7 Burst results for "Danielle Kaplan"

"danielle kaplan" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

05:21 min | 5 months ago

"danielle kaplan" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"To local charities and now can't can't even give them the money you know when a local charity says. Hey we've got somebody who's giving us a million dollars. They plan that they're going to get that million dollars now. All of a sudden they can't get that million dollars. Don't don't sell me on. Oh he's just so charitable and he's becoming such a member of the community. I need details. I don't need just lines. And i was really surprised at the athletic was so not detailed about it and wrote such a fluff piece for these guys. So yes as someone who is and i will admit it salty in scorned about your favorite. Nfl team moving from your city. I got it. it's okay i can. I can accept that. But when you're in a city for fifty years and you own that city and then all of a sudden because you don't have the cash to contribute and you're expecting the public to buy you a football stadium and then you go up to la where you're like the twelfth member of the local sports community and you're playing in somebody else's stadium don't sell me on living the dream. That's a bunch of nonsense. I thought it was all fluff. Come on athletic. Do better man. I mean you're literally ripping them for charity because they have details in. Yeah that's right. George because you know what to say that they're just that they're giving a lot of money to charity really. Can you substantiate that statement because the sister is trying to get the the brother to sell the team because he's committed all these dollars to charities and now can't provide the charities with dollars now that's that's in court documents. So i mean to say to say that i'm ripping them for being charitable giving them for channel ripping the writer for not giving any details. These are throw away lines. And look i got it. I got it i'm scorned. i'm salty. The i told everybody when when the chargers moved from san diego to l. a. The number one thing you could do to be an anti charger. Fan is to become a rams fan because both teams will battle for the same dollars in town. They'll battle for corporate dollars they'll battle for season ticket dollars etc et cetera. So the way to be an anti charger fan is to be a pro rams fan so salty to be sure i got. I think you're a hater. I hate or like she's a history. You admit it. That's fine lebron. Who are hater on. The broader issue are getting into that congress. You're sound like a hater go hater. I'm a big old hater. That's right that's right so bad. Hey laura listen if the if your favorite team moved out of your city. You'd probably be a hater to fix it because it hasn't happened in a lakers. Are here the dodgers. Here's right and they're also not true. Because the raiders have left me twice. So but when you say the raiders left you twice. You know the raiders. The oakland raiders. They came down to la. They went back to oakland now. They've gone to vegas. But you live in la so you. You're a raider fan from afar. You're not a raider fan from hometown. You don't think you don't think a lot of was when they were here. I was still a raider fan. And now everybody that is raider fans here in la which there are a lot of they are all raider fans. Despite the fact that they went back to oakland despite the fact that they went to las vegas. It has just because they leave. Your little town of san diego doesn't mean you stop being fans of them so that was dripping condescension and so good so good. Let me tell you something. When you're you're on fire today other than working the phones you're having a good day the phone Poor guy paul. You screwed him that. You've been good to listen. You guys got understand though. The the reason is is because i was in the middle of all of that i saw it all go down and it was nasty and it was ugly and it was all a bunch of nonsense and be asked was all just for listen. The way that franchise literally like all over it city the terrible terrible things that they lead did screw them. There's no no you're right. They did screw them. You know and then to say they're living the dream. Why because stan kroenke built a six billion dollar super stadium. They're living the dream. Because on sundays they get the decorate. Like as if it's there's so listen. I just thought that the athletic piece yesterday was was missing a tremendous amount of detail. It was very fluffy. And that's what you do. I mean you go out and you recruit now like the comedian. Fluffy is what you're saying. No doubt no it was a fluff piece. Okay what i'm sarah enough. Who's the writer. Call him out kaplan good. Do you have see style call. No no no no hold on hold on you wanna know the name of the writer this. The sports radio call out. It's actually very funny. The name of the writer is daniel kaplan ohio. So my brother. My man or danielle kaplan my girl. I don't know but the writers name was capital. Okay fair enough coming down to miss a detail like that girlfriend. Come on yup. i coming up next. We've got everyone's favorite segment big deal or no deal every day at six thirty all right there. We go big year. No deal speaking of big deals too big deal for you to call the right attorney when you're injured in an accident. Call my friends. Salmon acid nash. July eight hundred three or four two thousand eight hundred three..

la raiders rams san diego oakland Nfl chargers football lebron oakland raiders George dodgers stan kroenke lakers laura congress vegas las vegas daniel kaplan
"danielle kaplan" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"danielle kaplan" Discussed on KCRW

