19 Burst results for "Danielle Weisberg"

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

06:11 min | Last month

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Hey everyone welcome to a special live episode of skimmed from the couch. I am so excited to be back from matt. Leave for this recording. It's been a huge week and we are thrilled to have a virtual audience joining us today for our conversation with rachel. Hollis rachel is a bestselling author podcast host and motivational speaker. You know her as the author of the hit book girl. Wash your face and her latest book. Didn't see that coming just came out last. Fall rachel you for joining us. Welcome to skip from the couch. Oh thank you guys so much for having me. We're gonna start with our first question. Let's have you skin your resume. What are the highlights. So my first job out of high school. I didn't go to college. My first job out of high school was actually miramax films. So back in the day when miramax was making good will hunting and emma and That was a bit of a trial by fire as you might suppose. I sort of hopped around production companies after that working as an assistant and then a coordinator and in the midst of that working in la and working in the entertainment industry was an incredible lesson on some levels and also pretty toxic environment on the other. And so i started to dream about what it would like to start my own company and be my own boss and after having a really crappy boss. I quit on a friday and started my company. Monday morning and back then. I was an event planner. So i had gotten my experience doing movie. Premieres press junkets. And i started to do those for brides and people having bought mitzvahs and someone's fiftieth birthday party. And i solely built that company up into what would become a high end luxury event business and it was really fun and it really fed my creative passion of designing spaces and the thrill of putting an event together and i started to get a bit restless and begin again to dream of something more. I started a blog back in two thousand eight which was sort of the heyday to have a blog and slowly than built that into a media company. So back then we wouldn't have used. We wouldn't have known things advertising or Putting things into your blog posts or talking about a certain product. But i started to kind of finagle my way and realized that there was a business there and that gave birth to the media. Company that i now owned today and i like to say you know my my job hasn't changed that much over the years. I have always just been trying to communicate with women in my community and my company and the things that i teach have evolved as i have evolved as a woman so i started writing a blog than i began writing books. Then i began writing about my life and all of that led to the things i've known for today which is speaking and writing and podcasts. Obviously as you just said so much of your life is out of the public on social media. What is something that we can't google about you that you haven't posted on instagram. That you see on my gosh so many things. Well okay. i'll tell you guys. I have not said this publicly but i'm really excited. I just finished my first screenplay. Congratulations thank you thank you. I literally cried when i wrote the last words. Because it's something. I dreamed about writing for a long time and as a writing is my creative outlet and started as an author in fiction and then somehow fell into nonfiction and kind of advice. And it's always been a dream to write a screenplay because i want to challenge myself a new medium so that was a big deal to finish. Who knows what will happen. And honestly i don't even care. I'm just proud of myself for finishing. Is it adapted from your books or is now really totally new idea. Yeah totally new idea. That's so exciting. Great way to start off the year. So i wanna We're going to go back into to how you grew. Up and tire stories started to evolve. We mentioned in our intro. The title of your book didn't see that coming. Your own story started with a tragedy that obviously you and your family did not see coming which was losing your brother to suicide and that loss is such an enormous part of your story in one start first of all despite using so sorry for your loss in also by asking if you could share with our audience just how that experience shaped you at such an earlier age and really shaped your resilience. Yes so When i was fourteen years old my older brother ryan committed suicide. He had struggled with mental illness for a kind of as long as i can remember was when i was little. I didn't really understand that. That's what was happening. But as i can look back as an adult. I understand it from totally different perspectives. I was fourteen. And i think that losing him in in that way would have been awful and traumatic no matter what but what sort of added so much more gravity to the situation was that i found him so i had not just the loss but also the ptsd of of that day in the morning and going through those things and wife shattering. I mean my family. My i think that my parents did the best that they could with the skills and the tools that they had but they didn't have a lot of skills and tools so it was already a hard childhood and this was sort of the thing that shattered Everything that was and trying to learn to deal with that. When i didn't have parents who knew how to help how to advise or to ask me questions or hey. This is who we should talk to. That just wasn't a resource that existed in my life so it was really hard to say the least

danielle weisberg carl sagan one
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:29 min | 3 months ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"This episode is brought to you by goldman sachs. They have a series of programs and initiatives that provide women with economic empowerment and leadership. Opportunities will explain more in a bit but first let's get into the episode. I don't care how smart you are. You're not perfect. You're not perfect and a lot of times. There is somebody that you need to listen to. That might have a better idea. I'm carl sagan. I'm danielle weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it. All out than where. It began on a couch today..

danielle weisberg goldman sachs carl sagan
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:48 min | 4 months ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"We are very, , very excited about today because we have a special guest joining US Ashley. . Graham is here she is the ultimate multi hyphen it. . She's as supermodel entrepreneur designer author advocate and she's a new mom. . She's known as a trailblazer in the fashion industry and has emerged as voice for inclusivity and empowerment. . Ashley I'm excited to have you with us. . You are always on that still fun and interesting to talk to welcome to skin from the couch fake you. . Daniel, , it's always good to see you. . I wish that I could see in person so it could like rub some like baby Juju over your belly league. . First of all, , how's the baby? ? How is how is life in Nebraska? ? MOM's basement. . We have been here since like March thirteenth like the it was like right when it started and we were hearing rumors of the New York, , city, , shutting down and my mom who is who helps me out with? ? Isaac. . Lives in New York with us. . So she said, , let's just drive back to New York City and I was like, , but that's like a really long drive. . She's I can do it's twenty hours. . We'll just do it nonstop and sure enough she drove. . Seventeen of the twenty my husband took last few hours because he just needed to and we made it and we've been traveling and we've been very cautious about where we were traveling loads of road trips because we have that travel bug still and I think it's been so nice to be able to see the country from a new perspective. . That's pretty cool. . So how has it been doing road trips with how does is now? ? So Isaac is seven and a half months and we. . Seriously Daniel? ? One of the one of the best things to go through go through pregnant the go through the Labor and everything. . But then when they're like four or five months, , maybe five months I don't know how old lake the lake good time to do it but sleep training because yeah. . Then all of a sudden you're like, , wait a second I I, , slept through the night and the baby's okay and he's he's still likes me. . So, , let's start off with basic question although for you this is. . Not a basic question Skim your resume for us. . Oh. . Wow. The . resume first of all I, , read the skim this morning I was I just I love waking up to the scammy Chris Bring me so much joy and you'll see here I tell you this every time we just making me feel smarter. . So just think all thank you. . Okay. Highlights . move to New York at seventeen had to figure out the modeling industry. . Then was a TV commercial for Lane Bryant that was banned my name was on the map then a few years later I started a lingerie line with a Canadian company that catapulted into a few one major cover because I was not a at a total girl I'm not giving you highlights. . Sorry. . Then that catapulted into sports illustrated cover, , which set me into than starting my own swimsuit line, , which then turned snowballing into. . So many amazing things like a book a Barbie that was made in my likeness I, , didn't know you had Barbie. . That is so cool. . She's been mic she. . It's like it's amazing how she really looks like me too. . It's bizarre. . I was just on the cover of vogue and January pregnant those my second American vote cover. . Oh. . My God I don't even know I I did a Ted Talk I've got a podcast I've got I've got some shows we're going to get into it. . You've done a lot. . What is something that people can't Google about you? ? who what my farts smell like when you're pregnant. . This is why I love anytime we're together I have to tell you. . So for those of you listening Ashley was our moderator for the first night of our bookstore tour and curly <unk> like just fucking terrified and Ashley. . We got to hang out with in the green room before when I was pregnant when you're pregnant and you are just so chill and relaxed and it was like the Basque Calming Energy and fun and we so. . Appreciate that this is the best part being with you. . So I feel like that's something that people can't Google. . I. . Mean. . It's hard because I am such an open book but now being a mom like I have realized that there are some things that I just WanNa keep Permian Justin <hes> and you'll feel that to like there's there's intimacy that doesn't need to be shared with the world and you know you can talk about it but We decided to not for right now, , share is a photo on social media and it's been something that that we've kind of gone back and forth with but I'm really glad because he's ours maybe one day the world will really get to know him.

Danielle Weisberg
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:54 min | 4 months ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"I never morphed into any of these boxes like you know people won't pop you into a box but your decision if you want to to go along with the molding or not, I wasn't GonNa lose weight for anybody I wasn't going to stop being loud and having my personality. I'm curly's Aken I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skimmed from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch? We.

