19 Burst results for "Danielle Benton"

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners and members of KQED Public Radio 88.5 FM in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. Good morning. The time now is a 22. It's morning edition on KQED. I'm Brian what David Perlman was the kind of journalist who had newspaper ink in his veins. He was the oldest known working newspaper Man when he retired from the San Francisco Chronicle three years ago at age 98 with a career that spanned most of the last century, and the start of this one. He covered the most significant scientific advancements of our time. This year we lost him. Danielle Benton of the cake, You beady science team brings us this remembrance. Dave Pearlman passed away in June age 101, but the legendary newspaper Man is still winning awards This month, Perlman received the posthumous Mark Twain Award for journalistic Excellence from the California Press Foundation Day was a newspaper man. And so was Mark. Quite long time colleague and fellow science writer Charlie Pettitte presented the award to promise Family. Twain might be more famous. But Pettitte honors the man who made newspapers his life's Passion Day stuff like a barnacle to report him. Well, Twain was all over the place prom and never wanted to do anything else and in this 2014 interview, says, it's a great trade. Really. You're doing good. You're helping to inform the public about Whatever issue Yeah, I love being a reporter. And I think anybody winters journalism is gonna have a good time. He just wrote with a passion. Terry Robinson was promised last editor at the Chronicle, working with him for 12 years, he says Perlman turned complex science into compelling stories. But at the same time, he was very Meticulous and I learned very early. Don't mess with his precision to make something ho snappier. A total eclipse of the sun will turn day into night. Across a narrow swath of the U. S this month. When the full moon moves to block the sun's face. That was the lead to Perlman's final story. August 5th 2017, and he wrote it. Has brilliantly and as flawlessly as any of the other eclipses that he wrote about And solar eclipses are fairly rare, but not in Jerry. She was Steve Rubenstein was a colleague and friend, and he was a paragon. The ideal is shot for there wasn't anybody better at the craft, and he was even before Rubenstein first walked into the Chronicle newsroom in 1976. He admired Dave Perlman. Then I was 20 something, and Dave was already a legend. It was just an honor to sit in the same room with them and then to find myself. The next morning, my story wrapped up in the same chronicle with the same rubber band. It is story was wrapped up, Rubenstein says. Folks in the newsroom genuinely loved Perlman. Called him affectionately. Dr..

David Perlman Mark Twain Steve Rubenstein KQED San Francisco Chronicle Charlie Pettitte Dave Pearlman Chronicle San Francisco Sacramento Terry Robinson Danielle Benton reporter California Press Foundation writer Jerry Dave editor
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Your phone shares information about where you go on how long you're there. Whenever you leave the house and self interest are restaurants, jeans, grocery stores, places of worship. This data is anonymous ized and used by researchers like you're a less Kovic, Stanford computer scientist. He and others recently modeled how people's outings drove the course of the epidemic in the 10 biggest US metropolitan areas. When New York you had a huge spike and people state a common dividers die down. Philadelphia, San Francisco was up and then kind of flat. Researchers could also infer which types of locations were responsible for the most transmissions. Before there were widespread health safety precautions. There is a very small number off places about let's say 10%, where 85% of full infections happened. Indoors. Sit down. Restaurants, cafes and gyms are the top three. Crowded businesses also increased risk there, especially a problem in low income neighborhoods. And you found out that even a trip to a grocery store is twice as 3 FT. For an individual from a low income neighborhood versus individual from high income neighborhood. Residents of poor neighborhoods are also more likely to work, low wage service jobs that can't be done online. One of the big achievements of this study is to highlight the occupational vulnerability that People on the lowest ends of our occupational structure have had to face Merlin Chow Kwan Yin's studies public health at Columbia and was not involved in this work. He says. It highlights how important temporary income assistance could be for people who cannot afford to stay home. The study also shows that tapping a businesses peak capacity can slash transmission while cutting overall foot traffic by only a small amount. I'm Danielle Benton KQED news. Now we're going to continue our look at isolation during the pandemic. Today we focus on kids who haven't attended school in person since March. You therapists or hearing about depression, anxiety and even suicidal ideation. Ah lot more than usual. KQED science reporter Lesley McClurg is back and we just want to caution you Her story this morning covers the sensitive issue of Children and depression. Here's Leslie. Before the lockdown. Kenley Gupta spent hours sketching. This is a drawing I did that took a pretty long time. The eight year old points to a woman's face that I was actually pretty hard. The pupil and the Iris. But when Kenley is public elementary school in Oakland closed last spring, she stopped drawing. I was really shocked. I was really sad. I couldn't see my friends. She's a social butterfly in a good student. Her spirit flattened when classes went online. Kenley spent much of her day glued to her hot pink iPad gaming. She also ate a lot. There was a kind of almost compulsive snacking. Actually that I had never seen before. That's J. Gupta 10 Leagues Dad, he says she often crumpled up into a ball and hid under her blankie clutching her favorite stuffed animal named Green Guy. Green Guy has his own voice, and she actually just if she talked at all would talk in that mode. But mostly she didn't talk there. Silent storms shall just Stopped communicating. It was actually very difficult to motivate her. At some point I gave up Jay was overwhelmed. He's a single dad who lost his wife when Kenley was a toddler. During that dark time, Tenley developed mutism, a childhood anxiety disorder where kids are unable to speak. She May have been reliving. And in whatever way. That loss. J was also trying to juggle his job as a professor and homeschool Kinleys twin brother, Anakin. Even though his sister was suffering in again seemed to be doing okay. Though he also despises online classes. I much prefer real schools because I'm much more active at real school host or just Sit on the couch and say Buddha spry eight year old long to play basketball with friends during recess. I'm an energy boys, so I like getting out a lot. Jay was relieved Anakin didn't fall apart. He later learned Anakin wasn't keeping up with schoolwork. Last spring was rough on the family. I really felt like I was out at sea and, you know, people I talk to you. Had very little, you know, advice to offer you know about what to do. Closing campuses not only isolate students from teachers, but also support systems like counselors. Song Toye Trotter is a psychotherapist at UCSF Benny Off Children's Hospital in Oakland. We do see high levels of anxiety, high levels of depression we have had, you know, definitely increased number of suicide attempts and suicide behaviors. Her clinic recorded more use suicide attempts in the first four weeks of the pandemic. And it had in the previous four years, mostly driven by despair, giving up of hope. Why does it matter? There's nowhere to go. There's nothing to do. There's nothing to connect with. There's this like deflated nous. Even before the virus hit one in six Children suffered from a mental health disorder. The rate is even higher for those living below the poverty line. And.

