They can help in your employees and we put out a lot of free educational material with small businesses to get tips on how to move from their online and not every witness him on some things that are. We're seeing them. Mealy amazing and enter a happens. Facebook is making a really concerted effort to tackle misinformation which is something that social platforms facebook has struggled with in the past especially as it relates to elections. Talk to us a little bit about what you guys are doing to target misinformation in a time where everybody is really looking to get. The Most up-to-date factual information coming from government officials coming from medical experts in an time that just folded so it so much uncertainty and fear. It's a really important question. We've long had a policy that misinformation. That could be imminent harm. It's taken down. I think very early in its racist started partnering with Whol and taking down any misinformation based off with arms. We've done that as aggressively as we know how I think we're also partnering with. Who's CDC hope ministries around the world to make sure we get the right information in front of at this point we directly to a billion people? The health resources are Cuban nineteen information center. And what we've done which is pretty aggressive. We're putting the information that people need to be right at the top of the when you think about facebook's response especially the external efforts involving small businesses. It's unfolded pretty quickly as everything has with this. How did you develop a leadership team that can be reactive in the face of such uncertainty? How do you come up with these responses in a way that can actually help people in real time no question? I actually think some of the troubles. We've had influence the mistakes we made or asked years. We've worked so hard to correct those and set ourselves. Not they're serving us well so for example when you think about this information new years ago we didn't have policies out information down where we learned the hard way cut mucus out when we have that in place when covert nineteen team around. We already had a system information. This crime we immediately rents w a chance to see the best in the world switching side West Down Think. Some of the systems rebuilt up to progressive pastor serving really well with the small business loans. You know we are in the business of serving small businesses. That means we've long had an outreach. That is if come to really quickly. I think it was two weeks on a Thursday night that we should and I think we announced Monday or Tuesday that we really quickly and again i. We have lazing teams. That are really expert witnesses. They were hearing directly from small businesses. That we cash as we need absolutely media health so we have teams in place in order to get that out the door. I WanNa talk about you as just individual like being at the helm of such a company that everyone's always watching and especially in times of crisis is really in the public eye right now but in general like how do you handle stress. My God I know about myself that I'm way way without her in credits oriented so my friend are. He's been pushing the whole rather have baby look at mechanic. Everything's fine when they don't disaster matter what you do and then I realized my God. I'm like that too and so even I'm working unbelievably hard hours right now. I think everyone is really will kick the seven hours. I need to sleep because I learned the best. Extra showers ain't nothing doing more work in tonight's not certain while the next day. I am much more active exercise. I'm I try really hard to exercise. Non Lucky I haven't ignorant. Thank you my house new again. I think we've been under a lot of stress at facebook phrase Mary. I'm in a hard year and I don't get that feeling that anyone should feel bad. I shouldn't I'm this crisis and are moving as possible. We have felt very much under siege. Not Quite at this level but we have watched two very except for the last couple of years and again I think the pace of which we've been working is serving us well during greet more. Broadly when you think about moments of crisis and you've mentioned a few that facebook has been through in the past few years and obviously were in one globally. What some advice you have looking back or some mistakes that that you guys made as a leadership team in navigating that and I asked because Carleen air in the position as CEO's really navigating a crisis for the first time at a moment where there's massive certainty and no one has answers. I'm here a couple of things. One is to just try to move into the core systems. And as I think the second is just record remember. Keep around your really human me. We're all video conferences. But I am. I don't think I'm doing one hundred percent but I just walked war right now than I think. We normally don't start every meeting at work in your own office building. Are you saying I am trying to start literally every meeting that lay in as hume probably hitting seventy seven? But I hate that moment when I started I just started doing. It happens to people in the company the company inches for the other thing. Is You really want employees? Doing the peaceful come during this conversation. We know things are different. People have complete home. Your kids have twin children. People are under tremendous stress weekend. Everyone pays for being out. Worthing everyone for bonus because we said you know you're GonNa do all your friends jumped went last regular issue. He'll and he's when you do that. And when you treat people right way they're just even more they feel. They feel that they're getting me deserve. That's what that's what people sir. We are traveling all the time for work. All one thing that we are really obsessed with is thinking through what we put on our skin when we are flying when we are travelling when we are on the road in so many places. It's really important that we keep ourselves healthy and we've started to think about. What does that actually mean regarding the products that we use on a daily basis as also because her skin just looks really bad when we traveled so he loves using products. That ARE CLEAN. Because we like to know. Now what's in them and we don't want to actually have to sacrifice the quality which I think is a big misnomer. Think about clean beauty. And that's something that we've really started to investigate in so lucky for all of us. This march four is raising the expectation. On what clean can be yes. They have some amazing brands that are clean and thoughtfully made and some of our favorites are bite. Ilya Casaus our Ms Beauty Tower. Twenty eight and artsy so the products are packed. With good for you ingredients. They look good and they make you look good. It's great that one of our favorite stores before is focused on clean beauty. We really appreciate that. I think that we are part of a generation. That's really thinking about what's going into the things we use every single day and it's great that we can get all the products that we really love without the ingredients that no one needs exactly so time for you to get the best in clean makeup at Sephora online and in store right now look for the green seal to know which products are Kleenex afforest certified. I WanNa talk to you about resilience. You wrote Your Book Option. B. In the wake of your husband's untimely passing and your book touched on both in really different ways and we both really leaned on the lessons of compartmentalizing that you talk about in the muscles of resilience through a lot of different personal challenges over the last few years and I want you to kind of walk us through what resilience has meant to you in the workplace in what you think it should mean for others in the office. Resilience is our ability to Joe Everyone's facing right now. We need something six to nine on John. It's like a muscle to do. I think that initial insight is so important because when people overwhelmed. I've heard people say I can't. I don't have results not hustling like. Actually you have some and your voice to have more question is how do you feel? You've built it by recognizing that would ever. You're almost certainly not and that applies to the very worst. As you know the way I saw after my husband died which is kind of is devastated. Imagine even I'm we'd better. It's five years late and when people said to me for not your yoga sway. Five years I didn't there are so many for right now who are working at. London's the two who are looking at situations better. I'm admirable and leaving the very worst situation. The idea that every is not routes great. People do not come back from midnight. Feel we'll get better. Is I think Mary. Reassurance thing is this is a heart this remembering things could be worse when Adams said to me we know it could work and I was like really my husband just literally drop dead like happy he said gave at your resume driving your chill pill ossoff green and all of a sudden. I was like okay. My kids were ride. Snow are really hard right now. Thinking about how things could be worse is a way of feeling grateful for what you have and that along with remembering whatever state you're in is not our rays of zones in the third thing. Is We all love? It is being near for other people my children and I every single afternoon my kids Meyer. Holly on a smart people in our family are fans of older. People who are who. Milan's call the journey a novel and it gives them a moment of winning rather than worrying about they don't get to see their friends. They realize new. Permanent Reverend Hoffa Malone in Florida they can haul them in vacancy of giving others right taking a step back from the current crisis that we're in. I WanNa talk about one of the things that Danielle and I've spent so much time just going back and forth talking about which is how does show emotion in the workplace and I say that as we are both really private people and I grew up with the mantra leg. Everybody cries about work. You don't cry at work and I think as a leader now I relaxed what that means and what the impact of of that can phrase could mean to. Somebody and I'm curious as you've grown from you know a leader at Google inch. Obviously your your role now. How has your thoughts around showing emotion in the workplace changed? And what do you say? Now to those entering the workforce. It's interesting question is definitely one that the answer for me and what I did change over the course of my career. And he's a there soon. I ever in mid I cried at work. I was already at the first time. I talked about the challenges when I was in. It's already to facebook. Ceo and then. I said I cried got reported Sheryl Sandberg cries I'm Mark Zuckerberg shoulder I mean I was mortified. Wissmann 'em and with the Work Foundation did and the PUCK and I tried to say we have emotion can show it at work but it's tricky and it is definitely easier it will get. I think part of the answer is we need men to show emotion at work too right because such a big percentage of the leader rent skill that cons normal and while we still have a long way to go I think about Maria ten years ago or even certain people really being more willing to rush it. You can't cry every day. It just can't. I mean I did after Dave side but for the most part it can't but I think moments were honest and vulnerable really matter more. Can I do a thing with our senior leadership team whenever we do meeting? We DO CHECK INS YOU CHECK INTO MEETING. And what we mean is we. Check in her assuring. So here's what's going on for me. Especially here's this no nonsense and while I think when we first introduced it in with a little jarring people now everyone says that are being best things checking and people have shared just the most for small things. Children going aisin issues in their home health issues and it's really at the heart of why are leadership soon as strong as we really actually institutionalize sharing or smoke in Berchtesgaden. So talking about Leinen men women in the workplace. You wrote the book in twenty thirteen honey. You think your advice is held up as workplaces has have obviously continued to change. Is there anything you look back now? And you're like oh I would definitely adjust that yeah There were things I would have just you know when I wrote me and I had no idea anyway. We saw the first version of the book with just all data. I it was fabulous in in my editor told me it was the worst book they have to choose to. Bring your story in my store when I was good enough shopping other raise. He's one of the main criticism with men. Is that hard at red as if it was about? You Know White. Esslingen is really the only sways in there that came alive on mine and so we infer graduate added that missing and you just more story. More women of color more women in different industries. But I do think slim of the things that leaning has tried to tackle. We're still on right. We have a very strong you. I had one in Dacian very strong hugh at women in leadership if we could name. That's just a fact. I think we need to do better and we need to do more. We the very strong view that women have to go for leadership. Mitch can't do it alone. Meet the systems with their policies. That enforcement meeting supported each other and I think probably the thing. That's been the most ratifying that we started at the beginning wetted still circle small group of women that meet in person they now meet. Our goal was a thousand now. Free seven thousand nine hundred. Seventy four hundred eighty percent of women who joined circles attributed positive positive life. Change to their several in two thirds. Say they're taking on channel. Women can't do it on. The idea of union was always that we're GONNA have to support each other and have just been really powerful at Cheryl. I'm curious you know when I read the book it brought to light and not just for me but for so many behaviors that women tend to fall into in the workplace. Whether it's use of language or just really like sub-conscious behavior that stereotypically women Subscribed to you so I wanna tell you about a situation that yellen. I found ourselves in in the last few months we had a meeting with a female mentor. And we were telling her business update and we were coming up really competent and had a lot of strong opinions about a certain issue and she said to. Us ladies. I just WanNa tell you like you're coming up really strong and you need to tone it down and when you go into meetings you've gotTa tone it down and we both left that meeting and looked at each other mirror like that was really up up. But we didn't know what to say in that moment and I am glad that we have the confidence today to know that that was wrong but I don't think we would have had the confidence. If you years ago to that how do you think we should have responded? And how do you think our listeners should respond in moments like that? Women are too aggressive. I'm here from aggression. But an average women are told. They're too aggressive much more than that. But when you in that situation recognizing that there's inherent bias and this is important women to the first thing is not internalizing the bias recognizing bias. That's advice I feel very comfortable giving everyone when this happened. We should recognize the bias as you. Well as you said you're going to experience differently if you realize bias on how to handle it. I don't think you can give generic advice right if you got a very well. Meaning that you've had many conversations with someone told you now I think there's bias in the work for if I ever debited his. You can look at them and say hey you asked me to tell you. This is how you're trying to raise money for your company and some of that in a meeting might undo it. Not your best moments. Be like an your bias. We've been there many time. Yes but I can't say that the more this is generally good in population the easier upon for us to surfacing and women women still face actual harassment. Really horrible things that happen when I miss some of the big stuck at least in most companies at least you can go to. Hr Right you know the big harassment stuff. There are systems not everywhere but a lot more than there used to be for dealing with it but the small everyday seeing that That are still really really really holding them. Back men getting credit for their idea getting interrupted more niece. These happen by very well. Meaning people it can be really hard to them because that. Hr that much you. I I got up again right. I mean you could let people do so trying to set up systems where you found within your company and other organizations you can follow up there things more anonymously so that people can address them. I think is really really helpful before we go into our last segment. I WANNA ask about something. That feels a little bit off topic In this environment but I think as we remember the twenty twenty is the year of covert. It's also an election year and one of the things. Our audience is really cares about a sustainability in climate change and facebook has pledged to reach one hundred percent renewable energy twenty twenty. Can you talk a little bit about that goal? And if you guys are on track we are on track. And I'm really proud of our of our working. With data centers run a lot of energy companies like are a lot of energy and for a long time in our industry. How you ran your data centers with a very seriously help editing secret because if you've got more efficient cheaper and that was a cost advantage it was also better am. I think we were the first company. Were we open source? We found a way to make our data centers. I think at the time by thirty two percent more efficient and we open source closely and so we said to the world here. We're running more efficiently rather than they've another pasta advantage for us. We care about the environment and we open source citizen chair. That was part of half of US getting completely on renewable energy and so. I'm proud of the work nine to help. Not just our own company but our community and at community in more collaborative working toward honor to preventing climate change so now on to our last segment. It's our favors name lightning segment so we will ask you a few short questions and just answers fast as you can okay. Are you ready? I'm ready wettest. Replace Your morning. Commute warning stretch. Are you on morning person or night? Owl and Julia morning foursome. What is the last? Tv show bench watched herb your enthusiasm. Oh that's what I'm watching right now. Watching all of that work from. Home Tempe back. I mean trying to tell my children that they can't come in. What is something that you do that annoys mark? Eat His food. Are you a good cook? I wasn't I think a while ago. Are you cooking dinner right now? More like meeting things off were heavily on. Microwaves right now but yes I'm I'm cooking. I guess you off of a last question. What's good one what you're shameless? Plug a home. Everyone you can stay home really shudder. As I've heard too many people say well I'm not going to get sick place for protecting everyone. You're protecting health workers. My sister's frontline health work sheriff's Me County Hospital as a pediatrician. Everyone off to go to work to do things like behalf your first responders but if you can stay home needs do because you're protecting people who after work and the people who are wonderful. I don't even think it. Shame from thrilled to be able to say that I agree and thank your sister for but she all medical professionals are doing. Right now was Cheryl was such a great time to talk to you and thank you for being a longtime skimmer and thank your daughter for being a new skimmer innkeeper. Rain sat on you advice every so often that you've needed much but you set an example for a lot of young women here on businesses and we're GONNA need that even more than ever so adulation thank you. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign about the skin dot com. That's the way I am Dot Com two m's for a little something extra Tuesday march thirty. I is paid. It's the day that symbolizes the gender pay gap. It means that in order to make the equivalent of a man's twenty nineteen salary. Women have to work an extra three months on average. You might thank doesn't the equal pay act in men and women get paid the same while that's complicated and we wanted to find out why to listen to what we found. Check out our skim special equal pay you can find it. By subscribing to our daily podcast. Skim this wherever you get your podcast. It will also be in the skin this speed.

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The job should scare you.  Erika Nardini, CEO of Barstool Sports, on how to decide whether to go for that new position. - Episode 059

Skimm'd from The Couch

31:56 min | 2 years ago

The job should scare you. Erika Nardini, CEO of Barstool Sports, on how to decide whether to go for that new position. - Episode 059

"I think it's good in interviewing for a new job that the job should scare you and that it should push you into a place that you have not gone. I think if you're looking for the same, but different it's not going to be rewarding, and it's not going to move you forward. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary, and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch? So please welcome. Erica Nardini to the couch. Eric is an expert at marketing and growing brands over the course of her career. She's been a leader at major companies, like, Microsoft Yahoo and AOL but in two thousand sixteen she decided to take on a new role. She became the CEO at a small, but mighty sports blog, you might have heard of barstool sports. That's a role with the story behind it, and we're gonna let Erica tell it. In the meantime, Erica. Welcome to the couch shaky for having me. Thanks for being here. I'm excited to be here. We are very excited to chat with you. So before we kind of dive into to everything to start a both skim your resume for. Okay. Great love the skim your resume. So I started my career thought I wanted to be a lawyer, I started my career at Fidelity Investments, I worked in the legal department hated it wanted to work in advertising and talk to the HR people at fidelity. And they were like that's the worst decision of her. You're, you're a moron. But I did it. I took a huge pay cut went to work in the advertising department at fidelity, which was mostly run by women. It was very exciting. And the internet was just starting. And so, because I was young and interested in the internet, and no one was really paying attention. I got a huge amount of opportunity to be a part of something very big. It's the internet was growing. I then went and worked at a whole bunch of ad agencies in Boston's I lived in Boston at the time, which led me to working for Microsoft. So I went to work for Microsoft to build, you know, they're global branded entertainment group, in two thousand one I lived abroad, so I lived in London. I worked out of Tokyo at traveled all around the world, basically, connecting brands and technology with audiences. I then was part of a startup launch called Mata Lena which was a new view on the fashion space internet company from there, I went to Yahoo. So back to a big. Company and what I really saw was, you know, that was at the height of the portal era, whereby consumers were navigating the internet from big centralized places like Microsoft or Yahoo from there. I went to demand media to be part of their IP. Oh. And what I really saw at that point in time was that the internet was changing from being centralized and controlled to being searched driven whereby anyone can find anything. They want at any point in time and being part of a company that understood how to make content for that distribution and to monetize it with super interesting from there. I went to a oh, well to be the CMO via well, and then I launched a startup called backstage, which was a direct to consumer platform, which connected music artists and their fans. So my career really has spanned portal era, a search era and a social era, which really led me to barstools sports where I've been the CEO four. The last three years to shame. You haven't done much. Potential. So for those who are familiar with barstools one line. What is it? Oh, barstool. It's one of the funniest most disruptive media lifestyle brands out there. How did you become familiar with our store, I lived in Boston when Dave Portnoy, the founder created it? So I remember being lived with a bunch of women. I we, we would, you know, we worked hard we played very hard and I would get onto the train station in the morning, and there would be, you could choose from getting the metro from basically, like next like a homeless person, or you could get barstool sports, and Dave, and, you know, a handful of people handed out are still at the T stops that I went to. So I knew it from the beginning, I was there in Boston when he created it, it was also barstool is always the way guys that I knew talked. So it was the type of humor. They were interested in it was about Boston sports. It was about life in Boston. When I was building backstage, it was during the Deflategate. So the controversy with Tom Brady and the NFL. And I'm on a lot of what I built at backstage for big music artists on barstool because you would read something on barstool. And if you're a patriots fan or a Celtics fan or you know, Chicago Bears fan didn't matter fewer fan. You would read something. And then there would be a commerce experience right at the bottom of it. So in this case, like, I remember a Saturday morning, I was reading a blog of Dave's and at the bottom was it was wasn't ad for free. Brady t shirts, and I bought five, and I didn't feel like anyone was selling to me or as being manipulated. I really just wanted the free Brady t shirts go, I thought they were cool and I felt something from reading the blog. And so I've always loved barstool. I think that Dave is brilliant, and incredibly disruptive, and very true to himself, and his voice, and who he is. And he's held that. That steady for fifteen years, which is incredible. It's just unheard of so in the chance came, you know, when I knew they were looking for someone I I wanted this job very badly. Because the chance to work with a brand that knew who it, who it was with a huge amount of upside and potential needing the type of things I knew how to do was it was awesome. When you talk about the barstools sounded like people that you knew in your life, it reminded you of, you know, being out in Boston parcel, is known for leaning into in representing a Friday, image. And there's the fun part of that. And then there's also the negative connotations with that. How did you think through that when you when this actually became a reality of, like I might go run? That's shur. Yeah, people had a lot of reactions Steve or, like, what are you doing which I've talked a lot about people thought, I was, you know, do having career suicide, which by virtue of my linked, and I might be, but also just to jump in for people that aren't as familiar with partial, when we talk about the other side of that. Barstool and it's found her deport. I l Pez has racked up a lot of controversy particularly over the way it per trays women. So that's what we're going to yet. So I would take a couple of things about our, which is one is Dave and everyone at arsenal. And I got to barstool there's probably fifteen bloggers were always very unafraid, and they were not a big company, they were an underground disruptive alt- publication, really. So they didn't censor themselves. They've never thought about being PC. They, you know, they made jokes sometimes the jokes landed sometimes the jokes really didn't land. They never really backed down from what they said. So, you know, over the course of time, they've had, you know, they've made comments or written blogs, or you know, had quips on on various shows that I think, in two thousand nineteen or twenty seventeen or twenty sixteen at least in my tenure they wouldn't make again. Not because of me, but I, I think the world has changed really dramatically from two thousand nine to two thousand sixteen. I don't think we're Friday. I can understand why people think we look Freddie, you know, by and large the majority of our company is a, why a young white guy, which in and of itself has a connotation of being Friday. But if you look at the women, we have brought to barstool you look at the brands that were launching inside of barstool, you look at the type of talent that we're nurturing, it's really anything, but Friday, it is, it is still unapologetically true, though, to that knowing its audience, which by and large, our guys and increasingly we're attracting female audiences and different types of audiences and covering different types of topics. You know, the military politics business entertainment, sex and relationships, etc. At our core, though, we want to be funny and. Compelling and authentic. And I think that's what guides us to, to ultimately where we think we can go and it's alternately why we've been very successful. I think there's a lot of people who don't like barstool. There's a lot of people who think barstools not for them. There's a lot of people who are easily offended by barstool. I don't think we're as controversial as people say, we are, but it's very convenient to say that barstool is controversial mostly, because we're very disruptive and were somewhat threatening. And in our growth and the amount of time, we're taking them out of tension. We have for the audience, we want, you are a very successful business woman. There are unfortunately, not that many people at your level of success. And I think that is changing and will change. But it's why you are considered a trailblazer and someone that we look up to. Did you have a moment? You know, when we talk about the rise of the metoo movement, and we talk about times up. Did you have a moment where you're like, wow? I didn't maybe I didn't realize that some of this behavior really is wrong. Or maybe I didn't realize how this. Could come off. Or maybe I didn't realize that, you know, part of what we're putting out in the world could be part of the problem. Did you ever have a personal moment sort of thinking that through as a woman as a businesswoman? That's I mean you guys are equally successful and I, I love what he's built with the skim. I read it every day. I think it's awesome. Thank you. No, I bar still is the least, sexist least misogynistic place. I have ever worked like I have worked at a lot of places where most things happen behind closed doors. And I think for women who are trying to trailblazers for themselves, regardless of what that means like getting your first job or getting the job or a big job like insidiousness and closed doors and things that are unspoken. I think are the most dangerous places for anyone who's trying to break into a club that is closed. So no, I really stand by the culture and the integrity of our culture as a company, I think the metoo movement and time's up and just women's empowerment is really important. We are not a brand that is promoting any agenda. Whether it's female empowerment, male empowerment, this outer the other thing, we're a comedy brand dressed up as a sports site. So. You know, I don't think we are part of the problem. And I really stand by I think the people I work with are some of the finest people. I have worked with in my career. What I can control is the type of company that we have, and the type of culture we have in the way that we manage problems. And we the way we resolve we resolve them or in the way we treat our employees and find new employees. And so I'm really proud of that. And I think, you know, if you look at barstool were probably the one of the only companies in media that has a female CEO, a female CRO, a female CFO a female head of production like we have hired incredible women, not because they're women, but because they're incredibly talented hungry. Bad ass people who are gonna take our company to the next level. So when I look at the places that criticize us which are predominantly traditional media companies, and then I look at their roster, and I'm like, where the women when you decided to take the role, did you think it was going to be? Controversial. I think I underestimated the controversy it's interesting because you beat out over seventy male candidates to get the job, and normally that would be something, you know, without putting the brand into it, it would be like this amazing moment, but you would think would be celebrated, and you got a lot of flak. We read that you lost board seats of it. And I'm sure friendships Boven personal and professional. How did that affect you? I've loved my barstool experience I it has come at a cost certainly it was unexpected. It was. You know, it was the best deviation from a path that I had ever been on. I was CMO for big company. The president of a very interesting startup. But this is I feel so certain that this is my place. And I'm, I'm so glad I made it here. So it's been you know, any Nixon bruises and are worth it. So father stay is coming up, but we are in kind of an awkward position this year because we're going to be on the middle of the hottest Kim your life book tour, which are dads are excited about, but also means that we won't be around on Father's Day. So we need to make sure we get good gifts in advance. So I think that we're both going to do the same gift this year surprised ads hope you're listening. We're getting free bridge. I'm going to bring pictures of just my face really up close. I don't know what you're gonna do. I don't know if that's the best gift, but okay, but thing is an easy and affordable way to custom free in your favorite things from prints and posters to the photos on your phone, or just a close selfie. If you're me, just go to frame bridge dot com and upload your photo, you can order custom gift for any debt in your life. In minutes. Just go to frame bridge dot com and use promo code skim to save an additional fifteen percent off your first order again, that's just frame bridge dot com promo code. Kim. Cheers and talk about you as a leader in a few different ways. One is I I'm fascinated by the idea of someone becoming a CO. Eddie founder lead company, an a company that is such a strong founder vision, and also a founder, the pres-, who has a very controversial image. How did you approach that to get buy in from the team and level set that you are the CEO, and while Dave might be the founder like you were put in charge? Yeah. It's hard. I mean found you like shocking to the to the ultimate female founders? But the thing I loved about, Dave Portnoy, and Dan cats and Keith Mark vich and Kevin Clancy and John fight Oberg all of the original guys was that they knew what they knew. And they were very proud of it. They're fiercely protective of it, but they were also very honest and open about what they did not know. And I think if if. If barstool didn't have that type of environment, I would not have succeeded nor would anyone have have succeeded. So I think it's hard to it's intimidating to come into a company that is built and is so intrinsically tied to in your case to people or in our case, you know, one person, and very big personalities what I loved about Dave was that we saw the world, the same way, we saw the potential of commerce. We saw the idea of a very disruptive sports media brand or media brand. And I worked exceptionally hard, you know that first year I worked incessantly mostly to earn their trust. And I wanted to be in it together. So when we won we won together, and when we tripped and failed it was together, and I also wanted to protect them, because I think there will never be another barstool sports. The worst thing I could do would be to change. That that's. The key to working with a founder, especially create a founder and it, it couldn't have happened if he wasn't so involved or if wasn't so, vulgar, any of our core talent with an involved in it couldn't happen if I hadn't brought my side of it to what is it like to come in as a leadership in a leadership position where you are making business and product decisions every day for a target demo that you are not that target. I I'm obsessed with our product, and while I do not fit the prototype of our audience in any way, shape or form. I spend hours with our teams are audiences are fans. I feel that I've been able to really understand the motivation. Now, I'm not making the creative call. I don't want to be making a creative call. I absolutely should not be making a creative call because ultimately, I'm not the personality and I'm not the audience, but I think someone you know, one is I think you have to be really good listener, and you have to be. Thoughtful in the recommendations, you create you also have to not have a lot of control. So we tend to make a lot of things all the time. Some land some don't land, and that experimentation is, is also part of how we've been able to do it. So I feel like my job is to create the environment that lets creative people talk to their fans and to enhance the products on which they do it by looking at the data of what happened. What didn't happen? What worked what didn't work? So that's how I would look at it one sentence. What had how would you describe the company culture? It's very alive. It's just a very alive company like you come in to your office, which is gorgeous, like, I'm so impressed by it, and it's clean, and it's pretty, and it's quiet, and we have a romper room of, you know, we just moved offices a week and a half ago, we had one hundred fifty people in twelve thousand square feet, which just to it. It's like cramming a high school into one room. We had two studios and redo fifteen hours of radio podcasts live content every day. And we're on top of one another. So it's loud. It's noisy. It's chaotic, it's extremely creative. But it is just very alive. We tried that are HR person told us we had to move when we were taking conference calls from the bath. Yes. Totally. So, yeah. Let's take be quick break to talk about our book how to skim your life. It is all about some of the most important parts of being an adult think wine pairings, your finances, your career, big purchases, like cars houses, apartments, and more. It is the kind of book you're going to want to have on your coffee table so you can keep coming back to it. What are you waiting for? Now is the time. Get to it. The skin dot com slash book. That's skim dot com slash book. Go order how to skim your life today. Yeah. I want to talk a little bit about you as a manager. And when we talk about company culture and scaling it when you came on our show is about twelve people. Yeah, I was it was somewhat unknown. There were twelve people slated to come to New York. So when Dave took investment from the chairman group, he, he, he wanted to move barstool to New York, and go for the moon and the funny thing about barstool at the time, there was a big network of people who quote unquote, worked for barstool. And I couldn't when I got there, there wasn't a PNL there wasn't an Email system. They didn't use slack. They, it's still kind of struggle with flack. But so it was hard to tell who who works for barstool, and what exactly do you do very funny? I stay problem crazy. I day problem like we didn't have an office we had people who they blocked every thirty minutes. And but didn't really talk to one another. They didn't have any system to talk. To one another. You know Dave until fairly recent history back then paid them in personal checks, like it was it, it was an underground, alt- brand. So how do you keep some of that, obviously balanced pudding processes in plays like making sure they can talk to each other? Yeah. While also scaling and not having the founder right, personal checks, totally so he being checks or. Yeah, DNA is super important one have a lot of respect for them. You know, I always came into it with a ton of respect that they they'd gotten this thing to be so big with, with hardly anything with only their brains and their computers. And I sought to build process around that. But that was a process built for barstool. I knew fairly quickly coming into barstool that a traditional process was not going to work that an HR person saying no calls in the bathroom just was never ever. Ever going to fly. I also felt I could make their jobs easier. I could make them more famous. I could I could make things less have less friction we could create communication. We could be durable and repeatable in the things that we did every day I could create security, you know, really very honestly look at what we had, and then to build things that were made for, for it and to not be married to any particular decision. If over time it didn't work, and that's really the only way, you know, we've grown from let's call it on, you know, under twenty people in two thousand sixteen to one hundred and sixty people in two thousand nineteen we have gone from three podcasts to thirty podcasts. Like we have just we have just grown, so exponentially, that not being rigid on, on anything has been really important. Because if we were rigid we would still be doing things the way we did. Them in twenty twenty sixteen or twenty seventeen or twenty eighteen not just doesn't make any sense. You became a manager at age twenty three. What were you like as a manager then and how are you as a manager now, probably pretty similar? I love to work like I love to work. I love working with teams. I loved playing sports. You know I love locker room which is maybe why I love are still sports, like I I love a locker room, I think being with another group of people and going after winning something is the best to always wanted to work as part of a team. And I, I have I love team. I'm very blunt. I'm extremely impatient. I was extremely impatient. When I was twenty three I'm very hungry to learn. And I, I just don't believe that because someone something is told to you that this is how it should be. That that's really how it should be. Like I I just don't like that. I loved my team. And I was hard on them. What is winning look like for you. Now. It's a really good question. I don't I think winning is being fulfilled at, at what we're creating like I don't know exactly where this thing goes. I think anyone who tells you that they know where your company goes just lying. And nobody knows and on with, like oh, so they have the playbook approach. Yeah. Automatically like or whatever. So I don't know where barstool goes. I think we can be bigger and stronger, and funnier and enter new, you know, enter new markets, enter new audiences bring new people, create new products but I think winning is, for me and for barstool and for anyone who works at this company is I really being honorable to what we have created and taking it to a place that it has not been before. So as part of being a manager you have to hire. People and put together a team you famously did an interview where you talked about your interview practice our short and time in the end. Yes. We loved reading, I'm sure. But you talked about you Tex candidates on the weekends as part of kind of putting them through a process. I wanna know I wanna hear about your thinking behind that. I will tell you like we put any candidate any person that we hired this scam. We give them a homework assignment. We have I'm sure it's very similar reasons why, which is you wanna see how people respond to chat. You really want to work here. Yeah. At the same time, like I can tell you people just like in our personal lives, when they're interviewing for, for jobs and a potential employer is giving them a homework assignment or would text them on the weekend. Red Sox red flag for them. Yes. So what would you say to a friend of yours that is applying for a job that they're excited about? And the CEO of that company is texting them at odd hours on the weekends. What did I would you to put full context for that, quote? So what I was describing was when I was at AOL and see mobile. Well, and there are thousands of people in the, the marketing organization. Nobody texted anyone on the weekends. It was a corporate job. Right. And you could clock in at eight thirty or nine o'clock in the morning and he clock out at five and that was cool. When I got to barstool, or when I worked at backstage backstage music, so music is at nights, and on weekends and you, you know, I needed people who could roll. On nights and weekends. Those are typically young people, which I I love working with young people. I think that, that it's just exhilarating at barstool there was a couple of things about barstool, one is shit. Goes down at any given time on any given day so being attuned to what is happening. Not obsessed, not in a way that sacrifices your your life. But being attuned to. This is a twenty four seven company that lives on the internet and things blow up all the time something major happens in sports game of thrones. You know, game of thrones Sunday night. We're all over game of thrones. It's a Sunday night, like I'd like to be in bed watching game of thrones. But I'm watching Twitter, you know. So, so so you know what I would say to answer your question which is one. I think it's good in interviewing for a new job that the job should scare you and that it should push you into a place that you have not gone. I think if you're looking for the same, but different it's not going to be rewarding, and it's not going to move. You forward. So I any person who asked career advice for myself like those are big things that I think about in terms of, you know, it wasn't texting people on the weekends. It was just responsiveness to text as a means of communication, our company really converses overtaxed, we taste, c- skimmers tax chain. Yeah. All of our executive and it's it communicates. It's amazing. It's so fast. It's clear like cuts out all the blah bla-bla-bla like nobody cares. Like what needs to happen who's making the decision. What's happening next? So we don't have an Email culture. We don't have a conference call culture. We have texts culture and barstool always had texts culture because they all lived in different cities. And you texted one another. So, you know, for me is hey, can you succeed in this environment? Now, if you're a finance person, I'm not texting you you're not texting me, we're the text, isn't how you're you're running your business on a spreadsheet and Email, and in, like very secure files. If you're a creative person you are, if you're in production, you are, so I think it's important to show if you're interviewing for a job that you want to be at that company, and whether it's doing the homework assignment or thinking about what you would do with barstool sports or responding to your manager over text. That's important. I also think if that makes you feel like it's, it's an imposition that job is never going to work for you. And that's okay. We want to get to our favorite. Oh, art show selecting route, I love the lightning round. Ray Brandt was gonna. On the lake planetary. Yup. Okay. What did you think you were going to be when you grow up, I wanted to work for Benetton? Okay. Wait. Why? Because when I was in my teens Benetton you guys are too young for another word. Benetton used to make the huge magazine catalog, and they had beautiful photography black women and white women in the hair was amazing. And the colors were were it just the colors were amazing. I had my room plastered in Benetton adds an Absolut vodka ads. I was gonna say I had. I wanted to work really for Absolut vodka or Benetton college major sociology first job. I was like a busboy or like a bus girl in a restaurant, which was terrible job. But where stub that one, worst professional mistake you've made hiring people because other people think I should. First phone call when he get good news. It's a text of I would text my family. My girlfriend's first phone caller or tax when you get bad news. I tend to sit on bad news for a long time. So same people, but I tend to sit with, when's the last time you negotiated for yourself horribly and not probably when I came to barstool what about the hardest thing. Yeah. Same, what is the go-to interview question when you are looking to hire somebody? Why do you want to work here? How do people know in your stressed? I think I can get cranky and your teams like. I short I can be short. I if I have if I'm really chewing on something or focused on something I can be short what drives you? I'm just really curious like I love people and the idea of building something and figuring out problems like I was with my girlfriend's yesterday. This is not a short answer, which is funny. I was in my girlfriend's yesterday, and I was describing, I don't know. We were talking about things, and I was like, honestly, if someone comes to me with the problem, it could be like a personal problem. It could be a work problem doesn't I like all I wanna do is fix it, and sometimes that's annoying because people don't necessarily want their problems fixed. So I just like to fix things and build things, and then they break. And then the fixed new things a few minutes ago. You said that when you take a job or anyone takes job, he should be a little bit scared by so it still scares. You. I mean ever the future like. Awareness, barstool go, that scares me. Not scares me, but I, I don't know the answer, and it could go places where I need to teach myself to go. What's your shameless? Plug. Oh, I have a lot of shame. I mean, go to barstools sports and don't think we suck. Good place to end arrogant. Thank you. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join us next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily Email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign about the skim dot com. That's the S K I M M dot com to 'em spur a little something extra.

