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"danielle sarid" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

17:15 min | 2 months ago

"danielle sarid" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This is on point. I'm magnetron Cromartie. We are talking this hour. About what the cove in nineteen pandemic is exposing about mass incarceration in the United States. And yesterday we asked you on point listeners to call us if you or someone you knew is currently incarcerated in a in a in a prison or jail facility in the United States and what that experience has been like regarding the pandemic and. Here's Gloria. She called telling us she's concerned about inmates. At the Barry Telford Unit in new Boston Texas. She says her son calls her? Every day about cove in nineteen patients that are being treated at the same facility where patients with other chronic health problems are also housed. They are not testing these inmates. They're just putting them all together in a dorm. They have to go to the peel. Line stand beside each other. There is no separation. No six feet no nothing. They're just standing there trying to get their medications. They don't get cleaned both They don't get hot meals. They are not allowed to go to the commissary to get Food or anything that they need. Its own listener. Gloria calling us About the Telford Unit in New Boston. Texas I'm joined today by Dr Homer venter's he's a physician and epidemiologist who worked in the New York City. Jails from two thousand eight to two thousand seventeen. And he's author of life and death and rikers island and joining us now from Columbus. Ohio is Michelle. Alexander civil rights lawyer advocate and legal scholar and author of the new. Jim Crow. Mass incarceration in the age of color blindness. Michelle Alexander Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. So just let me. Just start with your first impression. Your first thoughts about what the The pandemic is revealing about mass incarceration. You heard Dr Venter's earlier saying that. He thinks that that infection rates in correctional facilities across the country are simply going to get worse for the next three to six months. Yes I think it's important for us to acknowledge that the scale of this crisis is due entirely to political and social choices. Our nation has made in recent decades Choices to treat some of us the poorest darkest among us as disposable as though their lives. Don't matter we have refused to grant access to millions of people to quality education to health care And a living wage and then when people stumble fail and break the law we keep shame and blame upon them brand them criminals and felons and then lock them and literal cages. Now I understand that the history of how we got here is beyond the scope of our conversation but I do hope we will keep in mind that the politics of race and class brought us to this moment when this particular crisis is over we can never go back to normal going forward. We've got to re imagine what justice truly means There are some things we can do. Right now To drastically an idiot number of people in prisons and jails and that is easier than we might think We need to drastically reduce the number of arrests. This means ceasing. All arrests for minor violations including drug possessions. It means we don't need any more groups of police going on buses and dragging black men off. Who aren't wearing masks. We've seen in Philadelphia and other places and we need to free people on the inside let people out of jails prisons detention centers and youth prisons The overwhelming majority of people in jail have not been convicted of any crime. And are there simply? Because they're poor. If they could afford it would bail themselves out. They should be released If we cut arrests in half we can save up to twelve thousand lives and jails and forty seven thousand lives and surrounding communities according to an ACO. You report The Prison Policy Initiative reports that you know if we began reducing jail admissions just by half the population would be twenty five percent smaller within a week. Right Michelle just for just second because you've said so much that actually want to dig into a little bit more more deeply because this is the core right this is the core of the issue and Dr Ventures. Just for a moment you know a. Michelle pointed out that so many people who are currently in jail They haven't even been convicted of anything. Let alone been brought to trial right. And that is and they are being their health and wellbeing as being threatened every day that they are in a correctional facility. I mean there are stories you wrote about life and death and records island of about exactly this happening. I just wonder what your thoughts are on that. I think that those are really core. An important elements that we cannot We can't ignore that. We've we'VE AS WE'VE HEARD. We can't ignore these choices we've made for decades. I think that there are the actions we can take right now. So there are quite a few local jurisdictions county jails that have made significant progress on release which is important to save people's lives and also lower the curve in the community and save local health systems. We've seen very little movement in state presents federal presidents and iced attention and so we have lots of work we can do right now to save the lives of people to protect our local hospitals that can as we saw in Joliet Illinois be overwhelmed in the in the blink of an eye with Kovin in one thousand nine cases as I run through facility and lower the communities overall epidemic curve and Michelle. Let me turn back to you because okay. In terms of not arresting people will come back to that in the second but releasing people right now. I think it was in. Was it a high. Oh that they've really released to ten or twenty thousand people at this moment in order to cope with a with the pandemic your thoughts on that if that happened this morning. I'm not aware of it. Okay let me double check L. High. Oh Yeah I in Ohio There was a demand made back in March by the Ohio Prisoners Justice League in the Ohio Organizing Collaborative By the governor. They demanded that the governor released twenty thousand prisoners forty percent of those state custody by. May I to date? I'm aware that the governor has recommended for release from prison about two hundred people Now many people might think that releasing twenty thousand people is a extraordinarily demand a very high number But it's really imminently reasonable According to the ACLU about twenty two percent of people in Ohio prisons are there for technical violations of their post release conditions and the number one reason people end up in prison is for drug. Possession is their most serious crime you know. Our nation's prison population quintupled decades Locking up and locking out far more people than any country on earth so viewed in this light you know cutting the prison population by less than half in order to prevent unnecessary suffering and death in the midst of a pandemic is far from unreasonable. And if twenty thousand people who were released in Ohio or if the governor pledged to do that today would be overjoyed. No they did not and it was my mistake and I really hate to make that kind of