Danielle Weisberg
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:23 min | 5 months ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Hey everyone it's currently this show might sound a bit different today because the scam is still working from home for the time being due to cove nineteen. . Today Misty Copeland joins me and skin from the couch she the most famous ballet dancer in the world she made history when she became the first black female principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre. . She has also a bestselling author philanthropist and advocate her new children's book. . Bun heads comes out this September mystique. . Thank you so much for being here. . I am so excited. . To, be , talking to you welcome to skin from the couch. . Thank you so much. . I'm really excited to. . So I was kicked out of ballet at age four. . So naturally made sense that I. . Did this interview with you very excited for a cer- bond over all things ballet. . So we're going to start how I like to start all interviews with just skim your resume. . I started bollywood thirteen years old. . It was not something that I had thought possible or knew anything about a my stumbled into it was discovered at my boys and Girls Club, , the local community center across the street from public. . School in San Pedro California, , it was there that my valley teacher taught me my first class on a basketball court and she told me I was a prodigy after an hour of working with her she ended up inviting me to train with her in her studio on full scholarship and I ended up moving. In . with her and her family to be able to train lean tensely for the next three years I trained for another year and a half at a different studio. . By the time, , I was seventeen about four years of training. . I was living in New York City dancing professionally for American Ballet Theatre I went on to dance as a quarter ballet member for seven years I was the only black woman in American ballet theatre for the first decade of my career I then went on to become the third black female soloist in their history. . In in two thousand, , fifteen I became the first ever black principal Ballerina. . Ballet, theater , now, in , their eighty year history found a lot of incredible opportunities along the way amazing opportunities for endorsement deals things that you don't typically see ballet dancer getting the opportunity to do <hes> estee lauder in Saco in. . Getting the chance to perform with Prince and Taylor. . Swift. . I've had a very diverse career adding author to it. . Extremely excited that I have the opportunity to. . Children's books along with other genres but I'm really excited about this upcoming book on heads. . I just got the book and it's fantastic. . So I'm very excited to give it to people as gifts. . Obviously you've lived in the public eye now for many years and you have a lot of fans especially, , it's Kim H. Q.. . What is something that your fans don't know about you something we can. . Google. . Recipe Ah. . So this is proof of this. I'm . I'm probably one of the clumsy as people we recently moved into. . Will me my husband bought a home and amazing designer newly renovated everything and yesterday I was enjoying my Sunday with spicy crab kind of jump Eliah and I tripped over the carpet in spilled the whole thing on our Blue Velvet Sofa and how did you have an emergency let cleaner come in and clean like deep clean. . The entire thing I am very surprised you. . I would. . Never Clumsy. . How can you be a clumsy Ballerina I think there's something that happens when you're not on stage you're not in the studio where you're so focused. . So much of the time on I mean naturally I'm coordinated but I'm there's just so much focus on my body that when I'm not having to do it I feel like I just completely let go I. . Think the title of Your next book should be the Clumsy Ballerina just putting that out there. . Yes. . Next Children's book. . I WanNa talk about your childhood. . This career podcast, , we talked to you so many amazing female leaders at the top of their respective names and obviously so much who each of us are because of how we grew up and the mark that are our parents family structure leave on us, , and that informs how we can go out into the world top. . Tell us a little bit just about your childhood and what it was like growing up. . Yeah I mean absolutely shaped informed how I saw the world and approached everything that I did I was born in Kansas City Missouri, , which a lot of people don't really know that I was two years old when my mom left my father and took her four kids on a bus. . We drove from Kansas City Missouri to southern California where that was kind of the start of my life <hes>. . That's pretty much <unk> in my memory. . All I remember is California growing up we moved a lot my mother married two more times had to march children my. . Life which is constantly in motion and it was constant. . There just wasn't a lot of security and so I think that it made me into the extremely introverted girl that I was I was embarrassed about the way that we lived <hes>. . We didn't have a home a struggled to put food on the table. . I'm mother ultimately ended up raising six children on her own, , and there was just a lot of hiding things. . I wanted in no way to stand out which is pretty crazy. . I ended up in a field where I'm out there exposed in performing for. . So many but but it was on my terms and so when I could, when , I could be a part of something where I could share my voice and my experiences without speaking, , it was exactly like what the doctor ordered. . It was just what I what I needed as a young person in I didn't have arts in my life until I was thirteen and so it was really difficult for me to survive by the time I started dancing. . We were living in a motel just constantly moving from different places whatever we could afford I think that had. . I not experienced. . You know just no stability <hes> a lot of abuse <hes>. . There were so many things that I just felt like I learned to be a survivor and I was just constantly in survival mode. . So stepping into the world of ballet, , it was like peace and balance and security and consistency, , and it was the opposite of what my world was in. . So I think that's one of the reasons I was so drawn to it as well as you know I, , think a lot of people look at the ballet world and they think you know it's Mean, , it is difficult to thrive and to be successful in. . All the hardships I felt like if I can get through all I have in my thirteen years with the life I've been living I can get through anything so I felt like I was so prepared not only as a young person to be in in the ballet world, , but also as a black woman that was probably the one thing that I really felt secure in my identity was the fact that I mother raised me with the understanding that as soon as I leave the house every morning I'm a black girl in that so I'm going to be viewed and treated in. . So there was no a lack of understanding in that <hes> area. . Of My identity and so I think that really served me well when I entered the very white valet worlds. .

stay Lauder Carl Sagan Danielle Weisberg
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:13 min | 6 months ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Hey everyone this show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. . This is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today Leslie Logic joins us on skimmed from the couch. . She is a trail blazer of the beauty industry leslie founded bare minerals, , which she grew into a global empire by tapping into the power of marketing and community. . And in two thousand ten, , she saito acquired it for almost two billion dollars while her new best selling book. . Pretty good advice. . Give some pretty great advice and is available now leslie were except to have you welcomed skin from the couch. . Thank you so much for having me looking forward to hanging with you guys. . We have been very excited to do this. . We met Leslie at a conference that we were at about almost two years ago year and a half ago we. . Didn't know who it was like we knew her name, , but we didn't know that she was the Leslie blodget. . We just saw this like friendly looking who was wearing this very cool hat and standing outside getting coffee and she came up to us in and you're a huge fan of the scam and when we realized it was you I think we both like didn't even know what to. . stadio. . So I think it goes to show like you have such a friendly personality and. . That makes everyone feel comfortable in talking to you and is also harshly how you are able to talk yourself into any room in in your early days of your career, , which we're GONNA get into. . So let's start off with our standard first question, , which is Skim your resume for us our. . Newspaper Out McDonnell's what did you do at McDonalds? ? Everything. . I started with like cleaning toilets and sweeping the parking lot and then moved up to making burgers it Max then at fit. . Two years of fit graduated in turned beauty companies. . Always wore is shadow since I'm little kid went to work in the industry or <hes> selling makeup behind the counter spritzing fragrance bloomingdales in New York City in macy's met my husband at macy's while I was working behind. . The counter is part of my resume I know it's a career thing is he's he's important. . Did he keep coming back or did he like ask you on a date while you were working at the counter? ? All right. So . I worked in macy's and part time because I was going to school and his girlfriend who's really cute. . Girlfriend had the same shifts that I did like. . He they lived in Brooklyn together and he would come in. . So she didn't have to take the subway by herself at nights. . and. . That's how we met. . We I I never knew the story Oh my God. . So he would he would come. . He was so sweet I kept asking do you have a brother friend and he did hook me up with friend once that didn't work out but it wasn't until they broke up a couple of years. . Later he got a number and called me so what I didn't break any relationship. . Okay. . That's a good story though. . Okay. . So keep keep going macy's macy's then got a job at Halston Orelon you guys probably don't know a Halston, , the fashion design end ud line I worked there for a little while then the big job was working at Max factor and then we were acquired by Revlon and moved to La? ? The company Max factor acquired by PNG and moved to Hunt Valley Maryland Maryland Baltimore had a baby in Maryland that was the best part. . Of Maryland then we moved back to la because Keith wasn't digging Maryland so much whatever, , and then he became the state <hes>. . Dad didn't have a career anymore after that I ended up being the breadwinner starting the kid was born and then were worked neutrogena. . And then <hes> San Francisco in here we are what is something that people can't Google about you that we should now. . Aren't. . So here's the thing to that I. . Don't have a Wikipedia page. . My team for years wanted me to build one, , but I had this issue with being. . Out there. . So I don't know what's out there and I'm very uncomfortable with what's out there. . So what would people not know about me? ? That I can play the harmonica and hula-hoop at the same time. . Did you do that growing up? ? On hula-hoop for sure the Harmonica, , I learned as an adult. . So I have a hula-hoop now as an adult that I use regularly. . So then I just combined two gifts that I have. . You write about a quote kind of stuck out at me. . The quotas get desperate I wanna dig into what that means because I think you know when in reading about your story like we've gotten to know you a little bit over the last year or so and I knew the high level part of your story. . But in researching for this, , it don't think I really could appreciate her understood how you really got your foot in the door and so I want to understand what get desperate meant for you. . Yeah I think for me. . I always had to work hard to get noticed it in everything I did and I think number one is my parents were divorced when I was nine and we were left with her mom not that there was a bad vanishes that she was the the strict one the tough one. . So I was always like driven to please her with I think a lot of kids have that too. . She was never quite one hundred percent. . Happy. . So I was always trying to please her. . So I was always going above and beyond to get the grades and to get on the teams and that type of thing because I wasn't. . We didn't have a ton of money growing up I had to be creative. . So by the time I went to two years of college and I. . My first two years. . It was rough because it was my first time being outside of my mother's like grip. . So kind of had a little bit too much fun when I realized that I had to. . GET DOWN TO BUSINESS. . My mother helped me figure out what my passion was. . I UNI but couldn't get in to fit I couldn't get a job behind the beauty counter, , which is what I need to do to get into the cosmetic program and I had to so learned that when I'm desperate when I can't seem to find my way is when I get most creative by when I'm at the bottom feeling down instead of being depressed for long periods of time I just started thinking what would I do in little steps to get there the story I have in The book is about Bloomingdale's I. . wanted to work there really did but they would not give me the time of day because I had no experience on mcadoo, , you have it if you don't get it the only solution to that was to just be in their face and I thought without being too annoying I'm GonNa go to the buying office. . I'm going to go there every day every morning I know when they come in because the first time I went and it was a very narrow hallway. . And I would smile and they would have to brush past. . We had to literally touch audience for them to get by, , and they just saw me every day and I think you don't persist Internet way just. . So dedicated to your personal 'cause I had no choice for sleeping on couches I didn't have a place to live. . They said. . Why don't you come in? ? We'll find something