Dave Portnoy CEO founder Boston Microsoft Benetton Erica Nardini AOL Fidelity Investments Kim demand media Tom Brady Yahoo Mata Lena Danielle Weisberg Carly Eric Tokyo London
Erica Williams Simon, entrepreneur and author: The only way out of feeling stuck is to move.

Skimm'd from The Couch

33:59 min | 1 year ago

Erica Williams Simon, entrepreneur and author: The only way out of feeling stuck is to move.

"Today's episode is brought to you by. Hr Block tax pro go expert tax. Prep without the office visit doc the only way out of feeling stuck is to move and by movement I mean create some space in your life to start trying to think. Think deeply and proactively about what can I do to change things. What can my next? FBI You won't necessarily find the immediate answer but it's asking the key questions. Shins that I think can help. I'm Carly's Aitken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have leapt from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. We welcome Erica. William Simon to skimmed from the couch. Erica is a writer podcast hosts and the CEO of Sage House media as a self-described -scribed professional question asker. She facilitates conversations to inspire social change. Her new book you deserve. The Truth Discusses The career decisions nations. She made in order to re write her life story and she shares. How you can do the same Erica? We are so excited to have you with US mainly because you have interviewed us many times and now we have you on the other side of the table. I'm kind of your good energy. Yeah I'm like I mean I feel a lot of pressure. You're the welcome to the couch. Thank you for having me. So we're GONNA start how he started every interview. Just Skim your resume for us. So I started out my career in politics six. I'm born and raised in the DC area and went to the leadership conference on Civil and human rights which is the nation's oldest largest civil rights coalition that no one has ever heard of. But they're behind every major piece of legislation since the march on Washington and they're a coalition of women's or LGBT or eggs and black and brown ours and so what was awesome about. It was right then I got to kind of get a lay of the land of the entire like social justice progressive policy world. So from there I went to run in the national use arm for the Center for American progress which they call like the White House in waiting. It's Clinton Chief of staff ran it and it was just the forefront of progressive policy and my job was to figure out how to work with young people millennials to get them involved and support their campaigns and in the process ended up on TV quite a bit and my spokesperson and fell in love with that part of the work did a couple more jobs in that arena went to the citizen engagement lab which is like this really cool incubator for social change projects and kind of had carved out at this role for myself as like the Voice of Progressive Millennial America. You know what I mean and I loved it and it was fine and it was flashy and exciting and yet there was a part. Pardon me that felt like I want more than this. For my life felt very limited then became the creative director the first creative director of up worthy which at the time was like a social good buzzfeed inroad a buck and then went to snapchat and built a program. They are called the creators lab. It was the first of its kind. It was a program physical space to bring storytellers digital media creators and influences together to have meaningful conversations. And now I run my own company. So that's the that's the resume and the highlight so we can get when something not on your linked in that we should know about you. I have been singing in the choir and directed McGuire. That was a little girl so music is like my passion outside of work and I bring that up. Just because it's kind of what I do is try to create the same spaces professionally that I felt. As a little girl growing up a pastor's kid singing and having meaningful meaningful conversations and community with people that still very much a part of the mindset that I bring to everything I do. What's your favorite song to Sing Whitney? Houston's I love the Lord which she sang in the preacher's that's why I love it. It's so good. When you started to say Whitney Houston I was like Oh my God me too? I'm like I WANNA dance with somebody and then you went into. Yeah I know I'm GonNa Dance. Somebody's a good one. So let's talk about how you grow grew up in DC. Your father was a preacher. You call yourself a preacher's preacher's daughter for life. What does that mean to you? The way that I view the world everything than I am came from that experience so the way TV depicts black. Churches coaches is actually not the way that most black churches in America are most of them are actually very small kind of like mom and pop. They call them storefront churches. So that's what ours was and felt like a giant family family. He started the church literally in our basement when I was nine months old. So when people say they grew up in church like literally of course then the church moved out and had the real building and all that stuff but my life revolved around a couple of key principles around service so ours was the door that was always open. If you needed a place to stay needed to be bailed L. out of jail in the middle of the night like you called my father it was that kind of orientation around just selfless giving it was oriented around having honest authentic conversations so whether it was because he was counseling people or the group or Sunday mornings. It was just this. Is the place where you can be real where you can be. Authentic used. Always say like we're not interested. Is it in your Sunday. Best like how you look in your outfit but we want to get to know the real you and have meaningful conversations and so that is kind of been a thread through everything that I've done in my life. I've realized that I've been doing that whether it was in the sphere of politics or media or attack my main mission was select. Let's cut through the BS and have meaningful conversations that can help you change your life and change the world in some way and I got that straight from from my father and really both of my parents. We met you with four ever really knowing this part of your background and so it was really really fun to kind of research and read more about you realize what a huge part of who you are is really based around your dad and based around growing up that way and around faith we are struck once said where you said you define in view faith specifically that your faith is about wonder what does that mean in general but particularly for for our generation for those who grew up like in the nineties in two thousand and even now the way that faith is presented in the public sphere is very much about certainty. Like you have to know these these things and believe these things. There are these lines around religion. That safe you you know you have to know with absolute certainty that this happened in this way and I just find and that to be such a limiting way of thinking about a God who was ultimately big massive and unknowable. Right and so I prefer to think of faith as looking at the. Aw and under of the things that I don't understand the things that there are no clear answers for. I'm not GonNa sit in debate science. There's an answer for that right but there's so many things we don't know and don't understand and you can't put words to love you can't put words to kind of like your own growth and development and all of these beautiful amazing things and so my faith practice is really really grounded in just the wonder awe of life and how how it exists and how we communicate and engage with one another and I think if you do that you can kind of free yourself from so many restrictions that society and institutions have put on your faith and your spirit and your internal life. I feel like that was beautiful too. Yeah I'm amazed that someone who has this authentic sense to face can then go into politics girl me too and and I are benthic since a face because I think that both parties all parties. There's kind of a religious pandering. How did you reconcile that? It was was hard but I went and pretty naive. I went into that world for the purest reason possible which I must say actually a lot of my colleagues did to. Let's be clear. A lot of people who are doing social impact work whether on the activist side of the political side tend to go in with a really pure mission. I want to change people's lives. I went to help help. People recognize their own power change systems and structures all that stuff like I felt like it was a continuation of my fathers when he did in our community. And I was like. This is just a different Scale a different level in a way to do that that you know spirit and and services one thing but let's talk about systems so I went in with that mindset and then saw what it is that I think everybody sees. which is you know all the red tape all the hypocrisy again very similar to how most people view religion right these are institutions? That are very change focused and I think when you go in with that power gets involved and things become corrupted and so it was really hard and talk about this in the book and the chapter on faith with and actually in the chapter on work and in identity. I think I talked about I do but just this idea that I was struggling to reconcile all the different parts of WHO. Yeah I was and so at work. I didn't talk about faith a lot for very obvious reasons right especially if you're progressive. We're not supposed to talk about that. Because Faith Jason Religion is supposed to be owned by conservatives and so that's just not a thing that's really cool to talk about and then on the flip. When I was home in my faith environment I was not talking about the fact that like Hey I am on the frontlines literally fighting for marriage equality fighting for reproductive rights and justice which were taboo topics in the church and so I was was kind of walking this line for a while and I think part of why I ended up at a point where I said? I can't do this anymore. I have to remake my life and write a new story for myself was because because of that I was living kind of this divided existence. Well a lot of people. It's a don't necessarily have the extreme of the divided existence that you're referencing. Lots of people have a job and feel like this isn't me like I'm not doing what I'm supposed to be doing fulfiled because of a multitude of reasons but ultimately this is informed me. That doesn't mean that everybody is like okay. Take a step back and rewrite my story really really hard thing to do and to have the courage to do I want to just kind of get into your mindset around around how you thought about stepping away from that and also I wanNA talk about relationship with money because it's not just emotional courage that you need to have to step away from something but it's also financial courage which is a really personal thing to think through. Yeah yeah it was tough book turbans saying like you don't have to do it this way. You can slow down. You can think I didn't do much of that abruptly quit my job. You talk about how you quit your job. It was an angry email. It just don't recommend that I had just come back from my honeymoon. I was on this high of living life. I'd be doing yoga. Whatever I came back and it was to be fair? My last job was not a great job. It was really toxic. I had a terrible boss. I was being disrespected. It wasn't just like I'm I'm mildly unhappy. It was like a job I needed to get out of. I didn't plan on doing it that day. Hey but I got an email. That was like once again while it had been on vacation. It had changed my job description without any conversation about it. They had messed up my pay. Hey there was just all of these things. I don't know what came over me because I am not usually a person who does things just that suddenly sent an email and I was like okay. Great thank you. This is my last day working for you but by and I walked into my living room with my brand spanking new husband and was like so I just quit my the job. What did he say he was stunned? But on the other hand he's like all right. Erica okay like I don't make rash decisions but I do move with my gut. And he knew how miserable I had been in that job so he was surprised but he wasn't surprised. I on the other hand became very surprised. Like maybe like an hour later. I you have that feeling we. Did they write back I don't know I log out of my email. I never logged back on C.. Never have spoken to them since then but I don't know what their reaction was. That's on that day about how I would be like trying to get back in a moment. I mean five minutes later what did I do. I need to see what they wrote any till I felt like I felt like I'd had some sort of a stroke like you do it. And then you feel really high. And it's just a super exciting and then slowly settles in. I tell that story for two reasons. One you don't have to do it that way but to I do tell it because people like me. We are never supposed to do that when you hear the quitting stories. You've got your eat. Pray Love you've got your Jerry Maguire's right like young women young black women `young load middle income. Women are never supposed to step back. There's a stigma around the idea of quitting. And I just encourage people not to abruptly quit or make unwise decisions agents but to know that it is okay to step away from something that isn't serving the world will not end. If you can figure out and we'll get into that part the financial piece of it which is huge huge. I just want to take away the stigma of that because sometimes you have to take a step away. Even if you can't quit your job though I do think it's imperative of that. How ever you can in your life that you create some space as opposed to just dwelling in the unhappiness and the being unfulfilled and the complaining which we naturally do right you gotta let off seems way but I think there's just a sense of feeling stuck and the only way out of feeling suck is to move and by movement I mean create eight some space in your life to start trying to think deeply and proactively about? What can I do to change things? What can my next be? You won't necessarily find in the immediate answer her. But it's asking the key questions that I think can help as CEO's CEO's. We are very busy very very busy important people and we are always looking to get time back and in that way we are just like everyone else because no one has enough time no matter what you do no matter where you're from there are never enough hours in the day so we are obsessed with helping all of you spend your time wisely and we're going to give you the biggest tip on that it is Asian are blocks tax pro. Tis The season you have to do your taxes. Taxes taxes are easy when you use H and R block tax pro. All You have to do is upload your tax documents and attacks pro literally does everything else. It is truly the easiest way to have the expert expert. Like do it for you. But you don't have to go anywhere you do it at home. And they're trained to get you every deduction credit that you deserve go to H R block dot com slash skim that is HR block dot com slash skim. It is better with block and we couldn't recommend the sport. Doc I want to talk about the financial part Because I always feel like to your your point when we hear these stories or when we talk about our story and taking on credit card debt I feel like that Perkins glossed over when you're hearing stories where it works out. How did you think through that? What's your advice to people that are going through that themselves? I mean advice want advice point number one is do not abruptly quit your job. You can actually take a little bit of time to plan but in either case So I'll tell you what happened with me so I Also how old are you this. Plan Twenty seven thirty seven now twenty-eight sorrows and you know I had no idea what I was going to do next and this is the part that's going to Piss people off because it's like my faith the`miracle managing staff but the next day. I had an e mail in my inbox from someone I had met before in like a professional networking group. WHO said Hey? I don't know if you do consulting but I've got a client that I think would love to just talk to you and pick your brain about kind of how to engage millennials and social impact stuff. And I was like yes I definitely do. Yeah absolutely I do. I had never consulted before. I had no idea what that entailed. But I was like. Okay ass and the client and then that being coca-cola like it was my massive so random But that was a short term project and it wasn't like a consistent income and it took a while to get paid and I still didn't really know what I was doing. I also had throughout the entirety tired of my work. Life had a side Gig which is also something I encourage people to do. Don't run yourself. Ragged and drive yourself into the ground to have ten jobs. My identity has never ver- been solely tied to my one job. Because I know that all of WHO I am fit into one job. We try to put pressure on ourselves. That kind of have every single part of who we are every passion and every gift and talent in one job that will never happens. I've always had multiple streams of income so I had media and communications training on the side that I'd always he's done and so I basically put the word out like I can do more of that now guys and so I kind of consistently had that coming in that hustle. Come from your family weirder that come from that. You always always had that stuff happening. It wasn't even the hustle that came from my family. What came from my family was the idea that you have to use all of your gifts? It was again a very existential spiritual the thing that if you have gifts and talents it is your job to figure out how to use them to serve the world so it wasn't really about like I gotTa Hustle and multiple jobs. It was like okay if my job. Bob Isn't taking advantage of the fact that I do this too. I'M GONNA go find a way to do it. It really was me trying to find fulfilment that then turned into okay so then that means you're hustler and you have multiple gigs. How do you react when people say? I want to be able to bring my whole self to work. Well that's rare. It's very rare. The metaphor that I give in the book is that statement is like pretending you have to get all of your belongings in a carry on suitcase in one carry on right. He's someone who has to check every time I I understand. What do you really annoying one time one time and we were there ten days and like I don't understand how you didn't check check check moon? You should have just checked with me. It was really annoying. Wasn't it. Yeah you don't have to fit your entire life in A carry on you have multiple suitcases and so it is important that you can bring your best self to work. Meaning if you're coming to work and the part of you that is showing showing up is not you know positive is not maximizing your talent. That's a problem but you don't have to bring your whole self even when I was talking about my faith side and my political side. I wasn't looking for a job that was going to let me like have a protest sign in one arm and like a Communion Cup in the other. They're like I'm not expecting my job to allow me to express all of those. I wanted to be in a place where I didn't have to pretend to be someone else. It's rare that you'll find the job that takes advantage of every single one of your talents and skills you can put those into different areas of your life with side hustles with hobbies with community service. Your job is to complete the circle of your life. But you don't have to do that. In one slice you moved to Los Angeles. I did why I wish I had like a super bossy progressive feminist. Answer for that my my husband. He wanted to move. I went kicking and screaming because I was like California. Had Your family react. Oh they were not happy my grandmother till the day. Hey that she passed away. She passed away a couple years ago. We were very very close and she. She loved my husband too. Because we've known each other since high school so he's part of the family but till the day she passed away every time. I would come home Tom. She would pat my head and say he won't let you leave how Hollywood secondhand not like holding it is. My family was not happy about the but I'm glad I did at the time that I'd quit my job. I didn't know what the next forget. Forget job I didn't know what the next season of my life was. who was I going to be next? What was my identity? What did I want to do? And it was so good to begin a new space to to explore that to be in a space where our lays a very like multi hyphen culture. I'm this and this and this and this and that was what I needed to be who I am so it was good to be in that environment. One of the things we asked a lot is when people either have gaps on their resume and terms of years taken off or whether maybe they were consulting freelancing doing doing multiple things at once how to position themselves then for a fulltime role. Because you did eventually take fulltime rolls what we're small startups than than one became snap. Yeah Yeah but how did you position yourself as someone for fulltime role. If I was GONNA pick one career skill I would tell people. It's the art of crafting. Your story story and I don't mean that in the abstract sense like your life journey I mean literally what is the story. How do you tell a tizzy what has happened in your life? If people don't recognize their power to do that you assume that you have these pieces. I have this job. I have this consulting gig. I have this gap and I just have to presents the pieces to someone and let them put them together however they want. No you decide how you string them together so for example instead of saying well I worked in politics and I had a job and then I left that job and then I was consulting and I was consulting with a corporate client and this and that and then I work attack. I was stringing together to say I've been on a journey journeys in three different industries to identify how to tell the best stories to young people right like that is a way of talking about it. Another way of talking about it is I could say at three three change focus industries. I have worked to help. Young people figure out the best way to create meaningful impact and transformation not lies suspending. Its packaging. And you can't do that on the fly. You have to take the time to kind of look and say what is the threat here. What was similar between this experience and that experience even if they were wildly different jobs or wildly different industries? Has there been one key motivation. has there been one key skill. Set that you've used and tying it together give someone someone the ability to say. This is the package I'm presenting you and it looks good. What has been helpful to you as you have gone through those moments of introspection two things so one is faith? But the way that I'll talk about that here is just saying like really developing your inner life before you start seeking out. INSTAGRAM quotes quotes influencers. Books I mean. All of those things can be helpful but I found that they are most helpful once. You've done the inner work to figure things out as best as you can on your own first. And here's why I say that influencers and self help books and all that stuff can be very very helpful. I mean I know I wrote one. It is amazing and it is hopefully very very practical and helpful to everyone who try to carve out a new life but they don't replace the inner work you have to do for yourself first of all. You're never seeing anyone's entire entire story anyway. You're looking at their instagram account. And you're like wow. That was easy for them. They quit their job and then the next day they had a brand supporting them. Whatever it is and you don't know the real story so one is like being really consistent and committed to my own inner girls like what does it mean to listen to myself? What do I actually enjoy doing? So that's one thing and the second is just as best you can hand find people who get you and support you whether that's friends or partner or if you need to join some sort of group whatever it is but I found that I wasn't the only one going this transition at that time. I mean some people had quit their jobs. Some people hadn't but understood and we're able to say like yeah. I'm rooting for you. You got this when you are working working for somebody else working at a company. Are you good on a team. I'm very good on a team. I'm not happy being told what to do. So are you to manage. I think I am to be honest. I'm hard because because I am always the person in the room that like if someone tells me what to do I'm like cool. I suggested no way instead like so. It's annoying. I'm sure so. Because there's a lot of people would say they also got driven what you're talking about resonates with them. which is that? There are very key parts of themselves that they are bringing to work in the parts of themselves. Maybe people don't see yet and they make decisions in a way that works for them and isn't necessarily following a rule book in an operational plan. But that doesn't mean that that those people are going to quit their jobs and start something. I'm very curious what advice you would give to those people about how to thrive in a more corporate environment the mindset shift that I had that eventually actually made me a good employee. Even though I don't like being play one was when I saw every opportunity as a chance to learn something I would see these environments as okay. This is like this is like school. I'm here to learn something. Learn people learn what it is. They're doing and how are they making decisions and I started to see it as a challenge to learn as much as I what could we tend to because we're not bring full to work which we don't necessarily need to but we tend to have very surfaced and shallow conversations with the people that we work with the more I was really really transparent and honest at work about what I was struggling with at work. Let me be clear. Not My personal life but You Know Hey. I'm having a difficult time time with this or I saw this way. You saw this. We can you explain that to me or yeah. I'm usually not good in this environment but I'm trying to get better. Can you help me like just being really honest. Just the more. My connections with my bosses were authentic and they actually wanted to help me thrive and didn't see me as competition it just felt much more collaborative operative so learning and being as on its and transparent as you can about where you are if you are having any challenges that the combination of those two things made me much better not member so the single worst thing happened to me yes. Have you ever accidentally picked up your significant others toothbrush and used it by mistake. Because that happened to me and I take out my tongue and my teeth I would. It was most horrifying thing in the entire world. That's that's gross. It was grows and reminded me that. If I had used my clip I would have known what was mine quips. Electric Brush has a sensitive sonic vibrations with a built in timer and thirty second pulses to guide to a full and even clean also. I really appreciate this quip delivers fresh fresh brush heads floss and toothpaste refills to your door. Every three months because who remembers to switch them out they do that with free shipping. So your routine As always right on and if you go to get clipped dot com slash scam right now. You will get your first refill free. That is your very first refill. FREE AT GET QUIP DOT COM Tom Slash Skim. I'm going to sell it for you. It is G. E. T. Q. U. IP DOT com slash skin. Quip is be good habits company. You've called yourself a one woman important. Conversations Business which I I like? How do you suggest people start that conversation at work or just in general? I think in general because I think a lot of people want to be be introspective and also there are so many demands and distractions and you're refreshing AFI checking email tax. goes off that it's hard hard to know how to actually start having those types of conversations. Either with yourselves more with the other people in your life adjust practicing asking questions. I was just with a friend yesterday and he was like I know people ask. How am I was like what? That's a very general basic questions. I mean that's the point like what is it that you want to know. Do you want to know. Oh how my day was. Do you want to know how emotionally who's GonNa come up to you and just ask out of the blue. How are you doing emotionally intense? And he's like I know but I WANNA get to the heart of the issue and I was like okay. No one's GONNA start off that way but it is a good practice as you're having conversations to keep asking questions to go a little bit deeper as opposed to leaving things things at the surface level so instead of just saying like how are you fine. Great you can ask someone what's been going on with your week as they answer questions continuing to ask because I find that we all start off surface all of us. We all start off with just a quick answers and the quick shallow questions but the deeper we go the more people realize you're genuinely interested in me. You're genuinely interested in what I have to say or what I think. And when people feel as if they matter they tend to much more quickly be authentic antic and strip some of that surface to me. That's the easiest way to start is to make sure that whoever you're talking to knows that you you actually care about what they're saying and continue to ask deeper questions. The narrative intelligence. It's my favorite thing. It's really the core kind of principle that I teach in the book. Narrative intelligence is our ability to understand and see the stories. Is that are shaping us in shaping the world around us so we talk about emotional intelligence. IQ right but no one ever teaches us that everything we see everything we consume is telling us a story that is shaping how we think and how we view the world and all the industries that I worked in. They know this very well right. Like politics understands. The power story media understands the power of story even the tech industry right. I worked at snapchat snapchat literally created the vertical story format story being a frame for your experience. It's these are industries that understand using story to get people to think a certain way believe and behave a certain way and we the average person just sitting around consuming and have no no idea that that's happening so narrative intelligence is in some ways putting that power back in the hands of people and saying okay. When I'm watching this film? What is it actually you telling me? What is the premise based on? What is the narrative here? Yes it's a fun love story but it is telling me the story that there is one soulmate one person for me out of the billions of people on this planet. Do I believe that or not right like asking that question. That's narrative intelligence in practice. If someone is telling doing me that the best way to succeed is to hustle and make a lot of money and Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and. They have this kind of very clear path to stop. and Ask yourself self before you just run in and do it. They say ask yourself. What are they telling me about success? What is the story here about my purpose about my identity? Do I believe that yes or no. It's not up to me to tell you whether it's good or bad but just the act and the art of saying what is the real story here. And how can I see it. And then make a conscious choice to accept did or reject it as I'm sure people are listening and probably going to be very inspired and are going to be like I didn't know who it was. I'm going to follow her now. Like I I like the story I like. I like the story. She's telling and they're GONNA buy your book. Yeah they're going to buy her out. But I think the question people are going to have is. How do you make money doing what you're doing like wizard job? What does your day to day look like? It's just found someone the other day who said Oh it's a portfolio career and I was like Oh what Buzzer buzzword. They just learned it means. I do several things but they are all tied to what we've just talked about. So how do I make money. I consult with organizations brands when they WANNA have important conversations whether with their employees or their consumers. I'll come in and help them design an event or design kind of a messaging campaign designed like we want to have an important conversation about issue. She acts or about topic x Eric. Help US strategize that come facilitate that. So that's one way. Second way is through content through books. Do podcasts through workshops and trainings things so I come in and I actually help people help staff. I helped regular individual people craft their story and understand how to better talk about their life their work and and then the last thing is like hosting and facilitating so moderating and interviewing. I love to ask questions so those are all the pieces. What sage house does which is my company is? It does all that like I said Ed specifically for brands and for organizations and so we'll come in and design the meaningful conversation that helps you write a story. Can you talk about the name. Yes so it's funny. I didn't think about this at first which I probably should have but being in California when I said Stage House people thought I meant like sage. That's why ass I was like no I. We have been known to sage office during the year and my home. So wasn't that but I guess it works too 'cause I am very spiritual and he did but no I meant it because sage as in a wise the person that we are generation in a society right now that is so overloaded with information and we have access to anything we want to know what our fingertips but wisdom is deeper than that it is. How do you apply that as how do you process that? How do you sort through that information? Fine Gems that help us live better lives that is what stages are and I think we have too few sages in too many influencers and so kind of what my mission is with these conversations and these spaces and this content ah is always to dig deep and get to the true wisdom of how we can live time for our last round favorite round. Okay row lightning first job working and physical therapy a PT assistant physical therapist assistant. Worst job the one that I had that I quit. WHO's the first phone call? You make when you get good news my husband. What about when you get bad news? My sister what's the most recent show you benched hip hop evolution on that flight. I'm obsessed it's really good. What's your biggest vice carbs? The French guests potato lava potato last book. You Read Atomic Habits by James Clear a layer DC ONO EH. How about L. A. or New York? Oh La. I can't stand. What's your shameless plug? Shameless plug is my book. You deserve the truth. My website heirlooms DOT com. Where you can sign up for workshops that I'm leading virtual workshops about the topics in the book awesome haircut? Thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you so much. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information. You need to start your day sign about the scam dot com that's the SK S K. I am DOT COM two. M's for a little something extra.