Kenley Gupta Anakin Kenley Jay US Merlin Chow Kwan Yin suicidal ideation Oakland Stanford New York Green Guy scientist San Francisco Philadelphia Danielle Benton depression KQED UCSF Benny Off Children's Hosp basketball
Economic Fallout From COVID-19 Continues To Hit Lower-Income Americans the Hardest

Morning Edition

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Economic Fallout From COVID-19 Continues To Hit Lower-Income Americans the Hardest

"Just a few types of locations. KQED science reporter Danielle Benton has more from a recent study out of Stanford. Location services are enabled on, say, your weather app. Your phone shares information about where you go on how long you're there. Whenever you leave the house and self interest are restaurants, jeans, grocery stores, places of worship. This data is anonymous ized and used by researchers like you're a less Kovic, Stanford computer scientist. He and others recently modeled how people's outings drove the course of the epidemic in the 10 biggest US metropolitan areas. When New York you had a huge spike and people state a common dividers die down. Philadelphia, San Francisco was up and then kind of flat. Researchers could also infer which types of locations were responsible for the most transmissions. Before there were widespread health safety precautions. There is a very small number off places about let's say 10%, where 85% of full infections happened. Indoors. Sit down. Restaurants, cafes and gyms are the top three. Crowded businesses also increased risk there, especially a problem in low income neighborhoods. And you found out that even a trip to a grocery store is twice as 3 FT. For an individual from a low income neighborhood versus individual from high income neighborhood. Residents of poor neighborhoods are also more likely to work, low wage service jobs that can't be done online. One of the big achievements of this study is to highlight the occupational vulnerability that People on the lowest ends of our occupational structure have had to face Merlin Chow Kwan Yin's studies public health at Columbia and was not involved in this work. He says. It highlights how important temporary income assistance could be for people who cannot afford to stay home. The study also shows that tapping a businesses peak capacity can slash transmission while cutting overall foot traffic by only a small amount. I'm Danielle Benton KQED news. Now we're going to

Danielle Benton Kovic Stanford Philadelphia San Francisco Merlin Chow Kwan Yin New York United States Columbia Danielle Benton Kqed
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Counties. Largest polling place the Coliseum and Arena. The Voting center opened Saturday. It will be available every day through Tuesday. County residents can register to vote. Replace a lost ballot. Drop off a mail in ballot or vote in person on touch screen machines. Oakland Mayor Libby Shaft People love the Coliseum. They know where it is. They have great memories and what other place has the expertise of moving massive numbers of cars and people safely? In and out the A's are paying the costs of operating the center. Amid a record breaking fire year in the state. A new report out today says California doesn't have a grasp on the true cost of wildfires. Science reporter Danielle Benton has more We know wildfires are an enormous cost for the state. But how expensive are they? Really? There were so many places that where we aren't actually measuring the cost. Michael War, is a fire expert at Stanford and lead the effort for the nonprofit California counsel on Science and Technology. The finding Knowing the true statewide costs of wildfires isn't currently possible. We thought this would be a much simpler problem. Some impacts aren't yet counted. For example, the damage smoke does to our health, even miles away from the fire, the morbidity and mortality impact death and sickness. From wildfire Smoke are just incredibly important Public health issue for the state of California also, damage to the environment into drinking water aren't measured statewide, so we just don't know. I mean, that's the real take away. But we know enough to be concerned and particularly concerned, given the scale of wildfire that the state has experienced since 2017 war, expects the true costs are far greater than we know. And he says, being blind to those costs me and we don't know how to best spend our money if we're spending enough or if we're spending where it makes the biggest difference. I'm Daniel Vent in the news. Pioneering Bay Area chef and restauranteur Cecilia Chang died Wednesday at the age of 100. Chang helped transform Americans appreciation for authentic Chinese cooking. NPR's Neta who'll be looks back on her life. When's his hearing A. Chang arrived in San Francisco.

Coliseum and Arena Cecilia Chang California Michael War Voting center Mayor Libby Shaft Bay Area Oakland Danielle Benton reporter Science and Technology NPR Daniel Vent San Francisco Neta Stanford
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lights were still on late morning. The Sun's heat never broke through, and millions of us were pretty freaked out. Don't think of something like way get warnings from forecasters about heat waves, gusty winds and red flag conditions, but there was no warning about an orange sky. Why? Because right now forecasting smoke where it's going to be and how high and when it'll clear it's ah lot. We know we had some work to do to impulse small for casting for the Bay Area. Rabban Mamedov is a smoke forecaster for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, located at the University of Colorado. He feeds predictions to local weather officials. Their hearts too. Take into consideration like mathematically the behavior of these fires. And of course, you have to know how the fire is going to behave to know what might happen with the smoke. So that's a major problem on the Dove has to know how much heat a fire is giving off, because more he means more smoke. What is burning is key for us or grassland. Or maybe cropland. He gets all this information from satellite data. Complicating his forecast, is everything else happening. Is there wind is rain coming are their canyons or flatlands, The complexity becomes mind boggling. And now with extreme fires, Ahmedov says he has to include how fire and whether influence each other considered the creek fire near Mammoth Lakes. The heat release Resulted in formation off on this for we've worked to forecast weather. Ah lot longer than fire smoke. And now with extreme fires in a warming world, it's clear smoke forecasting needs to catch up. I'm Danielle Benton News with the last day to vote just a week and a half away. Tensions are running high around the country in California.