Danielle Weisberg Carly
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:39 min | 8 months ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"I WanNa talk about your advocacy work both as <hes>. The work that you did especially with education girls or the first lady, but also in regards to what you're doing now at times up. We've heard this phrase. Come up when you when you think about what you were doing with them Mrs. Obama, which is the importance of measurable impact. What does that mean? I learned that from her <hes> by the way because she was very clear with us that we were going to design initiative for her to spend her time on that. You know it had to have measurable outcomes. She was not one for just a feel. Good campaign writer just appear campaign and had to be something that people on the ground could actually see the results and yet I also knew that. That when you're dealing with somebody like the first lady when you're dealing somebody with with folks like people who have been committed to times, <hes> <hes>. You also need to do things that operate at scale because affecting just twenty or thirty people at a time wasn't going to be good enough <hes> and that's hard to do. It's hard to develop things that will operate at scale and yet have tangible measurable. Impact <hes> and that's sort of what we tried to do. Then with each of the initiatives that will be different. With let's move and joining forces for veterans and military families retire for kids to college, and then she reference, let girls learn which last one to support ellison education around the world, and then what I'm doing at times up right, which is also to be building better replaces that will finally end sexual harassment and supports interesting victims, not just one or two at a time, but it scale, and it workplaces across the country, and that's what I've been trying to do <hes>, but it takes. You know takes really some careful thinking about. How do you craft not just a PR campaign on around issue, but actual strategic changes that will have lasting impact. How do you think your leadership style has changed from the White House Two Times up. A lot of what? I learned at the White House. I'm actually applying at times up in ways that I had no idea that I was going to. I had no expectation I'd never run them out for profitable for lots of that proper poor. I've been donors of that for profits on one fulltime before. This is new, but I'm finding. There's a lot a trick that is transferable from the White House to this. Like I said I mean I didn't realize, but I do think of my time leadership race of our founders, people like O'Brien John Under vibes and Katie McGrath and others through multiple industries, not just entertainment who have put their brands behind times up to power times up there like Mrs Obama there my principals, they are these folks who have tremendous voices megaphones, and they are willing to commit them two times up to whom I owed. The obligation asked the CEO, now of building strategies and messages campaigns that are. Are Worthy of their platforms and the trust that they have put in need to do that and be smart about it, and then I owe it to the millions of workers out there who are working for design strategies that will actually work for them. That aren't just a twitter campaign that are things that will bring paid sick. Leave to up right to speak of the issue that we're currently working on so vigorously in the middle of the Kobe nineteen precious you know our goal, there isn't just A. Headline around you know paid sick leave, but we need to actually have paid sick. Leave provided not just during the crisis, but on a permanent basis for worst. Tens of millions of workers across the country I mean here's the thing you know. As we emerge from the crisis, we're going to have to deal with these issues and make sure these issues are baffert just nice to do things when times are good now these are essential workplace bay basic functions that need to be incorporated in how we build our workplaces. Even as we're rebuilding after this crisis, because for example, if every company had had paid sick leave when we went into the crisis, we wouldn't be scrambling right now. Right they would have had those costs already baked into their business plans? Workers would already know they had paid sick leave and it'd be able to take it right when they got sick. Eight is a really stark example about why these issues around building better workplaces for employees or not just nice to do things they are essential to build resilient workforce's and workplaces for the future.

Oscar Mayer Danielle Weisberg Carly
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"This episode is brought to you by Oscar Mayer Natural. We'll explain in a bid, but first. Let's get into the episode. As we emerge from the crisis. It is a really stark example about why these issues around building better workplaces for employees or not just to do things. I'm Carly's Aken I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome skin from the couch this podcast where we go deep on career advice from women who have lipstick from the good stuff like hiring and growing team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch, so what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch? Hi.

Oscar Mayer Danielle Weisberg Carly
You have to outwork everybody else.

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:40 min | 8 months ago

You have to outwork everybody else.

"I'm curly's Aken I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome skin from the couch this podcast where we go deep on career advice from women who have lived check from the good stuff like hiring and growing team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch, so what better place to talk it all out than it began on a couch. Hey, everyone, the show might look and sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches, the scam is working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today joined by a powerhouse of the music industry, Julie Greenwald she is the CEO and chairman of Atlantic records during her time in the business. She's helped. Advance the careers of Bruno Mars. Kelly Clarkson at Sharon. Just to name a few chewy were really excited to have you with us today. Welcome to skin from the couch. They you for having me so truly. We're GONNA. Jump in, ask you to skim your resume for us. I went to two lane university go graduated in nineteen ninety wine, and then I did a program called teach for America where I taught in the calliope projects, and then I started working at Rush Management With Lear Coin Your Cohen's assistant from ninety two to ninety. Re Unwind Ninety. Three moved over to detmer hurts and became the promotions coordinator, and then from ninety three to ninety nine worked my way up industrial records, and then ninety nine took over island records and became the head of marketing for island addict. Jam. Then I'm not quite sure when I became president with now it's not to get causey with my dates, but I do know in two thousand four I. I came over to Atlantic records online I've been at Atlantic records since two thousand four Julie with something that is not on your kind of official bio that we should know about you I. Don't think I officially. put down. That I am a mom with two kids by that is probably my most favorite part of my life is that I am a twenty year old and a sixteen year old. That's great I want to kind of just start with the elephant in the room that we're all dealing with which is how to run companies amid stay global pandemic, the music industry is interesting, because in some ways you know, it seems like you have a lot of talented people who are at home, and a moment of reflection in some sorts and I'm sure they'll be a lot of good hopefully music to come out with it. But how are you thinking about this time? So for the artists that have been able to continue to give us, music is been business as usual in terms of. Thinking of Creative Marketing and promotional. For these artists rollout there songs, obviously facing different challenges, which is. Creation of music video photo shoots. We've sent artist green screens. We've sent them ring lights, and so been really just trying to keep everybody focused on the fact that the world is listening to music right now to help through such a terrible time, and so many artists are giving great music to continue out there. They're a bunch of artists that still need to get into a studio. Need a collaboration and those artists. Were just trying to be really good partners and friends to down and tell them that you know. Hey, it's okay. Take this time, maybe just right in a notebook and try to just be you know thoughtful, and in good partners to our artists that are staring at the fact that they may not be able to tour. You know for the. Future and so we're just trying to make sure that they see the light to buy you know. Streaming has really offered us a way to share their art and music and doing these live streams social. That, they can stay connected to their hands. I think we've been incredibly lucky. In terms of all the businesses that are really been affected were continuing to. Market and promote during this time. And as a leader, how have you been trying to set your team up remotely and keep them focused at a time when there's so much uncertainty? So, I personally jumped writing at first and I do weekly email. It's very personal. Email to my whole company every Sunday night to talk about okay. We're about to start in next week. Know Week two week three and I share my stories and I let them know that. Now I'm in a house with two crazy kids and husband and a dog just diagnosed. Diagnosed with cancer and Chemo and and so you know I let them know that I to going through you know challenging situations, and then also set up a time for every department where I call it either morning tea, or after key, where every assistant coordinator manager director on up gets an opportunity to see me on the screen and talk to me in. In us. We questions so I can kind of let them know what we're talking about. Upstairs and keep sharing the fact that we don't know when we're GONNA. Come back when it's okay because we're working. How can I help you and in really like? Let them see that they can. Individually email may call me facetime with me and I'm right there in the. The canoe with them.

Julie Greenwald Kelly Clarkson Bruno Mars Danielle Weisberg Coordinator Head Of Marketing America Assistant Coordinator Manager Rush Management Chairman President Trump Causey Cohen Official Cancer Chemo
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