mistakes on my deepest apologies. You're right it's only been one hundred or so thus far released. Its there's an error in my notes in so listeners and everyone I am very sorry about that. Do not like to make those kinds of mistakes because they would be huge news. I mean to your point. Michelle in Ohio. I think this number is right that there are nearly forty. Eight thousand prisoners in Ohio in. Twenty eight in twenty eight institutions. There are are are on lock down and in some of those places. There's infection rates close to eighty percent in the prison population. I mean it's one -solutely they're more than eighty percent of people caged at Marian. Pick away correctional institutions have already been infected with the corona virus. I believe twelve people have already died. And if the governor had taken Drastic action when the crisis became clear We would not have these stunning infection rates Behind bars and people would be you know at home with their families and loved ones Themselves and helping to keep their communities. Safe Dr Venter's turn back to you here because I'm curious about is what more can be done right now. Within the themselves because earlier you were talking about really fundamental fundamental problems that they had in terms of being able to provide care before the pandemic came along so is there is there room. Is there the capacity to make meaningful change right now to protect the health of incarcerated people certainly there is and the first step actually does involve what we were just talking about which is released because one of the basic tenants of managing outbreaks behind bars Is that you have to have the capacity to separate the people who are sick from the people who earn sick and also separate the people who are especially vulnerable. Those are people you want to get out of the jail or prison. But if and when it's not possible they needed special protections all of that requires extra space and that space is only attainable. If there's some extra housing areas so Facilities that are fifty percent of their capacity or sixty percent can do this can implement some of the CDC guidelines about setting up special housing areas for quarantine for people who have had exposure or for medical isolation You can set up special housing areas for high risk folks if you don't have extra space if you're running at one hundred twenty percent of your capacity that's impossible now. The other thing I've seen this incredibly disturbing is that that many facilities are looking at who is high risk and this means high risk of serious illness or death if a person the contracts covet they're taking CDC guidelines and then they're pairing them down so that for instance the CDC clearly says people who are diabetic are at increased risk of serious illness or death. If they contract code I've seen systems that are saying if you have diabetes will only consider your high risk if you also have completely uncontrolled diabetes You know you've had lots and lots of of high blood sugars recently. That's completely not evidence based it's a gross deviation from clinical standards but it's example of how systems behind bars often take some clinical standards from the community and then mangle it in a way that ultimately denies people the care that they need now about the ability to quickly release people who shouldn't even say they're they're awaiting trial. Isn't that something that should be able to happen at the at the county level? Dr Venter's I mean I can understand. It's more complicated at in the in the state prison system but what about county jails Most of the movement we've seen unreleased has come in local jurisdictions so that's absolutely right and some of it is on case by case been more systematic and so There are jurisdictions around the country that have made progress. I think that the state systems have been very slow and even Immobile in this one of the most vaccine and horrifying circumstances where people in ice detention where have virtually an entire system of of tens of thousands of people held up locked up at risk of mortal risk? Who Pose Zero Safety Public Safety Threats under any land so We've I would say the local county. Jails where we've seen the greatest share of movement but the other systems have been poor to nonexistent in this process Well as I said we have been. We did receive quite a number of calls about this issue. I just want to listen for a moment to on point listener kate. She left us a voicemail from town Kentucky where her son is incarcerated. She says he's been in facilities since December since neither of them can afford his bond money. He called me today and is in distress. Says there's no there's only two things and there's no hot water and he says sometimes you get the water on sometimes and and the Center has said that they are testing every two week which they are not. He has not seen anybody test since he's been there he's got bronchitis and I just worry about him constantly and of course he's worried about it because they don't tell them anything nothing about virus. That's on point. Listener Kate from Elizabethtown Kentucky. Michelle Alexander this is one area that that ripe for reform and possibly we've been seeing some small steps forward in terms of not incarcerating people simply because they can't afford bond yes. There has been significant momentum. for abolishing bail practices Nationwide and you know I think it's unconscionable that in our country we cage people simply because they don't have enough money to get out you know I I would hope that After this pandemic passes that we reevaluate and re imagine What justice looks like in this country? you know we have seen some states and some jurisdictions make bold moves during this time for example it's my understanding that in California Ten thousand people have been released from prisons in jails As a result of Corona virus concerns and it is possible for us to do much much. More you know in the years to come. I think we need to move beyond Are focused just on thinking about alternatives to prison for so non nonviolent offenders and people who are incarcerated for drug possession And begin thinking very seriously about how we might respond to violent crime differently. You know as Danielle Sarid points out in her book until we reckon nearly everyone who commits an act violence I survived it and you know we could begin to invest much more heavily in trauma support And and restorative and transformative justice strategies and. Begin to reimagined what justice looks like so that we can begin to close prisons in jails nationwide And never have a risk of you know having millions of people caged in the midst of a pandemic again well Dr Ventures. I have to let you go here in about forty five seconds but awarded to give you one last. Thought I mean you. You said earlier that you hope that the light that covert is shining on our prison system might keep the CDC and other groups focused now beyond the pandemic on prisons in the United States. Do you really think that's going to happen. Well it has to happen. This is a central hypocrisy to our approach to health and public health in this nation the organizations and agencies like the CDC spend millions on for example prevention of traumatic brain injury In.