Rabban Mamedov National Oceanic and Atmospher Danielle Benton Bay Area forecaster California Mammoth Lakes Ahmedov University of Colorado
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Spirits. Maura total wine dot com and buy the listeners and members of Kiwi de public Radio 88.5 FM in San Francisco and 89.3 of them in Sacramento. Good morning. The time now is 8 22. It's morning edition on I'm Brian. What? In addition to picking a president and deciding on candidates down the ballot, Californians are voting on a bunch of propositions this year. We know these, Khun be hard to keep track of. So this morning we're going to start trying to help you break some of them down today. What's behind proposition 14? A yes vote would authorize the sale of $5.5 billion in state bonds to refund the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine that is the state's stem cell agency. And no other state has an agency like this science reporter Danielle Benton tells us how we got here is an interesting tale. In the ramp up to the 2004 election, actor Michael J. Fox appeared in a commercial urging Californians to vote. My most important role lately is is an advocate for patients on for finding new cures for diseases in a 32nd spot, urging voters to say yes on Proposition 71. He uses the word cures three times. 71 will support research to find cures for diseases that affect millions of people, including cancer. Diabetes, Alzheimer's Parkinson's proposition. 71 grew out of a time in the early two thousand's, when scientists and the public were excited about the promise of stem cell and regenerative medicine. The federal government directed by then President George W. Bush band funding research on human.

California Institute of Regene President George W. Bush Michael J. Fox Maura Khun San Francisco president Sacramento Danielle Benton Diabetes reporter Alzheimer
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Over the ocean back to the north coast. The glass fire is burning in Sonoma and Napa counties, and has sent tens of thousands of people from their homes that is charged more than 46,000 acres and destroyed some 100 structures. It's just 2% contained late yesterday with particularly active in the Napa County town of Angwin Cal Fire is investigating what started this disastrous plays Stan Breck. He has that part of the story. When firefighters first laid eyes on the blaze before dawn Sunday, it was already burning fiercely. Very, very large flames spreading rapidly but exactly what started. The blaze, which was driven by gusty winds is still unknown. PG and a whose lines have ignited a long Siri's of damaging fires in Northern California, said that it has no information indicating its equipment sparked the blaze. PG and e power lines do run through the area where the fire started. Cal Fire says that electrical equipment is one of the potential causes that investigators will have to rule out. The agency's investigations typically take six months or more to complete. I'm Dan Breck e news. In other news. The Santa Clara County District attorney's office has charged the San Jose police officer with assault and battery for allegedly using excessive force during an arrest oddity, Bana Moody reports. The Da's office says after stopping a car that eluded the P D. A couple of Times officer Matthew Rodriguez kicked the driver in the stomach and dragged her away from her vehicle while she was in handcuffs. Rodriguez now faces a misdemeanor charge and could face one year in jail. Does this charge reflect awareness of greater public interest in police accountability? No, says Deputy d. A Jason Molinski. Well, we have to prove to a jury beyond a reasonable doubt doesn't change based on current events. But Officer Rodriguez did here. Is unacceptable and we charge him with the crime because Rodriguez is on administrative leave an arraignment date has yet to be scheduled. I'm Emblem Moody News. There's more local and state coverage at CBI dot or GE. I'm Danielle Benton News Coming upon morning edition on DVD In a few moments, Polls show more people are planning to vote in person when the number of people planning to vote by mail to shrinking You two fears about the Postal Service's reliability and political rhetoric, one of the stories ahead President Trump Joe Biden.

Matthew Rodriguez Angwin Cal Fire Napa County officer Stan Breck Dan Breck Napa President Trump Joe Biden Sonoma Bana Moody Jason Molinski Santa Clara County District Danielle Benton CBI dot Siri Postal Service Northern California San Jose Times GE
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's Morning edition on I'm Brian. What wildfires across the West and in California are dominating the public's attention. One of the things we're all talking about is how to prevent this from happening in the future. Science. Reporters have looked into what the state actually has done to lower fire risk what lawmakers are doing to address the consequences of fire and what they aren't doing in this year's legislative session. That is a lot for one person. So this morning we have to take Molly Peterson and Danielle Benton. Hi, Bryan. Morning, Brian. We talk a lot about fire in this space. A lot about solutions like prescribed burns, for example, right the idea that we plan to put fire on the land safely like I've reported from Trinity County about people who want to do that, but they run into bureaucratic obstacles. And I reported about the technical and safety reasons. Thes burns get delayed and you guys talk about home hardening, too. Yeah, we talk about how to make buildings less flammable, and we talk about clearing space around them too slow and advancing fire. But you've talked about these things for years, and it feels like some of it's being done. But maybe not as much as we need. Yes, that's exactly the problem. Here's one example. In the early two thousand's. Up until 2017. An average of just 13,000 acres were intentionally burned in this state. Every year in 2018 new laws were passed to try to make burning easier, and in that year 87,000 acres were burned. But scientists believe we need to increase that amount at least five times so there is a long way to go. And here's another example in 2008. Lawmakers passed this transformative set of requirements that has saved houses against these big fires in Santa Rosa and in paradise, but 12 years later houses built before that law still sit in the path of these monster fires. And we're still not doing for fires. What we do for earthquake risk, which is expand requirements and spend money on retrofitting. Overall, we do see the state spending more money on fires, but experts say it's not enough to do what they recommend. And it's a sign that we're not changing our mindset about fires dramatically enough. So what is the state doing about this? Have they proposed any new laws? Yeah, the ideas for legislation of fun into a few main categories. One is tightening requirements on new buildings and raising money for fixing old ones. The other one is improving how we.