03:44 min | 9 months ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"I wanted. Wanted to dig in a little bit. You are known as such a thought, leader and diversity space, and you know when our team saw that we were speaking to you this week. Everyone freaked out like we're talking. We're talking to celebrity and a think what I'm actually most fascinated by. When we go back to like the twenty five year old at this huge job. Even go back before that. How did you actually carve out a role and a position for yourself that many companies didn't have roles for there weren't really many examples to look for I. Really want to understand how you took an interest in a passionate I think he called it like a calling around working in diversity inclusion and turn it into your career. Yeah, I mean that's a pretty straightforward answer I. I have been a recipient and or participant in some of the biggest national diversity programs, and then my education was informed by scholarships received. Because I'm a person of color. So since two and a half years old and I still have the progress report. Where they're talking about me, they're saying you know. Tiffany likes the quiet ones you know I'm. I'm thinking of like two and a half three year old tiffany like walking around head. Start trying to I know. was I starting to protest I? Don't know what I was doing with the way that the proper support made it seem is I. I pretty much had that early age of understanding in questioning. Why am I treated a certain way because of my color? So when your whole life is informed by that? Maybe it wasn't even informed. Where I was in the hospital in the seventies, I don't know <hes>, but I was born across the street from the school. That I eventually went to so to think of my mom holding me while looking out the window at. The manicured lawns. The Windsor School, not even thinking that her daughter day is going to matriculate there and and seven years of her life. Growing into this diversity professional and I do think that they were key pivotal moments in my my life that really informed me was almost like lights in a room, and I just had to follow them, because I knew even when I was in inroads, which is an industry internship program that places young people of Color in business marketing. I had my internship at Verizon. And I knew even being part of Inroads I. Love The way this feels. I love the fact, this woman. Her Name Was Sandy banker at inroads at Bryson had the job of making us feel important special within a corporate environment. She was energetic. She was excited to come to work, and so I was like okay. That's what I'm GonNa, do I don't know how I'm GonNa get air because I want to feel like she feels when she comes into work, and so I always had it in the back of my mind, and so even when I. Started working in agency I questioned why there weren't more diverse people, and I went directly to the president had the conversation, and now people would grasping their pearls like how can you just go and talk to the president and set up a meeting I'm like Whoa? Why not because that that idea of speaking directly to authority empower about things that are not going well, are people not being accounted for with something I had been doing apparently since I was three, and so you know stories from my family and my mom I put i. put the pieces together that. Basically had a blueprint for this and was destined for this even the first second generation of my family were there. Teachers nurses were all in some sort sort of service, so my calling happened to be diversity in corporate America someone else my family would be. <hes> would be a teacher or nurse, so it's it's kind of. It's kind of generational and <hes>. Some would say genetic, but I knew probably at eleven that I was going to do this work. I just didn't know what it was called

Danielle Weisberg Carly
Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:46 min | 1 year ago

Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

"You really have to recognize that the people around you have value to add and that you may be the person in charge you have the vision. You have the responsibility woody. But if you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're gonNA lose them awesome. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better at our place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. Hey we welcome ambassador. Susan Rice to skimmed from the couch ambassador. Rice was national security advisor to President Barack Obama before serving as national security the advisor. She was the United States Ambassador to the United Nations as well as a member of the cabinet. Prior to the Obama Administration at Basseterre Rice was a fellow fellow at the Brookings Institute and began her career in foreign policy under president. Bill Clinton so many questions also ambassador rice as has just published her book tough love the title references. Her parents approach to raising her which prepared her for career in world politics. And I'm guessing a lot more. The memoir has been called both highly personal and unflinchingly honest. It's landed her a spot on the New York Times Bestseller. Lists congratulations. We we are thrilled to get the opportunity to speak with her about her historic career ambassador rice. Welcome to the couch. Thanks so much. It's really great to be with you. Both very excited right okay. So let's jump into it first question we ask everybody. Skim your resume for us. Okay scholar written and published academic work on national security and foreign policy when I was at the Brookings Institution as a foreign policy scholar I've also been a management consultant diplomat. negotiator national security expert. That's the first time we've had those bullets on this show. What is not on your your wikipedia or login? Daniel dropped. Her microphone in a very important question was the literal mic. Drop in writing. Not On your official biography or Kapadia that we should know about you. Well I mean there's a lot but one of the most important things if not the most important things is that I'm a mom. I have two kids one in high school now in one in college and I'm a wife and I'm a proud daughter daughter of two parents who had phenomenal impact on me So family to me is hugely important. What is a typical day? Look like for you now now. It's well now when I'm not on book tour normally. Okay it's so much better comparatively like I can get up at seven you know as opposed to five thirty or six. I can work out and take my time doing it. Not being rushed I can put on my yoga pants I and my fleece and very leisurely eat my breakfast. which is usually like fruit and yogurt or something like that with a lot of coffee and then it depends on what my days as about? When I was writing the book? Sit Down and focus on that. I spend time at the School of International Service at American University. where I meant to our students I do some speaking. I do some travel. I'm on the board of Netflix. And I do some other private sector so depends on what the the the deal of the day is but for the most part the great thing is I'm in charge of my own schedule and I'll have to get dressed up except when I'm on book tour you said You can travel. I'm sure you have traveled so much watch but a lot of it has been in your professional life. Where's the last place? You traveled here for fun abroad or anywhere anywhere. The last foreign trip we took took was to Peru with the family in August which was really fun. 'cause it's been a while given that the kids have jobs in camp in whatever that we've actually been able to do to a cool foreign trip together. Is there a place you haven't gone. That's been on your bucket list. Oh Gosh lots. Let me do a short summer. Yeah I would think you've been everywhere. I've been a lot of places Che's but not everywhere and there's a lot of places I still WANNA go Thailand Morocco Sosa Czech Republic. Ah Norway I've been Ireland into the big places have been you know. China had been Russia into Japan. Indonesia I've been to many parts arts of Africa most of western Europe a good bit of South America but I still want to go to Chile. I WANNA go back to Argentina. Yeah I WANNA go back to Brazil. We should do do a little girls chalet you should. It's amazing you talk about family being really important to you. And that's obviously a huge inspiration from the book. The the title of the book is a nod to your parents parenting style. Tell us about your parents. Well I had to really wonderful parents both past unfortunately but my dad. I was born in segregated South Carolina around nineteen twenty. His grandfather. My grandfather had been a slave. He fought in the Union army in South Carolina during the civil war and then after the civil war my great grandfather rather miraculously got a primary education occasion became a teacher and then got his divinity degree Went to college and after college he An after his early professional career. He established a school in New Jersey. called the board in town school and from the late eighteen eighty s until nineteen fifty-five that school educated generations of African Americans both in vocational and technical skills and in college preparatory skills and Albert Einstein and Stein and Mary McLeod but Thune. Eleanor Roosevelt. All came to the school which was really quite extraordinary in that. Legacy of service of education was what my father was raised with but born in this oppression of segregation and Jim Crow. He really was struggling to figure out how he could fulfil his potential during World War. Two he served with the Tuskegee airman and in the segregated Army Air Force and he had the horrible experience of not being able elite in restaurants off of base but seeing German. POW is being served and so he knew that he wanted to become somebody. He was brilliant and after after college he decided in after the war lead the south. Go out to California. He got his PhD in economics at the University of California Berkeley and then he spent his professional fashion career. Working his way up he worked in the Treasury Department. He worked at the World Bank in a senior position. Ultimately he was a governor of the Federal Reserve. And I'll come back to him but I learned from my father just extraordinary perseverance and basically believing in yourself even when society and everybody around around you is telling you that you're not worthy or you can't. My mom came from a totally different background. She was the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica. That came came to Portland Maine of all places in nineteen twelve and my grandparents on her side. Had No education was agenda when was a maid and yet like so many immigrants immigrants. They came with the American dream in saved and worked very hard and sent all five of their kids to college. Two of my uncles became doctors. One a university president won an optometrist optometrist and then along came my mother the baby and she was Valedictorian of her high school class. She was debate champion. She she went on to Radcliffe College now. Part of Harvard and was president of the entire student body graduated magna cum laude and because she almost didn't get go to college because she was denied a scholarship because she was black but eventually because her principal enter debate coach went to bat on her behalf. She azazel receive another source of money. She made the fight to enable college to be affordable to low income Americans. Her life's passion and she. He was known as the mother of the Pell Grant Program because she was instrumental in establishing and sustaining this extraordinary program. That's allowed eighty million Americans to go to college. My mom was it was a bad ass in nineteen fifty when she graduated from high school as an African American woman. In a very white state of Maine She he went on through her career to be a pioneer. And so these two parents who were wonderful but had a horrible marriage which can come back to really taught me to fight and to be strong and to not be dismissed her diminished or discounted by others how his career talked about in your household growing up. I mean I. I had a working mom and a professional mother from the earliest days of my life and so on the one hand. It was an example in an expectation that you can work and have family at the same time. It was rare. Frankly at that time this has been the late sixties early seventies for the mothers of my classmates for for example to be working outside of the home in a professional capacity. So I had her example and I had my father's example of rising up in government and in private it's sector we were expected to excel. We were expected to work hard and do our best. We are also taught that you know we could be whatever we wanted to be. They weren't saying you gotta be this or you got to be that but the fundamental message was whatever you choose to be do your best at it and make it something. That's about somebody other than just yourself when I hear you talk about your parents and them as role models to you and your family I think about it two ways on one hand. I'm like that is incredible. crediple an amazing and they obviously created such a strong legacy in you. Second thing I think of is that's got to be a lot of pressure at times. Did you feel that growing up. Who is funny not really not in the sense of? I was scared that I wasn't going to meet their expectations and they were going to get mad at me. They had a really important saying that. Did they sort of banged into me. And my brother which was do your best and your best will be good enough and what they meant by that was you know. Don't be a slacker. Don't be fast but if you do your best and it's not you do badly that's okay. You are allowed to fail. You just not allowed not to try your best. And so they gave us a sort of confidence in safety net. They'll be behind us. We can take risks. We can do something thing that we may not be good at but just do your best. The message was you know. Don't be lame and that was kind of their version tough love. It doesn't mean that they expected us to always get as observe. Be The best person on the basketball team or whatever the the thing was but were they gave us a hard time was when we sort of cut corners fit in the Rom- of your imagination that you would have the jobs that you ended up having served in the way that you ended up serving the particular job that I had were not in the realm of imagination. Because I didn't know yeah. When I was young I was going to be interested in foreign policy and national security? I didn't know the field well enough to say. This is what I want to but I knew that I was likely to to do something and do it to the best of my abilities and that it would be an ambitious objective.