"Night from any of the local valleys and mountains and a warning for the local desserts. Highs today, ranging from the seventies of the deep leeches triple digits in pin from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. It's not something he could do. But the mere suggestion by President Trump about changing the election date is causing extreme concern. He tweeted quote, delay the election until people can properly securely and safely vote, followed by three question marks. Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell dismissed the idea in an interview with W N k y 40 never in the history of the country through wars, depressions. And the Civil war, and we ever not had a federally scheduled election on time, and we'll find a way to do that again this November 3rd, we're going to talk about Republican reaction to the president's suggestion with Sarah Longwell, She's the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Morning, Sarah, thanks for being back in the show. Thank you for having me. I'm going to read the president's entire tweet and then ask you about it, he says, quote with Universal mail in voting parentheses, not absentee voting, which is good. 2020 will be the most inaccurate and fraudulent election in history on then he goes on to suggest that delay that we talked about you have said everything in his tweet is a lie. Walk us through that. Well, first of all, like you, said Trump cannot change the date of the election. The date of the election is constitutionally mandated and ultimately under the purview of Congress. But the you know The bigger issue is is honestly the vote by mail in the fraud. I mean, I really think there's two things going on here in terms of why, Trump said. This tweet. The first is that the president is trying to change the subject away from Yesterday's historically bad GDP numbers, which came out, you know, just shortly, and coincidentally before his tweet, Um and there are plenty of other stories that he wants to distract from it the moment whether it's the Russian bounties or his bad polling, etcetera, the president always had kind of Ah, low cunning. When it comes to understanding how to control narratives. So this looks like a classic case of calculated misdirection. But the bigger goal I think is about generally sewing. His trust in the outcome of the election and laying the potential groundwork toe either dispute the results or claim it was rigged so that he could be perpetually aggrieved if he loses. We saw the president do this in 2016 on DH, You know, he really only has a few plays in his playbook, and he tends to run them over and over again, But I think that it's you know, everybody sort of reacted to the idea. That he was talking about delaying the election. But I think what's most concerning is just this general tryingto undermine you no confidence in the upcoming election because that is that's scary at a time when the election is going to look different to people because we're in the midst of a pandemic because there'll be so many mail in ballots. Well, let me ask you about Republican response. When we played that McConnell clip. We also heard Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas say, Hey, this is just the president troll in the press. But yesterday, the co founder of the Federalist Society, Steven Calabresi, wrote this op ed in The New York Times saying that this is grounds for immediate impeachment and Calabresi as someone who has supported Trump. Ah lot in the past. Yeah, you know, While there were no profiles in courage from the Senate Republicans who should have issued clear, thorough repudiation Sze of his comment. The one real bright spot was that the founder of the Federalist Society came out and just in no uncertain terms condemned this called it Fascist, said that the president It would be warranted for him to be impeached again. That is strong language, and I think that sends a really strong message to the conservative legal community that nobody should be defending this kind of behavior and that the highest levels of sort of conservative Legal ethics would not agree with anybody defending this. Sarah Longwell, the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Thank you very much, Sarah. We appreciate it. Thanks for having me. Just a few months ago, college seniors could reasonably expect to graduate into one of the best job markets in history. Now because of the pandemic, they've graduated into one of the worst in generations, when members of the class of 2020 half landed jobs. The experience is Hot. NPR's Orry Berliner reports, 2020 was shaping up to be a great year for golden DACA. He'd be the first member of his family to graduate from college. Not only that he was the valedictorian of his school, Morehouse College in Atlanta. But in March, campus emptied and classes went online. And then the moment he'd been waiting for commencement. It was postpone. I wanted to, you know, give a huge speech on stage with my family, friends and loved ones who made it very, very possible for me to go to Morehouse, but it was, you know, came to an abrupt and he'd been expecting rites of passage and celebration. Instead, he landed in the pandemic. It's been a really difficult transition, you know, and it's been one that's American allies itself with a lot of anxiety. A lot of Unsorted mea lot of stuff doubt. Worst of all, his grandmother who was supposed to come see him graduate passed away in their native Zambia. Despite everything, there has been a bright spot. Tackle ended a paid fellowship with governor of Illinois after four rounds of remote interviews, so I'm more on the fortunate side. I know a lot of my classmates in other individuals across the nation are it is a very challenging time to be a new college graduate. Julia Pollack is a labor economist with the job site's IP recruiter, so compared with the labor market in February before covert hit We have seen job postings for the entry level positions most popular among new college graduates fall by 73%. But even though postings have plummeted, people are still landing jobs. So even in a crisis, there are companies hiring 18 million jobs have been posted on the recruiter since Koven struck. What has changed dramatically is how those new workers get hired. Interviews are evolving from those zoom and Skype calls and now to virtual video platforms where you record yourself answering the questions and then send that video in yourself. So you have no interaction with a person at all the lack of face to face human interaction. That's been one constant for Danielle Kaplan. She graduated this spring from the University of Iowa and moved in with her mom. It's been fine, but with a lot of activity around the house, it was tricky for her to find a quiet place for job interviews. So I feel like my interviewer seeing a different background every single time I met with them. Yeah, you know. It's very difficult, But as it turned out, backgrounds didn't matter. So I will be heading to Kansas City to work in a startup. And so I'm really excited about it. Kaplan's excitement is accompanied by trepidation because so much of the last few months have felt unreal, even disembodied. This is a huge major life transition that I'm about to undergo. And it doesn't feel that way. I've been virtually meeting people have virtually getting an apartment, so nothing feels like tangible to me. All that is about to change this weekend, captain. We'll load up a rental truck and moved to her new home town, Kansas City. There won't be anything virtual.