Michelle Dr Homer venter Ohio CDC United States Michelle Alexander Texas drug possession Gloria Dr Ventures Prison Policy Initiative Cromartie Barry Telford Unit Boston diabetes kate New Boston ACLU Jim Crow New York City
"danielle sarid" Discussed on Feedback with EarBuds

Feedback with EarBuds

07:55 min | 5 months ago

"danielle sarid" Discussed on Feedback with EarBuds

"This week's theme is for your reconsideration. The curator is Donde from luminary. Here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by Yolanda. Monday's episode comes from metaphysical milkshake and is called. Can you honor indigenous faiths without being a jerk. It's thirty four minutes long in this episode. rainn Wilson Resin Ostlund have one question. How do we honor and embrace embrace indigenous faiths without becoming like Kevin Costner? How can we become more than dilettantes? With dream catchers Kevin Locke is an artist Hoop dancer musician musician. Educator and cultural ambassador for his Lakota an Amish on Beirut's he joined the pod to share what we can do to better understand our indigenous faith traditions and how out to see our spiritual heritage in all the land around us. Join the conversation using Hashtag. Metaphysical an email your thoughts to metaphysical milkshake at soul pancake. GEICO DOT COM. Tuesday's episode comes from on second thought with Trevor Noah and is called prison break. It's forty four minutes long in this episode. Trevor and David David discussed their ideas for improving. Prison then talk about alternatives to incarceration Danielle Sarid founder of common justice. Wednesday's episode comes from from under the skin with Russell brand and his called science capitalism. And God with Neil degrasse Tyson. It's one hundred twenty one minutes long. Here's the description. This week's guest on under the skin is the infamous astrophysicist Neil degrasse Tyson. He's pretty amazing. He was promoting his book letters from an astrophysicist but he was much more than and being a focused and dedicated educator I enjoyed talking to him. Thursday's episode comes from here to slay with Roxane gay and Tracy McMillan Cottam him and his called all. Your faves are problematic. It's fifty three minutes long this week on the show Tracy and Roxanne take on the Popeye's chicken sandwich and all of its glory as well as the problematic takes that have come along with it. Friday's episode comes from the seaward with Lena Dunham and Alison Bennett and is called Lady Rosemary. Aber door it's fifty three minutes long in this episode Rosemary. Obrador seemed to most like a shy awkward wallflower but underneath drab exterior lurked an appetite for Jules parties parties and larceny born into an unassuming middle-class English home rosemary secretly stole thousands of pounds to fund her glamorous identity as titled Aristocracy. That's Lady Lady Aberdeen to you. Lena analyst Cover Rosemary's wild parties outrageous schemes her ultimate downfall and discuss what it's like to feel unseen and unappreciated those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Yolanda for this week's theme for your reconsideration as we mentioned up top luminary is a subscription based podcast service. They have a dedicated podcast listening APP and are creating content that is exclusively available on that platform. Because of this when they launched about a year ago they got some negative press while we were excited for luminary to curate. A list for us. We wanted to make sure that this paywall would not affect our listeners. That's why luminary is offering a code that what makes it so that you can download the APP for free for one month trial. Here's the Info head to hear luminary dot com and use the code ear buds at checkout. That's Code Earbud at checkout okay. Hi Jumping back in here to tell you the right way to download luminary free for one month instead of doing what I just said in the nice sounding well edited version. Now listen to my not so great audio voice and go to luminary dot link slash ear buds. And that way you'll get a free trial for one month again. That's luminary dot link slash ear buds for one month free trial of luminary. And if you're wondering why I didn't just cut out the part of this episode. That's wrong it's because as you can tell. I'm not an audio engineer and I was a little worried to get funky with the editing so I figure adding stuff in his good but taking stuff out is a little nerve wracking okay enjoy. Enjoy the rest of the show. You can download the luminary APP on the APP store or Google play. This means that you'll have access to all of the podcast recommendations that we mentioned for this week and and more they've got hours and hours of exclusive content. Check it out and let us know what you think next. Let's discuss what's going on in the podcast world. Here's some headlines Headlines from this week in the industry brought to us by the inside podcasting newsletter as a Friday January twenty four th twenty twenty first story. WNYC NYC studios death sex money and NPR's coats which have collaborated onto terrific companion podcast episodes which examined interracial friendships between friends. Your stories about recent friendship explores how race has impacted listeners. Friendship and ask Code Switch. What about your friends include somewhat soul-crushing data Regarding kids cross race friendships and advice on what to do when things get tricky. Listen to both next Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Guy. Kawasaki Sake has launched an interview style show titled Remarkable People Quote Equal Parts practical tactical and hysterical. It covers innovation entrepreneurship technology literature. CHUR design and marketing end quote. Reads show description Kawasaki. Who is one of the earliest employees that apple features a wide array of guests on the show including Jane Goodall Physicist Stephen Wolfram Arianna Huffington Professional? Skateboarder Jason Kunia and Martha Stewart next. Nick why is reporting that Endeavor for audio the studio behind hunted American Jihadi and blackout is laying off its advertising sales team in an effort to streamline the business quote into something that's more formerly integrated integrated with Endeavour content the division established by endeavor in two thousand seventeen to focus on developing packaging and distributing products primarily for film and Television End Quote and the last story of the day in order to keep your indie podcast healthy multitudes. Amanda McLaughlin recommends that you connect regularly with your audience owned the day to day work running your show create. Diy Ads strategies create a network of peers. And treat your show as a business for details on how to get it. All done. Read Her blog posts on the topic search for Amanda McLaughlin Multitude Indie podcast blog post. Those are some of the top podcasts industry related stories for this week. We'll be back next week with more more inside podcasting is a thrice weekly newsletter written by Skype Pillsbury you can receive it and read it in your inbox going to inside dot com slash podcasting now onto our sponsors. Thank you to bus route for sponsoring this week's show. If your podcast junkie like I am. You've probably thought about starting your own show. PODCASTING is super for fun but it can feel overwhelming if you don't know how to get started. That's where buds sprout comes in. Both sprout is hands down the easiest and best way to launch a professional podcast. In fact fact. It's so easy that they've already helped over one hundred thousand people launched their own show. Bus Route will get your show into every major podcasting platform like apple. spotify cast cast box and Google podcasts. You also get a great looking website detailed analytics to see how people are listening tools to promote your episodes and so much more and if you follow the the link in the show notes you'll get a twenty dollar Amazon Gift Card when you sign up for any paid plan and thank you to our other sponsor pit lane partly piddling parley is. Is The podcast for unbiased. INDYCAR sports car podcast news interviews and live coverage at each and every race from president of the series Jay frye champion Joseph Joseph new garden and up and coming drivers patio award pit lane. Parley will make you a racing fan. If you aren't one we'll turn casual fan into a hardcore one we'll keep hardcore fans wanting more fine piddling parley on all your podcast platforms their website pit lane partly dot com and on all social media at pit lane parley. That's pit lane not A. R. L. E. Y.. Hey listeners. Did you know that you can advertise with us too. And we'll make it work with your budget. Send an email to ear. Buds podcast collective at G G MAIL DOT COM..

Parley Neil degrasse Tyson Yolanda Google Trevor Noah pit lane parley Amanda McLaughlin Tracy McMillan Kevin Costner rainn Wilson Resin Kevin Locke GEICO Lady Rosemary Lady Lady Aberdeen Lena Dunham Cover Rosemary Danielle Sarid Beirut NYC
"For Your Reconsideration" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

02:40 min | 5 months ago

"For Your Reconsideration" Week

"This week's theme is for your reconsideration. The curator is Donde from luminary. Here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by Yolanda. Monday's episode comes from metaphysical milkshake and is called. Can you honor indigenous faiths without being a jerk. It's thirty four minutes long in this episode. rainn Wilson Resin Ostlund have one question. How do we honor and embrace embrace indigenous faiths without becoming like Kevin Costner? How can we become more than dilettantes? With dream catchers Kevin Locke is an artist Hoop dancer musician musician. Educator and cultural ambassador for his Lakota an Amish on Beirut's he joined the pod to share what we can do to better understand our indigenous faith traditions and how out to see our spiritual heritage in all the land around us. Join the conversation using Hashtag. Metaphysical an email your thoughts to metaphysical milkshake at soul pancake. GEICO DOT COM. Tuesday's episode comes from on second thought with Trevor Noah and is called prison break. It's forty four minutes long in this episode. Trevor and David David discussed their ideas for improving. Prison then talk about alternatives to incarceration Danielle Sarid founder of common justice. Wednesday's episode comes from from under the skin with Russell brand and his called science capitalism. And God with Neil degrasse Tyson. It's one hundred twenty one minutes long. Here's the description. This week's guest on under the skin is the infamous astrophysicist Neil degrasse Tyson. He's pretty amazing. He was promoting his book letters from an astrophysicist but he was much more than and being a focused and dedicated educator I enjoyed talking to him. Thursday's episode comes from here to slay with Roxane gay and Tracy McMillan Cottam him and his called all. Your faves are problematic. It's fifty three minutes long this week on the show Tracy and Roxanne take on the Popeye's chicken sandwich and all of its glory as well as the problematic takes that have come along with it. Friday's episode comes from the seaward with Lena Dunham and Alison Bennett and is called Lady Rosemary. Aber door it's fifty three minutes long in this episode Rosemary. Obrador seemed to most like a shy awkward wallflower but underneath drab exterior lurked an appetite for Jules parties parties and larceny born into an unassuming middle-class English home rosemary secretly stole thousands of pounds to fund her glamorous identity as titled Aristocracy. That's Lady Lady Aberdeen to you. Lena analyst Cover Rosemary's wild parties outrageous schemes her ultimate downfall and discuss what it's like to feel unseen and unappreciated those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Yolanda for this week's theme for your reconsideration