Erica CEO Los Angeles California Tom Slash US Whitney Houston FBI Center for American progress INSTAGRAM director Danielle Weisberg Aitken William Simon Washington McGuire Clinton DC
Adriana Cisneros, CEO of Cisneros: "I think when you have a crisis... it is kind of a unique opportunity to really think about what matters to the core of [a] business and rethink it.

Skimm'd from The Couch

33:03 min | 1 year ago

Adriana Cisneros, CEO of Cisneros: "I think when you have a crisis... it is kind of a unique opportunity to really think about what matters to the core of [a] business and rethink it.

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay. Lauder the nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first let's get into the episode. I think when you have a crisis like the one we're having right now. It is kind of a unique opportunity to really think about what really matters to the core of that business and we think I'm carly's aged. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it? All out than where it began on a couch. This show might sound a bit different today. Because we're skimming from three different couches. The scam is working from home for the time being because of covert nineteen today Adriana Cisneros joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the CEO OF CISNEROS. A Global Enterprise focused on media digital advertising real estate and social leadership. Adriana is the third generation at the helm of her family's company she's also the president of whom does Jones is narrows her family's nonprofit organization dedicated to improving education in Latin America Adriana. Were very excited to have you with us today. Welcome to skimmed from the couch. Thank you so much. I'm thrilled to be here. So we are going to jump in like we do all episodes. GotTa give me your estimate for us. So I grew up in Venezuela. That's where I was born and went to school in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. I moved to New York. I went to Columbia Undergrad and then I went to Nyu where I studied journalism. I was in the investigative reporting program there which was really cool. I had a few jobs in the middle mostly around journalism including one at ABC. And then I went back to school. I went to Harvard where I did the program for leadership development and a bunch of other finance courses and then I started working for the family business soon after that I began as head of strategy and then as I was tapped to become. Ceo of the Family Group. My started making a move towards Miami and I've been in Miami now for about seven years. Seo What is something that is not on your link. Dan or former professional bio that we should know about you. Let's see I would say that? Probably what I spend the most time on that. No one really knows is on endurance. Sports what is that mean? I? I'm happiest with the backpack in the outdoors. I love climbing very big mountains. I also like crossing countries on a bicycle a road bike and I tend to do very long rides on the weekends. What is a very long ride? One hundred miles on south and we take between four and six hours depends on sort of the the route definitely sporty but it has to be doors so give me a pair of skins and. I'm the happiest person on a mountain. That's amazing so your grandfather started your family business in the nineteen twenty s which has grown to a multibillion dollar operation. I want to start off with something that may seem basic but what is. Ceo mean when the company is that big. What is your job? Look like on a day to day so I think we're a little bit different for most family businesses. That are around. In most cases family businesses that survive beyond the third generation tend to only be in one industry and just focus on that one thing from the time of my grandfather when he started our business. He always thought more of his core team as a team that was leading a a holding company and every ten or fifteen years he would do a deep dive into a different sector industry or geography that he thought was interesting and that very much was something that my father continued with N. It's very much the spirit of what we do today. So what? We're focused on right now or in. This decade has really has nothing to do with what we were doing. Maybe fifteen or twenty years ago but I think they saw me an opportunity to bring a very young and fresh perspective into what we should be doing next and just for audience. How old were you in your tap to FIA? The conversation started very quietly only between our former CEO and my father when I was twenty seven and it was a conversation that took place over the course of three years in which. I really didn't think I was ready for the job or I wanted it but I was willing to listen and to figure out what I needed to do to train to be able to make that decision so that was a a three year process and that's when I went back to school and kind of honed in on a few skills that I that I had to develop further so back to your original question. What does being? Ceo Look like for me. Today I would say that the first two years it was really about deconstructing and rebuilding and in the previous few years it's been more about leadership and execution. We're going to dive into what it is like to take the reins in business that your father grandfather released at the legacy for but for our listeners. Who might not be familiar with the depths of just? How huge narrow says. Can you just skim? What the company is so? The company was started by my grandfather. In Venezuela in the mid twenty s he was probably one of the more advanced in radical thinkers of the era and of the American content. I would say he was a big dreamer And he was very good at executing his dreams. He came from a middle class family. His father died when he was very young. His widowed mother moved to Trinidad to live with her sister and put him in an English boarding school and when he was seventeen he went back to Venezuela to join a cousin and the reason. I like to tell that part of the story is because he was one of the few people that spoke English so they had this idea. The first buses had just arrived in the country and they had this idea of turning the trucks into buses for people and developed a whole network of public transportation. So fast forward you know. He ended up buying about thirty trucks that he turned into buses and he had just enough money to buy himself in his cousin. Two tickets on a boat to go to New York to the world's fair and when they were there they tasted pepsi-cola for the first time and he really thought that Pepsi was disgusting but truly revolutionary and convinced Pepsi to give him the rights to bring the product to Latin America. So that was sort of the beginning of his desire to bring. American goods into the region that he thought would resonate the next adventure that he had was he started a TV network. Which at the time was only six private TV network in the world So you know a true visionary and then unfortunately he had a stroke when he was quite young and my father ended up taking the family business when he was only twenty five and he continued on this path he ended up being the one that brought apple computers to Latin America. He launched direct TV in Latin America which was true of the revolutionary. He was obsessed with this idea that they were products. Available to bring connectivity to the region so you know that sort of the the legacy I grew up with these very forward thinking guys who were not afraid of thinking big sell. We're going to dive into a legacy you started to create. I WanNa talk about you a twenty-seven now I say this because it Daniel and I were actually a year year and a half and Danielle's case younger than you when we started the scam so I say this is like fellow youthful. Ceo Cancel but we also have no Kissy to live up to and the skiff was not established in anything bigger than our couch. I want to understand kind of your mental and emotional state twenty-seven you were the youngest of your siblings and you weren't expected to necessarily take over the family business. How did that conversation begin? And where were you emotionally and realizing what a legacy you would have to uphold and expanded to the future you know? I am the third one or the last one and I think for much of my upbringing. I was kind of a I. Don't WanNa say this in a mean way but the forgotten one. I had very loving parents. They were great but they really weren't focusing on on on what I was GONNA do. I had an idea I wanted to be a journalist and I always saw myself working around news. One way or the other might big plan was to set up a news agency to cover Latin America responsibly after I graduated from Nyu J. School. But that's around the time that my father had this idea of asking me to start working at the company. We came up with title which was head of strategy which is a position that we had never had it our company so no one actually knew what I was doing and it felt very nonthreatening against. They gave me access to all the meetings and spend. I would say probably two years going to all the meetings that I thought were interesting or on the contrary that I thought were not interesting at all. Have you watched succession? Yeah that's not the case of. How did it like a very peaceful and Organiz family so I wrote a paper of sort of the state of the business and the marks? I thought we were missing and I think we should be going. And that's what ended up getting me into trouble. The paper was very well received but unfortunately they told me that. If I wrote that paper I was the one that was going to have to execute on it and dots. What kind of formalized this whole conversation around me becoming? Ceo when that conversation started. Did you have a minute of terror or were you excited because there are so many things to be excited about but at the end of the day that's enormous responsibility? You know at the beginning. I really didn't want to have a conversation in. I really didn't want the job because I didn't think I was ready or that. I could do it but I've learned in time that when very smart people suggest things over and over again sometimes even if you don't see it you have to go for it because they're obviously seeing things from from an angle. That's different from yours and that's kind of what happened here. I had both are a CEO at the time. Who was brilliant. Who had worked for us for over thirty years and my father who had sort of the legacy in the memory insisting that this was a good idea that I was the person for the job so at one point I said fine even though I think it's a terrible idea I'm willing to consider it. And we were very structured into what considering it meant. We kind of identify what were the key areas that I needed to learn more about in terms of the job and in also in terms of education and ultimately those were the things that got me to feel more comfortable until the day came on like your three of this secret conversation where I said. Okay I got it. I think I can do this. How'd your siblings react to it They were thrilled. You know I think for both of them. They're very proud of of the fact that we have been around for almost a hundred years. That's very rare accomplishment for most family businesses most of them dwindle between the second and third generation. So I think they were. They were very excited about me coming aboard and potentially being committed to the job these for the next twenty years one of the things I read that you and your dad meet it deal with each other that you would always have to pick up his phone call. Yup so I'm living with my parents right now and go bed. I will say down. They're both very close to our families. Don't always say this softly so parents don't hear I don't always pick up their calls so walk us through kind of the dynamic between you and your dad at how you're able to preserve an important personal relationship contained. Amac with obviously one where I assume has. Guidance and experience has been instrumental. That rule still stands. I do always pick up the phone when he calls. It doesn't always mean that I'm going to talk to him. I can say you know. I'm in the middle of doing a podcast. And he understands you know. I've been lucky. I think that my father and I have a wonderful relationship first and foremost. He's my super friend. We connect in a way that is very special. We get each other. I love that description. He's the first person I call when I have a really crazy idea. And he's the first person that understands the crazy idea. So first and foremost I would describe him as a friend secondly I would describe him as my father and thirdly described him as a mentor. And what's really cool about being able to do that? In three categories is that we're pretty disciplined about keeping things separate. We can have very heated debate over family issue or a business issue and we don't let one thing influence the other if we're not in agreement about something of working on If he comes around for dinner and were sitting around with their kids. That energy doesn't translate into the dinner table and I think that's really important because I don't believe in contaminating your professional impersonal spaces with each other so we couldn't agree more yet when you started. You had ideas about restructuring. How did you actually take those ideas begin to put them into place being a brand new? Ceo so I took over after a very difficult period for our for our business group in nineteen ninety eight. When he'll travis the now defunct dictator in Venezuela who took over the country. We made a decision to leave both as a family and as a business and we moved their headquarters to Miami the following five or six years after that were really difficult. Chavez had declared my father enemy of the state US owning the biggest TV network in the country was really the reason why they didn't like us. Because we believe obviously in pre enterprise in free speech and those were two words that that didn't resonate well with the government so we left as a business we spend the next six seven years on survival mode. We were trying to figure out how to deal with a huge crisis in Venezuela where we still maintain our businesses the constant pressure from the government. It was a very difficult time. And the number one priority for all of our senior leadership was to figure out how to survive that crisis. So when I took over what I saw was that a company that for the first ninety years or eighty five years of its history had been innovating decade after decade had press pause on that because they were very busy in simply surviving. There were in triage mode. And there was a little bit of Post traumatic stress. I would say so. The first thing that I saw was that as a media company who had always been on the vanguard we were always the first ones to do things radically different way ahead of time. We kinda missed out on the past ten years in the past ten years meant the digital revolution. So obviously you know being of the digital age. The first thing that I did was to really think what we needed to do with the whole digital strategy for our company and two things came from there was a bit retroactive. Which was how do we used the digital platforms? How do we integrate them into our existing media capabilities? So that gave birth to a lot of things that now seem super commonplace which was to develop digital properties related to analog properties that you would see on television. The second part that I think was more interesting was that we saw at the time. The only video platform out there was youtube and we had a lot of content that we were producing being posted on Youtube. Not by US or by our network here in the United States which was univision by by third parties and it was generating hundreds of thousands of us and there was no one. Monetize that so. We're like there's a huge missed opportunity. Here obviously no has set up an agency focused on Hispanic audiences that was the insight that gave birth into us. Creating what is now the largest digital advertising network that America called Cisneros Interactive through which we represent facebook instagram. What's up that's one of The new verticals that now defined as business group. I love that story in a lot of questions about how you adapt forward thinking into an organ around a core group of leaders. But I think you know. Obviously we're talking to you. In the middle of all of us across the world. Quarantining and a lot of companies are making very painful decisions around restructuring around doubling down on a core part of their business and I'm curious for those listening who are thinking about how to preserve their own business or might be an employee at a business. It's also making tough decisions. How do you think about restructuring? And what would you say to them? The moment that something feels like it's extra or a little fluffy is the moment that you really have to put that in a list of things you should get rid of in. That could be anything from teams to initiatives to physical places. And that's a general rule and I think when you have crisis like the one we're having right now. Those issues surface much quicker and in a way it is kind of a unique opportunity to really think about what really matters to the core of that business and we think that decisions are really hard We've seen a lot of industries having to make very radical changes. You know like the hotel industry here in Miami when the Saudi. We're going to be shut down for three months. They've furloughed percent of their employees. Fortunately we're not in that industry. What's been interesting for us. This time around. Is that with our AD network. We HAVE OVER THIRTY OFFICES IN LATIN AMERICA IN EIGHTEEN. Different countries and the virus is affecting each country differently with different intensity in different timeframes as well so we don't really have a blanket strategy of what we're doing in terms of the virus we really do have to take it case by case so. That's a huge jigsaw puzzle. And we're spending a few hours on that every day. So part of this new work from home reality is a lot a lot of video calls so many back to back all day long. They one of the low points of my life recently was when somebody told me to try a filter on the video and I informed them that I already was filtered and since I no longer wear. Makeup only wear sweatpants. It's really up to my skin to pull through so lucky for us. We discovered something that keeps our skin looking healthier and more arrested. It's estee lauder advanced night repair. It keeps US looking and feeling virtual camera ready lightweight and oil free serum your pillow cases will thank you. It fights the look of key signs of aging so you can wake up to more rested healthier looking skin when over. Five hundred women tried it. Eighty percent notice more arrested healthier looking skin in four weeks their skin felt more hydrated and had a radiant glow head to ESTEE LAUDER DOT COM to learn more. That's E. S. T. L. A. U. D. E. R. DOT COM STARTS TONIGHT WITH ESTEE. Lauder advanced night repair serum in time of change. I'm thinking you know obviously time Colbrad did. It's so many moving parts but also thinking about what you just spoke through when you were coming on the restructuring that you did. How did you gain and keep the trust of your team? Yeah so you know one advice that I could give any. Aspiring CEO is when restructuring is going to be part of your job. Do it sooner rather than later because when it sooner you actually see things much more clearer and you're not attached to the past do not attached to legacy. You're not attached to the way things were done when I knew I was going to be taking over a CEO but we still haven't made it public. We had three or four off sites that I would host at home where we would brainstorm with. Our you know our leaders of each of each divisions in terms of how we saw the future but I realized that what was going to be really cool was instead of having the media people discuss media and so forth. We actually just mixed everybody. We have mixed groups with different expertise trying to see what the future looks like and that help us really reorganize the company and and see what was the fact that we needed to trim what I learned in the process. Is that bringing people together. That come from different backgrounds and industries to problem solve a really good idea more perspectives. That you have are the better. The best ideas came from people that had nothing to do with what we were trying to solve for. And then what I also learned. Is that letting go of people is really hard. And it's really hard especially if they've never done anything wrong in their job to simply because they became redundant. Those are one of the most difficult conversations I had to have and I wish I had more training in to how to let go of people successfully because I do carry that weight around me still. I WanNa talk about future planning so Danielle and I over last few years have really tried to build at muscle and we always like to say you know. Our team is in twenty twenty by twenty twenty two twenty twenty three and I was really proud of that and then I read about you and turns out. You're like twenty sixty. You are very dedicated to thinking at minimum fifty years into the future. Most people can't fathom what's happening next week top to us about what you're planning cycle looks like and why that is such a core part of your leadership style you know. I like to say that it's very important in our case to be able to play it short end long by long. I mean that when you're carrying on your shoulders one hundred years of history and you spend a lot of time understanding what were the key factors that made that possible. You realize that. There's a lot to protect so every decision every major decision that you're making in my major decision. I mean if you're going to launch a completely new initiative if you're GONNA make a big investment into something that's completely new if you're going to bring in a partner. It's very important that you pay it forward. They try to think. How is that going to impact who we are as a business for the next ten fifteen or twenty years and I think that's that's been a really cool exercise because it you know it. It just keeps everybody very honest when you're thinking that far in advance you're projecting what the outcome of the decisions can be kind of keeps you from for making bad decisions or working with bad people or partnering with bad companies and it also gives you the ability to make better financial decisions that are probably not perhaps not risky by that are gonNa keep you afloat when things get complicated and that's definitely proven to be the case during the few recessions that we've had in our lifetime having said that we also are very good at playing very short we as a business group were known for making decisions very big decisions very quickly to move on opportunities very quickly to execute very quickly. But I'm sure if I wasn't running a a very old family business and I was just doing a job that I thought it was gonna be doing for five or ten years I don't think I would be as obsessed as what the next fifty years might look like. A short part is really interesting because I think as leaders of growing startup we would love to be able to say that we make decisions quickly and knock things quickly but we always do. I think that that is a theme that we hear a lot from growing companies. What do you think it that has allowed you to set up a team to evaluate and make those decisions quickly? So that's A. that's an excellent question. My grandfather believed that. He didn't want his core team to be specialists. He wanted them to be generalists. And so he believed in having a team of ten fifteen twenty executives that were very well rounded that could be given the task to run any of our new businesses until the new teams of specialists. Were set up. A group of twenty executives has stayed with the company for a very long time. Where groomed in that way so they were great leaders. Were very good at organizing and deploying without having to be specialists in different industries. And that's something that's very much in the DNA over company and it's very much the spirit of how we do things and my core is like that we are all generalists. None of us are excellent at anything. But we're very good at a lot of things and I think that allows us to be on the one. Very quick study is on the other hand to not be biased towards ideas one or the other and united we can. We're bringing such different perspectives. That we can. We can decide if something is good or bad rather quickly than the next step is saying. Okay we're not the experts now. We really need to bring in the best experts that we can to run and execute on a new venture. Ariza the phrase that people say all the time to lead by example and I think that's something easily turned around but I'm really curious what that means to you and especially in the context of the enormous influence that this company has a lot in America where there's a lot of volatile political situations that come up. There is a lot of corruption that you guys have to navigate as the business has expanded and especially as you've taken over what is leading by example mean in your day to day what is leading by example mean when you think about this narratives role in the world fundamentally in our DNA we believe in doing good and we do think that doing good is really good for business as well every time that we come up with a a really bold idea of a new business that can change a country or continent or region. There's a part of our brain that's thinking. How can we use this new initiative the energy around the new initiative to create something that will also be beneficial for society as a whole assault given example when we launched direct TV in Latin America? That was in the early nineties. We realized what the power connectivity through. Tv was going to be an. We wondered how that could be used for educational purposes. This was at a time in Latin America when they had just started putting televisions inside classrooms with educational programming. And we said wow. Wouldn't it be interesting? If we launch a PAN regional educational channel in Spanish. That can be part of the school system during the day but could be family channel in the afternoons in the evenings so that parents could learn together with teachers. That channel was called classy. It was a huge success. One of the programs that we had on there was called English highway which was sort of how to learn English and to this day I meet people at Random Conference at. Tell me the reason we learned English was because we used to watch English highway. So these initiatives were massive. Meant that we had to work with the Ministry of Education of every country to understand what the curriculum was to understand with. The technology was available to understand how we would be able to get the signal of this TV channel in there. What training the teachers needed and so forth. We just do that because we think it's it's the right thing to do. And we have an opportunity to contribute positively to development of our society. It's the backbone of who we are DNA and and going back to your question about bribery in politics in all of that goes back to this perspective of playing very long. You know if if you're GONNA be around for the next twenty years you have to be a good citizen and you have to treat your neighbors with transparency so obviously going down a path that is not honest and transparent would be sustainable for a business this trying to be around for so much longer. So it's it's very clear for us talking about the long game when you think about fifty years from now when people are looking back and talking about you as CEO. I think it's very clear the elements that you've brought interior leadership from your father and your grandfather. What do you think are the things that are distinctly are uniquely traits of your leadership style? I and I think this is probably something that resonates with a lot of people generation and I have a feeling. It's probably the way that you guys run the skin as well as I believe in a much flatter and the organization that the one that I took over it was probably combination of percival being so young and second of all trying to figure out how I was going to be the CEO for people that were twenty years older than me who had been at the job for so much longer building an organization that is much flatter and that is much more transparent in terms of the open conversations that we have with Team ended up being a really good idea for us. So we're GONNA switch now to our difficult segment the lightning round. Go work from home edition. Okay are you ready? Are you a morning person or a night owl? Both which means that. My days are very very long. Now that we're all working from home. What's replaced your morning. Commute having longer breakfasts with my family which has been really nice thing. Can you skim your nighttime routine earth? A lot of things have changed with this whole whole thing. I used to either by cried very early in the morning or very late in the evening and now since the day seemed to be so long. I'm trying to exercise like mid day to just break it up and that's actually been really helpful so the afternoons have changed. The afternoon is now the time that actually get to be physically with my kids Instead of US doing either earning resume conference calls. I try to be their coach into an hour of exercise with them and like. You're an intense coach. I I would. I would fail as your time. We always have dinner as a family. We have very strict obviously no electronics at the table. Rule and our dinners last an hour. You know which is nice even even a Non Koga Times. Try to dinner. Yes always unless we have something for work but if we're home we all have dinner and then after that you know. We try to put the kids to bed. But it's sort of. It's becoming a very wholesome schedule now that we're all home. We have so much more time to do things that should be normal. What's the last show that you binge watched? I hate to admit this but tiger king. Oh Yeah I don't know why I'm trying to nine. I can't look away. What about me is it made me no one other away in in times of Colbrad since? We're all home a lot more to have a favorite quick dinner that you've been making days that. I'm really happy to spend a couple of hours cooking because I find it kind of therapeutic. So I'll do something more elaborate L. Rose something and they're days that the idea of spending two hours in the kitchen is the last thing I want to do because I just WanNa be outside and do something else so about once a week. I'll do a lot of pasta sauces bullying and so forth. We FREEZE THEM. So my quick one is to just do some pasta with frozen homemade sauce and idiot. Abyss has been great. Thank you so much for for making the time during a very crazy crazy time in our world stay safe and healthy and thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you so much bye guys. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign up at the Skim Dot Com. That's the S. K. I. M. Dot Com. M's a little something extra.

CEO Latin America Venezuela US Miami Danielle Weisberg estee lauder New York Adriana Cisneros ABC Harvard carly Columbia Undergrad Dan America Family Group apple youtube president
Annie Lawless, founder of Lawless Beauty and co-founder of Suja Juice: When you take an investment, it's like a marriage.

Skimm'd from The Couch

29:12 min | 1 year ago

Annie Lawless, founder of Lawless Beauty and co-founder of Suja Juice: When you take an investment, it's like a marriage.