Brian Trinity County Molly Peterson California Santa Rosa Bryan Danielle Benton
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"7 30. Live from Tokyo. EDIE News. I'm Danielle Benton. Hundreds of people took part in a protest in Oakland last night to call for justice for Jacob Blake, the man shot in the back by police in Kenosha, Wisconsin. They marched through the city and expressed outrage at yet another black man being shot by law enforcement. After months of previous racial toughest demonstrations, Most of the protesters marched peacefully. Some sprayed graffiti on buildings, set fires, two trash cans and smash windows. Police say they made several arrests. A bill that would allow the state to bar police officers from the profession if they're fired for misconduct or convicted of serious crimes, is moving forward in the state assembly. The bill is supported by the families of Sean Monterroso and Eric Salgado, both Bay Area residents killed by officers who reportedly had prior histories of shootings. Assembly member Steven Bradford says the state Khun Decertified a doctor, a lawyer, We could prevent a teacher from going back in the classroom and prevent people like ourselves from ever holding office again. But here in California, we can't get rid of bad officers. California State Sheriff's Association opposes the bill, saying local law enforcement can already see officers records. The thousands of firefighters battling three massive lightning cause that's the fires in and around the Bay Area continue to make games on the blazes. Cal Fire, says Thie Ln new complex in the North Bay, which has charged through 368,000 acres is 33% contained. The Stu complex on the far Eastern side of the Bay Area has also burned 368,000 acres and is 35% contained. It's easy you incident in San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties has burned a 1000 acres and his 22% contained State corrections officials say they will resume transferring people from county jail's into state prisons. This week. Intake has been halted for months because of covert 19 eighties Kate Wolf reports. The move has advocates for incarcerated people worried. Since March. County jails have house people sentence to state prison Now, state officials say they've worked with public health experts to create a plan that will allow for safe intake. The plan includes testing people within a week of the transfer that was put into place to prevent an outbreak like the one at ST Quentin, where inmates protested up to a month before transfer. James King is with the Ella Baker Center, He says. Prisons air still overpopulated and there are many ways in which people could still be exposed to the virus. There's simply no safer way. To do transfers regardless of how rapidly they do the testing..

Bay Area California State Sheriff's Association James King North Bay EDIE News Danielle Benton Tokyo Ella Baker Center Kate Wolf Steven Bradford Oakland Kenosha Jacob Blake San Mateo ST Quentin
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Per hour, causing extensive tree damage. Larry Jones started his day by removing large tree branches from the front of his home. We took a tree to felony Mila Street. We've pulled over to the parks, I This one here we can carry across the street. It wasn't that bad. So They worked out in other parts of the city. There are reports of roofs being toppled from buildings and power lines being torn from Poles, causing power outages. The utility Com Ed says 386,000 customers are without power today. For NPR News. I'm Araceli Gomez Saldana in Chicago. The Associated Press now reports one woman was killed by the storm in Indiana. On Wall Street, the Dow was up 319 points. The NASDAQ is down 25. This is NPR. Live from the Q E D News. I'm Danielle Benton, Santa Clara County supervisors are planning to discuss extending their moratorium on evictions at their board meeting this morning. Take your AIDS, Nina Thorson reports. The board will hear a proposal to keep residential and business evictions frozen through the end of September. The current moratorium expires at the end of August. Proponents of the extension argue that although many businesses have re opened in recent weeks, Few of them are bringing in the kind of income they need in order to pay a rent. For residential evictions, The supervisors say many tenants are still waiting to get unemployment and rental assistance that will make them able to pay off their back rent if they have a little more time. The board will also consider beefing up penalties for landlords who ignore the moratorium and try to force their tenants out. I'm Nina Thorson news. Governor Gavin Newsom shed little light on the sudden resignation of his state public health director late Sunday night duties. Politics editor Scott Shaffer has more Dr Sonya Angel was a key part of the health team battling the pandemic. Her resignation email to department staff said little about why she left, but it came less than a week after a serious glitch in the state's computer system for tracking positive test results for covert 19 A glitch. Newsome said he didn't know about when he announced a decline and positivity rates last week. We would not have put out those data points that we known that so by definition, were unaware I was unaware and was made aware. Later that evening, Newsome said. The backlog of nearly 300,000 test results has now been cleared, and it appears the rate of positive test results is in fact dropping. I'm Scott Shaffer. In Petaluma. I'm Danielle Benton. And support comes from field work growing, featuring same day delivery of craft beer, seven Bay Area locations. Online orders had fieldwork.