Susan Rice President Trump Brookings Institution Maine President Barack Obama United States Ambassador Advisor South Carolina Danielle Weisberg United Nations Carly Bill Clinton Radcliffe College Basseterre Rice Obama Administration New York Times Bestseller Netflix Basketball School Of International Servic
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:27 min | 1 year ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"You'll hear more about it in this episode where we talked to actress and star of the show Brittany snow there's like no I'm currently Sekine I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome to skin from the couch this podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team into the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback we started the skin from couch so what better place to talk it all out than it began on a couch.

Danielle Weisberg
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Episode. It's a crossover with the skimmed from the couch team Carly's Aken and Danielle Weisberg the two women quit their jobs as news producers and launched a newsletter twenty twelve it was called the daily Skim and it became the fastest growing newsletter on the market since then they've built a media empire which now includes their subscription APP and video productions Skim Studios every day they reach more than seven million people Danielle and carly had us over to the skin headquarters in New York for the interview and they take us back to the beginning when they were two girls in their mid twenties trying to build the skim from their couch. I really enjoyed this conversation and it's an important one about finding that right co-founder that partner to build something with don't forget after this interview you can head on over to skimmed from the couch where Danielle and carly turned the tables and interview me okay you're the skim founders Danielle Weisberg and carly's aken Carly's Aken and Danielle Weisberg welcome to no limits. Thank you so much for having us for excited. This is weird to be on the other side of that well. I'm really thrilled old to be here at the Skim and we just did the skimmed from the couch podcast which you has asked great questions. You guys are doing a great job with the podcast. Thank you for having me. Thank you for having US coming on our show excited yeah me too well. There's a lot to get to you so oh I want to go back to when you initially got started and Youtube met in Rome on we did we you know start. UPS are very competitive and one thing that we win hands down every time is the origin story <hes> so we met in college in Rome we randomly were there on the same study abroad trip we went to different schools grew up in different cities and connected there <hes> and and then we went our separate ways after eating a lot of pasta and it was going to say more pasta or Gelato Pasta for sure <hes> and <hes> we reconnected when we were both working fulltime for N._B._C. News after college sh <hes> and we became friends as to people starting off in the industry and bounced around the same cities from D._C.. And York and wound up roommate's twenty five years olds <hes> in a very small apartment in New York City you working at N._B._C. and trying to figure out how we could stay in this career that we loved when things were not good in the media industry after the recession <hes> we started off being really cheap labor. We I learned a lot and then when we weren't so cheap anymore and we're starting to think about how do we really build a long term career for ourselves <hes> although we wanted it to be there there just wasn't a clear path anymore. <hes> so in a lot of ways is we felt like the idea to start. Our own company was safer decision. Did you like your time and N._B._C. or was it frustrating. I loved my time there and I think we both thought that we <hes> we had amazing mentors who were both still in touch with all the time from like intern through full-time jobs <hes> an amazing co workers. I personally like I loved Corporate America. There's a lot of people you like. I can't wait to leave or like a 4. I didn't have that did not have health insurance technically under their like freelance <hes> umbrella which is the way that you can. I think they changed it but it was a way to make it cheaper labor really so I did not like not having those things but I liked being a part of something bigger. I liked <hes> getting dressed up for work. I like seeing the talent like you like. I liked <hes> I just I loved being where all the magic happened and I think the only time that I ever felt frustrated was really towards the end of my time. which was you know it's easy to kind of? Look back in trying to diagnose yourself with like Oh. I was feeling this this happened but I think what was happening. When I look back is that something like within me had other interests and it was it was business it was is clearly entrepreneurialism and entrepreneurship.

Danielle Weisberg Carly Skim Studios Rome Gelato Pasta Aken Youtube New York co-founder New York City D._C intern York partner Corporate America twenty five years
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

14:50 min | 1 year ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"F T L to get ten dollars off your first fab bit van box you're gonna be. So glad you did this pair body back to the show. I'm gonna go back just for a minute, because it seems like to me at least that twenty sixteen was a bit of a watershed year for you in terms of content. What really that was just true in the world. And I felt like that year. It's just felt like I saw the skim, absolutely everywhere. I mean, whether you were interviewing presidential candidates, which was super exciting, or as you mentioned earlier registering people to votes. Really? I mean, that's something you should be probably proud of forever. So what do you have planned? And of course, you've just crossed the midterms recently. But what do you have planned for the twenty twenty election? You've got to be thinking about it. I'd love to hear what you are working on in terms of that election, and then I'd also love to hear your predictions. I mean, what do you think that we will see from the news cycle Visco around? I'm still excited about this question. And actually, we are beginning about now accuses twenty one but you're the first person to ask us about is that I think that one were so excited to see the different types of candidates that we've seen ranks you will call are women. It's, it's exciting to see the earthy in this group and in this field, and I think that no matter what your political beliefs, are that something exciting just for democratic process on the other thing that we're really excited about that. We the about a law is creating this identity of voters out there in having people really identify as a voter, I not the hardy, but that everytime election comes around you're not the game. I'm Republican or democrat, you're thinking that you're voter the exits shin. Is that at the end of the cycle, you are going to cast an idiot? That should be something that you feel strong about. And that you feel informed, you know, it's gonna be it's, it's gonna be a big election on, it's really important that this group Omonia women who hold so much power at have power to change things show up and make sure that they make there was hurt. Yeah. I know you know, we're all just sort of looking ahead with a bit of trepidation. The last election cycle was just. Well, I don't know if it's dramatic felt kind of traumatizing on the nation a little bit. And then, of course, we are now in this very strange time where. It's easier than ever to as we have seen to manipulate social media. It's easier than ever to put out. Doctored videos. It's easier than ever to have just spin, and, and fake news. Go viral and so that feels a little scary. So as, as the two of you who are responsible for putting news content in front of citizens in front of voters. I would just love to hear you talk a little bit about media literacy, and how you protect your own company from these darker influences and. I would just love to hear your opinion on how you think as a culture, we will be able to overcome some of these really insidious forces that, frankly, can threaten our democracy. The great ashen. I four most probably started was with a journalistic background ridge realistic integrity in the core of what we do on yet. You know a team you know about a hundred people now but we have a very need at to'real team. And we have higher everyone that we hire comes from usually make sure they've gone from a hard news background, or really gone through a really strong, aditorial camp at the skin and for us, we lead from day, one sort of them entre. Lee don't have to be irst. We have to be right and that's actually try to go into breaking news. And because we come from a place where we know what it takes to have the resources, especially in today's world to truly fack into truly be in the moment. And Ray now in this, this kind of two rental in twenty four seven new rash that, you know, people can keep up with themselves. So giving. The way that our products were who have the riba JD. Newfound the ability to take a second to digest, it to understand, whereas sources coming from, what are these are these actually facts to be able to appropriately fat check to them the able to digressed it into end, put it in front of our audience in a way that gives them enough information so that when they have the ultimate choice of going into a voting booth repeal, they're making informed choice in. So I think we've always kept our head down in focus on that and focus on that mission. And we've been very careful about how we think about partnerships. And we've been very careful about how he thought about building, another platforms actually building another platforms. And so, for that, for that reason, I think he knew he'd been able to sort of, in many may be the little engine that could on her own. Well, what's telling to is that your consumers are across the spectrum, you've right, that you are, that you draw people from all walks of life in different political parties in different ideologies, and different geographical areas. I mean that alone is very compelling. That people feel like they can trust you for unbiased news content. And that is literally exactly what you deliver. I'm I love to hear what? What what's your favorite thing? That you've pulled off, like a weird question, like you've now branch into so many cool areas. What is something that both of you? I lived here, brother answers kind of look back ago that was awesome. Like that was unexpected or that with further than we thought it was going to go. Just however you really want to answer it. But I think the answer, which is I think it's for both of us. What we don't election, Ana, I can't, I think, honestly, people when we started gambling keep being in your old job than we would say, no, the only time we ever myth. It is like on election night, or on a brick news thing, and you the white wine miss that rotary on. That's just a great things the Harda. And when we finally got to have achieved was just staring at each other at all really, we can build our own karate and not only that, like, we can free true action that we can measure. And I think when we started having kind of vision of what no excuses and that could be for as started talking to other companies, or other forms that on encourage voting. We saw just how artisan they were have they were really tied to specific agenda to your point. Our audience is really politically diverse. They live all over, they don't all vote the same way they don't all think family McDonnell, hat all this anyway. We're all going general Anthony everybody in. So then we were able to create a truly grassroots campaign Eckerd that built not just from twenty sixteen but into twenty eight heat truly lead spearheaded by our community who we Matt. And who went home in their learnings from our skin boot can't hear back home at then into that day. We got over two hundred thousand people to vote in show midterm is crazy. And when will about look at the graphic diversity of our audience and know that they were showing up in the most closely attested reasons we know that we made an impact, we know we made a difference. And so to me, I think it is like how do we pull it off? Because we is truly through the vision on grit hustle. Amazing team. That is outstanding. I mean, really sincerely outstanding. And I, I love the, the that you have the ear of millennials because, you know, just as the, the trends have tended to show, it's harder to get younger voters into the booth just in general. This isn't just this generation, that's kind of every, and so the fact that you are working on higher engagement with younger voters is exciting. And it's good. And I think it's good for our democracy. And it sets a really great example. I just find that exciting. Like, you've, you're, you're catching lightning in a bottle right now with an with a generation that is so much more active and politically, progressive minded in general just and engaged and it's just exciting. I think your work has enlists potential. What do you wanna do next? Like, what are your when you're just sitting around, and you're sort of dream boarding for the next five years? What do you see what are you hoping for? There's so much morbid wanna do think that, you know this bookstore is so exciting brisk is a chance to get in front of our skimmers where they are in so really interested in seeing what we can do across the country, whether taken are no excuses effort in a bigger way. This person will be doing ticketed event, which was so excited about the opportunity to get on stage in real conversations on an nuance. John skin nest daily podcast this year. So podcasting area that we love our relate cited Hugh Roe into yet. That is awesome. How are you going to how are you structuring a book tour? Is it just the two of you on a stage? Do you have a special gas? Are you feeling questions from the audience there? We're gonna ten different cities, and we're gonna have a moderator in each city. So we're so excited to have women like actually ram Hannah. Rochman Kurla hall service shell got our lake the it's gonna be amazing group. We are so excited that we're going to have conversations about what's in the book meeting, all of the stuff that needed now as me now, gated growing this company growing up. That's awesome. What, what some of really learned like where would you say this is a spot? We either we got it wrong and had to make it right? Or we didn't anticipate it at had to sort of adjust for it or we went down this one path, and realize it was the wrong one and head, of course, craft like where would you say these have been a couple of our biggest lessons either, just in reporting or in managing or whatever sort of level of your career? Any for me personally adverts on the management side in that's been the hardest thing in at times. The most rewarding awarding attempt most fumbling. And really learning what it means to be a strong communicator. What it means to set explications to explain what accountability is on how I'm involved or not involved as a manager. And then, of course higher, and so, so many of the women mentioned before whenever mentors have been like our right? Hands in helping to keep that out. Absolutely that I, I appreciate your humility that, that you are willing to talk about that openly, and make adjustments when your work calls for it. I, I love that you have learned on the fly, and that you've still ended up building such a beautiful company that you can be so proud of. So before we sort of wrap this up, I'm thinking about you, as two very young, ambitious successful women, we have so much to learn from you. And from your example. And so if if. Got a listener right now who's thinking about starting her own venture in whatever field. She loves what piece of advice, would you with the both of you give her sort of at the starting blocks? I think that one of the bases vice is she get comfortable with the word. Now, if you're gonna hear it more times than you think possible is doing something new or doing something. Interesting. See, you have to learn how to take it as an invitation to take different path, and not see it is not against, you great point women in general struggle with what feels like rejection. But yeah. If we all threw in the towel after our first five knows we would have no career none of us. That's a great win. Did you have another one that don't don't dance around what it is you're trying to ask for? I think if you are at. Inker something to raise a promotion, a job fundraising at work. I think something we were really guilty early on. Like flirting with the ass in hoping on his mind reader? I think that's very gendered. You know, men don't have a problem with direct communication by enlarge, and they so they tend to get what they want more often, and where women have this strange notion of either being overly polite or this strange idea of diplomacy or even just that they don't have a right to ask. And so I appreciate that. You're pushing back on some of those antiquated notions. In fact, it's interesting too, when I when I read sort of the data on workplace relationships direct communication in men, primarily appreciated by both men and women. So it's not a trait that people disdain, they actually prefer direct communication. So for some reason, we have this sense, sometimes as women that it's too forward. We're fat. Fact, it's actually useful and, and welcomed. So thank you for saying that specifically..