"Today's episode is brought to you by Sephora. They've got clean makeup. Meaning the beauty you on minus the ingredients you do not will explain in a bit but first. Let's get into the episode. You have to remember. You can get money from so many sources. There's only one you and one idea so you're actually the valuable one in the situation when you take an investment. It's like a marriage. I'm Carl Sagan. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. Any lawless joins us on skimmed from the couch. She's the founder of not one but two successful brands. Her most recent venture is lawless. Beauty a clean nontoxic cosmetic company before starting her makeup line any co-founded sujit juice one of the largest organic juice companies in the country with experience in two different industries and he has proven herself as an innovator and as a business leader any welcome to skim from the couch. Hi thank you for having me so first of all. I'm obsessed with your name. What a great last name. My last name people think it's not my real last name sometime but today I was GONNA ask. Yeah it is and I dropped out of law school. So it's kind of an interesting coincidence so I want you to just kind of the way we start all interviews which is skipping your resume for us okay. Yes so like I said I was in law school. I left Phoenix. I went to Arizona State where I grew up in two thousand and ten to start law school and I was pretty miserable and I knew I didn't want to be an attorney like a urine. I was like this is not for me so really. My First Post College job was Suda and that was the first company that I started with my partner at the time. Eric and it really didn't start with any goal to create some nationally distributed juice brand. It really was just a local delivery service. We just loved organic cold. Press juice and decided to start this little local service and it grew into what you know a sujit today and so that was really my first kind of project and then in twenty fifteen. We sold fifty percent thirty percent to cocoa a twenty percent to Goldman Sachs and. I decided that I really wanted to take my passion for health and wellness into another category. And so for me that was beauty. I obviously was so conscious of what I was consuming and I really cared about health and wellness. But I'm also a makeup girl and I love beauty. I love makeup. I love products and when I wanted to switch over to clean makeup I was just so underwhelmed by the pigment the coverage and the types of products that were available for a makeup girl so that was when I decided I wanted to start lawless which launched in twenty seventeen. And that's my current fulltime hundred percent. You know project an all in on right now. So what is something that is not as part of your scam or not on your linked in that we should know about you. I would say that I am a very. I wouldn't say highly anxious person but I have to be doing things at all times. Have a ton of hobbies. I do tons of yoga I read. I read like a new book a week. I'm always doing things I feel like even when I'm not working I'm always getting into some sort of project. The last book I read was actually a reread. And it's the secret because I wanNA talk any welcome so our people last year ask Carly and me. What were some like management books? We had read and I responded. The secret and it to me was really helpful. In how to think through manifesting visualization life. Yeah when we started the skin we were remains and we had a bookshelf with l sat books. Jerry Books G. Mat Bucks like all the things and then just the secret. That's a guy that we need to get this off the ground. Well I read it years ago when I really wanted to take the leap and drop out of law school. I didn't tell my parents. I was so nervous to take the next step and not know what I was going to be doing. I feel like when you're in school. You have this constant continuum of knowing after school. Then I'm going to get a job that I'm going to do this. I'm going to get promoted to this then and I was like for the first time. I don't know what I'm doing and that book helped me so much. What I put out there will come back to me if I just stick with my passions and aligned with my purpose and the things that interests me it all will fall into place. The universe well provide whatever it is that I'm supposed to be doing if I just keep waking up every day doing what I'm passionate about and it worked out and I know that sounds so cheesy but I wanted to read the power recently and I was like I really WanNa brush up and read the secret again. I saw my next book is the power so when you were growing up. He suffered from some health issues. That caused you to think about your health and body in new ways. Talk to us about that. Yeah so it was asthma. That was the biggest thing that I had since I was like a baby all the way through adolescence. It was all over my face my body my arms and it was really quite odd because most infants and toddlers grow out of eggs. Ma and I was getting to an age where I was really self conscious about it. I was in like I was about twelve so like middle school area worst age. Yeah and YOU START TO CARE. And so Pediatrician did an autoimmune panel and it turned out that asthma's autoimmune and so a seal EAC and so I had sealy act disease and I didn't even know what it was. I didn't know what gluten was back then. You couldn't order by any gluten free product so once I cut gluten out of my diet miasma completely cleared up and after years of using steroid creams interesting. So uncomfortable it was like this huge lightbulb moment for me that there's this direct correlation between what we consume and how we look and feel and that just caused me to like devour every nutrition book. I could get my hands on food book health and Wellness Book Cooking Book and that was ultimately how I got obsessed with juicing so I want you to take us back to what kind of mental space you were in when you came up with the idea for juice. It wasn't even really coming up with the idea like I'm going to start this brand and we're going to have it in grocery stores nationally. I was so obsessed with juice. I read every book by the Skydiver. Norman Walker who created the first cold press and he was the first pioneer to really taught the idea that juice could cure all these generative diseases and cancers and skin ailments and all sorts of things and so I was just you saying for fun and I was working the front desk at a Yoga Studio in La Hoya in San Diego and a guy. Can you are in law school at this point? No I had dropped his right after. You're right teaching. Yoga was kind of my way of doing something to fill my time and figure out what I wanted to do. And this guy's skated up on a skateboard to take class. And checking him in and he has a green juice in a glass bottle. And so did I. And so we strike up conversations so we ended up dating. We read hanger all the time. Make juice and just started this little local cult following of people who would ask us to make them Jews mostly through the Yoga Studio and then it just kind of by word of mouth grew in grill and so people would text us every Sunday their orders and then we would make it and deliver it. And that's actually how I met. My current husband is he ordered juice from me. Dafa and I delivered okay so four before we get into the business side. I just have to ask. What was it like starting a company with someone you were dating? It was rocky. I mean in the beginning. It's all sunshine and roses when things are great and you're getting along and you're in the honeymoon and you're excited about starting this new project together but we did end up breaking up. We're still great friends so everything turned out. Well I mean it's an evolution to get to that So in a Lotta ways. It's like co-parenting when you're divorced because you still have this baby doe working together. We were still working together and this was right when we launched in whole foods so we had a lot at stake. We have these huge opportunity is and so you kind of have to cut your emotions out and realize the bigger picture and that we both just want the same thing. We started this because we love juice. And now we're GONNA get it nationally distributed and be able to have other people experience the same type of product like we need to cut the crap that we have personally and just continue forward and there was a period of time. I was much more active in president and he kind of needed his time. But for great friends now and it all worked out. And there's obviously a big leap from year in a new relationship and you both have a hobby about making juice and sharing it with friends and customers of the studio and taking meetings a whole foods. What was the skill set that each of you brought to the table. That really started making this at business. Yes so eric. My original partner was relieve creative so he was really into the product the recipes Just a super creative guy and much more organized and analytic and I'm also very creative. I'm much more creative than I am like math science minded but I definitely was able to put a lot more of the business pieces in place. Initially we just had to investors who were local guys that had tried. The juice really loved it and wanted to know more about it and you know said. Hey we think we could really do something big at this and I think we were all thinking of the blueprint model where it was just like a national home delivery. I don't think thinking retail at this point and we only had a three day shelf life because it was an unpasteurized cold press juice and when whole foods approached us about the opportunity. They were just starting. I'm sure you guys have seen this. But there's like a little local signed by certain products that they have in store and it tells you how many miles away a little picture of who made their kind of just starting that initiative and they were looking for local brands that had unique ideas of products that they didn't currently have their assortment. So we said Hey. We only have a three-day shelf-life XYZ and they require thirty days and obviously selling unpasteurised product. Just the same way they don't sell. Jerry is a problem so we actually researched food preservation method called HP which is high pressure processing. Now lots of brands use it. But it's a way for juices to be essentially pressurized in an ice bath so that they stay raw so we employed that technology and we're able to launch in whole foods as a test and the southern Pacific region and then it did really well and within six months. They plus us out nationally to whole foods. Rich You I think. Initially we had a contact at whole foods that was interested and she kind of wanted to know more and then we were connected to kind of some higher up people and we pursued it pretty aggressively or you nervous or were you like no. We deserve this to happen this I yeah I think at the time I was really excited about the idea of doing it in my mind so much work needed to be done to make it happen. I never really got overly hopeful and kind of just was going down the path of exploring the relationship with them and figure out how we could make it. Work whole foods. Seems like such a big company. I didn't realize like Oh. They can just launch us in that in six months. They complex us out nationally. And so I don't think I understood the gravity of the opportunity when it first presented itself. I think that it was more. It'd be really cool. If we launched in whole foods you know. But I don't think I understood that it would really change the business and be that one moment. That really catapulted the brand to like national household name. How did you guys think about distinguishing suture juice in the beginning because you were right at the trend of what is now a very crowded market? Yeah and we were really lucky that we had great timing because at the time it wasn't a crowded market at the time. I don't believe blueprint was certified organic yet. They quickly became certified organic but I think when we launched we were the only certified organic brand secondly are blends so we did really unique blends at the time. I think blueprint was very straightforward. It was like Apple. Lemon beat you know and we did eight plus ingredients on a lot of juices inc things like turmeric you know Sour Cherry and all sorts of like really high antioxidant things And the flavors were really kind of had this little local cult following so we had a lot of unique juices that weren't in the typical assortment of other brands. And I think that set us apart and also just the story that we had founder story it was kind of this little local success thing that I think people really loved knowing about so we weren't just kind of this nameless faceless brand. Who did you turn to for advice as you started something? Got This incredible opportunity. And then you're negotiating or navigating. A sale process all pretty quickly. That's a really interesting question. And that's something I always get asked. I feel like a lot of times. People will say like who is Your Mentor. Or who did you look to? And if I'm just being completely honest I don't feel like I really had anybody. I was like twenty four at the time. None of my peers. Were doing anything similar. I feel like a lot of the older people in my life that I knew. Kind of pooh-poohed. This idea didn't really take me seriously what we were doing so I really just relied on my partner. At the time that we would just go back and forth and it's really just came down to ultimately trusting ourselves and figuring out what felt right. Sure you make tons of mistakes that way but I feel like it was the biggest period of growth because I was able to learn as I was doing things. And if anything didn't work out it was really on me which is kind of a cool thing because at least at the end of the day you think well it didn't work out but that was my decision. We are traveling all the time for work. All one thing that we are really obsessed with is thinking through what we put on our skin one. We are flying when we are travelling when we are on the road in so many places. It's really important that we keep ourselves healthy and we've started to think about. What does that actually mean regarding the products that we use on a daily basis and also because her skin just looks really bad when we travel so he loves using products. That are because we like to know. Now what's in them and we don't want to actually have to sacrifice the quality which I think is a big misnomer. I think about clean beauty. And that's something that we've really started to investigate in so lucky for all of us. This March sephora is raising the expectation on what clean can be yes. They have some amazing brands that are clean and thoughtfully made. Some of our favorites are bite. Ilia Kosas our Ms Beauty Tower Twenty eight and artsy so the products are packed. With good for you ingredients. They look good and they make you look good. It's great that one of our favorite stores Sephora is focused on clean beauty. We really appreciate that. I think that we are part of a generation. That's really thinking about what's going into the things we use every single day and it's great that we can get all the products that we really love without the ingredients that no one needs exactly so time for you to get the best in clean makeup at Sephora online and in store right now look for the green seal to know which products are clean at Sephora. Certified you started the conversation today talking about that. You have invited and that that you're anxious person. How did you overcome that to be able to channel trusting your gut and not leaning on mentors or support network? Yeah I actually think if you channel anxiety in the right way it can be a really powerful tool actually to keep you moving forward. It's sort of like this restlessness with me and if I kind of stopped focusing on fear and worry side of the anxiousness and more the restlessness of it it helps me make decisions and helps me be a little bit more maniacal about what I'm doing. Because I'm so fixated on the project and the end result so I feel like really dropping the fear and constantly coming back to that notion like in the secret that fears ultimately the only thing that holds you back. really helps me channel. Magsi more to like forward moving versus stagnancy. Let's talk about the sale. You make this huge shift in your life from dropping out of Law School. You start this you learn so much and then you're in a position where you step away. Was that hard initially. I think it was. It was both hard and it was both so simple and easy because it was clear that it was time for me to work on something new. I think when you start a business. It's so exciting in the beginning there so much work to be done there so much unknown. And there's this constant build build build. That's thrilling and then when a company grows and there's a lot more people involved the team as you know hundred plus people there's multiple investors. It's running it's business. As usual every day I felt kind of stifled like there. Wasn't anything left for me to really do back to the anxiousness. I was just ready. I was antsy to do something new and get up and go and so I think that was when it was clear to me. But there's always that bitter sweetness because you remember what it was in the beginning. It was like your baby. And you're kind of leaving your baby behind but it was good. How old were you when you salt? I was twenty seven. I believe twenty six or twenty seven and I want to give you a little bragging rights Edens sulfur. Small amount and the company was valued at three hundred million dollars. When you sold. That's extraordinary. You talk about you know you didn't have the mentors or the people who are maybe like the older people in your life that you would have gone to for advice. Kind of pooh-poohed. This was everyone's reaction. I think everyone was just really proud. I think it's also inspiring to other people because it's not like I'm this super knowledgeable business personnel trapped loss. Just knew exactly how to start a business and so I think that's kind of how we all are people don't understand you don't have to have a business plan to start a business. You don't really have to know what you're doing but there's this idea that you do and so I think that hinders people from just doing things. Because they feel like they're not in the position they don't know enough. They need that. Stay need more money and you don't and so I think it was just inspiring to a lot of people in my life who either had ideas or just felt like they were holding themselves back because they knew me and knew that. I didn't know what I was doing either. I mean we agree with you. Don't have to know everything before you start and you don't have to have your business plan totally baked. But what do you think you do have? We did not yet. We did. Not which is why we agree with you. But that's why you guys just did what you're passionate about and look at. Where so do you think the key is the passion? I think it's passion and also a uniquely differentiated idea. You need to find a white space in the market. Like what are you bringing? That's different and you have to really kind of know yourself on what you can do that. Someone else can't like what's your spin on something. What's your angle on something? What is it that you can bring to the table? That hasn't been seen or done. Because especially in products consumer products now are such a saturated world whether it's beauty whether it's food whether it's fashion you start to feel like everything's been done because kind has so unless you're going to do something a little bit different that you have this uniquely creative idea about even if it is in a category. That's been done. I think that that is your real sticking point. What was the white space you saw in beauty Sephora was doing this big push for clean skin care about three years ago? They had really brought on all these clean skin care brands and it caused me to switch over because I was starting to learn more about ingredients and I started really making my entire skincare routine clean and I was like. This is so crazy that I'm spending more on cleaned skin-care yet I'm so married to my makeup products that I love that. I'm putting all the ingredients back on my face. Five minutes later we might make up onto thinking about that but yeah it makes no sense if you really look in the mirror. It's like what this makes no sense so I was like okay. I'm going to try to switch over to clean makeup and when I was playing with it all I was just like this is just not my journey. I am not a no makeup makeup girl. I'm not going for the natural luck. I were full face of makeup every day I like full coverage and so when I kind of saw okay. If that's what clean makeup is this is why clean skin cares. Happened and clean. Makeup hasn't is because there's nothing over here for the makeup girl that's going into Sephora buying fancy Hooda all these brands she's not GonNa look clean because that's not the type of makeup. She's after and myself included so that was when I realized okay. There's definitely a white space in clean. And I want to kind of redefine what people think of when they think of clean and create products for the girl that isn't necessarily looking for clean makeup. But it's just such a great product that she is into it anyway. Can you just for our listeners? Just explained what makes a beauty company clean? That's a great question because it's kind of undefined. Right now Sephora has their clean seal which does clearly delineate which ingredients cannot be included to be a clean brand but every brand different so me for example. I don't use silicone in any of my products some of the clean foundations. Do I personally. Don't so talk is a big one for me. Obviously parabens for me synthetic fragrance. Because it's a big way that brands can hide ingredients and then a lot of them can be allergens or irritants so I really wanted to be transparent about what's in the product I said. Oh to Kane it's a preservative that's Houston a lot of foundations but actually can corrode plastic That's why most foundations are in glass. Bottles those are like my top line things that I really tried to avoid. So how did you get up to speed on all of this just through research in Google and my own personal lake fascination with just ingredients it really started with skin care when I was researching for myself of cleaner products to to buy and reading all sorts of blogs and you know journals about different ingredients and what wasn't wasn't clean and then when I was formulating my makeup I kind of use that list of things that I really was avoiding in my skin care in my line for my makeup and then every time a lab would send me a formula and I didn't understand her known ingredient I would go on e? Wg which kind of just ranks ingredients by how toxic they are and what they've been linked to just kind of do my own research that way and understand what was the function of this ingredient. Where did it come from so I just did a lot of research really through Google and just learning that way? I love makeup. I love skin care and for me. It seems overwhelming. How do you advise people who are starting off in this trying to navigate this world trying to make good decisions? But also you know aren't as obsessed where. They're googling all day long. Where do you start? I think that things like this before clean sale. Make It really easy because you don't really have to read the ingredients if you know what isn't is included part of the seal. You can just use that as your little guide. I also think like what's important to you. You don't have to clean overnight. I don't make everything in my line because for example I haven't nailed a clean Mascara. I've been working on it for two years but I am not going to launch something just to launch it if I don't feel like I'm going to use it instead of my conventional favorites so for me. It's really like don't be hard on yourself and don't go in being like. I have to go all or nothing. Just pick up a few products. Do you care most about what touches your skin directly than your base product. Just make some small changes and adapt at your own pace for what you're comfortable with and slowly but surely you'll find some of those like hidden gems that you are discovering through the process that you really love what our mistakes that you made at. Souda that you have avoided making the score around. This is an interesting one. I would say just choosing partners wisely through Soochow multiple rounds of investment. But I think initially you know I went in wanting to scale this business and wanting to grow and you have to remember. You can get money from so many sources. There's only one you and one idea so you're actually the valuable one in the situation at when you take an investment. It's like a marriage so you really wanna get to know each other. You WANNA understand it. All the time that you're aligned with your vision for the business because if you're not there will be had spudding. There's no way out of it. Their money's in you can't just you know cut you raise capital or gone capital differently. Yes so this time around. It took me two years to get capital. I really wanted to get my foundation belts. Really figure out how I wanted. This brand the literal founding literally kind of tended. I wanted to figure out like what this brand was. Who Am I? Who's the span and kind of got established before bringing anyone else in and just this past December? I completed my series. Say and it took congratulations. Thank you. It took months of back and forth with many different investors to spend a lot of time with people. I moved slow to really. Just make sure that. I was aligned and comfortable and I went with call capital and that's not see firm that's a private equity is the private equity firm and I couldn't love them more. I'm been here in New York. I hung out with them yesterday. Like I text them all day. Did you want to work with private equity over venture capital you know? I didn't know I wanted to. I took meetings with both. I think it was more the personality fit for me and really understanding what the relationship would be. That made me feel much more comfortable than anything else. It's interesting I'm listening to you. Tell your story. It's very obvious why you're successful and you very clearly breakdown. Complex issues in a way that they're easily accessible and it becomes a consumer product. What are you not good at a so? I'm really good at the plumbing side of the business like I'm the creative person I love makeup. I Love Product. I want to be in stores. At sephora. I want to be making tutorials. That's my passion so it's tough for me especially I'm the CEO and we're just in the middle of hiring president but right now I'm working on a lot of things I hate doing and I know I'm not the best person for the job. My brother new hate. I hate like finance numbers Wade through your brother. Can we ask him director? Come join us. What was any like growing up like? Did you think that she was going to become you? Tell your knees entrepreneur. Is David older younger brother younger? I'm actually the youngest in our family so we have an older sister as well okay. Is this your favorite sister? She's definitely moment so growing up. Anne and I had kind of a special relationship. Our parents got divorced when we were super young. And Andy kind of assumed the role as being the mother of me. So it's kind of been that way with us. We've had a special bond you know ever since we were little. What's it like to work together? It's interesting I was. I was an investment banker for like five years. We were thinking about working together when she first started the business and she approached me at a point in my career where I still felt like. I had some things that I wanted to accomplish. I told her I wasn't quite ready. Working Twenty hour days for years on end to kind of took its toll after awhile and turned into me kind of calling her and begging her seeing if the position was still open. And you know I had the skill set those right at the time. Just kind of helping us with our first capital raise and I would say as a boss. She's definitely tough but keeps me on my toes. What really ticks off. She's very unique in terms of how much energy she has She's so vivacious and I for one like get tired when I travel I what a unique quality you have I I think just like keeping up with tough and she can go on one hour asleep and do a podcast and then she's going to run to like three other meetings today like she's pregnant. It's pretty ridiculous. The amount of things that she's able to accomplish in a day and surely doesn't show any signs of stress. You're wearing yeah this time for our favorite segment the lightning round anti. What was your first job anthropology working retail? But you're going to see any anthropology major worst job real estate. What is the first one call you make or who? Is it too and you get good news. David my brother. What about when you have bad news my husband? When was the last time you negotiated for yourself yesterday? What you negotiate. I'm in the middle of hiring a president so kind of with my investors negotiating the personalities. I've ever and figuring out things. I wasn't wasn't willing to sacrifice. What's your biggest Vice Shopping David? What is big space bags? What is the last show? You watched real housewives of New York season like six with an older season. I respect that David. Why does the sister Lee annoying thing that he does? She definitely prize in my personal life. What's the last sibling fight? You had not about work. Nothing really comes to mind like we definitely have work related moments of tension but it really only lasts a short period of time. And then we talk it out like we'd otherwise you guys. This is such a healthy relationship. What's your shameless plug? Go by lawless. At Sephora. We're all over the country so fifty four doors otherwise go to support. Dot Com awesome guys. Thank you so much. What a treat dav-david tank you. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information. You need to start your day sign about the Skim Dot Com. That's the S. K. I. M. Dot Com. M's for a little something extra.

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Instinct is everything  Chelsea Handler, comedian, on knowing its time to make a change. - Episode 053

Skimm'd from The Couch

31:56 min | 2 years ago

Instinct is everything Chelsea Handler, comedian, on knowing its time to make a change. - Episode 053

"Anytime you're not enjoying work. It's like it's up to you to say, okay, I'm not enjoying this. How am I going to re-engage? How am I gonna fire like fire myself up again and not everybody has the liberty to just stop working? But you know, when you're out at a out of your zone, and you're out of your lane, and you have to pay attention to that. I'm curly's Aken, I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast is where we go. Deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch? So please, welcome. Chelsea handler to the couch. Chelsea is a longtime friend of this game. And actually was one of our earliest investors. Thank you, you might know her from her stand up or her seven year run as the host of the late night talk show Chelsea lately on e or her Netflix shows Chelsea does and Chelsea were she's gone deep on everything from Silicon Valley to I lost. Gotta Chelsea has done it all, and of course, you might know her as the author of five bestselling books, including her latest one life will be the death of me and were recording on the day of its release. Congratulations Chelsea on that. And everything else were so excited to be celebrating with you here on the couch. Thank you. Hi girls. It's nice. You get it's good to see you. So we're going to start with an easy question for you scheme. Your resume for us, my resume loud mouth cash attrac- loud. Mouth Kesse check loud enough couches shack. And just getting rewarded for bad behavior? Was basically my entire career great. Yeah. I made a career out of being loud obnoxious in your face, and I just seem to work out. So I stuck with ice stuck stuck with as stuck stuck with it. I stuck with it. I skimmed with it. And and then, you know, eventually, you're just like wait a second. I do not like not way like it more. Like, wait. What am I doing moving forward? What am I gonna do with my life? What am I gonna do as import? What is something that is not on your s made that people would be surprised to know that you've done or do that's not on my resume. Okay. Let me think and thinking of something adventurous. But I guess I'm probably I pretty much telegraph that on my social media too. So everybody knows everything I do. There are no secrets is the problem with being do love your social can't, you know? I don't have any secrets. That's why. Because that's how I've been trained to not have secrets were you always the loud mouth growing up. Or is that like a personality that you put on? Well, it was. Yeah. I was youngest of six kids. So that comes with being like a little I was born like, you know, I was a firecracker, and it was loud and talk a and wanted what I wanted and was cute. So I got a lot of attention. And then and then my brother died. Died. And when he died that all of the attention that was swirling around me that I had felt retreated because everybody was grieving my brother dying, and I was nine years old. And so my personality combined without loss created a mouse drum of emotion of me, not only was I now like the rug was pulled out from under me in many senses of the word because my family was broken. But the person that I trusted the most was gone. And then the person I trusted second the most which was my dad he fell apart and never really recovered after my brother's death, and that made me be really strong and fierce and independent and fight all the time for what was what I thought was right or what I thought I deserved or respect. And I don't ever have to lean on a man, and I'm gonna be I'm not gonna have kids. Watch me watch me succeed in life without anybody. That was my story. So I want us to the book, which is doubt today. So yeah. Congratulations. Life will be the death of me. It is you've been a bestselling author before. It's that's nothing new. But this is a very different book than anything you've ever put out there. It is much more serious than the other books. And while you put yourself out there in many ways all the time. It was a different way and one of the reviews said raw, and I like Roth Kushtia word when you talk about. And we all have anyone who's been a fan of yours, we associated with this tough persona, and you're tough you're sarcastic. You're funny. Like, you seem the most confident person in the world, and so much of this book is talking about the therapy that you've gone through in recent years talked us just about this book, and how this was a release for you. It was a release because I was never allowed to I never allowed myself to be vulnerable. I mean, I moved out of nine hundred and fifty miles an hour because that's that way. I never had to sit still and deal with anything. And I thought things were going great. I was making a ton of money, and I I had been and I had this great career for so many years. And I just thought being in therapy was narcissistic like, oh, you have a show named after you books named after you, and you now you wanna go sit on the couch and naval gays like I just thought. Oh, I'm just so LA, you know, and I didn't want to start throwing around words like gratitude and the universe and kale and all that shit that comes with LA. You know, what I mean because there's trends, and it makes spirituality and like consciousness or mindfulness seem like a trend as well. When it shouldn't be shouldn't be diminished like that. Because it's so much adds so much value to your life. But I had a really hard time sitting still, and if you're basing your success on you know, what's in your Bank account and all the great vacations, you're taking it's going pretty well. But then at the end of the day on like, I haven't even thought about what I really want to do. I've just been saying. Yes to what's been saying. Yes to me. So for me therapy was about a validating. The fact that I had a right to be in therapy. Like, I thought, you know, everyone does and that my injury was worthy for a long time. I thought well, I wasn't raped. I wasn't molested. I don't have anything to be upset about look at my life. And and you know, that may very well be true. But everybody is pain is deserving to be heard, and what my therapist did over and over again. Was relitigate back to me why I deserve to be upset about my brother dying. When I was nine years old. He's like you have every right to be like that and your patterns of behavior throughout your life. Are a direct result of that? So diminishing, it doesn't do anybody any favors looking at it and going through it and trying to cut through it and say, okay, this is me this is who I am. Now, I can identify what my shortcomings are. And and be better for it. Finally. I was like I can't do this anymore. This is I want to be in a state of action not reaction. I don't want to react to everything. How did you cope with actually looking backwards? Did you really take the year off and? Sit in it. Because I think for people that are listening to our podcast for the two of us. It's always about what you're doing next. What's coming next that? I think people don't even know how to look back like where do you start? Yeah. I think I think taking the time for yourself to even think about your own life is so important because we're all just hustling all the time. And then you think like where did that year go? There's too many incredible moments. I've had in my life that I don't remember, you know, like that. I just was like I can't wait to go to bed. I'm so tired. I'm so tired. What is the point of that? You know? I got it. I got all the what I needed. So now, let me see what I can give back or what's needed from me rather than just, you know, like, I said cashing a check or not thoughtful about what you're putting out there. I mean, you guys must feel like starting a business like this. How crazier last few years have been and you know, and you feel like it's going to calm down. And you're going to get to the point where it's going to relax, and that's not happening. I turned forty. I'm not going to be on camera. I just showed a documentary where? On camera. You know, like a when I turned for I'm going to retire. Like, I you have all these ideas. So I was like, well let me start putting into motion. Like, actually, you know, what I want out of my life. And then maybe I'll be able to give something more and contribute more than I have been because I felt like I wasn't doing a good enough job. So take away the celebrity part of you like at the end of the day like you are a high powered businesswoman. And we thank you. You're welcome. And we deal with a lot of high-powered business professionals and a things like their beer, dealing with mental health come up a lot in ten of social conversations and thing that we hear a lot as I just don't have time. Like, it's not it's forget the money part of it for a second. Like, I just don't have time. There's so many other things I have to do. And if I have an extra hour, I wanna go home and see my family or I want to maybe let go workout for a little bit in. I think part when you become successful in your careers. You've got to get really good at compartmentalizing and compartmentalizing enables us to multitask. In many ways Nabil's us to have clear clear-headed focus when needed. How do you sort of reconcile the I don't have time or you know, I am just going, and I'm focusing on them compartmentalizing with would you obviously have found in such a value in doing therapy. I would say to people. I mean, I read this in a book called essential ISM that I love, and I would say to people like if you don't make your time a priority. Somebody else will. So it's up to you like, do you want to be in charge of your happiness? Do you want to be in charge of your life? Like, I meditate every morning now for twenty minutes. This is a sentence. I thought would never ever come out of my mouth. I mean, it makes me wanna you know, I have to say it every day. Just he'll get less. Nauseous say that because I feel like a traitor something that I've done for this book tour, which is, you know, this is I'm speaking in languages. I haven't spoken I've been on a book tour five or six times before it five times before this and always while a how to show always while I was doing standup always doing a tour doing everything everything everything I could do to show everybody, I was stronger tougher Chelsea. Could handle a Chelsea can handle it like the more? You throw out me the more. I'm gonna do. This is the first time in my life that I actually had time to write a book without having the book. I I just wrote this. And then I was like maybe this is a buck and gave it and they were like, yes, this is a book. But this is the first time I've had one focused my attention on one thing rather than eighty things. So the integrity of the work is at a different level. And now that I see that it makes me realize that you can't do fifty thousand things at the same time. You know, even with something like the skin like, you guys are doing everything that's skim related. So even though you're probably feeling so spread thin. It's got you've got the same agenda. So you're on the right track. Because you're not doing the skin and fifty thousand other things on the side, or maybe you are or not. But but even though there's a lot of like antennas coming out of this. You're all you have one main focus you saying, no more. Yes. I try to say, no more. I try and be think about things in an essential way. Like is it essential for my, you know, me or my family's happiness or is not if it's not. And your constantly doing favors for people. That's gonna get old quick. And then you become resentful. And then you become rich when not order when he was thinking about this book tour, which is different in many ways because the book is different and you're at a different stage. Personally, did you have any hesitations about? I mean, this book is so much. It's honest in a different way. Were you nervous to get up there? And talk about it. I'm not I mean, I'm all be nervous. I'm going on. You know, I'm going on this book tour, so it's going to be different every night. But yes, I'm looking at the tour differently. I've looked at like how I want to present myself, and how what kind of conversations I wanna have. And I didn't think the tour match stand up because it's a more serious book. But I still wanted to have a really fun night with friends who know me, and we could talk about, you know, all the personal things that aren't in the book. So I that's why chose different people for each city. And we have cool authors that I've admired for a long time in certain cities y-. Yeah. I wanted totally to be different because I'm in a different place. And it doesn't mean like, you know, if you I wanted to. Just like gets in the next volition of me without fighting it so much and having it be so traumatic. So you talk about the volition of you. And I I want to kind of go back for second. Which is a lot of our listeners. You know, they read it in or we've talked about in previous podcasts, the idea of changing careers, the idea of reinventing yourself or Piven and think you've pivoted a lot. And you've done that with seemingly with intention like as a fan. You know? It's like, okay, stand up comedian make sense that you got this talk show. Like, okay. Maybe I don't know why you wanted to leave e but like you went to Netflix, all of a sudden, you're doing documentaries now all of a sudden, you're doing more documentaries. More books are all of those decisions intentional. And how do you think about kind of the reinvention of yourself along your career? I I mean there have been decisions that have been intentional. And there have been instances where they were. It was an intentional where I was you know, just kind of given a situation and had to figure out what to do with it. But I mean, you get yourself where you're going. All the time. And I think it to be honest about what you know, like being in a flow state. You know about being in a state where you feel like, oh, I'm creating this is right. This book feels right to me the documentary. I just shot for Netflix feels right to me it's about white privilege. These projects aren't about my ego. There about making you know, what I mean there where it's about just sharing an experience and kind of experiential. And that's where I really the things I really loved to do yet. You know, you get drawn to do a talk show because you did a talk show. So people think you should do another one and you get and then you get sucked into that. And you and then you're on a cycle. And you're like, well, I haven't really even thought about what I'm doing. I loved making the documentaries. And that's why net flicks is so great because they knew how passionate I was about that. And that's where I what I wanted to really do. So they were cool with it. I mean, not you know, everybody gets to make. I mean that just speaks to my privilege alone that I get to make documentary about it. So I'm sure I'll got a lot of shit for that too. But you know, I like getting a lotta shit for stuff. They'd change your definition of success. Yes. Yeah. I did. I think in your young you really really want everyone to know your name. And then you grow up, and you're like, I don't need everybody to. That's a little bit too much on the nose. And then you're like, I would like to go to some places and be able to walk around in a bathing suit without getting photograph at some point. So yes, you get I think I got a big dose of myself when you think about kind of your career pivots or have Aleutian witch of which of the ones that you did were you the most scared. That's a good question. I think I'm the most scared. You know, it's funny to talk about being scared now because now I feel like I'm in such a state of like, you know, how to get yourself to a place where you need to be calm relaxed and like the on your own team. I think that's the thing. I learned the most it's not that I've ever been so scared because I I don't have that feeling so much, but I felt on on not right where it's doesn't feel right? And when we ignore that intuition that we all are born with like that muscle is there, and it's about whether or not we want to use it and pay attention to it instinct is everything, and you know, we don't trust our instincts at all. I think 'cause we get tired. Tired and we're tired. We want the day to end we want somebody else to make the decision. And if you're not operating on your instincts, and you're not like in a flow state. You're not in it. You're just trying to get through it. And anytime, you're not enjoying work. It's like, it's it's up to you to say, okay. I'm not enjoying this. How am I going to re-engage? And how am I gonna fire like fire myself up again and not everybody has the liberty to just stop working? But you know, when you're out at a out of your zone, and you're out of your lane, and you have to pay attention to that. And I wish I had paid attention to it all the time because it's a lesson. You keep learning. I learned it when I was twenty alerted again when I was thirty and I learned it again when I was forty. There's a trees I'd like to see more of go on spring showers. Bring may flowers you just come up with that. I did. But I've been the allot and hoping that it's true and got me thinking about waiting for payoffs. And you know, what that leads to go on investing? See what I did there? I am following. Yeah. Okay. So Robin Hood is an investing app that lets you buy and sell stocks E T options and cryptos all commission free, which is important. Because other brokerages charge up do ten dollars for every trade, but Robin Hood doesn't charge any commission fees, meaning you can trade and keep all your profits. Robin Hood is giving listeners of skin from the couch a free stock like apple Ford or sprint to help you build your per folio. Sign up at skim dot, Robin, Hood dot com. That's skim dot Robin, Hood dot com. Someone that has not an Iowa. But is very interested in it didn't that I did that start this. I want to know. I mean, I know obviously, it was filmed, and it was on the show, but, you know, hearing you speak now about intuition and gratitude and all of these words you thought you would never use. Would you do you think that experience started that or like totally different and started with you in therapy? Well, the IRS go, which I, you know, my that's Shawna. Shawna, who Sarah, my sister's here, who's Trump also could for those who don't know what is Iowa Iowa is a plant grown, Peru. And then they mix it into hot tea, and they brew it. And then you drink it, and you get super fucked up your you have like a psychedelic trip, but it's all repressed memories in your brain. So you have like this phantasmagoria of images that run through that are of your childhood. So you see yourself as a little girl in my instance. I saw my sister Shauna me on our beach Martha's Vineyard that we grew up on. We don't have our own beach. But you know, there was a little day in front of our house. And I just saw our childhood play out like we were on kayaks, and we would tip each other over and we'd p in each other. You know, we pay like ph kayaks be laughing so hard. We would be, you know, peeing in our pants and a lot of peeing in our. Family. It's a theme. And then we had like this dog that was running across the bay. And I was like oh my God. That's white foot. I was like forgot about our dog. But all of the images were true. So I was like those are these are real things. This is real these are memories that I forgot and it just went around, and it was like this glistening light, and it just all the happiest days of my childhood, and for Shoshana and me, it was you know, it was my message was love your sister more. She's not you stop pretending stop demanding that she act more. Like you like I wanted her to be more adventurous and move out of the suburbs. Why do you wanna live on in New Jersey? What's wrong with you? We're supposed to leave New Jersey, you know, and I didn't understand or respect that she just had a different outlook than I did. I was all about me. Like, what is it going to do what I want to do? It doesn't make any sense because she doesn't want the attention. You do you bought the attention? And like, that's the that's the more Barrasso heart. Not her part. I want to go back to you talk about gut instinct, we both like think about gut instinct and intuition a love for me. Personally. I always thought that I have very strong intuition, and gut and I think that's what led us to start the skim. But I've actually found as the skin has become more of a thing. And there's more employees more people around the table that I've lost confidence. Sometimes in my gut that I I can't channel at the way. I used to drive. It drives me crazy. And I'm curious how have you been able to tap into your gut again? Like what we're where do you find that? And how would you tell other people who are listening to to really isolate their gut instinct, I think that's such a great point that you bring up because it's something I've wrestled with for a law like a about two years. I was like in a zone where I couldn't trust my gut. And that was like that was everything to me. I was like, I know everything for my gut. And I think it's such like it's so clear that when your world becomes really big and the business, you're creating or the brand or your show, whatever you're in. Wouldn't it starts to balloon your? Gut. There's too many voices around to hear your gut. You can't hear your own voice. And so for me another answer meditation, but I have to say like the most creative I've become in the recent months is every time I meditating in the morning. I forced myself to do it. No matter what twenty minutes every morning, but I think that's so important because we do get there's a cacophony of voices. And and and you hire more people, and there's more people chipping in and so you're not it's not left to you to make those decisions as frequently as it was before. Because there are so many people around you so to check in with yourself, you have to have really focused attention, and you know, meditating my guy was like go meditate for three months, and you have to just do it every morning, and I was like I could be dead in three months. I don't have three months to commit to something. I'm like that's longer than a pregnancy. He's like not actually. Well, whatever it sounds like one. And then and then I woke up, and I was like, I'm gonna do it. I've never done anything for three months. Who knows what the possibilities are because I was such an impatient person always operating on impulse impulse. And then literally like, it's been six months. And if I don't do it. I feel it. I'm so much calmer. I don't react to things if I do I look away meditation. I think that will get you back into your life flow state in terms of decision making before you got all calm. What are the things that used to like trigger you a stress where did you kind of just lose it anything? I mean, if the fucking microwave looked at Iran. I mean, the if something like I have this. I still it's not like, I'm fixed. I'm just aware. Now, what my problems are. I mean now I'm on the road to like trying to get better at that at knowing because I think half of it is identification awareness and modification you identify the problem, and you're aware of it. And then you're like, let me try and not. To be a bitch right now. You know, and it's not stupid. But it makes you first of all makes you just so much calmer. And so the little things like I was driving the car the other. Jan I'm talking on the phone with my assistant, and might my big yeti container goes flying because of my driveways, pretty steep. And it just you know, all over my car everywhere. And it's like read I've got some electrolyte shit in it. And I was like oh my God. Fuck this is how I'm going to start my day. It's like seven thirty. And I just pulled over and I was like all right. Just pull over and just breathe. And I was like got can't doing this. But it and then I was fine. And I was able to laugh, and I wasn't freaking out about a Cup falling because who gives a shit like if you're going to be late you're going to be late. And if you're not you're not like at all works out. And I know that's a thing that people like I remember when my makeup artist used to go. Everything's gonna be okay. Everything's gonna be okay. Go stuff saying that doesn't mean anything. Nothing's going to be okay. There are children whatever country you want to choose being, you know, raped and murdered or whatever. And she goes. But you'll see even though all of these terrible things are happening. Like, you're either like breathing or you're not. So as long as you're breathing, which Oprah talks about on her all of her things, which is another thing. You know, I never thought I would be listening to. But it's so important. There's spirituality for a reason. It's too calm. And then you're like operating at a higher vibration, and you're pulling in people that you like let everything's less annoying. I mean, I take a lot of cannabis twos. Edibles legal and LA. So it's a whole new with a whole new world. Yeah. Okay. So there's a quote in the book that that stood out to us. And you said before you can be of use to other people you need to clean out your own injuries. And that's obviously what it sounds like you've been doing for the past few years since your show ended in two thousand seventeen you've gotten pretty political. Let's talk about that. What what prompted it. How do you deal with the backlash and how is it? I think opened you up to what you're doing. Now. I mean, wh what prompted it was the election, and what the I just felt out of control I felt like an out of control. So for me to feel out of control different thing. You know for me. That's the world is out of control. I've always been out of control, but the world is fine. So for me to feel like the world was also matching me I was like, well who's going to be in charge here, and you know, back to my nine year old cell phone, Michael I will. And I'll do whatever I can I'm gonna I can fix this. I could fix this situation. I can just go campaign for candidates. And if everybody does that, you know, if enough people do it, we'll see what we saw November. Which is exactly what happened enough people whereas outraged so that worked out, but what have I what I've learned is that you can't operate at a ten, you know, I was so angry. And I was so mad, and I was addicted to the news and finding out when they were going to remove Trump from office as if it was going to happen any moment every single day. And what I learned is that to be really effective. You can't be at a tent every crisis can't be a ten it has to be at a five and six and played it along game. And so that's a good lesson for me to learn with regard to life and regard to jobs, I treat everything like it's a temporary gig. I don't ever want to commit to anything. So it's like, well, why is that? Why are you choosing things? You don't want to commit to. And what are your commitment issues? Let's get both of those things out on the table. So we can find out what you really want to do. How do you? You know, we talk about the political stuff. Like, I mean are. Audiences very much down the middle politically. And I think, you know, I'm sure that you've definitely lost some of your audience and fans because you come out so vocally against Trump. How do you do you respond to criticism today maybe differently than you did when you first we're doing stand up, and I came on the show. I mean, I think we talk on the show all the time about it's not fun to not be liked. It's not fun to not be liked by an employee. It's not fun to not be liked by your audience or your customer, and is well, it's a gift to get feedback. It's like gift in quotes. Sometimes because you're like, I really hate hearing this right now, what is it like to be on such a public stage? And cure people say not nice things about you or strongly disagree with you. I don't I don't wanna be a person who only respects people who like me. It's it's powerful to like someone who doesn't like you and to not care that they don't like you. So I take a lot of pride in the interesting bet seems like did he take you a while to to come around to though? Yeah, that's a new. That's like a new ran news. Yeah. What about, you know, especially for our listeners who, you know, are probably not have dealing with likely. What happens when the public does that? But what happens when your coworkers? Give critical feedback where you find out that your boss had something, maybe not a nice about you. You know, we've all had those moments in a different scale. And I'm curious what your reaction used to be. And when you think back about that. What would you change? Yeah. I think that is first of all a huge always opportunity when somebody criticizes you because it's great to be like thank you for telling me that. Like, it feels really good to exercise that and be like, oh, thank you. I didn't. Oh, wow. I didn't realize I was coming across like, it's such an opportunity to prove that person wrong. My friend, Mary McCormack lie best friend was once said to me, she's like you shouldn't have been this is years ago. And she said you shouldn't have been at that party last night, you were really drunk, and I was like oh God. I better go out tonight and make a new impression. And she was like, that's actually really smart go out tonight. Don't drink and make sure you see all the same people. I'm like, all right. I'll try because then they breed, but that's pretty much what everything in life is. It's like you. That's an opportunity for you to do the opposite. So take the criticism. Think about it. If it's completely out of left field an inappropriate, then that's one thing. But there's always some truths a little everything. And it's good to be like, you know, what thanks for that note. And then flip it on its head and make a new impression. The next time. I feel like you would be really good at at negotiating for yourself. And that's something. We'll first of all are you? Yes. Okay. Yes. I think so I just had that feeling. What are some tips? How do you go into a negotiation with a lot of confidence? I think like any negotiation is about saying, hey, listen, like, this is what's happening. You can. I'm not sitting here waiting like there's a million opportunities in this world. And I don't want to ever feel like somebody's doing me a favor. You know? I still have that chip on my shoulder. So that's good. I don't wanna feel like that on. I'm sure it's happened and unbeknownst to me or you know, but I think confidence is everything you have to believe in yourself. Like, you really have to believe in what you're doing. Don't think you're a fake don't. I mean there. I went through two years where I was like who am I what am I do? You know, 'em fake. Am I even funny? Am I smart and my well read, what am I? And it's like don't play that game with yourself start with the things that you are and build on that so confidence is so essential in really manifesting things and making things happen because without your belief in yourself. You're never gonna get there in the first place. So I would just say that you have to believe in yourself. Figure out a way to do that to usually say if you're negotiating like a salary or contract. Do you say what you want? I. I'll say like where I wanna land. Yeah. I mean, I'm also, you know, I like to work hard like I like to show up improve myself to to a fault. I think all women are always trying to be like, oh, if you're one of the guys, you know, I'll do it will do extra two extra and I'm done with doing that. Like, I'm not doing extra anymore. You know what I mean? I've built a foundation for my life where I can be comfortable, and I don't wanna do extra. And I don't want to show up and think you're going to get that back. You know, you play one of the you think you're going to be like the cool chick. That's doing. And then you get a nobody cares anyway. In the end, nobody rewards you for that. So it's not about being more selfish. It's about being more strategic. Okay. Lightning round. We'll ask you questions. You answer. First thing that comes to your mind. You're going to be good at the. Yeah. What did you think you were going to be when you grow up? Oh, I thought for sure I would be a nanny I thought I was going to be a nanny to a bunch of jobs. I knew I didn't want kids. Interesting. First job waitress worst job. Working at a T shirt store, Martha's Vineyard folding t shirts in the back. Also depressing. Worst professional mistake you've made of God coasting that reality show. I did years ago called the lot with Steven Spielberg as a producer. It was a reality show host. They asked had me hosted. Yes. And after like, three episodes, I was like you guys. This is so bad. We know. I phone call. When you get good news, Shawna, usually first phone, call when you get bad news. I don't call people anymore. When I got bad news. You meditate? I just tried digest it when was the last time you negotiated for yourself. Just now we just we just just now. Yeah. We're doing a limited podcast for my tour. So we did that with iheart. How do people know when you're stressed? They know. What drives you? Vacation. I like that answer. I to me as well. What is your shameless? Plug my shameless plug to stand up comedy tour. I think that's the sit down comedy tour shit sit down. That's my play shameless fun Chelsea dot com. Thanks, Chelsea, congratulations. Thanks girls. Cannot mess. Stay almost. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join us next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily Email newsletter that gives you all the important, news and information you need to start your day. Sign about the skim dot com. That's the S K I M M dot com to M'S for a little something extra. What stresses you out you? That's fair fair. I get that. This is like when someone tells you to go to bed, and then all you can think about is everything else. It's keeping you from going to bed. If you like you're not in a good place today. So whether you want tips on how to spruce up your home on a budget or want to see how you can Marie condo. You're just get work or just want our favorite spring reads. We have got it all visit the skin dot com slash spring now to see more. That's the skim dot com slash spring. See there.