Scott Shaffer Nina Thorson Mila Street Danielle Benton Newsome Araceli Gomez Saldana NPR News Dr Sonya Angel Governor Gavin Newsom Larry Jones NPR Petaluma Bay Area Santa Clara County Indiana Chicago Q E D News editor
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bay Area. Learn more at S f l g dot com On K Q. E D the time right now is 7 30 Live from Kait. Greedy news. I'm Danielle Benton, The head of California's Public Health department has resigned last night, Dr Sonya Angel announced she was stepping down. Angel is departing from her role as director and state public health officer. She did not give a specific reason for leaving, state officials say. Sandra Suri, who works at the California Health Care Foundation, will become acting health director. Dr Erica Pan, who was recently appointed state epidemiologist after being Alameda counties. Top health official will be the acting state public health officer. A new study from the city of San Jose finds that while immigrants largely make up the essential work force, they are being disproportionately hit by the economic effects of the pandemic Shannon Lin reports, according to the study, published Friday. Immigrants, including those who are undocumented, make up a large percent of the agricultural food service and health care sectors and CNN say, however, many are also employed at businesses like hotels and salons that have suffered amid shelter in place orders. So Mama See, l is the director of the city's Office of Immigrant Affairs. She says she's particularly worried about undocumented immigrants who don't get federal aid. It's a community not only of going to Matt with ease public benefit like these checks, but they are so are least likely to have adequate insurance most likely to be renters. Maciel says the city has been providing income relief checks to undocumented immigrants through private donations. I'm Shannon Lin News. A knife. State prison staff member has died from Cove in 19 complications this time, and for the first time a correctional officer at San Quentin, 55 year old Gilbert Bobby Polanco, worked on death row and had been fighting covered 19 for over a month. He died early yesterday morning. Acting San Quentin Warden Rob Ron broom, Feld said Polanco's memory will be carried by the staff who continue to fight the Koven 19 infection at San Quentin. Over 250 staff members at San Quentin tested positive for the virus off those about 90 have returned to work. The East Base. First bus line with dedicated lanes has opened weeds for Cal Maria Dylan has more A C transit has given its new bus rapid transit line, a special name. Tempo, but it actually just replaces the busy line One, which runs from the San Leandro Bart Station through east Oakland to 20th and Broadway and Uptown Tempo has brand new buses that can interact with traffic lights to speed their way and 46 stations, mostly in the middle of international Boulevard. Transit planners say the dedicated lane will mean less bunching of buses, with writers waiting no more than 10 minutes during peak commuting ours. The project took 20 years cost $232 million faced stiff opposition from business owners on international. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan News. More at TBD dot orch IM Danielle Benton Support today comes from fieldwork brewing, featuring same day delivery of craft beer, seven Bay Area locations, online orders it fieldwork brewing dot com. On morning edition Coming up Hong Kong media mogul Jimmy Lai was arrested under the new National security Law Lie is the most significant figure to be targeted since the long was imposed by China more than a month ago. Stay tuned. The idea that having Children is the mark of a normal successful life has lingered in American society. Despite pushback and many people today, especially women still face scrutiny over the decision not to have kids.

San Quentin Shannon Lin officer director Dr Sonya Angel Danielle Benton Gilbert Bobby Polanco Dr Erica Pan San Quentin Warden Public Health department San Jose Kait Bay Area San Leandro Bart Station California Health Care Foundat Cal Maria Dylan Raquel Maria Dylan CNN California
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The goal and deliver more pocket a heavy traffic before you get to the G plan, turn And it's slow in the 37 right across the Mayor Alan Bridge through the lane merge, But those are the only slow spots so far. Joe McConnell for 22 years ago, Ed Ball set out to find the descendents of the slaves owned by his ancestors. We were there when black and white descendants met will catch up with it Ball next time here and now join us for here And now, after forum today on weedy public radio, coming up from 11 to 1 Sacramento Valley, mostly sunny skies, temperature's warmed up a bit. 93 2101 today, Sacramento's high about 97. The Bay Area so morning cloudiness, then clearing Good morning. The time now is 5 30 Live from Kait. Greedy news. I'm Danielle Benton, The head of California's Public Health department, has resigned last night, Dr Sonya Angel announced she was stepping down. Angel is departing from her role as director and state public health officer. She did not give a specific reason for leaving, state officials say Sanders Suri, who now works at the California Health Care Foundation, will become acting health director Dr Erica Pan, who was recently appointed state epidemiologist. After being Alameda counties. Top health official will be acting state public health officer. Change comes after state officials revealed that a computer glitch had caused a backlog of up to 300,000 Corona virus test records. A new study from the city of San Jose finds that while immigrants largely makeup, the essential work force, they're being disproportionately hit by the economic effects of the pandemic kick you ladies, Shannon Lin reports. According to the study published Friday. Immigrants, including those who are undocumented, make up a large percent of the agricultural food service and health care sectors in San Jose. However, many are also employed at businesses like hotels and salons that have suffered amid shelter in place orders. Soma Maciel is the director of the city's Office of Immigrant Affairs. She says she's particularly worried about undocumented immigrants who don't get federal aid. It's this community that not only is going to matter, Steve public benefit like these checks, but they are so are least likely to have adequate insurance most likely to be renters. Maciel says. The city has been providing income relief checks to undocumented immigrants through private donations. I'm Shannon Lin kick. Edie news operators of a casino in Tracy say their card room is the first in the state to reopen after the Corona virus shut down with card table set up outdoors. They say this is a test of whether outdoor gambling can attract card sharks during the pandemic. Julie Chang Reports Stars Casino A card room had been closed.