Omonia Rochman Kurla hall Lee Ray Ana McDonnell Hugh Roe Anthony Matt ram Hannah John ten dollars five years
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"So as your as your subscriber base continues to grow, obviously, your team is going with it. You've got a hundred employees that is crazy, by the way, because that felt overwhelming every, like have to take a deep breath like good Lord of hundred people. This is their job everyday feels overwhelming end. We have that late Hitachi moment of our office in realize that we have office that isn't art in our -partment tends that like they're alive, people who work here, they get, as a responsibility that we get all the time, and it's also a privilege to be a source of information for millions of people throughout the country because those things are beyond what we ever could imagined. When we started a copy on shore. I'm curious like what's the breakdown of your team in terms of in terms of gender? At what are you noticing? About the women who are on your team. Yeah. Offense adeptly majority women, but no certainly all are welcome. Definitely have station across the jenner's. In terms of things that we noticed a really a very s female CEOs. It's incredibly important to get you on that we create the office that we would want to work for and create a policies, that would look for in employer so whether or not family, leave policy, whether that's like the health benefits, including for Chile coverage weather, that's having not being able to, to have a family and to be able to let's will work environment on that. So important to us on in. So we're very excited in chewy honor to seize many of the armed police go through different life stages. With us already started seeing that in a, you know, a lot of a lot of new parents happening. Oh my gosh. Right. That's your, that's your crew. It's just gonna rain babies, probably in your work environment for a really long time of all these sort of young moms. I'm thrilled to hear that you are prioritizing. Morale and work environment and benefits and thinking, specifically about how those sometimes disproportionately affect women in the in the workplace. And so that is exciting to, to hear. You say that, do you have mentors? 'cause, you know you came into this basically idee aiding you're creating your your you're sort of vision casting, and now you are, you are CEO's. And so now it's so much management and team development where do you look to mentorship in, in terms of leadership Yemen thir-, too late where we'll take them on a we lead in very Hugh have belted incredible network of linen. Who chew the not within our nine online calls on multiple Jenny Fleiss season line. You know, they just really have been there for us on Redick in Ben and the done this before. Books in before but they built teams before they big time management challenges the four they hired before they fired before they his money before they've done all the things that we have been doing for the very first time, and we just been really lucky to have built a network of people that we can be very honest with, like, hey, going through this, this is really hard. I like hearing you say that I hope everybody is picking up on that. Because there's this really inflated idea out there that autonomy is something to be either applauded or that's the endgame or the goal. We're frankly, find a culture clever action, incredibly fruitful. That's all the leaders that I respect the most collaborate also in fired the book, which is we've all been through this before we all have to things before our release things. Whether it's you know, choosing your healthcare plan, negotiate your salary Lear all trying to figure out and know we wanted to create a reference book that you you'll that you have enough information to make educate places in the book is really funny, guys and. I love your approach to it which is very skim ish. You know, you just sort of took this, this skim approach to writing a book, which is fabulous. I've been holding my just crossing my fingers for long form content from you guys for some time. And so you really delivered here and I enjoy it so much. I wonder if you could just talk a little bit more you just touched on it. But took a little bit more about the book and about the process like okay. So everybody listening. It's it touches down quickly. These are not super deep dives. But they are kind of this, incredible encyclopedia of quick information for things, you want to one of your titles things that make you feel fancy Levitt that made me that thinks that save money. Things that are tedious of you talk about taxes a little bit. It's, it's kind of this very broad sense of kind of how to be an adult and I love it. Can you talk a little bit about the writing process, and what that was like for you and what you're hoping your readers take away from it? Exactly. Yet it is meant to the relations copulation, all the question that we had that go into being adult that no one really tells you at unfortunately, there's no class, at least Fennelly time wondering why there isn't a class and where he go, where the advice and a lot of this advice are things that we are going through together as a generation, and selling wanted to pull all of these together full degraded by lethal so lucky to get into one reference book that you can return to and having guy new through different moments in your life. One of maker, exactions. Is things that are using if through things like health insurance. I mean, those are things that we didn't learn until we were trying to look at plans for our employees are so many things that people don't talk about the don't have time in your day to go through an ARCO is that you go through this, you learn something new, and then you act on it jumped into our station might not have had before make it assist that you've been putting off Kate. Some sort of action that make you feel like you're take tedious step forward today. Yeah. And you nailed it. And I think one thing that I really commend you on is that not only did you tackle this wide array of dolt issues that. People in their twenties. And thirties, are going to encounter in many cases for the first time, but it's, it's fun. And it's cute. It's funny and it's clever like thank you so much for making it entertaining because sometimes reading great council on budgeting or investing or interviewing skills can just be so dry and so clinical, and boring, and you made it fun and entertaining at acceptable. And I just felt because I was flipping through like oh that, that sounded that may that's not easy. Like I could do that. I could tackle that based on this advice. I have to know. Do you have like a best life hack that you learned while pudding this book together when that maybe we even still use? Yes, I spend way too much time packing and. Is can spend release on the show. One of that was small helical for me as we lay out what you basically need for every trick. And deceived me a ton of time. Also fun, tricking in their jewelry. But I think my favorite on it's something called the Commodore method inning. It is really like the aid on it's been. It's really about Oxy could do sprints of hard. Bogus work in take a break our whole section. There's a whole section of about wellness in stress management, and a were all sort of, you know, as phones we all haven't attention problem if you talk about, you know, house time spent I opted by myself trying to focus on something getting distracted or thinking they will take too long enough starting it in the final door. Method is the perfect recipe to make sure that you can do really intense productive work in meditate O'Brien. I love that sets that works for me, too. That's exactly how I operate rather than just like dripping it out, over the course of a day in feeling like nothing done. Hey, everybody.