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Danica Patrick: I am coachable. Whatever it is, tell me. Because I want to do better.

Skimm'd from The Couch

31:58 min | 1 year ago

Danica Patrick: I am coachable. Whatever it is, tell me. Because I want to do better.

"Today's skin from the couch is presented by John Hancock. We are partnering with them to help you face the future more on that later but for now let's get into the episode. You're able whatever it is like. Tell me because I want to do better her. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better replaced to talk it all out than where it began on a couch. Buckle up skim listeners. I love that I say that today. Danika Patrick is one of the most recognizable professional female athletes in the world. She succeeded in the male dominated. Industry of professional motor. Sports broke the record for the most top ten finishes of any female in the NASCAR. Actually she almost has too many first female to titles to count. She's been named Time's one hundred. Most influential people list appeared in fourteen Super Bowl ads and grace the cover of sports illustrated. She may have retired from racing. But it's far from slowing down. Danika is also a winemaker clothing designer author and most recently a podcast host. We are so excited to have you Danika. Welcome to the couch. Thanks I'm on a chair. Technically you're we are on the couch. You're on the chair to the chair. Dang it okay edit it is take that as a lawyer would say so they ride it for us to talk to you one of the most celebrated drivers of all time because you were talking to people that are the worst drivers of all time so it just feels like this is a big moment for us. Yeah do you guys have cars. No I had to get better at driving licences which is scary that we were given honestly. I remember when I got my license. I got my license. The day I turned sixteen. You can take classes in school drivers identifiable or or drive right as I believe it was called when I was growing up which is out of school so that you can time it right to get it on your birthday as opposed to waiting till the end of the semester stor anyway so I get my license and I think that I scared my driving instructor because I usually didn't slow down until the car in front mm-hmm backed up as in like I saw tail lights but until they are actually closing the distance between my front bumper and his rear bumper. I didn't break and I freaked him out. Okay I want to get into your background. Just Skim your resume for us. I grew up in Northern Illinois. I was actually born in Wisconsin. Born in beloit late Wisconsin grew up in south boy and I started racing. Go karts when I was ten. My Mom and dad met on a blind date at a race. Some like my mom has been going to the racetrack and my dad has been racing racing since he was a kid. I came along not far after My parents Probably I think they got married in nineteen eighty. There were twenty one. I came along about twenty two years old old and then I started racing at ten and at sixteen I moved to England lived there for three years racing. I left highschool my junior year and got my ged. My good enough diploma And at that point in time thought man I better make this racing thing work and came back to the states. Didn't have a job for a couple of years. But then got taken in by Bobby Ray Hall Hall. Who is a guy who used to race indy cars and had an Indycar team and he started a lower level team for me and that went well and then two years of that and I was racing? Indy cars ours and then I did any cars for seven years and then I RACE NASCAR. For about seven years. There was a little overlap in them but I did each of them for about that long and retired tired in two thousand eighteen super easy. So that's great. I WanNa talk about all this. I have so many questions for you before we kind of dive into how a passion and a hobby became not only your career but really a historic moment for female athletes. What is not on in your wicked pedia or website that we should know about you? I don't know what's on my wikipedia at one point in time on my wikipedia. I went to college. So that's sure as Hell L. Notch as I only have. Ged Did you ever think about going to college. Now Well when I was a kid when I was ten when I started racing I thought I would go to college for engineering so I could learn how to work on my car Because I want to be a race car driver but that was ten and then probably by eleven. I stopped thinking about that. You you had other things now. What do you consider your driving force Pun intended my dreams? I'm just kind of a dreamer so I like to do things. At their furthest extent goals that go beyond something. I think it's important to have goals that. Go beyond the obvious What's the pride of the simplest example is my winery so I make a wine? The name of the wine is SOM- NEOM which mainstream in Latin and if my goal Oh was to make money which I haven't done yet and it's been ten years I would have sold it a long time ago right because that's dumb business but my the goal is not to make money. I believe it will when I- -CCOMPLISH my other goal which is to help people come together from wine To to share and put their phones away and connect like we just don't do so well anymore To go to the valley and Experience Napa Valley and experience since how wonderful it is to just be nature and understand the farming and understand the details of everything the romance of popping the Cork like just the whole thing so so I want to share. That experience helped people. Just feel that. And that's what made me fall in love with it and why I wanted to winery. So that's really my ultimate goal. If it my goal was to make money I would have sold it right so you know. Just have a goal that goes beyond. Let's say another example be fitness if my goal was to lose weight well. What do you do once you've done that? My goal is is to challenge my mind so it keeps me going back into the gym to make up new workout. See what else I can do. See how far or I can push myself Create new challenges new goals like I love the mental challenge of it but if my goal was to be fit well I'm fit now what you're done done. It's like weight. Loss with eating. My goal is to feel good so if my goal is just to lose weight through eating and I do that. Then what you'll never not wanna feel-good I'd eat to feel good. That never ends so. It's about creating a goal that goes beyond something either obvious or more shortsighted. So as we've mentioned were partnering with John Hancock for our face. The future Our series power for that. You're welcome John. Hancock it's all about helping skimmers take the guesswork out of their biggest money. Any moves like buying your first home growing your family or thinking about retirements sounds lovely. One day it got us thinking about the kinds of money decisions and making as we were trying to grow the Skim and there are many many many decisions that we were trying to make and trying to Avoi- While we've been growing the business one question we get asked a a lot. All the time is when did you start paying yourself. When you're starting a business thinking about one do take a salary from that? Where does that money go first? We get a big financial decisions. are hard to navigate. We've been there. We're also going through it and we break them down all on our face the future page. Check it out at the skim dot com slash feature. Do you WanNa do a sound effect. The future you can also head over John Hancock to speak with a financial planner. Who can help you navigate the future? Whatever that looks like Frio? I WanNa go back what I always find interesting when we interview people who knew from a very young age they wanted to do you are ten was there an a Ha moment that you were like. Oh this is what I WANNA do is. Is there anything else that was interesting to you or was this always driving your passion in the beginning before I wanted to do that at ten. I think the first thing I wanted to be was a veterinarian because I love animals still do and then I wanted to be a singer. But don't ask me to sing and I wanted to be a secretary actually think that was the first thing because my sister and I would pretend secretary with like old calendars. Your phone was plugged in. Yeah Yeah Yeah so my sister and I would do that so I'm going to be secretary then actually might have got him completely backwards secretary singer than veterinarian and then racecar driver. Once I started I just thought well I want to be racecar driver. Kids will say singer. And you're like Oh yes you are like good luck with and then they grow garage that how did you figure out. This was something that your family is GonNa Invest Time and money in for you to be able to do this and then also that you're really good at it Um We tend to like to things that we're good at right. I don't think anybody really likes to do things that are terrible at so it's about finding that which I always say as part of the battle rate it is finding things that you're really good at. I probably wasn't going to be a basketball player. I'm five foot one So that wasn't really going to be very realistic nick for me like you said that kids go. I WanNa be this when I grow will then you have to actually start doing it right so I mean we raced where if I wanted to be the veterenarian I needed to start working at the local local shelter or right. You've actually start doing something. It's just like self care or self help like if you're trying to retrain your brain and think new thoughts and create new patterns. It's great to have an idea but if you don't actually implement something thing that takes steps in making that a reality and practicing it you're never gonNa do it. We went to the tracks so I was like. Oh here we are. We're there a lot of other kids at your age at the track and other girls series at the track. All there weren't other girls really. My sister did try it. I too But Yeah Oh yeah I mean I was in there's age category so I wasn't just wasn't all for one out there from you. Know eight to fifty. It was the eight to twelve twelve to fifteen. What did your parents here about? What made you stand out at ten? What was the skill set that you had that started to get noticed? I heard this way later. Way later. but it was that I wanted to keep going back to the track. I kept asking to go to the track. I don't remember that at at all. I think instant gratification is something rare to come by and with racing. You get that because it's time so I'd come in and I'd be like what what was the lap time you know so I love that process of making it handle better going faster. You know pushing a little further so for me. There was some instant gratification -cation rewards with it but I guess I just kept asking to go and also I am coach -able so I think that's another thing too is is that not. Everyone is comfortable and tell anyone that like I mean. Hey if when you hear me doing a podcast I should ask something else or I'm interrupting too much. Whatever for it is like tell me because I want to do better? You take the feedback. Yeah Yeah I am really curious about your family and how you grew up so you left high school during your junior year to race on the European circuit. And then you move to a on your own and this was all while you were a teenager cracked and we've known you for about nineteen minutes looking at the timer but you seem pretty grounded normal. How did that happen? I don't think that if I had been left to my own devices or had success early on when I was even a late teenager. I don't know high what it turned out. How did how did you get? Yeah well with racing. It's a little interesting because there isn't that Markan time where you aren't with your family anymore. Now yes I did move to England. I was sixteen. I was there for three years pretty much on my own but I he came home and moved back in with my family. You know there was that break like you see in college where somebody goes to college and then they move away and they go play for team they get drafted apted and start to make millions of dollars or hundreds of thousands of dollars in professional sports at the age of twenty one and that just is not how it goes does and racing so much so I think that's part of it being around your family and the norm that you grew up with you know having good values and being undisciplined. Your parents seemed like they were obviously insanely supportive of you and this journey. How did they handle saying daughter? Grow into such a success. Asa a young age I mean I know they were proud like obviously they tell me that a lot on my dad for sure loved racing more than me. I mean it was definitely his thing so I think at times he would kind of project his own feelings onto the situation which wasn't always the best. It wasn't all just like roses but I think accounted They couldn't imagine if I didn't have the opportunity especially with going to England. They're like it's hard but I couldn't imagine that she didn't have the opportunity that'd be even worse. They're they're really supportive and yeah. They weren't scared to let me try either. Sometimes I think parents can project onto their own fear of things. That's one thing being that they didn't have didn't do right. I mean you could be afraid that your child would be endanger. You could be afraid that your child would fail and you're trying to protect them from that but really most all the time. Whatever you're feeling and projecting onto someone else has so much more to do do you than it does with them do you everything about the danger much more when I was done I was part of the broadcast for the indy? Five hundred this This this year after finishing up with that race last year and I felt the weight of like Whoa. These people are crazy. They can climb a wheel and launch into the stands pretty easily. You Know I. I was able to reflect on that when I was done but during it was an awareness but but not a real long thought process. Because it didn't serve me if you had to wait how competitive you are with yourself versus with others. How do you kind of think about how that works out I'm probably more competitive with myself. I guess holding myself to a high standard. I'm more hard on myself than I am with the other scenarios just to kind of scituate. That's in terms of timeline. You spent time in Europe. You come back. You're with your family and then you start with indie kind of a few years. I was nineteen eighteen and I came home and of Nineteen beginning being twenty years old at another ride when I was twenty. Three rows racing indycars. A what Moammar wet part in this kind of trajectory did you realize not only like. Are you getting a lot of attention because you're really good at what you're doing but also because you're really breaking ground for women when I was fourteen. Yeah Yeah Way earlier I was a freshman in high school. I think and I wasn't a very many years so probably was a couple of really wasn't even there my junior year So freshman high school and I had two different shows that came to my high school and filmed me One was ABC The network they were running a Sunday special called passenger. Play making a champion and the three girls Were Myself Alf. Tara Lipinski Annakournakova and we were all fourteen and so we were featured in that and then the other one was MTV. When MTV was really cool when they played the full music video loved it? When it wasn't just shows how did you make friends like being on the track where other people you're erasing visit other athletes in? Yeah Yeah I mean a lot of friends. I'm like don't I friendly west. Of course I'm friendly. I am too. You're from the Midwest I'm from Chicago. Oh yeah yeah well. Then I grew up near Rockford. Roscoe's those right on the state line. You make friends who kind of vibe with right like sometimes your teammates you love. Sometimes you hate them. Sometimes someone else you know. It's like everything else. You find your little spot lot with people because they are like you. I was reading about you. I was sort of struck that there was a moment in your career. Where you were having trouble getting funding and your dad add helped underwrite your career and you got a lot of criticism around how you were living your life and how you're spending money and what kind kind of came out with A? You're doing nothing different than how a male driver would be spending their time. But you were the one that came under fire and I am curious when you started to realize that you're getting judged differently. My parents were paying for me while I was racing in England for a big portion of that and my managers had caught wind in that I was going out too much and I mean I was going out I mean I was. I was living alone and I was You know I was probably seventeen at that point in time time so pretty much anything goes over there. Yeah and But yes I wasn't doing anything more than anyone else. So this wasn't as far as this was public criticism schism. I wasn't well known at all but this was more of a scenario internally about whether or not my managers we're GonNa continue to hell and so my parents thought well if you're not not really serious why are we doing this. What was I therefore So I think we all have these moments in our life or like. Yeah you're probably right you know. L. Human Nature is to kind of do the minimum and everybody's minimum is different but my minimum was different now. Because I was like I can't do any of these things anymore so I had some new rules going back If I was going to be supported I mean it was a little miserable but it was part of the growing. They're called growing pains for for reason. Because it's not that fun. What's Poon the race or the competition? That's meant the most you that you've done. Well I one. In Japan that was my indycar erased. I one and there was a big relief but I would say that the most pivotal thing for me was my very first indy. Five hundred just about qualified on the pole and I bought one the race Qualified Fourth I finished fourth. I almost spun in turn one on my lap of qualifying but still qualified fourth. which is kind of amazing? Because you know you have one little lift often you could drop a bunch of spots but still qualified really well and then it was really close and You know fuel was a little bit issue so that was the one that put mean on the map to stay away so I'm from Chicago. You go and I go home every Thanksgiving which means so much holiday travel rush every single year and it's it's a really important thing to keep up healthy habits amidst all of the holiday craziness. One thing that I never give up is my quip. We are obsessed. I with this toothbrush. Quip is an electric toothbrush. That has sensitive sonic vibrations with Bilton timer and thirty second pulses to guide a full and even clean. Which means you can zone out while you're brushing your teeth and it beeps it buzzes? And then you know it's time to move on to the next section. The Quip floss dispenser comes with pre marked. String to help you used just enough. Plus quick delivers fresh. Brush heads floss and in toothpaste refills to your door. Every three months with free shipping. So your routine is always right. And you don't have to think about it if you go to quip dot com slash Skim right now. You'll get your first refill free at get quip dot com slash skim spelled G. E. T. Q. The U. I. P. Dot com slash. Skim Quip. The Good Habits Company when you think about not being just an athlete but also an icon to a lot of women who are girls else that are considering racing or just I think any young girl growing up and seeing that this is something you can do. Is that heavy to you is. Is that something that you've ever actively think about while you were racing or has that come after more after the men. That kind of leads leads into why I have my own. podcast now is because when I was finishing up the last few years I did recognize that just is being out. There was enough for some people which you know. I think the reason why had such success along the way was because that was never enough for me to just be participant so I wanted to have that ability to inspire and help people grow and help people believe in themselves after my career And I was actually allows promoting my book pretty intense last year at the very beginning of the year. And I don't a few podcasts. I went on Joe Rogan. I went on rich role I went on John. Lewis houses show and I hadn't even grasped the podcast thing for me. I mean I know it's been around for years but I just not that actually I remember going on an atom corollas way way back in the first ever podcast ever existed back in his garage. Probably remember remember that and I was like what is this pot I mean so. It's not that I didn't know the word but I just didn't listen to him Watch clips on Youtube or something like that like people that posted it on Youtube. That was much more of my source and so I was like. How long is this interview like? Well take forty five minutes or I'm like what. Oh God how many and I did on but I felt such an energy from it and a rush of just like excitement and connection and you were able to go so much deeper and my life was twenty plus years of yeah way more thirty years of five to seven minute interviews right. That's all I knew. And this whole format Matt of podcast was so much different. But I felt energized by an hour of talking to someone deeply versus the drain of of a five minute interview or a couple of five minute interviews. So that was what really gave me the idea to have my own podcast. Who are your mentors when you're coming always an interesting question Because I just didn't have them I talk about being the person for other people but then on the other hand I also say they're like I wanNA grow up and be like you'll make you should want to grow up and be better than me like you shouldn't be like me. You should want to be yourself and I should maybe be some kind of inspiration to think big and not be afraid to do what you want. But it shouldn't just WanNa be like me right because you could never be like me and also I could never be like you. I can only do me right and you could only do great so I just didn't have them. Yeah I never wanted to be like anyone else. Was it lonely being on the circuit. No no I do think that the part that maybe made it the hardest was that karate because of a big office here and lots of people and you know camaraderie goes a long way in that environment that you work in the connection action and people working hard for each other and so it didn't dawn on me until the end of my career when I realized why I don't WanNa go to the shop and hang out and why don't like like get really into that side of things of team building. I'm a girl it was like. I had the thought of if the whole team was made up of girls I probably really the friends combat. I'd probably hang out all the time. But they're not and so either I don't relate to them at all or then you run that other different scenario of it's not appropriate appropriate Going to dinner with one of the guys on the team. I've thought we've had this coming up with work a lot for us. It's been obviously well documented. Most sources of funding come from men and part of how you start develop relationships with the investors is like you need to socialize with really closely with them and we're lucky that there's always usually two of us but there have been instances we had One of our male advisors now we laugh about it but there was supposed to be a dinner where it was gonna GonNa be the two of us in him going and she had to cancel and it was just me and him we kinda afterwards. Todd we both were hoping the other was gonNA cancel because we felt uncomfortable being spotted spotted. Friday night Jenner. And we laugh about it. Now get so stupid but you had to think that way and it obviously at times can limit access to mentorship it can limit access now. It's comforting to sort of hear that you experience that yeah you to commit. That was my whole existence was with all guys and so it makes sense. That's why it was harder for me to develop the personal relationships and Camaraderie within because I either didn't relate. It wasn't appropriate so so now you've got books you've got the clothing line. You've got the wine company. What did you learn about business from the years on the circuit or do you feel like you were starting from square one in starting all of these different business ventures? There was a lot of a feeling of square one. uh-huh running businesses versus being an element of business because with racing. I wasn't calling a ton of shots like I wasn't hiring. My engineer was an hiring. My crew wasn't hiring. My who's endowed by the team. Does that okay. So the sponsor comes in and pays a chunk of money and and I give them x amount of days of my services of appearances and photo shoots and whatever else and then I go drive the car. So so there's like so much that's out of your control So there's less to do. I find that so interesting because part of what I imagine you love about racing is that you are in control and then when so much of your existence then is not in your control. Well that's what I learned a NASCAR. The car was so critical to performing. And so if they didn't believe in you And they didn't put the time and effort into developing Matt car and massaging on it as they would say and taking care of the details than the difference between good and average was big as you go into these other ventures and really kind of solidify your role as a business woman. What are you scared of? I mean I just don't want him to fail. I was the same in Racing Mon asked me what was my biggest fear. I'd say failing that's the same thing. What is one venture in your growing business empire? You haven't taken on yet that you want to Probably something in in the space of cooking. I mean. My Book has recipes that I wrote but I really love cooking. Actually somebody asked me recently. What do I do that I love to do that? The result doesn't matter you know 'cause I'm pretty result yeah oriented And I just like to be good at things so I just don't really like to do them so so but cooking and mind you. I'm good at cooking. But the result isn't so critical. Yeah a guy just enjoy the process and something that I really just just enjoy doing casually I love to entertain. I love to cook for myself. I mean I can make my plate for one at home if I'm alone. Look beautiful just because I enjoy the art of it and we with our eyes and it's part of the process and it's just something creative so whether it's for a lot of people are just myself self just a process I enjoy so that's probably one thing that hasn't been realized in a business sense Other than the recipes in the book. We're GONNA move to our favorite segment. Okay the lightning around. You should be good at this fast paced expectations first job job. I worked at the limited to worst loved limited to to to. I wasn't a very employees. Though last book your at I'm I'm in the midst of reading mindset but I finished meet your soul by at least Romeo. I reread that Not a pun intended this time but What drives you now now Doing things that energize me whereas professional mistake you've made ours at the indy five hundred and I qualified really well every year until this year and I got out of the car and I said it wasn't my fault and I heard that for for the rest of my career for quite a while. Anyway for years I'd qualified in the top ten or eleven every year and this time was really bad and it was scary as hell out there and that was pretty dumb to say. First call when you get good news. Also probably Hayley Erin. WHO's the first is calling? You got bad news. It's either Haley. My best friend business manager assistant do all. I can't even call you anything because you just do too many jobs but or my boyfriend Aaron. When was the last time you negotiated for yourself? That's what I have to do. More all the time with businesses as in coming to New York here and doing podcasts shows I have a booker. And she's been helping but sitting down with my boyfriend and he's he's like you need to reach out to people you can just send a message to create relationships. Unlike you're right like I am so used to everybody doing everything for me down to opening the door I I mean years ago I realized I walk through I all the time. I'm like I gotta let people walk through the door. I I'd they have to be like that and so I am so autopilot to just giving someone the job of doing something. So that's probably the most recent thing that I'm like. Yeah you're right right. I have time critic relationships and talk to the people. You WanNa talk to. Instead of just someone that had talent booker you know finds in their rolodex. WHO's your dream? PODCAST GUEST OPRAH same. Do you WanNa teach me on a drive if you want me to okay. Thanks Shameless Plug podcast pretty intense. PODCAST by Danika Craig. Danika thank you so much. Congratulations on everything. Welcome thank you thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until that and subscribe to our daily Lee Email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information. You need to start your day sign about the Skim Dot Com. That's the S. K. I. M. M. dot com two. M's for a little something extra.