Dr Sonya Angel Shannon Lin Soma Maciel San Jose director Mayor Alan Bridge Public Health department Joe McConnell Danielle Benton Ed Ball officer Sacramento Valley California Health Care Foundat Sacramento Julie Chang Bay Area state epidemiologist Kait Dr Erica Pan
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The situation in California. She's a science reporter at D. Daniel. Thanks for being with us. Daniel, it seems like the fire season is starting a little earlier this year. How does this compare to normal fire seasons in California? Yeah. You know, I have some numbers for you from the beginning of this year until the start of August are state fire agency, Cal Fire has responded to 4700 fires. And that's up from the same period of time from the same period of time on a five year average. More than 1000 fires, you know the average would be about 3400 fires, so this is a very active fire year. Firefighting agencies have been very aggressive in attacking fires this year, using a lot of air resources and really trying to keep fires small, 10 acres or less. So we have seen that the total number of acres burned this year is way down from the average number of acres. Has the pandemic changed anything about how wildfire start? I mean, generally speaking, more people are staying home. So has that had an effect on inciting fires at all. You know, speaking with fire officials earlier this season, there was a real hope that we would see fewer ignitions. 90% of fires in the state are ignited by human activity. And there was a hope that with people staying home more and driving less that we would see fewer ignitions that has not played out the common causes of fire's getting out of hand or things like debris burning or Equipment malfunctions, power lines, malfunctioning campfire, arson, all those and even personal vehicles, igniting fires. When they pull over on dry grass, for example, all those sources of ignition are still happening. It's a little bit about how we're preventing fires here. What has the pandemic meant for firefighter training in general, and then we can sort of look at at the incarcerated population that deals with this but generally speaking Has that been affected at all? Yeah, I mean, the state agency. Cal Fire says it's ready, but it has really complicated. The pandemic is really complicated the preparations this year Training's have had to work differently. Where normally you would have a bunch of trainees together in a big classroom. Those trainings that had to be remote have had to be outside. Some training sessions have been canceled or delayed on DH. Then, as you said, there have been less firefighters available and in typical years And the incarcerated population in California is often used to fight fires. What is happening with that group of folks right now we know that Corona virus has affected certain prison populations across the country. So tell us how that all connects there in California. Yeah, absolutely. Inmate. Firefighting crews are a really important part of California's firefighting force. They've they've been used in the state since World War two actually. And then they're small but crucial, crucial portion California employees about 11,000 full time in seasonal firefighters every year, and typically, there are a few 1000 inmate firefighters. The Because there have been such widespread intense problems with covert 19 in the prison system. Thie governor has released about 8000 prisoners early. To cut down on overcrowding in prisons, and there was also a covert 19 outbreak in a fire camp last month. And so the numbers of increased rate of fire fighters who conserve our down a cz of late last month. Was about 7100 Daniel, You know, we talked about the complications of managing hurricane recovery relief in this moment of a pandemic. I'm wondering, you know, when you're looking at people who are we're evacuating in California because of the fires. What does that look like during a pandemic? Yes. So typically agency like the Red Cross most commonly sets up evacuation centers say in a gymnasium or large high school. Those are largely not being used, even though one was set up in Riverside County for the Apple Fire. It was effectively empty and was then closed. What is being prioritized is putting people into hotels because that is that is safer than a congregant evacuation center. Are there. I mean, given that you've just said hotels, they can't be cheaper free. I imagine. I mean, are there extra sequences in terms of preparing their given that that's the evacuation protocol so far? Yeah, I mean, it's it is definitely costing more. The whole emergency response this year for fighting fires is more costs about the costs there. Red cross about $100 a night to set a family up in a hotel. We also see many people stay with friends or with family. But it yes, there will be The true cost of responding to fires this year is still to be seen, but it's going to be much more expensive than typical. Have the California government officials sort of taken any lessons from these fires as we gear up for Maura potential fires to come in the region. Yes, well, the you know, we've we've seen an active fire season so far, but our worst fires in the state typically are most destructive fires typically come in September and October. Where you know, Tragically, we've seen thousands of homes on DH. Hundreds of lives lost in a single fire. I think that there is an acknowledgement that Come Responding to wildfires is complex and in a year and the needs of maintaining social distancing makes things hugely more complex. This year. We will be paying close attention as that season really ramps up. Danielle Benton is a science reporter at in California. Daniel. Thank.

California Cal Fire Daniel Red Cross reporter D. Daniel arson Riverside County Danielle Benton Apple Maura
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"17th. Sources close to the Biden campaign say that an announcement is not expected before next week. One complication is that with the pandemic, it's logistically more challenging to interview potential candidates. Also, the pool of possible running mates is large but in is reportedly considering about a dozen women. Committed to picking a woman as his running mate months ago, And recently he's received growing pressure to choose a black woman. Biden will be 78 by inauguration Day. And so there's extra significance in his choice of a running mate who could be seen as the future of the Democratic Party. Asma Khalid. NPR News State officials in Georgia are opening a 120 bid Corona virus pop of hospital in Atlanta today. Sam Whitehead of member Station W. A B reports the facility is designed to take the pressure off hospitals. Governor Brian Kemp says the facility at the Georgia World Congress Centre will open with 60 beds with the ability to double in size if needed. It's the second time state officials have turned the convention center in Atlanta into a pop up hospital. They shuttered it earlier this year after it on Lee took in a handful of patients. But a recent surge of new Corona virus infections across the state has left some hospitals in Georgia without many critical care beds to take care of the sickest patients. For NPR News. I'm Sam Whitehead in Atlanta Stocks are trading higher on Wall Street. At this hour, the Dow was up 240 points. This is NPR news live from the news on Brian Watt Sonoma County is set to receive state help to try to control the spread of the Corona virus in skilled nursing facilities. Most of the county's Covad 19 deaths have been among residents At such places. Science reporter Danielle Benton has more. The county asked for state intervention in stemming outbreaks last week, County officials say. One important need is securing a facility where they can take sick and exposed residents, said Dr Syn Dari Mace, the county health officer. The goal really is to separate those who have the virus. When does you don't the facilities have struggled with isolating and quarantining infected or exposed residents Statewide, Nearly half of all covert 19 deaths are linked to a long term care homes for the elderly. I'm Daniel Vent in the news. Bay Area airports, stung by the drop in air travel because of the pandemic are seeing a bit more activity. In fact, Oakland International recorded twice as many passengers in June compared to Mei is Julie Chang reports. While those numbers show a significant increase in traffic since the pandemic began, it's still only a fraction of what should have been a busy travel season. Oakland airports Director of Aviation Bryant Francis says he's encouraged by the trend, especially for the shops and restaurants inside the terminals. The larger levels of passengers creates opportunities for those concessionaires to expand hours of stores or restaurants that are currently operating or to reopen some locations that had been closed for several months. Fo in San Jose Airport also saw an uptick and fight activity. I'm Julie Chang news, and I'm Brian. What in Oakland? Thanks for listening. Support comes from California building trades who believes that poverty and housing can't be solved by driving construction workers into poverty. Support for NPR.