president President Trump Sarah Longwell Senate Mitch McConnell NPR Danielle Kaplan executive director Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Morehouse College Federalist Society Senator John Cornyn Kansas City Zambia Steven Calabresi fraud Congress
"danielle kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"danielle kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners of cake a day it's 7 34 It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. It's not something he could do. But the mere suggestion by President Trump about changing the election date is causing extreme concern. He tweeted quote, delay the election until people can properly securely and safely vote, followed by three question marks. Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell dismissed the idea in an interview with W N k y 40 never in the history of the country through wars, depressions. In the Civil war, and we ever not had a federally scheduled election on time, and we'll find a way to do that again. There's November 3rd, We're going to talk about Republican reaction to the president's suggestion with Sarah Longwell, She's the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Morning, Sarah. Thanks for being back in the show. Thank you for having me. I'm going to read the president's entire tweet and then ask you about it, he says, quote with Universal mail in voting parentheses, not absentee voting, which is good. 2020 will be the most inaccurate and fraudulent election in history on then he goes on to suggest that delay that we talked about you have said everything in his tweet is a lie. Walk us through that. Well, first of all, like you, said Trump cannot change the date of the election. The date of the election is constitutionally mandated and ultimately under the purview of Congress. But the you know The bigger issue is is honestly the vote by mail in the fraud. I mean, I really think there's two things going on here in terms of why, Trump said. This tweet the first Is that the president is trying to change the subject away from yesterday's historically bad GDP numbers, which came out you know, just shortly, and coincidentally before his tweet. On. There are plenty of other stories that he wants to distract from the moment whether it's the Russian bounties or his bad polling, etcetera president always had kind of Ah, a low cunning when it comes to understanding how to control Narrative's so this looks like a classic case of calculated misdirection. But the bigger goal I think is about generally sowing distrust in the outcome of the election and laying the potential ground work either dispute the results or claim it was rigged. So that he could be perpetually aggrieved. If he loses. We saw the president do this in 2016 on do you know he really only has a few plays in his playbook, and he tends to run them over and over again. I think that it's you know, everybody sort of reacted to the idea that Hay was talking about delaying the election. But I think what's most concerning is just this general tryingto undermine you no confidence in the upcoming election because that is that's scary at a time when the election is going to look different to people because we're in the midst of a pandemic because will be so many mail in ballots. Well, let me ask you about Republican response. When we played that McConnell clip. We also heard Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas say, Hey, this is just the president troll in the press. But yesterday, the co founder of the Federalist Society, Steven Calabresi, wrote this op ed in The New York Times saying that this is grounds for immediate impeachment and Calabresi as someone who has supported Trump. Ah lot in the past. Yeah, you know, While there were no profiles in courage from the Senate Republicans who should have issued clear, thorough repudiation Sze of his comment. The one real bright spot was that the founder of the Federalist Society came out and just in no uncertain terms condemned this called it Fascist, said that the president It would be warranted for him to be impeached again. That is strong language, and I think that sends a really strong message to the conservative legal community that nobody should be defending this kind of behavior and that the highest levels of sort of conservative Legal ethics would not agree with anybody defending this. Sarah Longwell, the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Thank you very much, Sarah. We appreciate it. Thanks for having me. Just a few months ago, college seniors could reasonably expect to graduate into one of the best job markets in history. Now because of the pandemic, they've graduated into one of the worst in generations, when members of the class of 2020 half landed jobs. The experience is Not NPR's Orry Berliner reports, 2020 was shaping up to be a great year for golden DACA. He'd be the first member of his family to graduate from college. Not only that he was the valedictorian of his school, Morehouse College in Atlanta. But in March, campus emptied and classes went online. And then the moment he'd been waiting for commencement. It was postpone. I wanted to give that huge speech on stage with my family, friends and loved ones who made it very, very possible from the Morehouse, but it was, you know, came to an abrupt and he'd been expecting rites of passage and celebration. Instead, he landed in the pandemic. It's been a really difficult transition, you know, and it's been one that's I'm not gonna live with a lot of anxiety, a lot of uncertainty, a lot of stuff doubt. Worst of all. His grandmother, who was supposed to come see him graduate passed away in their native Zambia. Despite everything there has been a bright spot tackle, ended a paid fellowship with the governor of Illinois after four rounds of remote interviews, So I'm more on the fortunate side and a lot of my classmates in other individuals across the nation are it is a very challenging time to be a new college graduate. Julia Pollack is a labor economist with the job site's IP recruiter, so compared with the labor market in February before covert hit We have seen job postings for the entry level positions most popular among new college graduates fall by 73%. But even though postings have plummeted, people are still landing jobs. So even in a crisis, there are companies hiring 18 million jobs have been posted on recruiter since Cove it struck. What has changed dramatically is how those new workers get hired. Interviews are evolving from those zoom and Skype calls and now to virtual video platforms where you record yourself on answering the questions and then send that video in yourself. So you have no interaction with a person at all the lack of face to face human interaction. That's been one constant for Danielle Kaplan. She graduated this spring from the University of Iowa and moved in with her mom. It's been fine, but with a lot of activity around the house, it was tricky for her to find a quiet place for job interviews. So I feel like my interviewer seeing a different background every single time I met with them. Yeah, you know, it's very difficult, but as it turned out backgrounds didn't matter, so I will be heading to Kansas City. To work in a startup. And so I'm really excited about it. Captain's excitement is accompanied by trepidation because so much of the last few months have felt unreal. Even disembodied. This is a huge major life transition that I'm about to undergo and it doesn't feel that way. I've been virtually meeting people have virtually getting an apartment, so nothing feels like tangible to me. All that is about to change this weekend, Captain blowed up a rental truck and move to our new home town. Kansas City. There won't be anything.