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Priyanka Chopra Jonas, actress, producer, entrepreneur, philanthropist: "For a very long time, I...never dealt with the things I was feeling."

Skimm'd from The Couch

34:53 min | 2 months ago

Priyanka Chopra Jonas, actress, producer, entrepreneur, philanthropist: "For a very long time, I...never dealt with the things I was feeling."

"For a very long time. I always ran away from greece and ran towards work or towards relationship or towards something but never dealt with the things i was feeling and i think accepting the fact that you're grieving feel sad or you feel afraid of failure of your career anything accepting your feelings is the first step in taking away their power. I'm carl sagan. I'm danielle weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. Priyanka chopra jonas joins us on skimmed from the couch. We are huge fans and so excited to have with us. She's an actress producer. Singer and philanthropist prank rose to fame after winning the miss world pageant in two thousand. She later took bollywood and then the global entertainment industry by storm. She's written about her career journey in her new memoir on finish with is on sale february nights. Priyanka were so excited to have you here. Welcome to skin from the catch ink. You guys so we ask everybody to skin they resume you have a long resume. So we're gonna ask you to like skim the highlights here. It's just everything is sort of happened. Really quickly right now in my life so i would say but actor producer entrepreneur founder of an author philanthropist. And yeah that's a. That's a lot of things we're gonna dive into all of that. But i actually just hear you say that. Is there one that you identify more closely with. No i feel like. I'm some of all of them. They've all been my choices. Besides which one when. I was seventeen years old. It's not something that i seeked. It kind of happened to me. Besides that everything else in my life has been my choice. My career has been my choice. So i think i'm a some of each one of those verticals because i kind of deliberately went after them myself. What something that. We can't google about you. Oh if it's not on then you'll never know. okay. I'll try to different way. What's the craziest thing you've read about yourself on google or out there just to wire. I do what. I do like people people feel like. Sometimes they talk as they know me i was. I remember early on. This is one of the first memories of this happening for me. Just done like just done a few hindi movies in india and i was like early twenties at that point. And you know how hindi movies have some of them. So we were shooting a song and it was raining green songs a sequences that you see in entertainment. Look a lot more beautiful and glamorous than they are. It's not fun. You're wet constantly. You're you have wet clothes on just like not fun to shoot that. You're like that for twelve hours constantly being made wet. I remember i was filming. Matenaer read on google a couple of days later that i had requested for mineral water to be used in the rain machines. That was a good one. Thank you for sharing that. Can you imagine how much mineral water it would require like. Who would make that would do that for anybody. That's like that's crazy. Yeah we're gonna in order to really understand your story. We need to start at the beginning. I wanna get a better understanding of what Why growing up with for you. We know you moved around a lot within india as a child and then you made a big moved to the us as a teenager. But how would you describe your your childhood at in your personality growing up. I think it was very nomadic. You know my parents were in the military. My father was in the military initially in my mom joined but because we moved around so much every two years we were in new plays. Adaptability is easy for me. And i think that my childhood that part of my life really lent itself and let me two words being adaptable and within that. I think i had a sense of adventure. I was raised in a family that kind of pushed me to have an opinion. Even when the room didn't agree with me. Like i used to always hang out my and their friends when they had people over and you ended having conversations like things in life and my opinion would be asked and i always like i was never laughed at number shamed. That kind of gave me a sense of confidence. You know in fact my mom used to always say even if the room disagrees with you you have to have an opinion you know otherwise would you stand for and that kind of built integrity in me about. What do i stand for. So i think my childhood i have to say is a big part of what i became. I wanna talk about when you made the move to the us as a child or yeah i was twelve twelve years old bexley yet. That's why i said as a child because that's crazy. I was visiting my cousins. And you know they had moved here like a couple of years ago survived to me and they were like oh in america they have this attitude like i wanted to be a part of it so when we were visiting my aunt and i was twelve years old and i went to my cousin's school and i was just like what kids don't wear uniforms to school in eighth grade as a teenager. I was so excited about the freedom of that and so excited about the fact that you guys had died so much space and girls were wearing lipstick and you were talking to boys and all those things at like twelve thirteen which was definitely not allowed in my house. My attention on that time was piqued because of that. Not because i wanted you know a better education or anything. But i remember going to my parents and pitching it that i wanted better opportunity for myself and my mom was okay with it because she and my dad were also going through a transition period. My dad had retired from the military. They were setting up their own hospital. So my mom was like hey convenient go kind of worked up for both of us when you think about that now. Are you like wow. That was incredible that i did that at that early age. I mean i think about myself at that age. And i'm like i know like i would not have been able to to do that. I don't know because i don't know any other normal you know. My parents never sort of shunned by ideas you know. We had conversation about pros and cons and made sense. You know everybody has had to be on board with everything we as a family would be on board with the decisions that were taken. So i just didn't know any other way. And i felt like that was inculcating. Boldness in me about taking risks and it's reflective in me as an adult as well i feel but i had never known any other way. I've i've been opinionated. I if i want something. I'll go after it. I'm not shy about that. If i want something. Even as a kid. I used to tell my parents would negotiate and it would happen. I wanted barbies. When i was like five or six or something kindergarten. I remember that. I wanted barbie and my dad was like you know it was expensive and my parents are military pants and they were like well. If you get as then you barbies. I got straight his. It's i put that report card in my book for that reason because i wanted a barbie. You give me a motivation like a dog with a bone. I would love to sort of hear from you how you thought about confidence like as a teenager who eventually went onto a global stage in pageant world. And we'll talk about that too. You know now as a competent woman who's got eighteen different job. Titles how has sort of your relationship with confidence evolved tremendously. I think it definitely has to do with maturity for shore. You know it has to do with experience but at the same time i think you know it has to do with feeling a sense of stability and calm and i think i'm at a place in my life where i feel a sense of stability. I have confidence in my abilities. In what i bring to the table as a woman i feel sure of who i am but i think obviously you not born confident. No one's born confident. Our circumstances sort of define how confident we can be how we're made to feel with from our parents our friends the environment that you've sort of grown up in all that really contributes to someone's confidence and i think mine it was like mountains and valleys for a long time. I was insecure. But i was also raised to be confident but i was insecure and myself. I think over time you kind of i. I've come to a please where confidence has become. You know something that. I always have my backpack at pareto. Need to take it out all the time. I don't need it all the time. i don't need to have it all the time. I'm okay feeling vulnerable. Okay feeling uncomfortable instead of trying to run away from my emotions hide under the garb of confidence I think confidence something you pull out when you need an otherwise. It's okay to be real and field feelings. You're seventeen when you won miss world. Two thousand like walk us through. What changed overnight. I give credit to this like huge monumental changes to my brother. He was ten years old. I had just moved back to india from the us and there were two rooms and one was my parents and the other one was my brothers so my dad because i was seventeen. Sixteen was like oh seen room. Of course. she's a grown up. Brother who was ten was kicked out and my mom made his room in the hallway between the two rooms and he was like the sleeping in the hallway and he wanted to basically keep me out of the house that he could get his room back. And i had just taken these photographs. Which were like mall shots. You know soft. Focus with your hand near face like those kind of photographs. He brought those pictures to my mom. And you know we used to watch the miss india pageant at home and it was something that he may have seen. I don't know but he saw the ad for that in a magazine. And he brought to my mom and he was like you know she. Jill need to go to mumbai. She does that and and my mom. I don't know just to calm him or i don't know placate him why she did it but she sent those pictures in. I had no idea you owe everything to him that it's just an absurd thing to think about. But you know i was. I was very competitive. I still am once. You put me into competition. I was like okay all right. Let's see a treated like a relay. Almost and i was like well. I'm going to be the best racehorse and then if it doesn't happen fine. But i gave it. You know my best once. I was in it. You've talked a lot about your parents and how you've grown up and how that shape deal. I think twenty twenty for the world was a really weird year and people have had to be resilient and also deal with grief and a lot of ways You you talked to. Your dad is being one of your biggest orders. How did you or were you able to kind of take lessons from the grief to become more resilient definitely but you know i can talk and fall into that again you never know. We are all human. We all have adjourning that we have to go on. But i think i have tools in my toolkit now to be able to deal with it in a better way. I think accepting the fact that you're grieving is very important instead of running away from it for a very long time. I always ran away from grief and ran towards work or towards the relationship or towards something but never dealt with the things. I was feeling and i think accepting the fact that you're grieving refill sad or you feel afraid of failure of your career anything accepting your feelings as the first step in taking away their power and you know the fact that grief is not gonna go anywhere and becomes your companion. It's like your companion in life. It's going to hang out with you and some days. It's going to come out in a big way and say hi and stay for dinner and sundays. You won't even see them. You know i sort of started treating grief as my companion made it easier. It was just days. That i think about my dad or think about moments in my life where i've been sad or things that make me sad and i let myself feel it and then the next is better brighter. Hey thanks for listening to skimmed from the couch. We wanna make sure we're bringing you the best possible show and no. This isn't an ad instead to help us. Keep providing you with a show you love. We want to get your feedback and learn a little bit about you if you can spare five minutes to answer a few multiple questions. We'd really appreciate it to do that. Head to the scam dot com slash pod survey. That's the skin with two m's dot com forward slash pod survey. A few minutes of your time will help us give you hours and hours of the content you want in twenty twenty one and beyond. Thanks you go on the pageant stage to enter bollywood which i am personally fascinated by. It's all my musical theater. Dreams brought to life and it's hard to put into words. How big of a star. You become and i'm very curious from your perspective. You know so so much. We we all read and consumed all these kind of media headlines and stories about you know stars catapult to fame. But we don't see like behind the scenes like they auditioned a lot. They got rejected a lot. They were figuring out how to go sheet. They're worth an olive sort of behind the scenes parts. At what point in this journey like do you think that you shifted to becoming businesswoman recently. Actually i think i would say about when i founded my production company actually was my mother's idea. It's a very funny story. I turned thirty and my mom sat me down one night. And then she says you know actresses have a shelf life and all the actors even if they're in their fifties always wanna work with the youngest ones and you know in the ripe old age of thirty and i. Yeah see and she's like what are you gonna do if this is not you know your korea. I think you should start your own proxima house. I think you should start your own business. And i think you should get into business because you have an aptitude for it and it was so funny. I was very astute of her to say that. I'm glad not just me but you know a lot of female actors in my generation have changed that perspective and you know we can still be doing great work. You know as we get older. We're pushing the envelope. But it was my mom's stewed thinking at that point which sort of led me to found my company which is pro pebble pictures and i was bitten by the bug and i found it fascinating to be able to build things out of the power to be able to build ideas and those ideas become businesses and actually become your livelihood and your purpose and then i started like delving into investing in tech and then founding a hair care brand. It's all very new but it came from the desire of wanting to branch out of putting all my eggs in one basket. Just in case as your star began to rise and this is you know really kind of in the in the bollywood era of career. Who are you going to for advice to help you navigate not even your support system but what did your mentorship system look like and how much my family or i had never been in the entertainment business so it was like a we just applied logic like the chopra family always does. Is you know we're scientific about it. It's pros and cons. You always you never have one plan. You have multiple plans the way we were taught in the way i was taught the way i think i think is always to work backwards. If you have an ambition of. I wanna get say this movie. I wanna work with this person. What am i going to need to get to that. I'm going to have to get to someone who knows them. Someone who can get me a meeting. So i need to get somebody Get to someone who can have a conversation phone call. They will pay. So it's like you work if you want to buy a car. How much money am i going to need. What's kind of. Where am i going to get this from. How much do i need to earn. I always work backwards and me and my family at dinner and talk about like all right. Where do we wanna get. How do we get there. And what are the kind of roles. I wanna do and who should i be meeting and just sort of learned on the job. My acting school has been my career. I have never been to you. Know any sort of formal education when it comes to films and the arts. And i just kind of figured it out by sheer sort of great. I fell dust myself off and tried it again. Ibes mother william. You know you just have to evolve in. Stay a student. I think that's really important. One in the things that i find fascinating about actors is how often they have to deal with rejection and swimming. Starting out totally additioning for roles. How did you deal with that. And has it gotten easier for you over time you come to terms with the fact that it's part of the job over time and it happens to everyone but in the beginning it's very person he's like you feel rejected. It's like how dare you. I thought it was great. It feels very personal in the beginning. I mean it's it's it's still not fun. it's shitty. Yeah it seems like it would be really shitty to have that be part of your day but it's literally your job like it's part of your job for someone to watch you deliver the best that you think you have and then say that's not good enough for me on memphis not what i'm looking for like. That's my job to deal with that all the time. I always think it's so interesting to hear how actors deal that because we get rejected from a job in. It's it's not our job but it happens all the time that people don't get what they want or they think they're right or something. Okay think about it this way for actors. We have no consistency. We don't know where next check is coming from. We don't know the next couple of months where we're going to be because our jobs dictate that so. It's a constant hustle. You have to constantly be on your feet and there's no consistency of if you at least have age of you know that you have some sort of consistency for a bit for a couple of months for us. It's like okay. You know just for two months or like for six months. It figure out what the next thing is. It's so inconsistent. And unstable thrive off of that hassle or does that stress. You do thrive off but it also is sort of insane. Like it's not healthy to have that level of competitiveness with yourself constantly looking for what's the next thing you know. I see my career. I've always in this way like a ladder. I've never arrested on laurel. I've never liked movie. Does really well not someone to be like all right. I'm going to take a vacation for six months now. That like no. I've never been at home for six months. Except for quarantine and it took a global pandemic to do that. All of this the chaos that you thrive in the hostile. What is stabilizing for you. I didn't really know what it was for a very long time. Because i lived out of hotels rentals. The last home i own before the one. I'm in right now. Was about fifteen years ago. You know. I just like never had anything just moved around in a suitcase. I think when this house we made this house. My husband and i threw quarantine. Actually it really gave me that sense when i wrote this book. Actually which is why. It's such a sort of steady reflection of my life. It's like really a window into my life. From a very steady place is because i felt ground beneath my feet and i felt like i could breathe. I knew all my stuff was everything. Had a place you know. And i didn't realize i was missing it so i think only now. I sort of crave a home. And i crave like my dogs and i need my family and like all of that stuff really really matters to me and i take a lot of time even if i work crazy hours to be able to have. That gives me a sense of peace. The entertainment industry is infamously known for just the continued issue of wage equity the disparity around how men and women have been paid and obviously there are strides. Being made and people are much more open about it. But i would love to understand from you your experience with that and how you learn how to get more. Comfortable talking about money negotiating. I've been kicked out of a movie. Ones for arben told that i should leave. That wasn't kicked out of it. Because i decided to stay and suck it but i was told that if i don't Take the paycheck which was nominal compared to my co actor for almost the same amount of work that produces sentiment. There's so many other girls who will take this opportunity and you know women in movies are interchangeable in big movies. Like this are interchangeable is fine and you know that really stuck to me on point and this was early in my career and i didn't do anything about it. I had to work within the system. Because that's what we're told that you know if you want this job. This is the only way early twenties. That's what i believed again and took almost fifteen years for me to get to that place where you know could stand my ground and it took hearing the conversations from other women banding together to give me the confidence to stand up for myself. You know. I started reading about a lot of women and female actors and you know when we female actors when we would mean we talk about it at parties in. Generally that became a topic of conversation. Women were championing each other. And you know it sort of gave me a sense of like fuck that i want. I want to be able to stand up for. What i you know what i think i bring to the table to do. Think that that demand has pushed the needle. I have to say that you know in one of the jobs that i was doing. It was actually brought up by the studio that there should be buried with me. And michael acta and my agent sprouted up and it happened. I was very pleasantly surprised. And you know. I love that. We as an industry are going towards that direction. And it's kudos to all the women that stood up for themselves and for others by providing for this large fight. And we've seen that in history all the luxuries we enjoy today of being able to get jobs in powerful powerful positions and being able to vote and drive has been because women before us have fought that fight females. Women have been denied so much through yawns. I think those our generation's responsibility to change that so that the next generation doesn't inherit these problems. And i'm glad to see the with so many of us banding together. We're doing that. It takes me forever to fall asleep. This is not something new. But it's just gotten worse with being a new parent living through a pandemic. And i somehow always end up scrolling through social media until way past my bedtime. So i wanna tell you about something that could help called proper. It's a natural sleep supplement. That helps you fall asleep. Faster stay asleep longer and wakeup refresh. Proper offers various formulations to help you find what works best for you so you can choose from benefits like immunity stress reduction mental clarity and they even have a line of supplements including cbd. Start solving your sleep issues with proper. Had to get proper dot com right now to find out which formulation is best for you and use our special promo code skin s. k. I m. m. to get ten percent off your first order. That's promo code skin at get proper dot com for ten percent off. You've talked in the past about losing worlds because of your skin color and when we think about the ways that you've been an activist one of the things that stands out is being on a mission to change representation in the entertainment industry whites changes g. You want to see made. And how do you think the industry is is doing. So i feel like when i first started trying to find work in hollywood and trying to build a career here. It was almost like there weren't any parts of written for someone who looked like me. It was never a conscious thought to do that. In mainstream entertainment in new mainstream leading parts are important roles and that was an issue that really required breaking down doors. And sort of telling people that i'm here auditioning for a mainstream movie and mainstream part. Not for the stereotype that you're used to seeing someone like me be in. I'm fighting for that role. That's the one i want. And that sort of required education really have to say that. I met some wonderful people between the hindi film industry and hollywood who kind of always had faith in my abilities once i showed that like. I'm not afraid of walking onto a set. Because i know what i bring to the table. I'm not my twenty one year old self anymore. you know. I have had tremendous experience in various genres. I haven't even done that. I knew scratch below the surface as an artist in america yet. And that's what i'm looking to do for myself. And for people who look like me minorities females south asians specifically south asian people not just in india around the world are one fifth of the world's population but when you look at global entertainment in english language cinema won't see that in like leading roles in mainstream part in pop culture and i didn't even realize that i started seeking it myself. You know i was busy building another career back home in india for me. And i'm so glad actually to see their to have teammates in this mission like you see indicating in serie camille raise all of these amazing artists are pushing the envelope to save that we want to be a part of mainstream pop culture and that's great and hopefully with us pushing that goal post further demanding entertainment. Look the way the world is actually that it'll be a big change. I think we're walking. We're definitely going in that direction. And i think the industry is especially would streaming coming in now like for example. My movie the white tiger. I don't think that movie would have been made five years ago with the budget. That has right now before streaming became what a did. It's an all indian stock us. It's an iranian director. It's an indian story in india written. I don't think that would have had the mainstream of that kind of release it's going to be seen. In one hundred sixty countries people around the world are going to be able to access it now with a platform like that would streaming coming in. Today we have to provide content that is global and that is cross cultural in parasite winning best picture last year. What really is a foreign film anymore. You know i. I was watching an iranian show the other day my mom watches k dramas all day like we're all consuming entertainment from and now we need to the industry needs to reflect that your drive and ambition and work ethic are incredibly obvious in five minutes of reading about you but also invite minutes of speaking to you. Do you ever stop her second. And just say that. I'm really proud of myself actually. Had a moment like that. When i read my book for the first time. Like you know when you're writing a writing in pieces and like this chapter and editing. That when i read it cover to cover for the first time i kind of had to sit alone for about half an hour and process but i just read and i kind of told my younger self to like. Stop being so hard you know doing myself to stop being so hard younger self like alright. I went through a lot. And i pulled myself out of the bullshit time and it was my strengths and my grit that my career was self made and with the support of my family. I've been able to build it on my back. And you know i. I had a moment after read. I'm curious you know as we kind of keep coming back to you and you list all of your occupations and all the things that are on the horizon when you think about your other projects are things that you're dreaming up in that are we don't even know yet. New beer agent doesn't even know yet. What stresses you failing at it. Whenever i try something for the first time like i mean this is the first time i've ever founded a company out of one hundred. I don't know how to do it. I'm just gonna run with it. You know when. I started being movies. I didn't know how to do it. Started pageant when. I wrote a book like i'm everything that i've done has been for the first time and every time i have the stress of dropping the ball on it a for not living up to my expectations because i really strive for excellence in everything i do from my personal life to like how my bad looks like how i you know. My house looks to my various verticals. But that's always a fear. I think that's everyone's fear right. We're gonna move into our lightning round so quick questions and quick answers We are spending a lot more time at home. What's replace your morning. Cardio my workouts. I've gotten so consistent at working out also. I'm training for a job but the morning commute used to be my sort of meditation time you know the car drive. I used to check all my My phone and what happened in another part of the world. While i was sleeping and but now like i feel that way when i work out and i've been able to do that almost five six times a week. So that's gripped. What's the last show you binge Bridge or two. And i went through sunday shooting day to. I think like a hundred people. Ask this question. What is your favorite jonas brothers song. I believe Was written for me a good reason. Yeah there's been actually really made me laugh we're gonna. This is our last jonas family question. What is it like to have your sister in law as queen of the north. I really don't see her. That i just here. Sophie are you a good cook. No terrible cook with the first thing. Then you go to order depending on my mood. I love asian food so usually tie biggest vice carbs when will world sort of resumes travel at a normal speed. It's the first trip. You wanna go on. I go on beach sand between my feet. I need a bikini and anita bellini now. I need son. I mean the sun. I'm in london for a year. So i mean the silent ninety two all right. Let's let's do one more. What's the last book you read. Gosh actually that's all. I've been reading. I like reading multiple things. I read this amazing book called homegoing last year and i really recommended by yoga z. Bestseller but story of two sisters in ghana and they're multi generational story all the way to america how they both had two different sort of like sliding doors. They had two different lights. And it's amazing so beautifully written bianca. Congratulations everything. congratulations on the new book. And the hairline. Thank you for coming up so lunch ladies. This was so fun. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join us next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email. Newsletter gives you all the important news and information. You need to start your day. Sign about the skim dot com. That's the s k. I am dot com to m's for a little something extra.

india danielle weisberg Priyanka chopra jonas bollywood google us carl sagan Priyanka Ibes greece arben michael acta Jill mumbai korea memphis swimming hollywood william
"I would look at everything in my life and question, like, "Is there a solution here? Is there something to build here?" - Leah Busque Solivan on what it means to have an entrepreneurial mindset

Skimm'd from The Couch

35:13 min | 1 year ago

"I would look at everything in my life and question, like, "Is there a solution here? Is there something to build here?" - Leah Busque Solivan on what it means to have an entrepreneurial mindset

