18 Burst results for "Daniel pink"

"daniel pink" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

02:05 min | 5 months ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Want to get your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> own copy of Dan. Pink's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> when <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> scientific secrets <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of perfect timing? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Join <Speech_Music_Male> the next big idea club <Speech_Music_Male> today. And <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we'll send you one <Speech_Music_Male> for free <Speech_Music_Male> talk about timing. <Speech_Music_Male> Of course <Speech_Music_Male> you'll also get access <Speech_Music_Male> to all the best new <Speech_Music_Male> nonfiction <Speech_Music_Male> ideas as selected <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by Dan and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> fellow curator. Susan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Cain Malcolm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Glad. Well Adam <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> grant ideas <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with the potential <Speech_Music_Male> to change <Speech_Music_Male> the way you work <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> live <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and understand the world <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just go to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next big idea <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> club dot <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> com slash <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> win. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That's next big <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> idea club <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> slash <SpeakerChange> when <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you've <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> been listening to a special <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> corona virus edition <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the next big <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> idea podcast <Speech_Music_Male> next week. <Speech_Music_Male> I'll be speaking with kickstarter <Speech_Music_Male> cofounder <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jhansi strickler <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about how this <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> current crisis <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> could be an opportunity <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to start <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> building a more generous <Speech_Music_Male> world. <Speech_Music_Male> If you like the podcast <Speech_Music_Male> please give us a five <Speech_Music_Male> star review and <Speech_Music_Male> tell your friends to subscribe. <Speech_Music_Male> Were available <Speech_Music_Male> on Apple. Podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> spotify. Npr <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> One and every <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> major listening APP <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as well as <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at one three DOT <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> com. I'm your <Speech_Music_Male> host Rufus. Chris <Speech_Music_Male> are sound design <Speech_Music_Male> is by Jake <Speech_Music_Male> Gorski. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Kayla Bessinger <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is our associate producer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our series <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producer is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Michael Cobb. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jonathan Miller <Speech_Music_Male> is our senior <Speech_Music_Male> producer or <Speech_Music_Male> executive producer. Stephanie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> John's Marshal <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Louis and non <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Lopez <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for wondering