Neil Degrasse Tyson Lady Rosemary Trevor Noah Yolanda Lady Lady Aberdeen Kevin Costner Cover Rosemary Lena Dunham Rainn Wilson Resin Kevin Locke Geico Beirut Tracy Mcmillan Danielle Sarid Obrador Russell Analyst Jules Roxane Gay David David
"danielle sarid" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

10:10 min | 6 months ago

"danielle sarid" Discussed on On The Media

"You very much. Thank you Danielle. Sarid is the Executive Director Rector of Common Justice and author of the new book until we reckon violence. Mass incarceration and a road to repair. Coming up could restorative justice bring peace and order to our online lives. This is on the media this is on the media. I'm Bob Garfield and at this point I hand the Mike to our producer Mike alot injure who earlier this year immersed himself four months. In the question of how restorative justice could be applied to the hate-filled epithets spewing world of content moderation. I'll get to where restorative justice fits in just a moment but first I wanna talk about the problem. I'll get memes memes direct message to me of like my face photoshop into Holocaust gas chambers. This is Ashley. Feinberg senior writer at slate and when she's not being harassed Biting twitter personality a lot of things right is kind of have to not look mentions for a few days until things calm down find. Burg's experience is quite common. A twenty seventeen hugh study found that forty percent of Americans have experienced harassment online last year. Feinberg had the opportunity to confront. Twitter's CEO Jack Dorsey about the toxic state of his platform. She shared the interview audio with us. Someone like tweets out our home address. Phone number It's like a crap shoot of whether whether or not that's unacceptable. Yeah we're not integrate state right now with our systems because they rely upon reporting that is twitter relies on users like you and me to report violent posts for human moderators to review and take down. It's expensive laborious and psychologically harmful for the moderators and just not that effective. But when Feinberg Press Dorsey on how twitter plan to reduce cyberbullying he seemed to draw blank. Finding the report. Button doesn't the most obvious and intuitive. So let certainly so since then. What would be like an alternative to that making more obvious? Jack's Big fix make the user report button bigger. I shared this little exchange with you to demonstrate the stunning lack of imagination at the heart of our content. Moderation conundrum like the criminal justice system in our analog world. I fear that we've become resigned to using old broken systems for taking on violent behavior the online when facebook or twitter tracked down a user who say sends anti Semitic means to a journalist they might suspend the harassers account or or band that person altogether. It's that eye for an eye old testament style of punishment called retributive justice that you see throughout our society But harassment researcher Lindsay. Blackwell says that approach is not working platforms right now are instituting harsh punishments. That are fundamentally fundamentally about deterrence these thirty day bands. These things that we absolutely no are ineffective. It's not actually going to influence people's propensity to re engage in that behavior unless you're treating the underlying causes we know in society in criminal context increasing the severity of punishments doesn't actually do too much at all to deter crime. There's no proof that the death penalty for example actually deters criminals. There's no proof I. I called Lindsey back in December to hear hear about her research on how to reduce harassment and bullying online fifteen minutes into the conversation. We agreed to embark on an experiment. That would keep us digitally early. Tethered for the next six months. Honestly like I don't know what I'm going to do when this is over like I feel like you and I have bonded in the trenches and I don't like what comes next that's true. I feel like we got. I got like mad at each other. Yes we made up and yeah we went through a whole thing. We you wanted to test out. Lindsay's idea a pretty radical solution to online harassment based on the sort of restorative justice that Daniel Sarid has pioneered learning restorative restorative justice. We can think about more empathetic model that treats people not as singularly bad you know as like quote unquote trolls. Who are here to cause trouble double but understands the nuance and the very human reasons why people engage in things like harassment and hate speech online? Yes absolutely there are people who are coordinating harassment campaigns on a large scale for the express purpose of silencing people often marginalized people but that's a minority of cases. I also think that if people thought of mediation as a viable aw tool they may be more likely to resolve a conflict than say doc someone harass them. Violence begets violence begets. Violence begets violence. What excites me about? The notion of mediation is if you can just sever that chain of online violence and harassment earlier. You Save in theory infinite. Harm down the line absolutely. I think. That's super spot. On the only way to test out the idea was to tested out with real people with real problems in a real community instead instead of punishing online jerks by simply kicking them off the site could we work with them to reform their behavior. So we turn to read it and I know what you're thinking and you're right right read. It does have a reputation for hosting some of the most vile speech on the Internet. But we chose it for a few reasons one. A lot of people use it more more people visit ready than instagram or net flicks. It's the sixth. Most popular sites on the American web. Two strangers on Reddit tend to congregate around around shared interests so we can assume that the harassed and the Harasser at least share some common ground. Yes you have different cultures interacting in different people from all over the world. But they're uniting around sort of a common cause or common theme or a common topic. Eventually Lindsey and I set up shop on our Christianity one of the biggest online forums for discussion about the religion with about two hundred thousand active members. Ironic because restorative justice is like so Christian at its core four and retributive justice. which is the foil for restorative? Justice is like straight out of the Bible like I for an eye so I think it's really funny that we ended up in Arco Sanity. Yeah we ended up there because I was originally speaking with the guy who runs a popular political subbed. I don't I don't want to get this guy in any trouble any more trouble people that I've already gotten him in and basically just from speaking with me. He ended up being doc St- multiple times and I think I reached out to like ten different communities just putting feelers out being like. Hey I wanna talk to you hear about what you do Blah and I heard from bruce the top moderator of our Christianity and I could tell just from the way his name is written on the subject at the he was an atheist and I was like weird. I gotTa talk to this guy. How do people feel about an atheist at the helm of Christianity celebrated? I think some of them are very furious about it and in and use that as a reason to go other places other people look at what I've done and what I've done is tried very hard to be respectful of the range of opinions Finian's within Christianity Bruce's a computer programmer living in the Pacific northwest. He's nocturnal so we often spoke at odd hours he told me that he became name. The highest ranking moderator in the Christianity sub. Read it because he's been around the longest of anyone on the MoD team. That authority grants him final. Say on the community's policy policy decisions taking down posts and banning unruly registers. It's super time consuming. But Bruce Sticks with it because he's genuinely curious about what what it means to be a good person and finds Christians to be thoughtful people we get people with relationship issues like We've been having sex and I want to stop and he doesn't Because I've had some sort of spiritual awakening or I have fallen in love with an atheist. What do I do and you can? Do you respond to that. No I don't feel the need to say something in response to the Christians usually handle that that's the wholesome altruistic side of the form room but bruce's MoD team seventeen of total spend most of their time containing it's darker elements their volunteers scanning the forum from Dan night for language that breaks the suburb. It's rules the big categories for what we deal with every day The first one is our rule. One point three which is for bigotry. Like calling a gay person a sodomite. This is another are Christianity Maude. Who goes by the screen name Agent Smith Radio but I call him a SR or for short or there's interdenominational bigotry? You can say for instance that I believe that the Catholic Church is messing up how they should be handling the abuse of clergy upon young children. That's fine but if you were to say the Catholic Church the horror of Babylon is represented in revelation. That crosses the line offline is our is very active in his Canadian Baptist Church. He takes immense pride in his work in the forum but he told me that he's seen a lot of MODs burn turnout because of the psychological toll the work I've had attempts of dachshund against me. I have had death threats against me. We have a lot of atheists who are part of our forma among certainly Jews. Muslims come by as well every threat. I've gotten every hateful message. It's been from another question. Okay so I'll be honest. One stereotype that I I have of Christians is like Flanders from the simpsons.