"Today skimmed from the couch is presented by A._C.. Hotels by Marriott. It's a global hotel brand. That works cited about more on that later. I let's get into the episode I would look at everything in my life and question Asia Mike. Is there a solution here. Is there something to build here and so that moment of inspiration when I was out of dog food could have just coming on like any other airtime but because I was in this entrepreneurial mindset I was able to Kinda capture that moment and discover it as something that could then turn into a company Anthony. I'm Carly's Aitken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback we started the skin from a couch so what fedor place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch so so please welcome Leia Bosque Sullivan to the couch. Leah is an engineer and entrepreneur who founded one of the first GIG economy companies task rabbit the mobile mobile and online marketplace that hooks you up when you need someone to help you move pick up your laundry cleaner place before your family shows up for visit build your furniture. I have used that many many times Leah Built Tass rabbit from the ground up and lead the company before selling it to Ikea in 2017 building Ikea furniture obviously a huge market for tasker. We've all been there many many times today. Leah is helping to build other startups as a general partner at the venture capital firm fuel capital capital. Leo Welcome to the couch. Thanks so much for having me. Thanks for being here. We are so excited to talk to you. <hes> I think as Daniel was saying in the intro we used test grab it many any time. It's nice to officially say thank you in person <hes> so wanna get into just kind of your background. What is not on your resume? If we looked at your linked in and what would we not find well. <hes> what you would not find is probably my strong passion around the arts. I actually grew up as a ballet dancer. The answer <hes> and I danced for twenty five years before I started task. Grab it yeah and then gave it up when I started the company because who has time to do any sort of extracurriculars alerts when you've found it a company yes wait. That's crazy so were you dancing professionally or for fun before you started task for fun <hes> and I was dancing in the Boston area and so <hes> mostly ballet and jazz and we would do shows in the Boston area but it was something I was pretty serious about and banned in college. I actually had made a minor in dance. I was a computer science major but then a minor in dance. It's funny that you say you don't have time because I think I was joking. The other take like all of my hobbies have disappeared and that's that's a huge one. Tell us a little bit about what it means to be a general partner now and what your day to day looks like so fuel capital. I joined fuel about two years ago. As general partner my partner Chris Howard founded the firm about six years ago to raise funds on his own own and we just launched a seventy five million dollar fund that we deploy that we raise together so the day to day now is a lot of meeting with entrepreneurs. <hes> you know we try to meet with two to three entrepreneurs every single day here pitches follow up on meetings doing diligence we meet with a a lot of co-investors as well because our models very collaborative so we like to invest alongside other investors some of which we are investors in skin as Lau <hes> and so a lot of meetings with other investors <hes> and then time as well just to do research into think in due diligence and you know my background in engineering and technology I think really drives this passion and me to stay ahead of the curve on what's coming new from a technology standpoint and so I'll spend some time thinking about that. Do you think that anybody who knew you when you were growing up when when you're doing ballet surprise about what your career is well. I'm sure some people are surprised I mean I grew up in a very tiny town Shirley Massachusetts population four thousand I mean I went to a school pool that had in one building kindergarten through eighth grade. I mean it was super super tiny so I'm sure a lot of people are surprised about what I what I'm doing today but it's funny because when I think back I remember when I was eight years old asking my father what the highest title and the company was and he told Oh mate was being a C._e._o.. A chief executive officer and I remember starting my first company which I called pollution solutions good name relag Geron yet very rainy and it was this recycling program that I started in my elementary school and it was basically an excuse to kind of boss around my a little sister and my cousin but I set up offices in our basement. I had a whole like poster board pitch and program. I brought to the school and so there was something saying I think in me from a very early age that maybe knew this was the path so we're gonNA come back to your work and what you're doing now at fuel but we want to talk talk about your first baby task of it as my first baby so you started out as an engineer. You were working for a startup that was bought out I._B._M.. As we said had and then in two thousand and eight you had an idea for an errand service so right yes skim that story for us so it was February of two thousand eight a remember his February because it was cold and snowing outside and I was living in Boston at the time and it was one of those awful winters and I was meeting friends across town for dinner when I realized I was out of dog food and at the time I had this one hundred pound yellow lab named Kobe at very well fed. He's the best dog and when I realized that a dog I was at a dog food. I thought this is such a simple problem. Why isn't there a simple solution? Four months earlier earlier the first iphone had come out so this is very early days of the IPHONE. There was no APP store. Mobile Technology was just emerging but but as an engineer. I thought there's got to be someone I can connect with on this phone. Someone who's at the store at this very second. I should just be able to connect with them right now and say I need doctrine and so I became obsessed with this this idea in this new technology that was emerging around social location and mobile and I ended up quitting my job at IBM four months later to build the first version of the site that sounds so amazing using picking back to what it's become but you have the idea and then. How did you actually turn it into something? What were the first steps that you took yeah? I mean I like to say I certainly was not the first person to have this idea. The idea for task rabbit is a very simple one getting help from your neighbors <hes> but I was the first the to really put it into action into leverage the technology that was just emerging. I mean we are so so early. It was this was before lift and Uber even existed right so the thought that you would ask a stranger for help was kind of insane at the time but with my engineering background I knew that I could build what was in my head and I could leverage the mobile technology. I knew I had this theory that with facebook facebook emerging I would be able to build trust between strangers because I thought okay I could leverage the social graph and if you were hiring <unk> a task rabbit and had a good experience with them then your friends would be more likely to hire that purchase while task grab it back then actually in the very very beginning when we're just US live in Boston it was called run my errand dot com. I hated that name from the very beginning but it was the first thing I actually thought of that night. I was out of Dartford Later so I tell the story like it was this moment of inspiration and then four months later I quit my job and like that is all true but the story that you you know I don't usually have time to tell is that for many months even years leading up to that moment. I was sort of getting bored at I._B._M.. I sort of felt like I have these other skill sets that I wanted to explore that I wasn't utilizing on a daily basis and so I had been thinking a lot about new ideas and joining a start up or doing something on my own. There's this great book. I don't know if you guys have read it. By Adam. Grant called originals. We look he's he's amazing and so Adam writes about this concept of Asia Day which is the opposite of deja Vu right and Deja Vu is when you see something and you feel like you've seen it before. It feels familiar to you but you've only seen it for the first time so volusia. Day is the opposite of that where you see something obtain a thousand times but you're able to take a step back and look at it with a fresh pair of eyes and because I was sort of bored that I._B._M.. In thinking about new ideas I definitely was in a mindset of visual day like I would look at everything in my life and question like is is there a solution here. Is there something to build here and so that moment of inspiration when I was out of dog food could have just coming on like any other time but but because I was in this entrepreneurial mindset I was able to Kinda capture that moment and discover it as as something that could then turn into a company. I WANNA contextualized this a little bit because here we are twenty nineteen. It seems so normal that you would just like let a stranger into your apartment or get into their car and you touched on this a little bit but for a lot of our listeners who are used to that it was not always like that. It was still a weird thing to let someone into your home. Yes can you talk about. How did you guys market that? I know you talked about facebook but it's got gotta go beyond that like how did you make that. Did you think it was going to be as big of a challenge as it was. Did it turn out to be much easier to convince men's people to let people they don't know into their lives so I mean it's a great question because like I said I just really emphasized like people really thought aw that I was insane that you would let a stranger into your home like an ask for help and the idea that you would hail a car off the street a stranger strange off the street and jump into the back of their seat like it was unheard of unheard of theirs that mean that always goes around instagram which is like two thousand eight parents like don't get into a car with a stranger in one thousand nine hundred and make sure Uber Yeah absolutely did you believe in like the stranger partly. Did you have personal concerns around it. <hes> you know I like like to think that I I met the I thirty task irs over coffee myself thirty of them. I had coffee meetings and sort of my litmus test was would I invite this person in my grandmother's house to help her get something done and that's how I decided who the first thirty tasker were to start the site <hes> you know that doesn't scale and so I had to figure out ways to automate that <hes> in so of course we did background checking and then ratings and reviews came along and all these different things but but in the early days the the messaging and positioning around trust <hes> was incredibly important it was the thing that we had to overcome when when you think about you know I I would say task but is really credited with creating the GIG economy or maybe I shouldn't say creating but really making it something that we all are aware of and and <hes> you know obviously that has taken different iterations especially after the housing crisis in two thousand eight. How do you think about task rabbits roll over the last ten years what that has meant for other businesses? Yeah I mean it's funny because in two thousand eight <hes> prior to two two founding the company I was like June of twenty of twenty two thousand eight that I left IBM may was by September that the stock market was crashing in that everyone is being laid off and I just left this cushy job at IBM announced thinking what am I doing it turned out to be the best time to start a company like task. Grab it because so many people bowl we're looking for new ways of working and they had been laid off and they're great highly skilled people that needed to make money in and and needed new flexible ways to to work and so I feel very fortunate that I was able to start the company at that moment in time because it did help it has helped a lot of people I mean sixty thousand active tasks across the country. <hes> you know has been incredible to watch grow by two thousand Nintendo. There were lots of other companies emerging and the sharing economy then became this more mainstream trend for our listeners. Can you just explain the difference between sharing economy and kick economy okay so the sharing economy really focused around this idea of being able to share resources newsbeat between strangers so things like airbnb in sharing homes <hes> sharing rides like lifting uber. I mean I even lumped task. Grab it into that in. It's just the sharing of skills and sharing of time since then <hes> and this is kind of you know hindsight twenty twenty there's been a lot of controversy around the GIG economy and is it are are the impacts a good thing for workers. Are they in traditional businesses. Could it be hurting us as workforce in different ways. Do you see that differently now than you. You did ten years ago I do. I mean one thing in this is sort of like a pet peeve in that I have in the space don't mean to bring it up but for some MHM reason the word Gig economy just like h just rubs me the wrong way because I am not not a good word. It's just like it. I feel like it it minimizes A._M.. Is is the work and it minimizes the people doing the work and I much prefer thinking about the freelance economy or distributed work being able to be distributed and flexible and so that is one thing for me that when I started in two thousand and eight you know it started to really scale in two thousand ten and this idea of the freelance economy of sharing resources sharing skills distributed work it really all came down to flexibility disability and that is the number one thing when we asked hackers what they want to you want to make money of course they wanNA make money right but if you ask them to stack rank my hourly rate versus the flexibility of the job versus anything else flexibility would always come out on top and so one the thing that I learned as you look at the Labor markets and the workforce is flexibility is not only key in what we've built to date at task grab it but the need for flexibility in the Labour markets in general is something that this next generation of workers demands it's part of their expectations on how they work and so what we need to see happen is legislation and rules and policy evolve to meet the needs of the actual workers today which which <hes> you know doesn't necessarily line up right now and that's where the controversy happens. We'll get back to that in a minute but first. Let's talk about something all our guests on this show deal with and that's traveling usually for business I think in the month of June we were on something like twenty. Three planes travel for work is part of our day to day and we get tired. We get cranky. We just WanNa go home and what we have come to love is when we stay at a hotel and adjust makes it feel better like you can breathe and that's why we're excited to partner with a A._C.. Hotels A._C.. Hotels is equal parts beautiful which we appreciate but more so functional which we appreciate even more you just want to look at their instagram. You'll know what we mean in everything from the guest rooms the hotel lobby to their location is completely over thought and thought out in the best way possible. <hes> can't Belt and then eventually sold <hes> it is looked at as an inspiration to an entrepreneur entrepreneurs like ourselves like a lot of our listeners like you built an incredible empire empire and you know I always hate when people tell us like it looks easy and you know we all laugh at that. I don't think what you did look easy by. I think that you made aide look really seamless in a lot of ways and I'm sure that that is not the case. You've been very public recently about the toll that stress took on you physically basically and would love to just kind of dig into that a little bit and and have you talk about what that looked like for you. Yeah I mean it was really a roller coaster ride. There are lots of high rise. There're lots of lows probably more lows than highs and you know one thing I learned early on is that I really just needed to stay level. I learned not to ride the highs and get too excited about anything because there is going to be a low around the corner and I didn't WanNa hit rock bottom either we got oh. We joke about that all the time like as soon as you hit a high. It's like you're absolutely and so it. It's emotionally emotionally like just really difficult to to ride both the highs and lows so I learned how to stay level which on some you know some people will say like Oh. That's it's too bad like people would say you should celebrate that round of funding or you should celebrate being on the today show and I was just like nope knows you let your team celebrate. Yes I definitely he led the team celebrate but I would also you know try to like temper the celebration with a boost of reality because I think sometimes and we this at task grab it all the time where it was like we had so much press and you know we were so fortunate to get all of these inbound organic leads and people wanted to talk to us about the story but that doesn't necessarily mean that the business and the revenue and the dollars are lining up to that story right and there was always a lot of work to do and so sometimes those two things hyphen momentum didn't necessarily match the reality so it was important to kind of keep. The team came in reality but I certainly you know personally like I was never happy. I was never happy with anything going on even though there was some amazing the things that happened when you talk about the the team celebrating these things. I just think it's so interesting to contextualize this like two thousand eight eight to two thousand eleven like you're looking around and people are getting laid off left and right we talked about the housing crisis. Recession did the stress of that that moment you're building the company and add to the stress of just starting a company well. I mean it was all very stressful. I would say that <hes> you know the moments that I can remember that. Were the most stressful were times when I had to reorganize the team. I had to let people go off the the team. I had to edit the team. I had to raise money the the last round of funding for task grab. It was the hardest money to raise. Why do you think that was so counterintuitive right. I mean at one I think it was hard because it was a surprise to me. I didn't expect it to be hard and it was the very small amount of money that we needed to basically get us to profitability <hes> which then led to the sale too key so it was like this very small amount of money that we needed to raise but because we had been on this venture track for eight years ray it made it really difficult to raise as the tiny bit of money at the end that we needed because no venture investor wanted to put in a tiny bit of money at that point and as an entrepreneur for the first time name like I didn't understand that model you know I would go back to my investors and be like hey could you a million will get a million from here. They're like no now. That doesn't make sense for our model model. Unlike what do you mean like you have a billion dollars range by giving. Just give me a million dollars. I don't understand so but no that wasn't to their model. Anyone and who has <hes> raise money from outside investors has been through that moment of like. Are we going to get funding and it's and it's talking about it. Yeah I know me too. <hes> talk through the pain and you have a lot of employees and yeah depending on you. Yes you recently wrote. This article about stress is actually putting you in the hospital and I would love to share that story if you don't mind if it was the last three million dollars I had to raise <hes> and it wasn't coming from my internal internal investors because they were either you know tapped out or it didn't make sense for their model and so I had to go find it externally and at that point when you're an eight year old accompanying you various <unk> almost fifty million dollars like to ask for another three from anywhere like the valuations don't match up right. There's ownership requirements all these these things and so it's kind of amazing because I had this cold inbound email off of linked in from <hes> Task Rabbit user are in London who's just like a super fan and he was like hey can. I come by the Task Rabbit Office. The next time I'm in San Francisco and great you know he's like I run this fund and in London and I was like okay but I didn't really know anything about what he did so he came by the office and we really hit it off and it turns out he runs his multibillion dollar right right out cared lesson to apply to Lincoln. I mean I never revived to either at Bir ever but it was serendipitous <hes> and so you know that actually was the investor that ended up doing three million which was completely outside of his model in wheelhouse but because he was such a fad ical user in London like he really believed in the company any but you know after a hundred meetings with investors saying no to me <hes> I I was completely completely stressed out. We were like two weeks away for missing payroll like we did not have money to pay people you know in the company and so so <hes> we were close you know with some of these investors about these conversations right to they like take such a long time sometimes and so it was the Monday. I'd gone on a walk with an entrepreneur friend. He tells me later that he felt like I looked a little like off like a little green in the face but I went home and my stomach started hurting and it progressively got worse and worse and worse and how I ended up taking an Uber Bird the emergency room at like eight P._M.. At night 'cause I couldn't get off the couch and then I waited five hours in the waiting room for the emergency room and it got worse and worse and and worse and worse and then I finally get into see a doctor and he's like your colon is about to burst and they had done an m._r._i.. Hi and he was like you know. We don't know what causes this but have you been under a lot of address lately and he's like it's stress induced colitis and so. I ended up in the hospital for five days straight pump full of antibiotics thankfully no surgery was needed because they antibiotics <hes> solve the problem but I remember I was like making calls to London from hospital bed like trying to get this deal closed. How does that experience both trying to raise is that lasts three million and also separately the intense stress help you on the other other side now when you're looking at investing while I mean I think is an investor. I have a lot of empathy a lot of empathy for the founders that are coming in into pitch that are sitting in front of me. I WANNA understand not just about their business models and you know their visions for the business but I wanNA understand who who they are and what drives them and when Chris and I invest in a company we're not just investing the dollars we want to invest in those people and so both Chris and I are big believers and you know just the importance around founders health and wellness and overall sustainability and I believe that Ah that really influences cultures and teams and you know hundreds of thousands of people at a time can be influenced if the founder actually isn't in a really healthy stable place after hitting a very scary point how have you as you continued to grow and then South House. Grab it and now in this new role. How do you manage stress now. Do you do. Do you have different tools today. Well I think you know everyone is different and I think for me. I found that I have to have time. Time to exercise a for me that is the thing <hes> and so I try to do something really active every single day and I need something for me that is like mentally until we exhausting as it is physically do something today. I did soul cycle this Martin Okay Yeah so I actually sold cycles kind of my go-to because I feel like it. It is both mentally and physically exhausting but I've tried a lot of other things I like all kinds of different things I also went on this like four day retreat where we hiked ten miles a day and it was amazing. I did that recently <hes> so I think everybody's different. <hes> meditation can also be something if you can carve out out like ten minutes a day <hes> to just take time quiet your mind refocus. That's something I think it can be real helpful as well so for me. The trick Eric is scheduling it into my day and if it is not on my calendar I am not going to do it and so making sure that every day there's some time something something that just allows your mind in body that kind of reset and stay healthy. I think is important so so this summer we've done a lot. We went on a book tour. We saw you guys in ten different cities. We were on like thirty planes. It's been crazy and one of the the things that we are so happy to have back at home is a good toothbrush and our favorites is quip so there are a lot of reasons why we like quip tip. One of them is that we like to have matching things matching quips. Apparently one of the things that I love is that you can stick it on your mere. Yes the other reason that we love love quip. Is that <hes> there no wires. There's no clunky charger. It can run for about three months on a single charge and then just when you think you're like Oh. I need a new brush head. The brush heads are automatically delivered <hes> every three months for just five dollars so they know exactly what you want and you don't have to think about it. We can't recommend it enough so clip clip starts at just twenty five dollars and if you go to get quip dot com slash skim right now you can get your first refill pack for free. That's I refill pack free at G.. H. E. Q. U.. I. P. DOT COM SLASH SKIP <music>. How do you support the founders that you work with on that piece because I think it's a it's a good thing to say or to talk about? When a founder is looking to raise their making decision between funds it's another thing when that founder is actually in the middle of raise and you see them burnt out outright so a couple of things one is my experience as a founder was that there were very few investors that you know <hes> I I felt like I could even admit that I had went to work out like Oh? You spent an hour away from the office today like the the pressure I felt for my investors. Busters was real and some of that was in my head but some of that was from that right and I remember one investor telling me one time like He. No you post a lot of pitchers with your her family. Your Kid yes oh my God and so like what message does that send do a founders yes. What did you say I mean <music> at the time I just said yes? It's like I'm with my family. I'm like it was a did you at the time no a bit like that was so inappropriate and absolutely yeah absolutely but you know I also had raised a lot of money at that point I had a great relationship with my board and so I felt very confident about where I was and who I was. I can imagine a lot of first time founders that get that sort of feedback from an investor like that does not set them on us on a good path horrifying. It is so as so for me as an investor. Now I think simply just talking about it. You know giving not not only permission but the encouragement to take the time and so we've launched a whole series of events that we call reef. You'll feel capital so we do these regularly okay and we invite a founders to come in refuel with us and we'll do a soul cycle class or a boot camp class or go on a hike. We're doing actually a two day retreat St for our portfolio company in October so a lot of funds will do you know a two day C._E._o.. Summit and they'll bring in business leaders to talk about business where like our founders can get business advice from anywhere and they can get it for two. That's cool. I'm happy to share business advice but we're going to do a two day. Overnight retrieved that will just refuel and reset our founders in our portfolio so actually making the investment there i WanNa talk about finally the the career transition so so in two thousand seventeen useful tasks rabbit and then we've talked a little bit about fuel. I WANNA go back to that that moment when you sold tell me about it yeah well task grab. It is my first baby so I said to other babies since then but task grab it is really the first in so he you know it was exciting but it was also emotional and I remember being on the board call that we had to formally vote vote on doing the sale you know and everyone went around in voted and I was last and I was in tears but it was like happy tears but it was also so like this is an end. This is the end of this chapter and so it was very emotional <hes> but I felt like as a founder for me it was is my dream to build something that lived beyond me and I felt like I was sending my kid off to college and they didn't beat me anymore and they were going to go in thrive on their own and and so that was really fulfilling and to see that now play out to over the last couple of years that I has run the business spent great of course I had an amazing team team like Stacey as the C._E._o.. To really who I trust so much right to continue to be there so I think all of that made it a lot easier for me <hes> but but it was you know an exciting emotional time so I'm going to turn this out to our last segment our favorite the lightning round goes like this. We will give you a prompt you if to answer as quickly as possible R._A.. Okay I one. What did you think you are going to be when you grew up and astronaut or Ballet Dancer College Major Math Computer Science and Dance First Job Bank teller worst job babysitting last task ask you did as a task rabbit like that I did as a task grab it that I posted as it has because I've done both right? I actually want both the owns the last one that you personally personally did the last one I personally did was probably picking up dry cleaning for someone <hes> and then the last tasks that I posted was some <hes> yard work help that I needed in California yeah. We're as professional mistake. You've ever made hiring their own people. I call when you get good news. Oh my sister what about bad news. I don't tell anyone. When was the last time you negotiated for yourself <hes> well? I negotiate a lot every day on behalf of fuel and deals that I'm getting getting into yeah. What is your go-to interview question when you're hiring someone? What do you wish you had done twenty years ago? How do people know when you're stressed? They don't <hes> what drives you today learning learning new things what's your shameless plug. We've got an incredible portfolio at fuel including companies right here actually based in New York <hes> companies like good dog that are connecting dog breeders with <hes> people looking for dogs. We've got this amazing female founder Sally Christianson who you started a company called Arjun which is really reinventing women's work where <hes> so a lot of fun fuel companies greatly at thank. Do you so much thank you. Thanks for having me. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch and if you can't wait until that subscribed to our

founder engineer Boston Leah facebook general partner IBM Task Rabbit Office Chris Howard Ikea partner Danielle Weisberg Asia Mike Aitken Anthony Leo Daniel fedor Dartford
"I was going to work incredibly hard at whatever I did and was just searching for something that would make a meaningful difference." - Wendy Kopp on developing her big idea

Skimm'd from The Couch

34:03 min | 1 year ago

"I was going to work incredibly hard at whatever I did and was just searching for something that would make a meaningful difference." - Wendy Kopp on developing her big idea

"Today's skimmed from the couch presented by a._c. Hotels by mary it. It's a global hotel brand. That's dedicated to perfecting the essentials. I knew i was going to work incredibly hard at whatever i did and was just searching for something that would make a meaningful difference and i felt that i wasn't alone that. I was like one of thousands of people out there who are searching for something similar and that's really what led to this ideal. I'm karl. I'm danielle weisberg. Welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch so what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch. You may know today's guests wendy kopp as the founder of teach for america started back in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine which brought college grads into the workforce first teaching in underserved schools in two thousand seven when he took that concept and applied it globally founding and running teach for all she's been recognizes. This is one of time magazine's one hundred most influential people and was awarded the presidential citizens medal for her work wendy. Welcome to the couch. We're excited excited to have you here today. Thanks so much so <hes>. We're going to jump into it. Which i questioned. Skim your resume for us. Well my resume. A is not that long because as you just said <hes> i thought of an idea when i was a senior in college that has really kept me busy ever since i never would have guessed that i would still be going at it thirty years later that it would take me all across this country tree and really all across the world i through teach for america and now teach for all and that's really the extent. I don't even have a resume. I hope never to have won well. So what is not on your linked in <hes> that we should know about you. Maybe the other side is that i have four kids a loving loving husband and a wonderful family we talked about when i was looking at the names teach for america and then teach for all and i was thinking teach for all like do feel like career working down in america and now you're moving goodness <hes> no in fact green for many many years until maybe thirteen fourteen years ago i had my head down fully focused on the massive inequities and continuing challenges in the u._s. I had honestly i mean it's almost embarrassing to say now but it i'd never thought about the rest of the world. Is it related to this. <hes> what happened was that i started meeting. People i mean never something in the water and within one year i had met thirteen people from thirteen different countries who were just determined that something similar needed to happen in their our country and we're looking for help and that is what ultimately led to the launch of of teach for all twelve years ago now as a network of independent locally led organizations in now fifty soon to be more than that <hes> countries and growing walk us through what what it meant to to step down from teach for america to do teach for all like what that meant for you and your career <hes>. It's so interesting because i must admit admit. I don't think i thought about it. As stepping down exactly i think in the five years prior teach for america had doubled in size and teach for all had grown from zero to twenty five network partners <hes> and sort of as i have done and his anyone growing enterprise is does at every year along the way you kind of constantly. Ask yourself like what does this need. You know like what what teach for america need. What is teach for all need and it it just became came really clear that each of these organizations needed dedicated leadership and <hes> you know there was so much the amazing leadership at teach for america and it just felt like it was ready for <hes> you know lisa vian wave beard is an incredible bowl woman who really grew up in one of the communities in which teach for america works and then became a core member and then you know joined our team and really help build teach for america <hes> you know to to step forward and lead the organization which she now does so it it wasn't it wasn't hard like i didn't feel like i was giving something up. It just felt like this is great like she can take it to the level. It needs to go to an and i can put all the more energy and entities for all which it needed at the time. I'm as well so i'd be hard pressed to find another example of someone who senior year college project has received accolades and honor degrees that have income from it truly you have wind so many awards. You've earned fourteen honorary doctorates which one is the meant to most to you. I honestly just i feel so unbelievably privileged to have somehow found my way to this idea that has enabled me to you know work with such incredible wool hearts minds and souls all over the world who are kind of drawn to the same thing in to be part of something that's making such a meaningful difference <hes> <hes> and that's that's all i focus on honestly. Did you have a moment that when you got the presidential medal of honor where you're like. How is this happening not not really. I have to admit i mean this. It's just not it's not just me going this far. What does a typical day look like for you. Do you have a routine then. Is there consistency in your days. There's so much variety in my days. I mean i just got back from two weeks across you know visiting teach for afghanistan and and teach for nepal and teach for india and teach thailand <hes> and then went on a week of fundraising on the west coast and now i'm i'm in new york which is a rare thing we're actually live and i'm like just got my days packed with internal meetings and that's part of the beauty of this whole thing you know <hes> but i try to stay on a bit of a routine like i get up really early and look at what has creeped into my email box <hes> and you know gonna run women and then get my day going so and i go back to you as the college student. Who are you in college and when you think about looking back a who you were that in who you are now. How are you different. Oh gosh that's a really good question. I was in total funk my senior a year and i could not think of it these topic. I couldn't think of anything i wanted to do after i graduated and i think where did you go to school. I went to princeton and until hill my senior year i had been in overdrive from birth rate like but i think it was almost being in that funk that ultimately led to this inspiration like i was was just searching for something i knew i was going to work incredibly hard whatever i did and was just searching for something that would make a meaningful difference aunts and i felt that i wasn't alone that. I was like one of thousands of people out there who were searching for something similar and that's really what led to this idea like. Why aren't we being called upon. I mean at the time we were being called upon so aggressively to commit just two years to work on wall street. You know it's like why aren't we being recruited ended as aggressively to commit just two years to teach in low income communities like to address the equity and opportunity you know <hes> so that's what led me to the idea <hes> which i was the last senior to declare a topic. I couldn't even find an advisor anyway at from the minute minute. I thought of it. I just realized this has to happen and i've been obsessed ever since so anyway i don't even know how to explain all the ways which i have changed and evolved. It would be hard to rebuild pieces. I think i had little con. Have you ever read a <hes>. Honestly i skimmed <unk> skimmed it several years ago and realized yeah like i don't want to. I wouldn't wanna read. I know i mean you can just imagine the incredible credible learning curves on every front that i have con- through from first of all just the substance of the work i mean you know really what it takes to recruit and develop people who will be effective teachers for the kids facing the greatest challenges and who will learn the right lessons and then go onto effect systemic change. I mean just i had really no idea <hes> what would be entailed in that and then all the other aspects from how to build a strong organization to how to actually build a sustainable funding base to how to navigate the politics of of the world <hes> and i think i went through just massive learning curves with teach for america and then a whole new set of learning curves teach for all how do you build a network that you know has everyone united but also everyone encouraged to innovate and <hes> and how do you navigate the foreign aid system. I feel nothing but like incredible privilege to go through all these learning curves. I'd love for you to explain kind of the central thesis around teach for america for our listeners. Yeah and around teacher american also also teach for all really 'cause. It's there's a core purpose that unites all of us across the teach for all network from teach for america to teach for india to too many many any others in between i mean i think we have to start by thinking about the nature of the problem like we're all working to address the fact that the circumstances of kids birth predict kicked their educational outcomes and life outcomes and we view that as a really complex problem right. It doesn't start in classrooms. There are whole segments of kids kids in countries all around the world that face many extra challenges. They show up at schools when we're lucky enough for them to show up at schools that were really never designed to meet their extra needs. There's a whole prevailing ideology about the low potential of these kids that fuels the whole thing so it's a complex problem and in the face of a complex problem like that. There's no one solution right. We're not going to solve this problem with any one thing not with roic teachers not with a different curriculum not with a laptop happen. I mean this is gonna take so many changes to really address and and our whole belief is you know we we need to change the whole system and that's that's gonna take a lot of people at every level of the system at every level policy across sectors in communities you know coming together around a vision for all kids having the chance to fulfil their potential so we think of our mission as to develop collective leadership to ensure all children fulfill their potential <hes> and sharon approach to doing that which is all around kind of galvanizing a rising generation of leaders in any given country to channel their energy into the arena of working with the most marginalized kids initially commit two years to teach knowing that those two years can can be really important for the kids. They're working with and also knowing that what you learned through that process for the teacher themselves so transformation like it changes everything your understanding of the problem your commitment to addressing it and it becomes foundational for a lifetime of leadership and so we're trying to grow the force the people who throughout their lives working at every level of the system and and across sectors will be committed to working for change and who through their own leadership leadership will support and catalyze the leadership of others their students. The students parents other teachers in the schools others in their communities. You just talked about how big the issue is isn't. There isn't one solution when you think about doing this for thirty years. How'd you keep that passion up. Do you burn out. Do you ever feel like this is just too big. I think one of the things about this role of mine is that i mean every day a a c juxtaposed on the one hand the incredible disparities and inequities were addressing and on the other hand evidence evidence that it really is possible to solve them and i think that juxtaposition has kept me going for thirty years. I honestly don't think i've ever felt burned out. <hes> you know again. I feel like it's such a privilege to be able to see this at so many different levels like i can zoom in and be kind of somewhat proximate to the issues and and then zoom out and see real evidence. I mean honestly right now. What keeps me going just seen what's happening in communities where we've been working for in some cases thirty thirty years and to see you know if you have historical perspective despite the fact that yes. It's not anywhere near where we need it to be today. If you have historical perspective you realize oh my gosh but how much worse it was even twenty years ago. Is the school or study you went into. We started in in six areas of the u._s. In new york city los angeles new orleans <hes> some rural communities in north carolina and georgia when you skimmed your thesis or when you think back to the lessons of those earliest years. What do you think the organization and you were most wrong about that. You corrected over time. I think that we underestimated how much would need to go into the training and development of the teachers and their ongoing support not only during the two years but beyond the two years to really maximize their impact act as a force for change <hes> there were some things that we got right without realizing we were onto something i mean i have to say like they're these new studies that are about to come out that look at what happens to these teachers during the two years they look at how these people's everything from their career trajectories but also their mindsets their beliefs their understanding the nature of the problem the nature of the solutions evolve and i think what becomes clear from that is that we kind of landed on and i never could have known that this would be true but <hes> an approach to cultivating ongoing leadership. That's let's you know really almost unparalleled like it's it's really dramatic the the impact of those two years of teaching and i don't know if we could have fully predicted but i wanna talk about overcoming doubt and naysayers so i en- researching preparing for this <hes> i was struck by a quote wrote that i think one of your professors said to you when you had this idea and realize that you were on to something and you want to go out and raise about two and a half million dollars and i hope i'm not paraphrasing what he said but he said that you were deranged. You are around twenty two years old twenty one years old at this time what what made you not listen to that. What made you not blake okay. My professor told me i'm deranged like screw. You like. I'm going what made you have that naievety. I mean i. I do think that there's a real advantage in in in experience because you don't fully know what you can't do you know i think a lot out of the key to everything. Actually is is operating at kind of the right line between confidence and humility and there were certain things i was just absolutely absolutely convinced about and had had some reason to be confident about and other things that i was really open about and and trying to get feedback icon. I'm not sure what exactly he was referencing. I don't know if it was exactly the money issue. I think most people in the beginning the big thing. They didn't believe i believe was the college students would want to do this and that was the one thing i had any reason to have confidence about having bene- college student i was like no no no like we will show so people like call up on the college since two they will jump at it but there were other things where folks really pushed and questioned which which really helped us evolve our so you talk about college students will want to do this and obviously you've proved that to be true. I think that a lot of people feel a tag between lending lending their skills even in your case like being able to build something from scratch. There's a way that this could have probably with your skills had become something that was much more the corporate driven and made a lot more money and versus doing good and i think that's a struggle that we hear a lot from our audience from people that are starting getting out is. How do i make a choice. I mean i was in a position when i was graduating from college where i felt that i had nothing to lose by taking a risk and doing what i really wanted to do and i felt like if if it didn't prove to be the right thing i could moved something else later and not everyone has that luxury because there are all sorts of pressures on kids from financial to to the next thing and it wasn't that that i had money i mean i needed to like figure out some way to sustain myself and do this but i didn't have a ton of debt like there were things that enabled me to do it but but i guess my my thought coming from that vantage point is just you know <hes>. <hes> do what you what you love like. Do what you're gonna find really meaningful foale and if you can't do that right after you graduate from college. It's going to be really tough to ultimately make that choice so that's not a perfect answer. Maybe but it's i think it's the path of no regrets dive in you know and and do everything you can at the front end before you have just immense pressure. Are you know from kids and and life you talked about not having debt and were part of generation that has unprecedented amounts of student loans and it's it's a huge issue. Have you seen <hes> there been any impact on that with teacher. America teach for america has done so so much to try to make it financially possible for anyone to do teach for america from loan forgiveness to grant programs to many other arrangement i and teach for america's become more and more diverse over time in terms of you know everything from folks who come in with pell grants to people who grew up in low income communities <hes> so so i think but i think they find it a challenge for sure i mean you know and we need to put all the more into making it financially feasible. As as time goes on one of have the criticisms that's come out against <hes> teacher. America is ben that these are young individuals who are not trained or certified in a traditional way going into educate next generation of kids. How do you push back against it. Well i think so first of all we look at the evaluations valuations that show that the teach for america teachers are are having at least as significant an impact if not more impact than you know other teachers who would be in those classrooms <hes> if if that wasn't the case then we'd have to rethink everything and we also see you know really significant long term impacts wchs <hes> coming from the fact that these folks never leave the work right. You know these are people who probably never would have taught for the vast vast majority of them and not in low income communities. He's who eighty five percent of whom are are full time in the work you know two-thirds education another twenty percent in policy and other related endeavors in in the u._s. and they're working to change of really broken system that has never served are low income kids and kids of color well <hes> so i guess that's how i think about it like we need. These folks alongside many many others. <hes> you know to tackle system. That has never worked. Where do you think i think at this point. Now you know teacher america's thirty years old almost three years old teacher ause or you're spending your time. What aspect of your job are you uh able to provide the most value at this point. Is it on the policy side. Is it an organizational side where where's your kind of genius stone right. Now you know i'm spending spending my time on lots of different things i just got back from spending time with with teach for india and other network partners in asia <hes> <hes> and can help them. I mean there earlier on in the trajectory trying to figure out how do we how do we get bigger and better and of course i can see so many patterns from having seen these network partners all around the world and having lived the teach for america journey for so long <hes> so that's that's one thing i love to do <hes> at the same time. I spent a lot of my energy trying to marshal the resources necessary to do this work because there's actually not a very significant constituency for global education. I mean people think very locally and nationally about tackling clean education what we've seen across for all that we could be moving so much more quickly if we were in fact taking global approach and learning from each other across borders but finding the resources to that is super challenging so i mean i spend a lot of energy doing that. I'm not sure it's where my geniuses but it's just kind of what you need to do. If you're going to make this happen we'll get back to that in a minute but first let's talk about something bet every guest on this show deals with including us and that's traveling for business we calculate we are on like twenty three flights <unk> different hotel every night for the month of june and it was amazing book tour so happy we did it. One of the biggest takeaways is learning about 'bout what helps on the road and a great hotel is like the only thing we wanted at the end of the day and we found that with a._c. Hotels by mariot a c hotels. They really built the hotel with designers. I saw every hotel is equal parts just really beautiful to look at seriously look at their instagram but also functional everything from the guest rooms to the lobby to their lounge are designed to know what you need before you need it. It's intuitive which is really really helpful in the u._s. A._c. Hotels house has over forty five locations in cultural hubs <hes> with plans to double that not to mention their global expansion so visit a._c. hotels at a._c. Hotels dot marietta it dot com to learn more <music>. We saw an interview. I think with ink that you said my greatest asset was inexperienced and i love that you took what could be seen as a negative and you flipped it into a positive. It feels inspiring. What is your greatest asset now well. I've always thought that we need both inexperience and experience. I mean always and <hes> i think there is something super powerful powerful about an experience like we need people before they become jaded by the way things work and and you know to ask the crazy questions like we need to challenge the current paradigm and at the same time we do need the folks with experience and <hes> you know so. I try to keep both of those things in mind. <hes> you know a and figure out. How do we build an organization that unleashes leashes the leadership of everyone from the folks without experience to the folks with experience like i do think we need all of us so we started this company with absolutely no business or finance knowledge at all <hes> like none we have learned all of it on the way and sometimes people ask us like did you ever think about going to business school and i- depending on the day flip back and forth part of me is like it would be really nice at times if i had just just like a breakdown of one oh one what what are the things that have taken me so long to learn and other times. I'm like no. I think that would ruin and so much of how we think about things. Have you thought about teaching yourself. I went through a whole era where i was just down to get into the classroom. <hes> you know and i actually do believe pretty deeply that i mean there's a lot that i'm missing seen because i haven't taught and i feel it on an almost i mean almost daily basis like i think that the folks who have taught and particularly you you know in the context in which we're working have a different level of both insight and conviction about what's possible astle and a different level of credibility and i'll never have that like there's no way to do this through osmosis right <hes> but at the same time you know we all make our choices says and i've always felt like for whatever reason and who knows if it was even the right choice but that my greatest impact would come from from you know making a different choice so oh started this i asked you what was the moment that you were excited around the different degrees and honours and you said that that's not it gets you so it gets you. Why what what have been the moment or i am really proud of myself. <hes> yeah what what gets me is is is making an impact and seen things work and you know making the breakthroughs their you bet a moment where you're like. This is kgo me. There are moments all the time you know even last week you know like we've had a really really challenging year. This is the most boring thing to talk about but like you know any social entrepreneur will relate like if you don't have the money i need to do the work. It doesn't happen so we got to find a path to a diversified and sustainable funding base and we've just had a really challenging year and we pulled it off you know and i felt like go me and all the team <hes> and then there have been many moments i mean again. I feel so lucky to say this but <hes> you know where you just see like. It's working. I mean we are twelve years in fifty countries. <hes> this approach that brings us all together is it's like the same movie plane in terms of the people who are drawn to to this work and the impact they have in their schools and the degree to which they never leave the work so like incredible and that's not about how many i mean it's about like so many people in so many different countries and and so many colleagues but yeah i really constantly see evidence that what we're doing is is working. I also see plenty of evidence by the way that we're nowhere near where we wanna be and that's also what keeps me going like more more problems to solve you know with something as big as the mission of teach for all. How do you think about measuring success for the organization and i'm sure there's not just one answer but also for you personally well. We stepped back as a network three years ago and asked ourselves like what's what's the twenty five year vision like. What are we all working on together. We asked ourselves about twenty five years because of the big insight that we've come to along the way it does that this is a very long game aiming. This is not one of these problems that we can lake create a vaccine for or solve overnight <hes> it really takes going at it over time <hes> so we came together around a vision that and this is gonna sound really really lofty but there were certain choices that bat have been extremely orienting in the kind of inform the question of how we measure impact <hes> so the vision we articulated was that we would have whole communities communities in every part of the world enabling all their children to have the education support and opportunity to shape a better future for themselves and all of us super lodhi. That's beg previously we're all united by this idea that all kids should have the opportunity to attain an excellent education but there was such a good push across the network to say an excellent education to what end and we were thinking about. Where will the world be in twenty five years right like the economy's changing so much. The planet is falling apart. We have these increasingly complex problems facing communities facing our global society and it really did bring into stark relief. You know like if our kids today like the kids in classrooms. Today are not growing as leaders who have the proficiencies and dispositions mindsets and values and you know sense of agency and awareness to navigate avoca the changing economy and solve these increasingly complex problems. There is no hope for any of us so it really was a reorientation in that sense to say okay so we really we need to rethink education entirely and work towards a much broader set of outcomes for kids and i think the other piece of it was just realizing in order to make progress against the challenge we do really need collective leadership like we need people working together and the only way to see that has is to have people coming together within certain places so the focus on you know clustering our folks in certain communities and really working working in deep partnership with the folks in those communities to say okay what are we working towards for kids and to work overtime not only through the teachers who teach commit mm it two years to teach but through our alumni and through our partners and others in the schools and communities say how do we really move the needle for kids in an aggregate sense towards this broad set of outcomes so in order to measure progress against that we need to look at a lot at this and of course we need to see like for the teachers during their two years they making in an impact but we also need to see are the communities in which we're working making aggregate progress for kids depending on the country in the community. I mean the the measures are somewhat different but but are we seeing more kids graduate. More kids go into whether it's college or other strong post secondary options like are we. Are we really moving moving the needle for kids in an aggregate sense. We're gonna go to our last segment. Which is our lightning round. <hes> this is <hes> our favorite segment and basically we're asking you questions to answer as quickly as terrifying so this would be great now. This is the first job i worked in a craft store. Oh we're stopped filing things for a bank after my senior year in high school. What is the worst professional mistake you've ever ever made probably trying to do too much myself rather than just fine people who could do it much better last thing you binge-watch this uh-huh okay. I almost never binge-watch but i have to admit that this weekend one of my kids a sec. I watched at least he's five episodes and maybe more of veep oh it's very him. I call when you get good news. My husband richard. What about bad <music> news same thing if you had a bad day what should someone do for you. You like an ice cream person wise a white wine. Yeah who's your mentor. I have to say don't have one. I have so many people helping me every day and guiding me but i really can't point to to just one. When was the last time you negotiated for yourself this morning. I gotta go well meaning like people in the world and this work. We'll just take a one hundred percent so we have to be clear about our limits and this morning i was fully inundated and i was just like i gotta go on a run run so i did. It and i feel like my whole day is making decisions like that like what is the space that i need. What's your shameless plug. Either teach in or fund a teach for all organization ship w._w._w. Dot teach for all dot org wendy. Thank you very much. Thank you thank you. Thanks for having me. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join us next week for another episode of skin from the couch and if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information. You need to start your day sign about the scam dot com. That's the s. k. i. M. dot com chew. 'em spur little something extra.