Hitachi Chile jenner CEO Jenny Fleiss Oxy Yemen Lear Fennelly Levitt tricking Redick ARCO Hugh Kate Ben
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

15:20 min | 1 year ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Right to your inbox every morning, just a matter of minutes short, and sweet, you kind of get this high level overview of the day's biggest news, but here. Like the kicker. Here's what's great about it. It reads like a smarter Regina George from mean girls is telling you, the news, so this is new actually wanna read. And this brought to you by the two women have on the show today. Brilliant, brilliant, CEO's named Carly's Aken and Daniel Weisberg. So Carlton, yell worked together in BC in twenty twelve they decided to go rogue. And we'll talk about this to fill in a void that they saw on the news industry. So their friends from college who were smart, people were asking questions that could have been answered by short digestible news bits that they could have read in a pinch rather than long form. One hour news show or reading paper cover to cover, and that's where the skin was born. So Carly Danielle head while a few hundred subscribers when they launched the skim and that number has exploded to a whopping seven million plus. Now, the also have a weekday podcast called skim this, which is also ten minutes short sweet. Or they break down the breaking news of the day in that word enough. They just wrote a book called how to skim your life. It is delightful. It's, it's a book of life hacks. Honestly that break down the most boring parts of adulting into their signature skim style that again you actually wanna read things like what's the difference between an ATM mutual fund, but also how do I choose wine at dinner? I mean it's, it's all across the board. Like all these adult things that we have to figure out that maybe somebody ever taught us. But maybe they didn't. This is a fabulous conversation Carly into are interesting and vibrant and they're fun to talk to. And they're exciting and their work is really, really fantastic. So we're gonna talk about how they built their business what they had overcome what their goals are for the. Future, what they see for the upcoming twenty twenty election. It's all in here. You guys you're gonna love this conversation. So I'm pleased to share it with you introduced to you. If you've not met them live, the very smart talented co founders of the skim. Carly's Aken Danielle Weisberg. So Carly end in yell. Welcome to the for the podcast girls. I am so happy to have you on today. Thanks so much. General really excited to be here and appreciate you having on. You are just seriously. No joke. I can't wait for my listeners to kind of hear you talk about what it is. You do where you've sort of come from. And how you've risen through the ranks. 'cause I like absolutely love your story. So I've told them just a little bit about who you are all the very impressive things that you do at the skim. But if you don't mind for just a minute, if you'll indulge me, I love hearing about me shoots. Of course, whether it's like romantic or like best friend potential. And so could you just tell us for a minute. How two of you met what you were doing with your lives at the time and then just kind of say, this is me. And I'm this is my name's over to can pick up, which is, which sure this is Jane yell, so. We curly and I like to say, you know, in start up world and everything is really competitive in that we'd win the best founder meet story. Curling I met when they were studying abroad in Rome, when we were in. So we went to different schools and were lucky enough to be able to spend an amazing semester in realm. We Mets because of our love of fried artichokes, as we've been this. Yeah. There was like another girl who is also looking for the best fried, artichokes, says, I'm so we over that and the to it's good. They did not disappoint. Also, I reconnected after school when you're both were gang for NBC news teams brands lead then became roommates in New York still working in the news business. An had really this, same quarter light crisis a loving what we were doing work to mealy hard to get the jobs that we had to step back and realize that we wanted to do more. And we didn't want to wait in line for opportunity to open up that could be ten years later, on at the same time really, really loved working news. Stories odd reporting what was going on each day, and we serve that function for our friends who are really busy leading in so many different ways. Ryan Cade to re the wires all day long. We were and to step back of me about this demographic, that are represented millennial women were leading in so many ways and copy unique set of challenges, and they deserve a source of information that they can trust him that fit in with their teens. Soobee started the company from her pouch, just into gusts, working all night and all day on newsletter. End daily running to full fledge membership puppy, that have products that has products that all walk around the idea of living smarter and lead. Now run a company that has over a hundred employees about bananas, you guys. So when you are on the couch, and you're just beginning to piece this together in its early stage. Did you still have your other jobs? Now, this is currently. No. We had quit on relaunched really a few days later, still newer, we never tried to do it. In a half. Honestly, a few reasons why one was that awesome. It's different schedules in y'all's. Optimizing bait shifts in Iowa. I am nine to six job I divide. But knee that was wanted the other reason is that, you know, when we started getting advice from people, they said, if you're gonna raise money like you can't ask somebody to believe in you one hundred percent and you're not showing the ultimate, which is quitting. So meet are very personal decision to go into credit card debt to do that. That is not, not like were like this. You do. Right. The, you know, you've gotta check your own situation dot was hours. We had no choice but to a credit card debt because we had about four thousand dollars saved with the two of us rights by. Yeah. We went full, we don't fully right in. I actually love that. I am not super risk averse. And so I, I recognize sometimes just a moment where, you know, you're onto something you definitely see, like avoid in the marketplace, which they're definitely was at the time that you guys sort of lifted this off the ground, and you've just kind of jump off the cliff I really like admire it. I, I admire the just the you bet on yourself, obviously, the skin has just grown grown and grown and developed only layers, and, you know, new types of resources, and I mean you guys are you went from two hundred it's a big deal. But at the very beginning, what were you thinking thought this is this is our idea? This is one. It's gonna look like this will probably be the main path that we sort of tread here. And so how did you gin? You know, it's funny when you're actually talking about this the other day in, in one way, we I think we always dreamed, a big it. What would we knew day one? This is not Email newsletter. Business weaned day one. This is not a media business, and we knew day one that need. We're going to the product strategy fit into teens that was going to likely have subscription as a part of it weeks. We always like could see that this was big, and we always could steal the traction that it was happening can never visualize the people that was going to take that will help us get there. So no idea, how many people is gonna take me never been like Elizabeth, our office, be visitor funding will have that, you know, we have no idea, but I think we always we knew sitting something really big. And so it wasn't, you know, step one to get to. It was more like had a week to get on t's really overly used. Cliche anything on the rocket ship, get going. So we definitely felt out momentum early on. And really the Jeff one was how do we get this front people in all we cared about was how many people signed up for the daily skin and how to get more of them? So now that you guys are CEO's. I'm kind of comparing your this career to the careers that you left, like how have your specific and individual roles changed since you're in B C, like what, what is your day to day look like at this point? And are you are each of you sort of putting into rotation? The skill set that you were using previously or you flexing, a lot of new muscles to skillset we had, when we started the company was that we knew how to ask questions and our jobs, donated it, you, you have to question you have to look y things, and I think you have to let go of a fear in order to be acceptable doing so we knew network, we need to talk to keep all mea you ask questions. And I think that is the that has carried us through to today, because every day we learn something new, which means everyday there's something. Were base with that being had no idea out. We are meant to get through it, and, but we know how to ask you for help in think that is something that has made a huge difference for us totally are dated as are the same only in that everyday is totally different. And that was the case when there are two of us on a couch in. It's definitely the case now that will running a much bigger company, I think that were still hugely involved with every aspect of the company, not role has really run alongside the skin and the rest of team. I love how much we have expanded recently launched daily podcasts. And now the book an it's amazing to be able to have a team that can do that. So I'm I'm curious to hear your thoughts on this, obviously, always worked in news. But how have you seen your business transform since the beginning, specifically in your opinion? What is the difference now because everything just feels like rapid acceleration? What's the difference in the new cycle today than when you first started? We started to seven years ago. Everything is different in that guarantee. I think if it's possible there's more annoyed today than there was when we started seven years ago, we were starting in years ago as response to too much noise. That holiday protected. Our business strategy on its ribbit in it one that we really, really have Underdown double down on our focus is having time well-spent, which is, you know, that there's a lot of noise, we know that everyone's busy in. So having make sure that our product show of where you are. We are consumer end and that when you experience or interact with skin products, that you say time will set.

Carly Danielle CEO Regina George Carlton NBC BC New York Daniel Weisberg Ryan Cade Iowa Jane Underdown founder Rome Soobee Danielle Weisberg Elizabeth t Jeff
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