harassment Twitter Feinberg Press Dorsey Executive Director Rector of C CEO Jack Dorsey Bruce Sticks Daniel Sarid Lindsey Lindsay Catholic Church Bob Garfield Danielle Mike Ashley instagram Burg Reddit facebook producer hugh
"danielle sarid" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

01:46 min | 6 months ago

"danielle sarid" Discussed on On The Media

"Save the Internet are cruelest tendencies. It's all coming up after this from. WNYC in New York. This is on. The media broke Latte stone his way this week. I'm Bob Garfield in this episode. A critical look at the assumptions under girding. Our notion of justice both on social media platforms and the criminal justice system itself. We'll the address the court system. I with two point. Three million people behind bars advocates on the right and the left agreed that locking getting people up just isn't making us safer but that raises the question. What then do we do to address criminal behavior when it appears some criminal justice? Reformers are pushing new approach one based not on punishment but on truth and reconciliation. It's called restorative justice and when done Well it can help. Prevent further harm. The core drivers of violence are shame. Isolation exposure to violence and an inability to meet one's economic economic needs the four core features of prison are shane isolation exposure to violence and inability to meet once economic needs. We've baked into our central response to violence. Exactly the things that generated Danielle Sarid is the executive director of common justice an an organization based in New York City. That has pioneered the practice of restorative justice with violent offenders at a local level it is a process of making amends and and accepting accountability. Neither of which is accomplished in courtrooms or prisons and deterrent. Forget about the terrorists. Deterrence.

WNYC Bob Garfield New York New York City Danielle Sarid executive director
"danielle sarid" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"danielle sarid" Discussed on On The Media

"Spend our taxpayer dollars housing and feeding people who've caused harm at at the same time we spent a couple of taxpayer dollars trying to tend to the people they hurt and we let them off the hook for doing that repair small footprint so far kind of pilot projects in two boroughs of New York great data based on tiny sample size. What are the prospects for restorative justice for getting traction for being more widely embraced for being an Arrow in the quiver of a thousand as instead of just two so our current system estimates as though there's a hamburger stand in the middle of the desert that serves really nasty burgers and there's a long line because there's nothing for two hundred miles and if you looked at that hamburger stand and you surmise that those were the best burgers in this country you'd be making a mistake and if you surmise that everyone's favorite food was burgers? You'd be making being a different kind of mistake. What I know is that if there were also a Taco spot and a pizza spot and a veggie spot the line at the hamburger understand we get shorter and shorter and shorter as people availed themselves of options that actually might nourish them so the reason that I'm hopeful about the expansion of restorative restorative justice is I think that it is in line with what most victims actually want? It's just not in line with what our public narrative has been about victims. We've lifted up a handful of stories. We've given the megaphone only to the most vengeful and we've done that at great expense to victims so if changing everyone's minds were required for this expansion. I'd be a skeptic like most everyone else what I understand. Is that the story we've been told about out who people are and what they want is largely ally and so all we have to do is act on the thing that is true instead of acting on the lie that we've been told and we'll find vast demand for this across the country at the heart of this conversation and really the premise of this entire episode of O._T._M.. Is the assumption that antisocial behavior of various sorts is just kind of given that it was was ever thus first of all is it true to begin with and and if so is it something that you believe can be moderated on a grand and scale so I'm sure some degree of antisocial behaviors part of any community any society and always will be the question for me is one what is the scale of that behavior and what happens after it does it continue indefinitely indefinitely or not the scale of antisocial behavior in a society is determined largely by features of that society by things like the the presence of poverty and even worse than poverty inequity meaning poverty adjacent to wealth it means sub-standard education sub-standard mental health and in healthcare it means an infrastructure that doesn't support people traveling from where they live to where opportunities are it means unaddressed unacknowledged unrepaired racism on the part of social institutions that all of those things are productive of violence productive of antisocial behavior sure and so how we build a society determines how much violence how much harm we're going to see but then the other question question is that once someone does something wrong. What do we do? Do we do something that reduces the chances of them doing something wrong again or something that increases creases it or something that leaves it entirely alone and I believe in a healthy society in a society that aspires to be safe and just that when someone does something wrong wrong. It's our job to intervene in that in a way that reduces the likelihood that that harm or that poor behavior will happen again so oh society that is safe and just and decent for people to live is produced I think by a combination of <unk> structures that act in the interest of safety and equity and responses to antisocial behavior that act in the interest of safety inequity Danielle thank you very much Danielle. Sarid is the executive director of Common Justice and author of the new book until we reckon violence mass incarceration and erode to repair. That's it for this week's O._T._M.. T._M.. PODCAST extra.