NPR News Brian Watt Sonoma County Atlanta Julie Chang Sam Whitehead Biden Georgia Brian Kemp Oakland NPR Asma Khalid Dr Syn Dari Mace Democratic Party Georgia World Congress Centre Oakland International California Lee Danielle Benton Daniel Vent
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They're not predicting a speedy resolution. Kelsey Snell NPR NEWS Washington The head of the White House's Corona virus task force, Dr Deborah Burkes says the pandemic has entered a new phase. NPR's Matthew Schwartz has more. At first, the Corona virus hit the densely populated urban centers. But now, Debra Burkes told CNN State of the union Things have changed. What we're seeing today is different for March and April. It is extraordinarily rides spread its into the rural as equal urban areas and to everybody who lives in a rural area. You are not immune or protected from this virus, Burke says Americans are going on vacation, often to covert hot spots. Getting infected and then bringing the virus back to their communities without even realizing it. Burke says that people in multi generational households with an outbreak in their area Should consider wearing a mask even at home. Matthew Schwartz. NPR NEWS Washington Microsoft says its CEO has consulted with President Trump about purchasing the U. S assets of the video sharing APP TIC TAC. NPR's Bobby Allen reports, Trump initially indicated he does not support a U. S company taking over the Chinese based APP. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says he's working toe win the administration's okay to complete a deal to take over TIC Tac's operations in the U. S. The White House has threatened to impose economic sanctions against TIC Tac that would, in effect, be a national ban. It is owned by a Chinese company, which has raised national security fears in Washington. Microsoft says If the deal is approved, it would ensure data on American citizens is not offshored. NPR's Bobby Allen reporting. Microsoft is a financial supporter of NPR. You're listening to NPR news Live from news on Brian Watch. So Noma County is set to receive state help to try to control the spread of the Corona virus in skilled nursing facilities. Most of the county's Cove it 19 deaths have been among residents at several skilled nursing facilities. Science reporter Danielle Benton has more Connie asked for state intervention in stemming outbreaks last week, County officials say one important need is securing a facility where they can take sick and exposed residents, said Dr Syn Dari Mace, the county health officer. The goal really is to separate those who have the virus from those you don't the facilities have struggled with isolating and quarantining infected or exposed residents? Statewide, nearly half of all covert 19 deaths are linked to a long term care homes for the elderly. I'm Danielle Benton sweetie News They area airports, stung by the drop in air travel from the pandemic are seeing a bit more activity. In fact, Oakland International recorded twice as many passengers in June compared to Mei is Julie Chang reports. While those numbers show a significant increase in traffic since the pandemic began, it's still only a fraction of what should have been a busy travel season. Oakland airports Director of Aviation Bryant Francis says he's encouraged by the trend, especially for the shops and restaurants incite the terminals. The larger levels of passengers streets opportunities for those concessionaires to expand hours of stores or restaurants that are currently operating or to reopen some locations that have been closed for several months. Fo in San Jose Airport also saw an uptick and fight activity. I'm Julie Chang news, and there's more at dot org's on Brian..

NPR Microsoft TIC Tac Matthew Schwartz Julie Chang Bobby Allen Washington President Trump Burke Danielle Benton White House Dr Deborah Burkes Noma County CEO Brian Watch Debra Burkes Kelsey Snell U. S Oakland
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Innovation supports transformative ideas that benefit humanity while protecting the natural world recognizing through science the interdependence of all living systems for this Valentine's day we have an update from Pluto as you may remember Pluto god dumped from its status as a planet a few years ago it's now called a dwarf planet but despite suffering rejection this planet has heart a big heart shaped region known as Tomball radio to hear more about this and new research into how this heart affects the planet we're joined by KQED science reporter Danielle Benton for our occasional series spacing out so tell me about this part of Pluto yeah this is one of the big discoveries of the twenty fifteen New Horizons fly by mission that's runners didn't know much of anything about Pluto and they thought it might be just this flat ball but when New Horizons flew by they found this really diverse beautiful terrain of canyons and mountains and plains and this heart shaped region in particular got a lot of attention because it's just so visually striking and astronomers have found out something new about this frozen heart of Pluto yeah it turns out that this heart Paul says with a kind of beat that influences how winds move on the planet one half of the load off the heart is just scraggly mountains and the other half on the west is is frozen plane of nitrogen what happens in this nitrogen area is that when the north keeps up high in the daylight the nitrogen sublimates and creates a pressure that has to flow somewhere it flows south to the hemisphere where it's dark and it creates this north south cycle as the planet spins the winds deflect and overall flow in out west word way and of course we have winds on earth or or or similar.

Valentine Danielle Benton New Horizons Paul KQED reporter
Wildfires Spark Population Booms in Fungi and Bacteria

Morning Edition

01:14 min | 2 years ago

Wildfires Spark Population Booms in Fungi and Bacteria

"Some interesting research out of a science conference in San Francisco this week we know that while fire smoking Kerry action pollution over hundreds of miles but fire scientists say there are also living things and all that smoke KQED science reporter Danielle Benton explains fire ecologists leader cozy are was thinking about how bacteria travel in the atmosphere when she went on a prescribed burn with her students and I just started thinking about the smoke in a new way and just wondering if there might be anything living in it Kobe are of the university of Idaho presented her research at the American geophysical union conference in San Francisco turns out there is an astounding amount and diversity of bacterial cells and fungal spores lofted into wildfire smoke during a fire the more severe the burn the more cells transported this is a new area of research but cozy are things these microbes may impact human health there are numerous allergens that we found in the smoke and so it may be that some people who are sensitive to smoke have that sensitivity not only because so the particulate matter in the smoke but also because there are some biological organisms and that she believes these microbes may also be seating snow flakes and affecting