14:44 min | 1 year ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"To overcome impostor syndrome in your business, so that you can start to profit if you wanna be part of that, there is a link in the show notes, you can find that they're I would love to see what that masterclass. Now, let's dive into today's episode I am so excited about this conversation today, we have onto amazing women Carly's Aken, and Danielle Weisberg. They are the co founders and co CEO's of the skim. It's a membership company, dedicated to helping us live smarter lives. They started this company literally. On their couch seven years ago. And now they have over seven million daily subscribers including Oprah it all began with their daily skim Email newsletter which has expanded to an app a production studio. Any YouTube channel among other things they also have a podcast called skin from the couch, which you might have already heard because debuted at number one within just a few hours of launching, and they have a book coming out tomorrow, which is called how to skim your life. It helps you take control in areas like personal finance your career stress management and lots more, you can pre-order it today, or you can fight it on the bookshelves tomorrow. I think you'll find so many helpful nuggets in there. I love their story. I love their too nasty. So without further ado. Please, welcome the incredible Danielle Weisberg, and Carly's Aken. Hey Danielle and Carly. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank you so much for having us. We're so excited to be here. Really looking forward to diving in finding out how you guys started the skim. So take us back and let us know sort of where this came from and, and take us through the journey of. How it got to be where it is. Now shahr. It's daniel. So we started seven years ago, while side it's surreal to think about what we had when we started. We were twenty five years old room mates. And we started the company from our living room couch. We had grown up in the news business loved getting our hands into any type of storytelling that we could and worked, our way up to be producers and absolutely loved it at the same time. We saw that our friends didn't have a new source that they trusted or that they felt really connected with them in the way that they live their lives in. This is an audience have millennial women that is leading in so many different ways and deserve to have news that fit into their routines. I'm so we saw a win the market and wanted to create a company all about this audience in making it easier to have mused fit into your day-today. Over the past seven years. We've raised funding we've grown our company in our products. We have an amazing team. Team. And we are creating a membership to living smarter. So awesome. Just the fact that you did this from your couch. I just love that in and of itself, the fact that it then became so successful, just all of those things, I know that Oprah has she said that she's one of your subscribers. Is that true? Yeah. That is probably the best Janice Carly. That was probably the best of my way. Tell us about that. It was crazy. We, we were flying to the west coast, and we landed in LA, and when you when you land you turn your phone back on, like your Email kind of takes. Yeah. Load washer. And so, I notice maintenance as being really slow and then I tried to get on Twitter and realize I had like zillion messages. And then saw that Oprah had tweeted about us, and remember, I don't Danielle and I weren't sitting like in the same row. And I kept trying to find her like Jamaica, I contact media, it was just it was crazy like, oh my gosh, it was a dream come true. It is a dream. It's amazing. That's an official stamp. Of you have arrived. Welcome you've arrived. So let's talk about being on this couch and having this idea and how you actually started to put one foot in front of the other and build this incredible community business entity all of the things we spent the first year, we really woke up every single day and had a idea of what we wanted to do, which is create a berry date, Email 'cause at the time, that's all we had a knew that it would just the two of us. We had about four thousand dollars saved, we had a great idea, and it was going to be up to us to make it into something. So we would do things like make postcards with the company's website. And with our logo, and a slogan, we would sneak into equinoxes bathrooms and leave them there. We would go into Starbucks and drop them off. We would basically just get kicked out of. Places. We spent that horse. You're trying to meet anyone that we could who had ever started something and just get advice and we did a college road trip. It's you guys at the time he could kind of pass still is college students, so we would try to stuff like these postcards under dorms than sit in the cafeteria with our skim shirts just like go up two random friends and ask if they would sign up for this new product called the dealer skin. So it was just grassroots marketing which was fancy way of saying, we did whatever we could to get people to know about our products. We printed up t shirts sent them to our friends around the country and just ask them to wear it at places in our neighborhood, and we really were able to network and to get different connections that ultimately led to us getting first round of funding a then being able. To hire a team at the same time we were doing all of this. We were writing the newsletter at all hours of the day and night, you're sleeping in shifts. So that first year is such a blur on. We've really did everything that we could to try to get people to know and sign up for this free Email. Gosh, it's so incredible because it's so unusual. I mean, this is what separates accessible people from those that aren't this much hustle. I mean you try to get people to subscribe to this newsletter and you're putting in all of this effort, and was that a free newsletter. Or did it cost money to be a subscriber? The daily est game has always been free. That was free that in it's free now. Oh my gosh. So here you are putting all of this effort to send a daily newsletter that you it was basically news. Right. It was filled with news and the two of you were creating all of it. You were right. An editing and making all of that content come to life. Yes. At the daily skimmed the premise of the daily scam is everything that you need to know to get through your day. So what is the key information that either happened yesterday is happening today in, but you need to know about tomorrow on? So the idea, you know, when we started seven years ago in still true today, is that you should be able to go to any work, or social event, and be able to talk to anybody about anything. Cool. It's really, really cool. It's like I saw written down. He said like to break breakdown important things in like an easy to today. Just read you said before your market was millennials true or not true. Yeah. That the company is all focused around on women and really thinking about what their challenges are in their day to day what they need to be informed on, what are some of the key stats around this demographic, and creating a company all around their lives. In creating information at the bay need to make the most informed decisions in there. Day-to-day. Yep. That's amazing. And so it's really so generous that you wanted to do this so much that you were working all these hours and barely sleeping and driving around to different college campuses, and doing everything you could to try to get the word out and you weren't even making money. And that wasn't even the business model right away. I just correct. Upper went on, which is that, while news always been our passion. We couldn't afford to leave her jobs for a passion project and we've always knew the business opportunity were sitting on, and while the daily skim was free, and it's still free, and that was our first signature products. We always knew our grander vision was to have diverse, I'd Rapin UN that we could create products at finish the routines of his audience on. And so we were very, very methodical and how he built the company. So while I'd love to say that we're generous, people I we were also Avary strategic from really Jayme one around how to build a big business. And how did you know that? How did you know at that? That age sitting on your couch, what would eventually be the products that you could you could eventually monetize, once you built a very engaged community, giving them something for free. I mean I would love to say, yeah, when you went all the products are going to be on me knew how the structure would work together. We didn't. We had a lot of ideas on how can evolve and a lot of ideas on what we wanted to create. But I think you know, the north star Ross has always been that it we have focused on this particular audience, an audience that has so many competing interests. For their time it, we created something that they trusted, and that they started off their mornings with than we would have this amazing gauge meant that would allow us to build other products. So I think at a time when a lot of other people went for scale, we just focused on meaning something to a very particular inside. After group of people that are hard to get in front of any if we could do that, in a big way than we would be able to monetize it in a lot of different ways. So we knew that we didn't want to be dependent on just advertising. We knew that we wanted to be able to do creative things on that meant that we would have to have openly audience that we could have subscription revenue that we could recommend digs chew. And so the decisions that we made about the future of the company, awkwardly went back to is good for audience and will they trust us? And what does this ad I love it so much. I wish I could take a highlighter or a red pen and just like under underlying everything said circle it and like draw arrows to it that is it in every time I'm asked like, what's the most important piece of building a business? I'm like, what you just said, so eloquently, if you can build engaged community of people and show up in front of their face where it's hard to get their attention. But do something that they find me. And they keep giving this and you create a community, once you have that it is gold is liquid gold and from that point. Absolutely. You're right. You're right. You've lived to see that. It's true. And you knew you knew..

Danielle Weisberg Janice Carly Oprah YouTube impostor syndrome CEO LA Twitter Starbucks Jamaica official Ross Avary Jayme seven years four thousand dollars twenty five years one foot
"danielle weisberg" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Hi, I'm Danielle Weisberg. And I'm currently vacant, and we're the co founders and co CEOs of the skin if you're not familiar with the skin. It's a company that helps millions of people just like you get all the news. They need to start their day in about five minutes. We started the skin from a couch in our apartment, we didn't have any experience launching a company. So we reached out for advice and support of other female entrepreneurs we looked up to you now five years and over seven million subscribers later, we're bringing their advice and stories to you with our podcast skimmed from. The couch. You'll hear from women like Hoda copy and savannah Guthrie co hosts up today, I hate my eggs -iety. I have a lot of anxiety. Like, I hope I hope hope hope I don't even put it shoot it out on people. But I think everyone knows like Libby. No like when I if I have to interview the president or something I'm like. Subscribe for new episode each week of what it really took you women to find success and the highs and lows along the way subscribed to and download skin from the couch on apple podcasts or wherever you listen. This is firefighter Raphael yet for firehouse subs. Introducing the new firehouse pub stakes up with savory steak crispy fried onions are rich. Belgian beer cheese sauce on tap. For a limited time. Order yours as firehouse subs dot com. Remember a portion of every sub you buy helps them by lifesaving equipment for I responded. Firehouse subs. Joy more subs. Save more lives. Limited time only plus tax discipline locations. Firehouse subs will donate a minimum one million dollars in two thousand eighteen hours public safety foundation by donating point one three percent. Every purchase up to seventy percent off. That's right. I court furniture clearance center, get up to seventy percent off new retail prices and choose from wide variety of previously leased furniture and a core for your home or office so fast from one thousand nine hundred nine bedrooms that's from three ninety nine ninety nine dining sets from to..

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"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Success! How I Did This

Success! How I Did This

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"danielle weisberg" Discussed on Success! How I Did This

"And she was really excited about the idea so we called it a tender party and we paid for the bus but then we put a bouncer at the door and told every student that the couldn't walk in unless they downloaded tender so you'd literally have to show tendered on your phone it's about four hundred people download a tender at usc and i'm sure no one really knew what they downloaded when they hawked in but then they went home and open the app and started matching with each other answered seeing each other i think it really created phenomenon within you esi amelie after that i remember like every afternoon we would leave the office the whole team get in a car and like we were driving by every fraternities sorority in los angeles and like than san diego then orange county and like basically every school we could cover in the beginning of january we had about twenty thousand users and at the end of january had five hundred thousand users all organic so i mean you will lose it i mean the growth curve was just unimaginable so it was it was pretty amazing just like tinder needed users the scheme needed readers it's the daily newsletter that summarises the news with south and personality and its targeted at smart busy people cofounders danielle weisberg and carly's they can quit their jobs at nbc and went into credit card debt to launch the site and like tinder did they started by sending in the email to everyone in their address books then weisberg says they got bowled laid also emailed every news anchor out there truly and weird like we didn't know most and and we were like we're former and be sears like that you would love us iud appreciate you know the neither were solving and most of them didn't respond on hoda copiers spotted and she sad now i'll check it out like sounds great we did not know her we followed up to more times nor response dave four of athens business she said we were one of her favor things on air and it totally changed your life on my gosh so he went friend.

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