"daniel pink" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

09:04 min | 5 months ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"I think there's a kind of libertarian. American frontier spirit fantasy that we don't need each other. We don't need government and I say that without judgment right I mean we I think we all have a little bit of that Libertarian. Spirit in US shirt right in moments like this that we realized we really do need a highly functioning government so hopefully we That's that's something that becomes more apparent to people. I I also think getting back to this trend towards more and more freelancers the GIG economy as you pointed out you wrote about this in two thousand and two and free agent nation. This has been a trend. That's been underway for a long long time and it strikes me that what's exciting about. That is that you know. People who work for themselves tend to be happier. I read somewhere. They say you have to pay twice as much money to work for. Somebody else makes perfect sense to me. It's aligned with the autonomy piece but in order for that to work on a larger scale we do need to have an infrastructure that provides people with healthcare care. God right I not to mention perhaps Recently I've ever since talking with Andrew Yang on this on this podcast that makes more and more sense to me. So here we are. You know twenty years since since you first started writing about about the rise of the GIG. Economy the move towards freelancers. Maybe this accelerates maybe this moment helps accelerate that trend but it does feel like some changes. Some fundamental changes needed to be put in place to prepare our society for that absolutely right. I think that we're going to begin reckoning with his even more on a number of different dimensions there's a business strategy the kind of like NBA leadership side of this which is interesting and important. Then there's also the public policy side of it on the first side of it. Is the business structure. I don't WANNA sound too much like a business school professor but I'm GonNa analogize from a theory of from Ted Limited at Harvard. Business School Twenty five years ago thirty years ago where he talked about people buy things. They don't buy things they buy jobs to be done. So when you buy a drill. You don't WanNa drill you. Want a hole in the wall so product services. Our jobs to be done. I think that what's what's happening now is we're moving toward like especially. I think is being exposed. Now is a job. Okay so you have a job as an accountant but within that job as an accountant are dozens of jobs to be done and weak. And we should be scrutinizing those because a lot of those jobs to be done. People might not need to do them. They might be a total waste Need to talk about which need to be done collaboratively which needs to be done. Solo. What has to be done synchronous Lee and what can be done asynchronous to my mind. Synchronous work activities is overvalued a synchronous work is undervalued and so we have this kind of sorting where we're jobs in many ways that the capital. J. Job is being in some ways unbundled and we're realizing Zenit in a particular job project manager Accountant. Whatever is actually a collection of smaller jobs to be done and we can figure out which of those we need in which of those which of those we don't now there is and I think you made a very very good point here too and try to make this point one hundred years ago in free agent nation. Is that the biggest? I thought the biggest change of this move toward free agent nation wasn't going to be among people who were quote unquote independent workers. It was GONNA be in corporate America and that what somebody who was working for herself and somebody who was working for a company look like that border was going to get murkier and murkier and murkier and murkier and one of the things that's happening this actually shifts into that public policy round that we were talking about is this there has been a massive shift of risk away from organizations onto individual Massive and you see this to me. Most tellingly in retirement savings as Muendane is that might be as relenting topic as that might be. My father had a what's called a defined benefit pension. So when he retired once he retired he got a check. Every month from his former organizations for nonprofit is former nonprofit he. My father passed away nine years ago. My mother still get those checks. Okay his kids do not have defined benefit pensions. They have 401k's where the risk of retirement savings has shifted from the organization to the individual. So they want to save for quote unquote retirement. Whatever that is. The onus is on them if you look at health insurance we had employer provided health insurance where people had relatively small premiums. Not Much co-pays. Now if they even have employer provided health insurance. They're paying a lot more. More of the risk has shifted to them education and training. Those budgets have been slashed. People have to self. Educate the risk has been shifted to them so over and over and over again. What we have is we have this. Massive shift the risks from organizations to individuals for a long time in this country. Post World War. Two until the nineteen seventies corporations companies employers played a quasi-government role but no longer And so we have this shift to risk now. The shift of risk is okay if you have skills to survive in the labor market it stinks if you know and so what we need. Public policy question is we need another entity. Our Society to provide those kinds of shock absorbers. And what you have now. Is You have people who are you are driving through their professional lives without any shock absorbers so they hit something like this then the cargo spinning out of control. So what we need to look at is. How can we provide these shock? Absorbers for people. How can we build in greater resilience into our systems? And if you look at what's happening right now you see these mile long lines for food. Banks in middle-class places like San Antonio Texas you see twenty million unemployment claims in the space of four ways that is a society without shock absorbers. That as a society that isn't resilient and there's a moral problem with that of course but it. Here's the dirty little secret. There's an economic problem with that because that kind of structure isn't sustainable economically. It's not a healthy economy when you have it like that so anyway. So that's my that's my. That's my ran for today. Thank you for indulging. Well I I think I think what's Nice about that about this moment is that this doesn't necessarily need to be an issue that falls along partisan lines right. I mean I think that we all know that people need help. I think everyone irrespective of politics likes autonomy. Wants a sense of purpose in their work likes the idea of working independently very often and I think to be able to see collectively that the best path forward to that is to make sure that everybody has access to an adequate kind of base health coverage and and minimum resources to to navigate this world. Yeah yeah well. This has been great. Dan and a as a final question Dan. I like to ask people in this series. What gives you hope right now What gives me Hope Right. Now are a few things. I two things in in this particular moment. Two things number one is that we have these people were talking about earlier. Who are on the frontlines making a contribution and then these people these truly truly heroic people who are making a difference who are stopping these hospitals who are trying to come up with a cure. The other thing that gives me hope. I don't think we've talked about enough. Is this if I had said to you three months ago? You know what Rufus. Here's what's going to happen. We're going to tell people that they have to stay inside. That they have to shutdown their small business. They have to stay inside. We're going to close down schools and we're GONNA do this because there's a virus and it's going to keep everybody safe and vast majority of people around the world are going to say okay. I'm willing to do my part. I'll stay home. I don't think he would have believed Yup. I don't think he would have believe me. When look at the people who are not compliant? They are a tiny tiny minority of people. The rest of the people are actually saying. You know what I'm GonNa do something I am going to. You know no one. We don't have police in the streets enforcing these these stay at home things. We don't have police in the military in the street. Enforcing social distancing people are doing this. Because it's the right thing to do for themselves their community and if we look at that that should give us a lot of hope. It's a beautiful thing to see will thank you Daniel Pink for taking a break from your cheese consumption at your book writing and you're connecting with your extended family to talk with us today it's been a pleasure rufus. Everley enjoyed..