president President Trump Sarah Longwell Mitch McConnell Senate NPR News executive director Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Morehouse College Federalist Society Senator John Cornyn Zambia Steven Calabresi fraud Kansas City Congress Trump
"danielle kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:39 min | 1 year ago

"danielle kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You'II Day, It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. It's not something he could do. But the mere suggestion by President Trump about changing the election date is causing extreme concern. He tweeted quote, delay the election until people can properly securely and safely vote, followed by three question marks. Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell dismissed the idea in an interview with W N k y 40 never in the history of the country through wars, depressions. And the Civil war, and we ever not had a federally scheduled election on time, and we'll find a way to do that again this November 3rd, we're going to talk about Republican reaction to the president's suggestion with Sarah Longwell, She's the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Morning, Sarah. Thanks for being back in the show. Thank you for having me. I'm going to read the president's entire tweet and then ask you about it, he says, quote with Universal mail in voting parentheses, not absentee voting, which is good. 2020 will be the most inaccurate and fraudulent election in history on then he goes on to suggest that delay that we talked about you have said everything in his tweet is a lie. Walk us through that. Well, first of all, like you, said Trump cannot change the date of the election. The date of the election is constitutionally mandated and ultimately under the purview of Congress. But the you know the bigger issue is is honestly the vote by mail on the fraud. I mean, I really think there's two things going on here in terms of why, Trump said this tweet. The first is that the president is trying to change the subject away from Yesterday's historically bad GDP numbers, which came out, you know, just shortly, and coincidentally before his tweet on, there are plenty of other stories that he wants to distract from the moment whether it's the Russian bounties or his bad polling, etcetera, the president always had kind of Ah, low cunning. When it comes to understanding how to control narratives, So this looks like a classic case of calculated misdirection. But the bigger goal I think is about generally sowing distrust in the outcome of the election and laying the potential groundwork toe either dispute the results or claim it was rigged. So that he could be perpetually aggrieved. If he loses. We saw the president do this in 2016 on do you know he really only has a few plays in his playbook, and he tends to run them over and over again. But I think that it's you know, everybody sort of reacted to the idea that Hay was talking about delaying the election. But I think what's most concerning is just this general tryingto undermine confidence in the upcoming election because that is that's scary at a time when the election is going to look different to people because we're in the midst of a pandemic because there'd be so many mail in ballots. Well, let me ask you about Republican response. When we played that McConnell clip. We also heard Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas say, Hey, this is just the president troll in the press. But yesterday, the co founder of the Federalist Society, Steven Calabresi, wrote this op ed in The New York Times, saying that this is grounds for immediate impeachment and Calabresi as someone who has supported Trump a lot in the past. Yeah, you know, While there were no profiles in courage from the Senate Republicans who should have issued clear, thorough repudiation Sze of his comment. The one real bright spot was that the founder of the Federalist Society came out and just in no uncertain terms condemned this called it Fascist, said that the president It would be warranted for him to be impeached again. That is strong language, and I think that sends a really strong message to the conservative legal community that nobody should be defending this kind of behavior and that the highest levels of sort of conservative Legal ethics would not agree with anybody defending this. Sarah Longwell, the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Thank you very much, Sarah. We appreciate it. Thanks for having me. Just a few months ago, college seniors could reasonably expect to graduate into one of the best job markets in history. Now because of the pandemic, they've graduated into one of the worst in generations, when members of the class of 2020 half landed jobs. The experience is odd. NPR's orry Berliner reports, 2020 was shaping up to be a great year for gold in Dhaka. He'd be the first member of his family to graduate from college. Not only that he was the valedictorian of his school, Morehouse College in Atlanta, But in March, campus emptied and classes went online. And then the moment he'd been waiting for commencement. It was postpone. I wanted to give that huge speech on stage with my family, friends and loved ones who made it very, very possible for me to go out of our house. But it was, you know, came to an abrupt and he'd been expecting rites of passage and celebration. Instead, he landed in a pandemic. It's been a really difficult transition, you know, and it's been one that I'm not gonna live with a lot of anxiety. A lot of Unsorted mea lot of stuff doubt. Worst of all, his grandmother who was supposed to come see him graduate passed away in their native Zambia. Despite everything, there has been a bright spot. Tackle ended up aid fellowship with the governor of Illinois after four rounds of remote interviews, So I'm more on the fortunate side and a lot of my classmates in other individuals across the nation are it is a very challenging time to be a new college graduate to be a Pollack is a labor economist with the job site's IP recruiter, so compared with the labor market in February before covert hit We have seen job postings for the entry level positions most popular among new college graduates fall by 73%. But even though postings have plummeted, people are still landing jobs. So even in a crisis, their companies hiring 18 million jobs have been posted on ZIP recruiter since Koven struck. What has changed dramatically is how those new workers get hired. Interviews are evolving from those zoom and Skype calls and now to virtual video platforms where you record yourself answering the questions and then send that video in yourself. So you have no interaction with a person at all the lack of face to face human interaction. That's been one constant for Danielle Kaplan. She graduated this spring from the University of Iowa and moved in with her mom. It's been fine, but with a lot of activity around the house, it was tricky for her to find a quiet place for job interviews. So I feel like my interviewer seeing a different background every single time I met with, um yeah, you know. It's very difficult, but as it turned out, backgrounds didn't matter. So I will be heading to Kansas City to work in a startup. And so I'm really excited about it. Kaplan's excitement is accompanied by trepidation because so much of the last few months have felt unreal. Even disembodied. This is a huge major life transition that I'm about to undergo and it doesn't feel that way. I've been virtually meeting people have virtually getting an apartment, so nothing feels like tangible to me. All that is about to change this weekend, captain. We'll load up a rental truck and move to our new home town. Kansas City. There won't be anything virtual about it Berliner and pure While she's driving..