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I dont think that luck happens. I think you create luck  Tina Sharkey, co-founder and co-chair of Brandless, on how to make sh*t happen for your business. - Episode 063

Skimm'd from The Couch

32:34 min | 1 year ago

I dont think that luck happens. I think you create luck Tina Sharkey, co-founder and co-chair of Brandless, on how to make sh*t happen for your business. - Episode 063

"One of the things I try teach kids, and I try and teach everybody is to do what I call make the advance and making the advance can mean just ask the next question, because I don't think that luck happens. I think you create luck. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcomed the skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary, and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch? So please welcome. Tina Sharkey to the couch, Tina is a serial entrepreneur and an investor and she spent her career building communities online, working for major companies like AOL and Johnson and Johnson in twenty fifteen. She left to start brand list with her co founder, and since then they've been working to build direct relationships between suppliers and customers. We are so excited about brand less, we're gonna let Tina get into that soon Tina. We have known you for such a long time. You have been such a great supporter of the skim an investor in the scam. And we're so excited to have you here today. Welcome to the couch. Thank you for just for the record for those who don't see they are on the couch nominee chair, but I'm okay yes, it's actually it's good that no one can see because we both look really tired today. So let's start our. We're going to ease into it. Tina skim your resume for us. Well, let's see I'll go forward backwards. So right now, I am the chairman and co-founder brand Lois and before that I was venture partner at sherpa and started something called sherpa foundry and before that I was the global president and chairperson of baby center, which is a, a division of Johnson and Johnson largest platform for noon expecting moms around the world. And before that I was running networks and community and messaging and platforms before that Sesame Street. Yes. Yes. I heard, I know so cool and, and before that I co founded a company called issue, which was the, at the time it was the largest community for women online. And we took it public and then sold it to NBC and before that I was at QVC started when Barry Diller was running QVC. They started a new network called Q two, and so we built that in New York. And so it was online shopping, but for a new generation who didn't think online shopping was for them. And so there's a theme there. So building things for people to connect them to their passions and their interest, and other people like them and curious when you go through your as may what is something that we looked at your linked in that would not be on your Lincoln. I don't think that like the thread like you know, you can never reverse engineer your resume because that's not I wasn't intentional about it. I was just trying to follow my passions. And go to places where I thought I could have an outsized impact. And so, but if I was to see my linked in, I'd say building communities with Seoul, it doesn't reflect that, but that's been a filter for everything that I've done, I left FASt. So obviously, as we just heard your resume is just a laundry list of incredible companies in positions. You are incredibly to nations. And we were reached doing research for, for this interview, which is always kind of fun to do research, or someone you know, personally and you think, you know, but there is something that we didn't know which is a loved the story at eleven years old. You wanted to be a model and you convince someone at Bloomingdales to let you do just that. Can you please tell us the story? Oh, totally. So, well, I it's, it's worth noting that. I'm a third generation my, my parents and my grandparents were in the fashion business. So I always loved fashion and I still do. And so my mom and I were shopping on a Saturday and I was very tall for my age. And so. Like I was saying above all boys. And so what was I going to do with that height at that time? And so my mom, and I went to Bloomingdale's, and we had a thing where she said, you know, meet you in an hour because I like wanted to shop alone. And so I snuck away, I went to the fifth floor where the executive offices were, and I asked to apply for a job to be a model and I met this woman, Cathy, I think, Kathy raked in, I have to. I wanna just like break this up for a second. Does your mom know? The no she knew I was meeting her back in an hour. And did you go into Bloomingdale's a day of going to go get a job today? Well, I admit there were these, like, really cool women walking around, and they like every fifteen minutes, we're in a different outfit fully accessorize, don't you love like photos in magazines and it's like the bad is the belt. And you're like who does that? But these women were like doing it because clearly they were models. And so, I said, you know how do you where do you get? How do you do this? And I went up and she said, oh, well, you know, there's an office on the fifth floor. So I just knocked on the door and the woman who was the boss was sitting there. She said, I can't believe I'm never here on a weekend. You know, you're lucky you're very lucky, and then she said, sell me this pencil, and she handed me at pencil, and I like sold her. The pen, AD say, well, I said, well, this is fabulous pencil. I said, you know, it's, it's pre- sharpened to you might need this, if you're taking. You know, a test. It's very comfortable on the hand. The collar is very nice have been. I don't remember what I said. But like those things I might say, and so she said, great go into the back in try this on because she wants to my size was, so, and I tried it on. And like all the excess is we're like on the table. And I totally accessorize. I was like, oh, this is so awesome. I came back out. And she said, you know turnaround, you know, tell me this outfit, whatever. So I sold her the outfit, and then she said, okay. Well, what do you what when can you start? I said, what do you mean? And she said, well, you know, going to need to get your parental approval. I said, oh, we can handle that. I'll be right back. And she said, excuse me. Can you get back into your clothes? Like looking so. Yeah. Heels beret, there's going to be like the best. Buy, put my clothes back on, and then marched my mom up there to get approval to get the job. I love this to you. Mentioned your family was in fashion. Your mom with the president Perry. Ellis, also did not know research, what I loved is that your mom. Let you go to meetings with her. Yeah. Talked to us a little bit about what that experience, how that shaped you and how that when you think about your mama cat that shape. Also, your parenting, so I was super fortunate because I went to Stuyvesant high school in New York City and after school, I lived alone with my mom, I have two older sisters, but they were already out of the house. And so I took the subway up to her office to do my homework and she said, look, as soon as you're homework's done, you can sit in any meeting as long as the person running the meeting is okay with it, and only speak when spoken to. And so I was. Like a got it. So I was like very keen to get my homework all done, and there were certain people like I really wanted to be in their meetings 'cause they were like the creative meetings. They were showing the lie in and that gnhs. This is amazing. And so that really shaped me because I never knew that, like women didn't have a seat at the table like a lot of the leaders of my mom's team were women, the merchandisers the designer, so a lot of the salespeople are women. So she had had this community of people. Always I never dawned on me that it wasn't like that everywhere as I just saw a strong woman who was my mom. I saw the people. She worked with who were many women. A lot of the people they met with were women because the fashion industry tends to over index on that, especially on the creative side. Whatever, and so it was only later that I realized, oh my God. I got to like, get busy here, but really just sort of assume that's the way it was. Did you do that with your? Oh, always, yeah. I mean, well, the table for us. Us is just like the kitchen table. So, you know, their dad, and I are both entrepreneurs and so they hear about fundraising. They hear about hiring. They hear about pivots. They hear about all that stuff all the time. And so it's not even like it's just a never knock your. In fact, you know, when I was contemplating ITO Leffler, Mike founder, and I were incubating Brown list, but neither of us had taken an operating role because we were just incubating it and we had other jobs. And so one day I came home for dinner and Jacob and Charlie were like. Oh, share your day. And they were sharing their day what you do. I'll I interviewed a couple of CEO's today. They said oh for which companies because, you know as investor, I was interviewing for a lot of times, they said, well, I met someone for brand lists and literally, it was like a fork drop were Jacob was like, what, why would you be intervening someone for brand less? It's like having someone else raise us. You know, like you're on the head of the freshman PA for you. Charlie and Jakup you're applying to college next year. And I really wanna make sure I'm available and they're like, okay, like, first of all you're more engaged the most of the non working moms. We know so down. Number two, you can't do that. And then Jacobs said and this is what I knew that they'd spend a lotta time at the table. He said, look, just get it to a good top line gets scaled higher global operator Homer. God. Oh my gosh. I don't know whether to, like, thank you for to say, like I'm so sorry, why need to start a therapy account for you find area and the best way it was, like, what are they gonna be? Yeah. I think it's interesting what we're talking about scrappy us and growing up with this model that you had. Do you think of scrapping us as a trait or as a skill? I think it's, it's a trait and a skill and I think it can be learned, but I do think that it can be done in a way that's really elegant. And so one of the things I try and teach my kids, and I try and teach everybody is to do what I call make the advance and making the advance can mean just ask the next question, because I don't think that luck happens. I think you create luck. And one of the reasons that I've been advising you to extraordinary women is because you have this, like in spades, you're not afraid to make the advance and it's not it's not pushier anything, it's just like you ask the question, you, you sorta say to somebody. Oh, I'm thinking about this. What do you think and you create luck that way because there's a door there. If. Anyone here is like a Harry Potter person. I am so the room of requirements is waiting for you. You just have to like know that really just gets up. That is great wouldn't you talk about mentoring people that are on your own teams. How do you encourage them to ask? So what I do with my teams is, I don't believe that mentor ship is, as successful, if you take it out of context, I think it's really, I don't think there's some big off site where you have some big like aha moment. I think mentor ship are moments. And so what I like to think about with my team is that very close to an experience, that I've witnessed to pull someone aside and say, hey, can I give you some feedback in that meeting where you said XYZ and so, and so said, XYZ, I think you might have approached that in a different way. And had you said this, or had you come prepared with that we might have had a different outcome, and no harm. No foul. Like you have an opportunity like I try not to pick things that are, oh, my gosh. That's off a cliff and like you can't get it back. But were an object lesson where you like, no, the situation, you know, the dynamics and you can give someone like spot feedback and spot coaching and get them back in or coaching them before something or the best is, when I can model that behavior for them. What's the last really scrappy thing you show your team, you can do texting one of our celebrity investors, who's become a friend and showing that I don't have to have all the information that I'm seeing her as a peer which is like weird to think that I would think of Serena Williams as a peer but Jeffries? Yeah, I know. 'cause it's like she's not actually appear. She's a goat. And I don't know what I am. But maybe I guess it visit the farm now. Like all rise. But she's I'm not like I see her as like she's a mom, and she's a wife and she's notch manure, and she's an investor and she's the best fr- contenders player on the planet. So in that capacity. No. But in these other capacities I can share something with her. And I can be of service to her in the same way that she's of service to us. And so that's not something I'm afraid of because I don't I like I don't like when people put me on a pedestal, and I don't like to put other people there because I think it creates distance and yet false familiarity is also inappropriate, so you have to find the right balance. We are on a ten city tour right now, meeting, lots of skimmers and talking to amazing moderators about how to skim your life. That's right. Our book is finally out, and we cannot wait for you to read it, it covers all the most important parts of being an adult, like negotiating your salary, saving for retirement, and the most important thing reading a wine list. It's the perfect gift for recent grad or anyone who could use a crash course in adulting. It's the kind of buck. You're going to want to have on your coffee table so you can keep coming back to it. So what are you waiting for go? Get your copy at the skim dot com slash book. That's the skim dot com slash book. Such gears a little bit. You are a serial entrepreneur, and I wanted to talk about your latest, venture brand lists. Give us the elevator pitch. What is brand less the elevator pitch? Well, Brandis is a, an extraordinary community of people who are making stuff, that is better for you better for your family. Better for your home and better for the world at much more accessible prices to try and better life for all. How does that work is there's a lot of science to that art? It works, first and foremost by bringing together amazing talented inter and multidisciplinary people with extraordinary experience in lots of different areas, because it's not digital media. It is. It's community building. It is content building. It is art direction and photography. It is product development and long ROY. Maps with vendors around the world, it is product, safety, quality, and integrity, it is shipping and packing, and all the rest and in his getting boxes with perfect delivery to your door, which is our objective. Whoa. Is the need. You're trying to, to fulfil in creating brand less. So what I really thought about. And I think we could do this exercise because none of us are driving like if you close your eyes and you think about like the pantries, the bathrooms, the, the, the home you grow up in, and then you think about your home today and what's in your cupboard you're cabinets what's, what's on your tables? It's likely so many different things and in so many different things not only because you've decided you want different things, but because we are more informed today, because brands have a responsibility to play a role in your life beyond just the functionality of the product itself. And you think about those things as you are purchasing. You're much more conscious so we were seeing this, like rejection, rejection of government institutions. Media brands all these things like I had this rejection visual, and then, you know, occupy this occupy that all of it, and then I thought, wow, like they're all occupying and they're rejecting, but where's everybody going and I had this visual like all these people running away, but I know what they were running towards. And so there was this moment where I felt like brands themselves were losing trust. Brands are trust marks really. I mean, a government is a brand a away, like a flag, and a physical product is a brand and the skin is a brand. And so the question is how you regain trust. And so might we re imagine what it means to be a brand one. That's based on truth, and trust and transparency the other thing. I noticed because I'm a big sort of cultural, anthropologist type, and so I was watching, how people were shopping. And if you go to the market, what you'll see is that people are picking up packages turning them, over turning them, sideways, turning them. Upside down putting them back on the shelf, and then taking a step back, and then they're surveying all the various things in that paradox of choice. Sound familiar? Yes. And they're like frozen at the shelf, because it's just like a rainbow of color. But they're not sure like, where's it manufactured is this sustainable, is it gluten free, is this organic. Do I wanna pay more? Do not wanna pay more. The prices aren't even on the products anymore. They're on the tape on the shelf. Can I talk someone about this? I not is there someone to help me. No. And so, and then I saw this over and over again and eat. Oh. And I said, wait a second people shouldn't have to pay to have quality because they should be able to find things that are better for them things that are better for the world at much more accessible prices to make better everything for everyone. And then I said, nobody's doing 'cause I built so many digital products. There's no you. I knew exa like it would be weird. If every time I texted, you guys, it was on a different platform, like everything rolls up into I message or into Snapchat or into one or two things. Maybe it's DeAnne but it's not more than than even that's confusing. So I said, what if we were to build like a you, I knew X? Across all physical goods. And what if we were to put the attributes that everyone's looking for all over the place like all in the same place? No matter where it is. And what if we were to create a concept, where to be branchless it becomes an attribute this idea that it's truthful? It's transparent its intention is to scale, kindness and community. And it's, it's exactly what you think it is. And it's not it's all very upfront and indirect conversation with you. How did you decide to do this with your co founder? Well eat. And I, we both lived in the same neighborhood, I was friends, not only with him with his wife, and we had been introduced similar to how I met you to buy like a million people were like you've gotta meet them gotta meet him on. So one day, we just met, and we said, wow. How did it take so long? We should totally do something together. And he was doing a few other things. He's a serial see PG entrepreneur, and I was doing a few other things. And we said, well, let's just start. And so we just started to meet, and I my first question to him was what problems? Are you trying to Saul like what's bothering you? And he said, Nacho people really knew what things cost versus what they paid for them, they'd be like rioting in the streets, sort of in that occupy way. And he said, what's bothering you? And I said the fact that there's no community that the there's no you I it's hard to navigate all these things. But if direct consumer is the intention, that's on a channel that's a relationship. So why don't we build a relationship with people? And help them find and create extraordinary things to help them in their families, and better life for all you start a brand less while you were in the venture world, you are at sherpa capital, were you invested in lots of companies including the skin. Thank you for that. Would you have invested in brand lists? Absolutely. What would have made you get to? Yes. Well, if I could separate myself at the very early stage of company, the first thing you look at is the people, and I think that, you know, and I have backgrounds that give us a lot of sort of muscle memory of the different things that we've done well, and the and, and the multitude of things that we've learned along are littered path of failure. And, and so that's a lot of learning. That's first and foremost, second of all, there was a really big what we call a Tam total addressable market third, the market condition. Fans were such that we were seeing a massive shift in consumer behavior and consumer choice, and that it was not only millennials didn't wanna buy the products they go up with. It was just a massive consumer shift and a mindset at people were becoming much, much more informed are round not just the food that they eat. But also the things that they put on their body and in their homes. So it was like this inflection point in this moment in time where we said, wow. Everything is changing. This is just really, really big opportunity. And we were able to recruit a great team on the team had instructed the expertise having gone from being an operator to then working at as a venture capitalist in obviously a very male dominated industry, which has been reported about a lot in, especially talked about here. How has that changed you as an operator when you went back to an operating role? Do you have a different perspective? Now, I think. As I said earlier, because of how I grew up, I was used to seeing like, female operators. So I just kind of, you know, I air on the side of inclusion, but I think diversity inclusion is not just about, like gender or skin, or ethnicity, or choices, personal choices you make, I think ever seen. Inclusion is about finding a way to bring people with different voices and engagement styles to the table. And so I think it's really important to teach people, how to make that advance had to be heard in a meeting had to be get their opinions known, and that's not always allowed as person in the room. It's not the person who necessarily was raised and comfortable with interrupting or engaging with a different model. And so the confidence factor, I think is something that needs to be developed early, and it needs to be kind of validated, and the culture has to support that. So it's a it's a no brainer for me to build an inclusive culture and diverse culture. But then the question is, how do you unlock that? And that's the challenge that I think, is like that next step in two thousand seventeen one of the sherpa co-founders was accused of sexual sexual misconduct. How did you react? And at this point, you are doing brand lists. So what was that like for you having obviously complement environment, where you worked really closely with somebody and now being you've always been a role model for women and leading now a very inclusive, Tina community is the forefront of that inclusion is the forefront of that. What was your personal reaction? Well, I wasn't there anymore and I wasn't involved with the firm. And so it was just very, very sad for all parties. And you know, I really wasn't engaged or involved. But just very sad. On the hottest game. Your life book tour. We are taking a ton of pictures, and we are so excited to meet all of you guys and for all of the memories like in ten years, when we look back at this, we are going to have the best pictures, except for right now. They are all on our phone, so it's time for brain bridge, all you have to do is go to frame bridge dot com. Upload your photo, or you can send like a poster or physical peace in the mail to them. You can preview item online in any frame style. You can get wrecks from their team. It honestly could not be easier. Just get started today, frame, your photos or sun, the perfect gift to each other for weddings birthday special events. Just go to framework dot com use promo code skim, and you'll get an additional fifteen percent off your first order. Again, that's frame bridge dot com, promo code skim. I cannot wait for Danielle to see all the pictures of the two of us. I'm going to frame from the tour. Going back to branchless. You've built this company in spent almost two years as it CEO, and you decided to step down as the CEO in March of this year, you're now co founder and co chair of the board. How did you make that decision? Also, what is chair of the board, actually meet? So so co chair of the board, the re-, I'm co-founder because when I founded the company together and co chair because ITO and our coaches together, and that means that, you know, we like the coast, too. I love that. So, yeah. So that means that, you know, in theory, you know, you're you, you oversee the board. And so we're very young company. So I would say that, that doesn't fully manifest at this stage as the way it might in the more like mature company, but that is the that is what that means and we do play that role and I stepped down was less about stepping down and more about sort of scaling. And so I wanted to be able to scale myself, and so as a as a co founder and as the founding CEO you know, I was wearing like every single hat. You know, chief cook bottle washer hiring scaling ops logistics, and building a team to do all of those things, every aspect of the business from nothing to something to something great and part of your role, and you guys know this so well, is you are the chief of. Vangelis as well. And so not only doing your day jobs, but you're also out there, telling the story engaging with the communities engaging with all the people who, who love the skim making sure that the birthdays are in the mail and, and everything in between meaning with advertisers marketers future. Investors, other investors, I mean everything. And so that just was really hard to scale and actually get deep into the logistics and the ops of a very complicated supply chain and a very complicated global network. And, and we have an office in Minneapolis in an office in San Francisco being in both places like all of those things. I just couldn't do all of that. Well, how do you give up that control? And I know you've obviously and start and transition, different businesses and for us I look at this, and I'm like, this is something that you need a started together, you grew it mazing point. What is that like interview question like where you at the end of? Processor, like, okay, this person is going to lead the company. I think the, you know, the interview process is really about I getting to know the person I do I like this person, do I want to go, you know, in the bunker with this person, like how is this person gonna be in? It's really easy to have a collaboration and funding. Good times. What's this person going to be like in challenges? What's this person going to be like, how much frontline has this person seen what are all their reference points? And then how do they think about those reference points? And you have to look at the whole person. How do you know I think one of the things we talk a lot about is like learning how to fire yourself on, on whatever your task is whatever your job is so that you can elevate in your position? How do you, you know, for those who are they're building teams or for the first time, managing someone more junior than them? How do you fire, quote unquote? Fire yourself without micromanaging and feeling that need that like the way to manages to micromanage. Yes. So that's a great question. And one that I really I'm working on. And I think the first thing is that I wanna make it really clear to my former direct reports that I'm their coach and I am their cheerleader, and I'm there to help them solve problems, but they don't report to me. And so I'm not a shortcut on things. And so, I really need to anytime that they come to me for something I make sure to reroute them. And I make it really, really clear that I don't own that decision and I might not agree with that decision. But I'm certainly not going to say that to the person to the to the leader. I'm going to say it more offline if it's important Ryan, but they're not going to do things the way, I do things they're not going to operate the way operate, and they're gonna bring a different set of skills, and experience to the table. And I welcome that having said that I'm still like super involved in the culture, super involved. In, in, in scaling, all the things that I just shared. And so you have to figure out like what lane am I gonna run in and you can't be in every single lane and you have to make space? And so, I think initially I tried to make a lot of space like oh that. Like, for example, there's like an offsite. I think today and I'm not at it intentionally because if I'm in the room out of respect and deference, like, I can't just say, oh, I'm just here to listen, whatever. So you really can't be in the room, right? We are going to go char, very last segment, which is our favorite. It's a lightning round, we are going to ask you questions. Okay. You're going to do it as fast as he can already. What did you think you're going to be when you grew up? Mom college major international relations and language first job. First job. Let's see while I was a model at Bloomingdale's, but I think before that I worked at the tennis shack filling the soda machine in Marynich where stab that could also shop worst professional mistake. You've made worst professional mistake. I've made kosh the worst weather, so many or a notable a notable one. I actually I'd say that I turned a couple of really great jobs down, because they were big reload. And, and I just wasn't up for it, and that I think was a mistake, I phone call. When you get good news. It's probably a joint text Jacob and Charlie your son, first phone call. When you get bad news live with it for a bit. When's the last time you negotiated for yourself? Last week. What's your go-to interview question when you're hiring someone? Tell me about your family, I do a lot to what drives you. Impact? How do people know when you're stressed? How do people know? And I'm stress I usually tell them good. That seems healthy finally, what's your shameless. Plug shameless. Plug is please good Brownless dot com. Follow us at Brownless life on Instagram or Facebook and spread the word to all your friends. We have a referral code, and so we would love for you to join because when your friends join you win. And they win often Tina, thank you so much for everything done talking to you. Congratulations. And never in checkout. Brand list. Thank you. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join us next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily Email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign about the skim dot com. That's the S K I M, M dot com to M'S for a little something extra.

Tina Sharkey co founder Bloomingdales CEO New York City Jacob Danielle Weisberg Charlie ITO Leffler Johnson Seoul co-founder NBC QVC Carly Barry Diller engineer Lincoln Jacobs