accountant US Dan NBA San Antonio Texas Daniel Pink Andrew Yang Muendane Harvard project manager Accountant America Zenit Everley Lee professor Ted Limited
Setting Goals Instead of Resolutions With Dr. Andrea Goeglein

Live Happy Now

09:59 min | 9 months ago

Setting Goals Instead of Resolutions With Dr. Andrea Goeglein

"Andrea Andrea. Welcome back to live happy now. It is always a pleasure to have you on the show. Thank you and it was always a pleasure to be here because your messages I followed up and I really love what you put out on social media of the articles in the various podcasts. I really appreciate it. We'll thank you you know as we were looking at the Beginning of a New Year and we wanted to do something that talked about setting goals versus setting resolution. So of course you claim to mind again. So so I thought that we could start by having you explain to us a difference between setting a goal and setting resolution. You know for me. And there's a a lot of personal experience you know I once was a teenage girl and I remember those resolutions. That said I have a boyfriend. You know at the same time I was at teenagers. You know and as I have vowed to end in my education and in my life what I realized I was. I was a statistic. And that's statistic is the one that you know. Your listeners are going to be reading a lot this week how many days it takes before the resolution. I shouldn't fails and I wanted to know how to do that differently. and luckily my life's work. Help get me there. And so a resolution listen to me aligns more with just a declaration or an affirmation where is a goal is actually elite attached to something that you have in your mind that's already in process end or you want to put in process and you began to you begin to think through. What do I actually have to do? What actions what footsteps do I need to take to make make that thing a reality? The differences a resolution is kind of the spark and the goal has all the gas to get you moving. That's a great way to put it because we do as you mentioned. There's all the statistics about how long it takes for us to fail at resolutions. And this week it will be absolutely the message out in the media and then you have the early adopters who are like look. I'm just GONNA go ahead and fail like three days into it just to get that out of way so in terms of it like why is it so much more effective to set a goal they said a resolution is at your mindset or is it like what is it the mechanism that makes it so effective. Well the mechanism is that goal actually has like you know. There's there's there's a line and self help about the difference between a goal in a dream and you can have a dream of something that you want to do and a goal is actually when you take a wish and they call that a wishbone and you put it and and having something with backbone in it so it's actually the difference between and you know I mean the resolution you know it can be that initial inspiration but what has to happen is a goal has multiple parts and there's all sorts of formulas that all of us have used in our lives that have that has to have something certain has to be something specific it has to have time like it has has to have the resources that go with it. There are very specific things that end up making a goal goal and Nada Dream and not a wish and not a resolution excellent. You know it reminds ends me last year. We had Tara swore and she talked about her book. The source and one of the things she talked about was vision boards. She's a believer in it. But she said you can't just make a vision board and then wait for it to come true. You know. That's where we've Kinda got it wrong. You put the pictures up there. And then you're like okay. Bring me my handsome Knight Knight in Shining Armor in my house and I will tell you I am a visual person and for me getting to see the pitcher up something help so for me. I actually have a vision book. I've had the same book for fifteen years. Wow Diane Ed to it yes I add to it. I subtract. Because that's another part of the difference between a resolution and a goal there is an actual in addition to the process of setting up. You know so. What strengths do I have? What of the resources? What are the steps? I'm going to take the things that you would do to actually see something. Come to life there. Is that other part heart of being able to see it and then knowing that wait a minute is this really. I thought I wanted that because my friend had thought I wanted that bigger job because it it would pay more money but my goodness disruption in my life is so dramatic. I really don't want it and do I really WanNa live in that city like you get to update things right. Yeah and there is a critical part of where we are at this moment in time that I would like to kind of give a little hint. You really don't have to set goals this week. The Gulf of this week and actually many times for me has been the the month of January is actually getting