president President Trump Sarah Longwell Senate Mitch McConnell NPR News Danielle Kaplan executive director Steve Inskeep Kansas City Rachel Martin Federalist Society Senator John Cornyn Morehouse College Zambia Steven Calabresi fraud
"danielle kaplan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"danielle kaplan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. It's not something he could do. But the mere suggestion by President Trump about changing the election date is causing extreme concern. He tweeted quote, delay the election until people can properly securely and safely vote, followed by three question marks. Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell dismissed the idea in an interview with W N k y 40 never in the history of the country through wars, depressions. And the Civil war, and we ever not had a federally scheduled election on time, and we'll find a way to do that again this November 3rd, we're going to talk about Republican reaction to the president's suggestion with Sarah Longwell, She's the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Morning, Sarah, thanks for being back on the show. Thank you for having me. I'm going to read the president's entire tweet and then ask you about it, he says, quote with Universal mail in voting parentheses, not absentee voting, which is good. 2020 will be the most inaccurate and fraudulent election in history on then he goes on to suggest that delay that we talked about you have said everything in his tweet is a lie. Walk us through that. Well, first of all, like you, said Trump cannot change the date of the election. The date of the election is constitutionally mandated and ultimately under the purview of Congress. But the you know The bigger issue is is honestly the vote by mail in the fraud. I mean, I really think there's two things going on here in terms of why, Trump said. This tweet. The first is that the president is trying to change the subject away from Yesterday's historically bad GDP numbers, which came out, you know, just shortly, and coincidentally before his tweet, Um and there are plenty of other stories that he wants to distract from it the moment whether it's the Russian bounties or his bad polling, etcetera, the president always had kind of Ah, low cunning. When it comes to understanding how to control narratives. So this looks like a classic case of calculated Mr Action. But the bigger goal I think is about generally sowing distrust in the outcome of the election. And laying the potential groundwork toe either dispute the results or claim it was rigged so that he could be perpetually aggrieved. If he loses. We saw the president do this in 2016. Andi, you know, he really only has a few plays and his playbook and he tends to run them over and over again, But I think that it's you know, everybody sort of reacted to the idea. That he was talking about delaying the election. But I think what's most concerning is just this general tryingto undermine you no confidence in the upcoming election because that is that's scary at a time when the election is going to look different to people because we're in the midst of a pandemic because will be so many mail in ballots. Well, let me ask you about Republican response. I mean, we played that McConnell clip. We also heard Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas say, Hey, this is just the president Troll in the press. But yesterday, the co founder of the Federalist Society, Steven Calabresi, wrote this op ed in The New York Times saying that this is grounds for immediate impeachment and Calabresi as someone who has supported Trump. Ah lot in the past. Yeah, you know, While there were no profiles in courage from the Senate Republicans who should have issued clear, thorough repudiation Sze of his comment. The one real bright spot was that the founder of the Federalist Society came out and just in no uncertain terms condemned this called it Fascist, said that the president It would be warranted for him to be impeached again. That is strong language, and I think that sends a really strong message to the conservative legal community that nobody should be defending this kind of behavior and that the highest levels of sort of conservative. Ah legal ethics would not agree with anybody defending this. Sarah Longwell, the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Thank you very much, Sarah. We appreciate it. Thanks for having me. Just a few months ago, college seniors could reasonably expect to graduate into one of the best job markets in history. Now because of the pandemic, they've graduated into one of the worst in generations, when members of the class of 2020 have landed jobs. Thie experience is God. NPR's orry Berliner reports, 2020 was shaping up to be a great year for golden DACA. He'd be the first member of his family to graduate from college. Not only that he was the valedictorian of his school, Morehouse College in Atlanta. But in March, campus emptied and classes went online. And then the moment he'd been waiting for commencement. It was postpone. I wanted to, you know, get back, huge speech on stage with my family, friends and loved ones who made it very, very possible for me to go to my house. But it was, you know, came to an abrupt end, he'd been expecting rites of passage and celebration. Instead, he landed in the pandemic. It's been a really difficult transition, you know, and it's been one that's American allies and filled with a lot of anxiety, A lot of uncertainty, a lot of stuff doubt. Worst of all. His grandmother, who was supposed to come see him graduate passed away in their native Zambia. Despite everything, there has been a bright spot. Sacha landed a paid fellowship with governor of Illinois after four rounds of remote interviews, So I'm more on the fortunate to know a lot of my classmates in other individuals across the nation are it is a very challenging time to be a new college graduate to be a Pollack is a labor economist with the job site's IP recruiter, so compared with the labor market in February before covert hit We have seen job postings for the entry level positions most popular among new college graduates fall by 73%. But even though postings have plummeted, people are still landing jobs. So even in a crisis, there are companies hiring 18 million jobs have been posted on the recruiter since Koven struck. What has changed dramatically is how those new workers get hired. Interviews are evolving from those zoom and Skype calls and now to virtual video platforms where you record yourself on answering the questions and then send that video in yourself. So you have no interaction with a person at all the lack of face to face human interaction. That's been one constant for Danielle Kaplan. She graduated this spring from the University of Iowa and moved in with her mom. It's been fine, but with a lot of activity around the house, it was tricky for her to find a quiet place for job interviews. So I feel like my interviewer seeing a different background every single time I met with them. Yeah, you know. Is very difficult. But as it turned out, backgrounds didn't matter. So I will be heading to Kansas City to work in a startup. And so I'm really excited about it. Kaplan's excitement is accompanied by trepidation, because so much of the last few months have felt unreal. Even this embodied this is a huge major life transition that I'm about to undergo. It doesn't feel that way. I've been virtually meeting. People have virtually getting an apartment. So nothing feels like tangible to me. All that is about to change this weekend Captain load up a rental truck and moved to her new home town, Kansas City. There won't be anything virtual about it. Laurie Berliner and pure While she's driving..