Danielle New York Common Justice executive director Sarid
"danielle sarid" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"danielle sarid" Discussed on On The Media

"Listener support W. N. Y.. C. Studios this is on the media. I'm Bob Bob Garfield last week on the show. We examined the power of the prosecutor in our justice system. The D._A.. is even more powerful than judge's Criminal Defense Offense attorneys probation the governor the mayor anyone and how voters are electing a new wave of so called progressive prosecutors to try to turn the tide on Mass S. incarceration. If you haven't heard yet be sure to check it out. It was part one of a three part series. We're calling repairing justice. This is part two. We've talked about how the law and order approach doesn't work and we don't want to keep locking people in jail for every infraction but that raises the question. What then do we do to address injustice when it appears rather than the isolation violence that prison breeds some some advocates propose there should be a new approach one based not on punishment but on truth and reconciliation? It's called restorative justice justice. Danielle Sarid is the executive director of common justice an organization based in New York City that has pioneered the practice of restorative justice is just with violent offenders at a local level Danielle welcome to on the media. Thank you so much for having me. Let's start with assumptions. Someone someone does something violent and the best thing to do is lock them up for as long as possible which in a dozen on the face of it sound like a foolish Polish proposition rapists murderers people who kick old ladies in the face on subway cars. They need to be dealt with what's wrong with that assumption sure so the fact that people who cause serious harm need to be dealt with is entirely right the question comes when we start to answer how and it depends on what our aspiration as if our aspirations district perform punitive nece then we should lock them up for a really long time if our aspiration is to produce reduce safety or to heal victims or to help people become people who will never caused that harm ever again then prison has very little to offer for us. I'm in the business of ending violence and we know in that business know that the core drivers of violence are shame isolation exposure exposure to violence and an inability to meet one's economic needs the four core features of prison. Our shame isolation exposure to violence an inability to meet one's economic needs. We've baked into our central response to violence exactly the things that generate it. That's not what a society that wants wants to be safe. Does the other assumption that animates our appetite for punishment is the assumption that that's what crime victims want and the truth is in our public discourse we have heard from a tiny fraction of kind dictums and largely from a non representative fraction. We've heard mostly from white women like me. Even though a young men of color is ten and a half times more likely than I am to be robbed or assaulted even likelier than that to be killed and so our picture of who crime victims are and what crime victims want is artificially monolithic and distorted in a way that means that we are enacting the things in their names without ever having actually asked them what it is. They want you mentioned safety you mentioned punitive nece. There's also the question of deterrence terrance and rehabilitation and as you say justice for victims..

Danielle Sarid Bob Bob Garfield C. Studios prosecutor New York City executive director representative
"danielle sarid" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"danielle sarid" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"About the indifference that was represented in the poem. But it just came to mind flitted in and out sings attack took place in twenty thirteen. He's been revisiting that night. Because of what's been in the news lately. One act of hate after another an assault on a subway. Commuter leaves a woman with a broken spine because she was thought to be a lesbian and identifiable Jewish man in crown heights. Who's punched in the chest by a man who just walks away swastika swirled on a school playground. Also terms including hail Hitler and no Jews allowed risque alleged perpetrators of these incidents where people of color as we're seeing attackers. These aren't isolated examples. We know that communities of color and other marginalized groups are on the receiving end of hate. But people of color commit hate crimes to this is. Borne out by FBI data year after year and twenty seventeen for example, twenty one percent of hate crime offenders were black although they make up thirteen percent of the population. The challenges can we confront this form of bigotry without further inflaming racial tensions in November two Latino teens were arrested following a violent attack on a young orthodox Jewish man in Forest Hills afterward, Nora Gomez, Strauss saw the response from neighbors descend into name calling. And then they started referencing that as animals and saying, you know, these animals coming from other neighborhoods to our place, and it was a pretty coated or uncoated way to say that these words, you know, kids of color coming in and doing this. The question is what if anything do we do differently when people of color are accused of hateful acts, the color of the skin the religion, the ethnic background the alleged perpetrator should have. Nothing to do with how the authorities and now the majors respond and cry Rabbi Abraham Cooper works the Simon Wiesenthal Center, and he spends a lot of time confronting hate crimes. You have to be held accountable by society and part of that usually means you're going to do jail time. But this thinking is exactly what jobs seeing has resisted since the night of his brutal assault. His attackers. Didn't just hurt him. He says they also went after a Somali woman a new immigrant through a bottle filled with urine at her face and cut her nose. Sings John was broken when he was attacked. And yet even he thinks the criminal Justice system is not the answer because it destroys communities of color and the days following his attack. He had an encounter in Harlem that shook him up a young man on a bike stopped me. And said, you know, you that guy that professor guy, and I said, yeah, he said. Said well cumin the young man said he was sorry about the attack. But it also meant he was now a target of police. He's like Dino that if you're a young black man that has a bike. We're being pulled into vans for questioning about whether we attacked you. It sucks. What happened to you? But it sucks that this happens to increasingly what people like sing want is restored of Justice because imprisonment is seen by many as a sort of violence itself that compounds the initial act of violence violence against both individuals and communities. Gabriel Burton hill is black and works at the restorative center. In Newburgh, New York, she says African Americans are on the receiving end of generations of neglect and racism, and sometimes manifests resentment toward others, including Jewish communities. This is not how I feel but once a group of people think that it's okay to mistreat another group of people. It's just a matter of time before that thought process breads about and in cases, where bigotry or even violence does occur supporters of restorative Justice. Ask what if he offender the person responsible for the act of hate was confronted with dialogue instead of a prison? Fill alternately what if the community got involved in the early nineteen nineties residents of billings, Montana responded to a series of anti-semitic attacks in a novel way. Everyone displayed minora in their windows to show solidarity with the victims on the Brian Lehrer show one advocate of restorative Justice. Danielle Sarid acknowledged that some survivors violent crime may not be interested in restorative Justice. But I believe that option deserves to be on the table for survivors survivors should have a pathway not just to ratchet bution, but also to repair there's still much data about restorative Justice. Whether it really works who was designed for. But for seeing it's the choice. He didn't have in twenty thirteen after his attack. Police arrested one man Christian Morales and charged him with second degree aggravated harassment as a hate crime scene. Doesn't know what happened after that? He didn't want anything to do with the process, but according to the Manhattan DA Morales was sentenced to. A year in jail. It's very very important for adjust and merciful society to build restorative paths. When things go wrong, and I think it's really tough. When you don't see those options, the idea that people of color, commit hate crimes is a messy subject some people. We reached out to didn't want to go on the record about this. But at a time when hate crimes are on the rise. A lot of people are looking for new solutions for the victims. And the accused a Rune Van Gogh Paul WNYC news. We'd like to hear your solutions for dealing with hate. You can tweet at WNYC. You can also join the conversation with a Rune vantage Paul reporter, Matt Katz on the Brian Lehrer show later on this morning at ten WNYC's. Supporters include Dada films, presenting William when two scientists experiment with cloning the limits of nature versus nurture are put to the test by.