San Francisco Danielle Benton Kobe Kerry Kqed Reporter University Of Idaho American Geophysical Union
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So yes so whether it's safe or not with that hideous go estimates you'll need at least sixty thousand dollars to fix the home's foundation and thousands more to fix the rest of the house some flood victims including some of those suing received financial assistance from the city of San Jose through Catholic charities of Santa Clara or through individual donors that parodies go says she hasn't seen a penny of help from the city they didn't help us at all until this day I have to fight them so I get really upset that they have presented themselves somehow to say oh yeah we help flood victims they haven't valley water in San Jose declined to comment on the lawsuit since twenty seventeen valley water has repaired levees and is in the planning stages of a coyote creek flood protection project that these go says she feels the city in the water district are dragging their feet with the lawsuit they know how to you know create more obstacles for us we already live in the flight home some people have to move out so like we are continually suffered a mediator was brought in the summer to help resolve the lawsuit pursued by parodies go and roughly a hundred fifty other households if nothing comes from that the case could go to trial and early twenty twenty one I'm Tiffany camp high kick you reading is when you think of your thanksgiving table what's on there Turkey is traditional stuffing maybe cranberry sauce crab is the local delicacy if you can get it not this year but what about something else from the sea KQED science reporter Danielle Benton examines the case for eating purple sea urchin about five years ago a blob of warm water spread through the Pacific Ocean starfish which eat sea urchin began disappearing the urchin populations just exploded and they started to eat all of the kelp forest along our coast Laura Rogers Bennett is an environmental scientist at the UC.

San Jose Santa Clara Turkey reporter Danielle Benton Laura Rogers Bennett scientist coyote creek KQED Pacific Ocean sixty thousand dollars five years
"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:17 min | 3 years ago

"danielle benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Past eight it's morning edition on weedy. I'm Brian watt. It's been a big year for snow in the Sierra Nevada range records have fallen along with the snow. We've seen reports of fifty feet of snow or more on mammoth mountain in the central Sierra. And in the resort town of mammoth lakes. Some people have literally had to tunnel out of their homes. This is the time of year when the snowpack is typically at its peak and tomorrow when surveyors do their monthly manual survey. They're likely to find a snow pack at about one hundred sixty percent of the average we've called up Ben hatchet in atmospheric scientist at the western regional climate center in Reno and Ben in a word or two. How would you describe the snowfall this year, absolutely fantastic and not just for skiers? But also for anyone who uses water in California. All right. So the water supply loves it. But what is it about the storms that have come in this year that has created so much snow and so much water in the snow? Well, we've had very consistent snowfall and the storms that have been bringing the snowfall have been somewhat colder than average. And so we've seen snow levels bringing snow down to one or two thousand feet. Quite frequently. We've even seen snow in the city itself, San Francisco, and the foothills there close to sea level, which is pretty novel and rare, and so we cumulated a lot of snow at the higher elevations at the middle and even down in the foothills. So we have a lot of water stored in our snowpack right now. All right. So do we ever reach a point where we have too much snow is definitely possible because we have a very nice state of our reservoir water levels right now or at about eighty percent full and running about one hundred and eleven percent of the historic average for the date, and we have a lot of snow stored in our natural snowpack reservoir. So if we have a warmer than average spring or has some very warm spring storms that accelerate the melting we might see some that water coming down a little bit early, and that could create some challenges for the water management community because our reservoirs are so full right now and those in some of these communities that have been receiving heavy snowfall like Manasota springs and Myers. People have been tirelessly shoveling out of their homes or businesses. We've seen overuse injuries from too much shoveling. I think the chiropractors are going to be very busy this spring and summer. Oh my goodness. Right. Well, I'm sorry to hear that. Everyone shovel safely shovel safely. Yes. Stretch then hatchet of the western regional climate center in Reno. Thank you very much. Thank you very much for having me on a much more serious note. All the snow we've received this year has also meant a heavy year across the west for avalanches. Especially in the rocky mountains avalanches there have triggered evacuation orders in almost twenty five people have died. That's a lot of people. But it's pretty typical for a heavy snow year. Unfortunately, science editor Danielle Benton has been looking into the state of avalanche science. It's an old problem. But the full solution still eludes us she started with a call to the Sierra avalanche center. Good morning. Sierra with the avalanche forecasts for when if you're heading into the Lake Tahoe back country during winter and early spring. The Sierra avalanche center is a good place to start bottom line. Considerable avalanche tangible exist all of Asians to win. Slab storm slot and loose wet islands problems. Human triggered avalanches likely with natural triggered avalanches possible recording. Forecasts offer about five minutes of info on conditions and where it's riskiest. Everything's available online too. It's the product of lead forecaster Brandon Schwartz and his colleagues who start studying the snow wants the first ball of the season hits the ground. And we tracked that snowfall. We look at how those snow crystals change on the ground, and as they change throughout winter each snowfall creates new layers in the snow pack a relatively weak layer of snow under a stronger one on a slope of thirty degrees are more. That's the recipe for an avalanche. Though, we're looking to see what it's gonna take to make those weak layers fail and trying to figure out what is that gonna be perhaps surprisingly Schwartz and his colleagues do not use computer models. They're forecasting. No one has yet developed a computer model that can accurately predict the complexities of an avalanche one area of science that he says has advanced recently is the physics of how snow fractures and releases or start sliding, which is important for modelling, Kara Burke Lind is one of the researchers studying this fracturing he directs the national avalanche center in bozeman Montana. He says even snow that looks the same can vary widely across a slope. There's areas that are going to be center areas that are going to be sicker. The weekly is going to be a little bit weaker in one spot and a little bit stronger another spot that means in some places, you might trigger an avalanche just by skiing across it. But other.

Sierra avalanche center Ben hatchet Brandon Schwartz mammoth mountain Brian watt mammoth lakes Nevada Reno Kara Burke Lind California Lake Tahoe Manasota springs bozeman San Francisco Montana atmospheric scientist Danielle Benton forecaster Myers