president President Trump Sarah Longwell Senate Mitch McConnell Danielle Kaplan executive director Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Federalist Society Senator John Cornyn Morehouse College Zambia Steven Calabresi fraud Kansas City Laurie Berliner
"danielle kaplan" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"danielle kaplan" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR nears. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. It's not something he could do. But the mere suggestion by President Trump about changing the election date is causing extreme concern. He tweeted quote, delay the election until people can properly securely and safely vote, followed by three question marks. Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell dismissed the idea in an interview with W N k y 40 never in the history of the country through wars, depressions. And the Civil War. We ever not had a federally scheduled election on time, and we'll find a way to do that again this November 3rd, we're going to talk about Republican reaction to the president's suggestion with Sarah Longwell, She's the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Morning, Sarah, thanks for being back on the show. Thank you for having me. I'm going to read the president's entire tweet and then ask you about it, he says, quote with Universal mail in voting parentheses, not absentee voting, which is good. 2020 will be the most inaccurate and fraudulent election in history on then he goes on to suggest that delay that we talked about you have said everything in his tweet is a lie. Walk us through that. Well, first of all, like you, said Trump cannot change the date of the election. The date of the election is constitutionally mandated and ultimately under the purview of Congress. But the you know The bigger issue is is honestly the vote by mail in the fraud. I mean, I really think there's two things going on here in terms of why, Trump said. This tweet. The first is that the president is trying to change the subject away from Yesterday's historically bad GDP numbers, which came out, you know, just shortly, and coincidentally before his tweet, Um and there are plenty of other stories that he wants to distract from it the moment whether it's the Russian bounties or his bad polling, etcetera, the president always had kind of Ah, low cunning. When it comes to understanding how to control narratives. So this looks like a classic case of calculated misdirection. But the bigger goal I think is about generally sowing distrust in the outcome of the election. And laying the potential groundwork toe. Either dispute the results or claim it was rigged so that he could be, you know, perpetually aggrieved If he loses, we saw the president do this in 2016. Andi, you know, he really only has a few plays and his playbook and he tends to run them over and over again, But I think that it's you know, everybody sort of reacted to the idea. That he was talking about delaying the election. But I think what's most concerning is just this general tryingto undermine you no confidence in the upcoming election because that is that's scary at a time when the election is going to look different to people because we're in the midst of a pandemic, because there'd be so many mail in ballots. Well, let me ask you about Republican response. I mean, we played that McConnell clip. We also heard Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas say, Hey, this is just the president troll in the press. But yesterday, the co founder of the Federalist Society, Steven Calabresi, wrote this op ed in The New York Times saying that this is grounds for immediate impeachment and Calabresi as someone who has supported Trump. Ah lot in the past. Yeah, you know, While there were no profiles in courage from the Senate Republicans who should have issued clear, thorough repudiation Sze of his comment. The one real bright spot