assault Brian Lehrer WNYC Christian Morales FBI crown heights Rabbi Abraham Cooper Rune Van Gogh Gabriel Burton hill Hitler Simon Wiesenthal Center billings Montana Harlem Forest Hills Danielle Sarid Dino Manhattan Newburgh professor
"danielle sarid" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"danielle sarid" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And six pallbearers carried him out for dead. Downland avenue that long Blackhurst. Sped was something about the indifference that was represented in the poem. But it just came to mind flitted in and out sings attack took place in twenty thirteen. He's been revisiting that night. Because of what's been in the news lately. One active hate after another an assault on a subway. Commuter leaves a woman with a broken spine because she was thought to be a lesbian and identifiable Jewish man in crown heights. Who's punched in the chest by man who just walks away swastika scrawled on a school playground. Also terms including hail Hitler and no Jews allowed risque alleged perpetrators of these incidents where people of color as we're seeing attackers. These aren't isolated examples. We know that communities of color and other marginalized groups are on the receiving end of hate, but people of color commit hate crimes to this is borne out by FBI data year after year in twenty seventeen for example, twenty one percent of Hake. Crime offenders were black although they make up thirteen percent of the population. The challenges can we confront this form of bigotry without further inflaming racial tensions in November two Latino teens were arrested following a violent attack on a young orthodox Jewish man in Forest Hills afterward, Nora Gomez, Strauss saw the response from neighbors descend into name calling. And then they started referencing as animals and saying, you know, these animals coming. From other neighborhoods to our place, and it was a pretty coated or uncoated way to say that these were kids of color coming in and doing this. The question is what if anything do we do differently when people of color are accused of hateful acts, the color of the skin the religion, the ethnic background of the alleged perpetrator should have nothing to do with how the thirties, and now the majors respond and cry Rabbi Abraham Cooper works the Simon Wiesenthal Center, and he spends a lot of time confronting hate. If you commit a crime, you have to be held accountable by you Sidey and part of that usually means you're gonna do jail toy. But this thinking is exactly we're seeing has resisted since the night of his brutal assault his attackers. Didn't just hurt him. He says they also went after a Somali woman a new immigrant threw a bottle filled with urine at her face and cut her nose. Sings jaw was broken when he was attacked. And yet even he thinks the criminal Justice system is not the answer because it destroys communities of color in the days following his attack. He had an encounter in Harlem that shook him up a young man on a bike stopped me and said that guy de professor guy, and I said, yeah, he said well cumin the young man said he was sorry about the attack. But it also meant he was now a target of police. He's like, do you know that if you're a young black man that has a bike? We're being pulled into vans for questioning about whether we attacked you. And he's like, it sucks. What happened to you? But it sucks that this happens to increasingly what people like sing want is restored of Justice because imprisonment is seen by many as a sort of violence itself that compounds the initial act of violence violence against both individuals and communities. Gabriel Burton hill is black. And works at the restorative century. In Newburgh, New York. She says African Americans are on the receiving end of generations of neglect and racism, and sometimes manifests resentment toward others, including Jewish communities. This is not how I feel but once a group of people think that it's okay to mistreat another group of people. It's just a matter of time before that thought process breads about in cases, were bigotry or even violence does occur. Supporters of restorative Justice. Ask what if the offender the person responsible for the act of hate was confronted with dialogue instead of a prison cell alternately? Would if the community got involved in the early nineteen nineties residents of billings, Montana responded to a series of anti-semitic attacks in a novel way. Everyone displayed minora in their windows to show solidarity with the victims on the Brian Lehrer show one advocate of restorative Justice. Danielle Sarid acknowledged that some survivors of violent crime. May not be interested in restorative Justice. But I believe that option deserves to be on the table for survivors survivors should have a pathway not just to wrench of you. But also to repair there's still no much data about restorative Justice. Whether it really works who was designed for. But for seeing it's the choice. He didn't have in twenty thirteen after his attack. Police arrested one man Christian Morales and charged him with second degree aggravated harassment as a hate crime scene. Doesn't know what happened after that? He didn't want anything to do with the process, but according to Manhattan DA Morales was sentenced to a year in jail. It's very very important for adjust and merciful society to build restorative pass. When things go wrong, and I think it's really tough. When you don't see those options, the idea that people of color, commit hate crimes is a messy subject some people. We reached out to didn't want to go on the record about this. But at a time. When hate crimes are on the rise..

assault Christian Morales Sped FBI Rabbi Abraham Cooper Gabriel Burton hill Simon Wiesenthal Center crown heights Manhattan Hitler Newburgh billings Brian Lehrer Forest Hills Danielle Sarid Harlem Nora Gomez New York Montana
"danielle sarid" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