was that the founder of the Federalist Society came out and just in no uncertain terms condemned this called it Fascist, said that the president It would be warranted for him to be impeached again. That is strong language, and I think that sends a really strong message to the conservative legal community that nobody should be defending this kind of behavior and that the highest levels of sort of conservative Legal ethics would not agree with anybody defending this. Sarah Longwell, the executive director of Republicans for the rule of law. Thank you very much, Sarah. We appreciate it. Thanks for having me. Just a few months ago, college seniors could reasonably expect to graduate into one of the best job markets in history. Now because of the pandemic, they've graduated into one of the worst in generations, when members of the class of 2020 have landed jobs. The experience is Lot. NPR's orry Berliner reports, 2020 was shaping up to be a great year for Golden DACA. He'd be the first member of his family to graduate from college. Not only that he was the valedictorian of his school, Morehouse College in Atlanta. But in March, campus emptied and classes went online, and then the moment he'd been waiting for commencement. It was postpone. I wanted to, you know, get back. You'd speech on stage with my family, friends and loved ones who made it very, very possible for me to go out of our house. But it was, you know, came to an abrupt and he'd been expecting rites of passage and celebration. Instead, he landed in the pandemic. It's been a really difficult transition, you know, and it's been one that's not gonna live with a lot of anxiety. A lot of Uncertainty, a lot of self doubt. Worst of all, his grandmother, who was supposed to come see him graduate passed away in their native Zambia. Despite everything, there has been a bright spot, Doc landed a paid fellowship with governor of Illinois after four rounds of remote interviews, So I'm more on the fortunate side and a lot of my classmates in other individuals across the nation are it is a very challenging time to be a new college graduate. Julia Pollack is a labor economist with the job site's IP recruiter, so compared with the labor market in February before covert hit We have seen job postings for the entry level positions most popular among new college graduates fall by 73%. But even though postings have plummeted, people are still landing jobs. So even in a crisis, there are companies hiring 18 million jobs have been posted on ZIP recruiter since Koven struck. What has changed dramatically is how those new workers get hired. Interviews are evolving from those zoom and Skype calls and now to virtual video platforms where you record yourself answering the questions and then send that video in yourself. So you have no interaction with a person at all the lack of face to face human interaction. That's been one constant for Danielle Kaplan. She graduated this spring from the University of Iowa and moved in with her mom. It's been fine, but with a lot of activity around the house, it was tricky for her to find a quiet place for job interviews. So I feel like my interviewer seeing a different background every single time I met with them. Yeah, you know. Is very difficult. But as it turned out, backgrounds didn't matter. So I will be heading to Kansas City to work in a startup. And so I'm really excited about it. Kaplan's excitement is accompanied by trepidation, because so much of the last few months have felt on Rio, even disembodied. This is a huge major life transition that I'm about to undergo. And it doesn't feel that way. I've been virtually meeting people have virtually getting an apartment, so nothing feels like tangible to me. All that is about to change this weekend, captain. We'll load up a rental truck and moved to her new home town, Kansas City. There won't be anything virtual about it. Laurie Berliner and pure While she's.