11:38 min | 1 year ago

"danielle sarid" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"I'm Amy Goodman with near main shea, we end today's show with criminal Justice reform and the fight to end mass incarceration. Criminal Justice reform has gained momentum in recent years with twenty twenty democratic presidential candidates vowing to take on the issue and a number of states across the country tattling everything from cash bail to sentencing reform, but these efforts have focused almost entirely on non violent drug offenses while sidestepping the problem at the core of what? Michelle Alexander calls, America's addiction to incarceration violence. A staggering two point two million. People are locked up in America sprawling prison system and more than half of those currently confined and state prisons have been convicted of violent crime in order to cut the prison population in half and transform criminal Justice in this country. Our next guest argues that reformers must reckon with violent crime. And come up with radically new ways to address it. Danielle Sarid lays out a path for this transformation in her new unflinching book, titled until we reckon Sarid has spent nearly a decade working directly with people who have committed violent acts and survivors of violence as the executive director of common Justice, a Brooklyn based organization that offers alternatives to incarceration for people charged with violent felonies, her experience anchors her book is she calls for a complete overhaul of the way, we've been taught to think about crime punishment and Justice. She also challenges the notion that pre prisons keep us safe revealing. Instead, how incarceration perpetuates the very violence. It's meant to curb Danielle, Sarah and writes in her new book, if incarceration work to secure safety. We would be the safest nation in all of human history. We would not be a nation where by the most conservative estimates available every year nearly three thousand. And young men of color are murdered before their twenty fifth birthday where than fifty seven thousand children survived sexual violence, nearly half a million women are beaten in their relationships. Nearly three million men are robbed or assaulted countless transgender people are killed for who they are where every year we bury our own children gunned down in our own streets. She goes on to write just as we ask people who cause in personal violence to reckon with their actions. So should we as a society? Call ourselves to reckon to until we do. So no different future will be possible. Danielle Sarah is the executive director of common Justice. It's the first program of its kind in the country. Welcome to democracy. Now. It's great to have you with us. Thank you for having me. So talk about what we must reckon with. So there's no path to ending mass incarceration that doesn't include addressing violence. That's partly because as you said more than half of people in this country are incarcerated for crimes of violence. But it's also because our national addiction to prison is based in a story about some imagined monstrous other somebody who is not quite human the way we are. From whom we have to be protected at any cost. It's that image of somebody that has been racialist in this country since our very beginnings that animates us to choose prisoner for schools prison over hospitals prison over basic infrastructure. And until we tackle that central narrative. The possibility of actually ending mass incarceration in our lifetime. Won't be within reach. What about that distinction between violent and nonviolent crimes? So I think our honestly it is. People who have advocated for reform who's made that distinction most central many people who experience violence know that their relatives who struggles with addiction and their relative who gets in fights at a family barbecue are the same relative that distinction has been considered politically expedient and in many ways for some of the shorter terms wins at has been the problem is that sets up a barrier to us doing what has to come next. But the other problem is that if you asked crime survivors, what types of crimes that was most important that we get right? They wouldn't say petty theft, and they wouldn't even say drug possession. They would say crimes of violence. And the problem is the prison not only fails to keep them safe. It actually creates more danger. I wanna ask Daniel how you came to this position. I mean, you start your book with the very striking couple of sentences, which I'll just read as a teenager, you right sleeping on a friend's couch. I woke up one night to the sound of the book. Blitz stopping. There was a time once when I would have awakened to them starting, but that was long before before the level of violence in Chicago went through the roof before the crack epidemic before mass incarceration. So could you talk about how you came to see the importance of the question of violent crime as against non violent crime and incarceration. Absolutely. So when I grew up in Chicago came of age at the same time mass incarceration really began to gain its Holt in this country, and we saw people go away and come home worse for it. I think that's largely because the thing prison targets most squarely as the thing in me that hurts when you suffer. There are people who are incarcerated who are capable of keeping that intact that the system is designed in every single way to undermine it. So when people came home worse for having been away. We didn't think about it in some abstract notion of recidivism, we experienced. That is harm within our own neighborhood worse in what sense? Would you say? I think people had trauma hurts people isolation hurts people. And so I'm in the business of ending violence. And we know the four core drivers of violence are shame isolation exposure to violence and an inability to meet one's economic needs. The four core features of prison. Our shame isolation exposure to violence and an inability to meet one's economic needs. And so we have baked into our central response to violence in this country. Precisely the things that we know generated. It's reliable in doing. So it's why study after study will find Krizan house was called a criminal genetic effect, which means that not only fails to reduce recidivism. It increases the likelihood that someone will cause both more and greater harm going forward. So what is the alternative at common Justice? We offer one of them. And of course, the real answer to displacing. Mass incarceration will require many in common Justice. We bring together. Are people who've committed serious violence with the consent of the people they've harmed into a dialogue process after extensive preparation in that process. They acknowledge the harm done to the survivor. They reach agreements about what the responsible person can do to make things as right as possible. If the responsible person fulfills, those agreements and continues through our violence intervention curriculum for the year following that dialogue. They don't don't go to prison and the felony charges against them or dismissed and in the meantime, we work with survivors of their crimes to help them come through what happened to them and in their lives, generally, what is the violence intervention program. I mean, what do they would they go through? So the core of what they do is mostly consumed by acting on the agreements the commitments they've made to those they hurt. So that that may include restitution community service getting work getting clean talking to other young people in their neighborhood any number of things. Rapist, we don't work with sexual violence, a common Justice others. Do we don't do that. Because we think these processes are inapplicable to them we do it because we understand that sexual violence is distinct from the kind of street violence that we address the violence intervention program with us the part of their work that actually happens in our office requires people to reflect on the values beliefs experiences, an expectation that drove their decision to commit harm in the first place. We don't believe that people are just sort of trauma machines who take it in and put it back out violence is a choice people make and given a context in which to actually examine the underlying drivers of that choice. People can choose to behave differently. Well, can you explain a Daniel? If there any precedents are examples of the kind of restorative Justice that you are advocating so restorative Justice. Practices are thousands of years old. They're actually far older than the court systems that we think that they're the innovative intervention to try. Transform restorative practices. Have their roots in native communities in this country and other indigenous communities across the world. And so since time immemorial when communities have dealt with people who belong to them who are members of their community who commit acts that they know to be wrong. They look for courses of actions that will not only change that behavior, but we'll keep that community hole. And so there are programs around the country that apply restorative Justice to lower level crimes than those. We address that apply restorative Justice with younger people in the juvenile system. Even with serious crimes common. Justice is the first to apply these practices as a diversion from the criminal Justice system that it is anything but new compared to restorative Justice. The criminal Justice system is like a little toddler on its grandmother's lap. I wanted to read a quote, if Michelle Alexander, the scholar civil rights lawyer and the author of the new Jim crow, she wrote in her New York Times column about Michelle. Dell. Sarah's book she said our criminal injustice system, lets people off the hook as they aren't obligated to answer the victims questions, listen to them honor their pain expressed genuine remorse or do what they can to repair the harm. They've done. They're not required to take steps to heal themselves or address their own trauma. So they're less likely to harm others in the future. The only thing prison requires to set people stay in their cages and somehow endure the isolation and violence of captivity prison deprives everyone concerned victims and those who have caused harm as well as impacted families and communities the opportunity to heal honor their own humanity, and to break cycles of violence that have destroyed far too many lives, you use examples in your book, Michelle, Sarah, those are the words have Michelle Alexander recommending until we reckon Danielle Danielle Sarid. Give us some of the examples. I think one of the most powerful ones early on as I said earlier that we only take cases into the project if the victims of the kind consent, it's important to remember fewer than half of victims. Call the police in the first place another half, don't even make it past grand juries. So that means that the victims who remain in the system following indictment are the ones with the greatest appetite for incarceration. These are the victims we ask whether they want to see the person who hurt them go to prison or come to common Justice early. In our experience, we were talking to a mother who's fourteen year old son had been robbed and beaten the young man who caused this harm to him was facing at least three years in prison. And I was having a conversation with that mother about whether he should go to prison or common Justice. And she said to me when this young man, I hurt my child. I I wanted him to burn death. And then I wanted him to drown to death. And then I realized as a mother I don't want either of those things. I want him to drown in a river of fire. And she said, but the truth is three years from now my nine year old boy will be and he'll be going to and from school to and from.

common Justice Danielle Danielle Sarid Danielle Sarah Michelle Alexander executive director Michelle Daniel America Amy Goodman Chicago Dell Brooklyn Krizan theft drug possession New York Times Jim crow three years fourteen year