president President Trump Sarah Longwell Senate Mitch McConnell NPR executive director Danielle Kaplan Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Federalist Society Senator John Cornyn Morehouse College Zambia Steven Calabresi fraud Kansas City Laurie Berliner
Members Of The Class Of 2020 Face A Brutal Job Market

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:21 min | 1 year ago

Members Of The Class Of 2020 Face A Brutal Job Market

"Just. A few months ago college seniors could reasonably expect to graduate into one of the best job markets in history. Now, because of the pandemic, they've graduated into one of the worst generations when members of the class of twenty twenty half landed jobs, the experience is odd NPR's Berlin reports. Twenty twenty was shaping up to be a great year for Golden. DACA, he be the first member of his family to graduate from college not only that he was the Valedictorian of his school. Morehouse College. ATLANTA. But in March, campus emptied and classes went online and then the moment he'd been waiting for commencement it was postponed I wanted to give that huge speech onstage with my family friends and loved ones who made it very possible for me to go to it came to an abrupt end been expecting rites of passage and celebration. Instead he landed in the pandemic, it's been a really difficult transition you know and it's been one that's a mocking allies with. A lot of uncertainty. A lot of self doubt. Worst of all, his grandmother who was supposed to come see him graduate passed away in their native. Zambia. Despite everything, there has been a bright spot dako landed a paid fellowship with the governor of Illinois after four rounds of remote interviews. So I'm more on the fortunate side and a lot of my classmates in other individuals across the nation are is a very challenging time to be a new college graduate through pollock is a Labor economist with the job sites Ziprecruiter. So compared with fee labor market in February before covert hit, we have seen job postings for the entry level positions most popular among new college graduates fall by seventy three percent. But even though postings have plummeted, people are still landing jobs. So even in a crisis, there are companies hiring eighteen million jobs have been posted. On ziprecruiter since covert struck, what has changed dramatically is how those new workers get hired interviews or evolving from those zoom skype calls and now to virtual video platforms where you record yourself answering the questions and then send that video in yourself. So you have no interaction with a person that all the lack of face to face human interaction that's been one constant for Danielle Kaplan she graduated this spring from the University of Iowa, and moved in with her mom it's been fine. But with a lot of activity around the house, it was tricky for her to find a quiet place for job interviews. So I, feel like my interviewer singing a different background, every single time with them. You know this is a very difficult, but as it turned out, backgrounds didn't matter. So I will be heading to Kansas City to work at a startup in. So I'm really excited about it. Kaplan's excitement is accompanied by trepidation because so much of the last few months felt unreal even disembodied. This is a huge major life transition that I'm about to undergo and it doesn't feel that way. I've been virtually meeting people. Virtually getting an apartment. So nothing feels like tangible to me all that is about to change this weekend. Kaplan will load up a rental truck and moved to a new hometown. Kansas. City. There won't be anything virtual about it. Berliner NPR news.

Danielle Kaplan Morehouse College Kansas City Twenty Twenty NPR Zambia Berlin Berliner Npr Atlanta Labor Economist Illinois Kansas Pollock University Of Iowa