your mind ready to want to do some things different in your life not saying saying this you know because the rest of the world says January one something happened. I actually have a number of times a year where January is actually the one that I do more globally and then I start putting berry specifics to it and then mid year I do a check and then September one and this is just a person who gone to two master's degree in a PhD. I went to way too much school wool honest to goodness September is actually my mental New Year. Oh how interesting Yes and I know that it came out of habit that that was always my stark point January. You know the first twenty years of your life January's just the thing after the holidays and you go back to school again and you're picking up. You're finishing up where you left off September. I just was always something very new and different. A lot of new was happening every September. So my cells just got used to it and I encourage your listeners listeners to do an inventory for themselves. There's a wonderful book out called when and I think it's a Daniel Pink so your circadian rhythms. When is the best time of the day it helps you discern as an individual? Where do you fall so that you get? The highest performance format will say. Take that globally over year. And when do you have the greatest impetus is it after the spring. And you've got new energy or some you know there are different times so my message is don't be held to the conformity of what the world is telling you. It's time to do this. It's time to do that. But invite yourself into the experience of observing your life dreaming bigger than when you have before and putting the actions to it. What will that take just doesn't mean it has to be done tomorrow right and that's good because you can kind of like when you're gonNA say paint a room you don't just go out and buy the paint and discount home start slapping paint on you know you think about it look different colors? You think about how it's going to be and you do a lot of preparation beforehand so that you really talking about that same thing of taking some time to be mindful and thoughtful about what it is you really want to accomplish a place for this year right. That's terrific so so as people are looking at okay. I WANNA create these goals. Should they do one big goal. Do they do different goals in different areas. What's most effective okay? So what's most effective is what has worked for you historically but not to be sarcastic. Ask that that. Let me tell you what I suggest and play with this. So would I would invite you to do is actually set the goal. ooh upsetting some time aside to go for a walk to be in nature to do things and just think about what went on. Or what's going on in my life that I actually would like to see different. Just allow yourself to float with a question in something. That isn't regimented writing things down and thinking about it and da Da. Ah but you're in movement or in a pleasant situation and you're allowing yourself to look back you don't have to condemn the things you just have to be not an honest observer and say what's going on in my life that I really would like to be different and then start with those things. If it was different different the second question is if it was different what would it look like and that begins to give you the option to clean up some blocks that you may not even know you may not be achieving some things in your life because some other things are going on that until they get cleaned up. You actually really can't move forward. There are realities to where we are at the moment. Some of them are structural. Some of them are mental. And when you acknowledge Oh wait a minute. I can't leave this place right now because I have this obligation to finish but I can do this. And you stop the rating yourself which is one of the most detrimental things to goal setting. Is that that you actually start out looking at a goal as though you are a failure and you're gonNA kick your own but and get you and now you're GonNa do it right.

Andrea Andrea Knight Knight Daniel Pink Diane Ed Tara
"daniel pink" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"It's not that hard to every twenty minutes. Look at something twenty feet away for twenty seconds yet. We can all do that in even that these micro breaks matter. Microbes batteries. Well, and so what we have is these kinds of conventional wisdom that is just wrong that powering through his better. Nope. That larks morally superior to house. Nope. And so this is why we have science. So so we can take these things that we have intuition about that. We have folklore about and say which of these true, which of these are not true. You do a great job of up ending a lot of our conventional wisdom that we've it's not so wise, and the thing that I also love is that you talk about napping lottery napping to naps a pretty good for us, except she had the ideal nap is is remarkably short shorter than ever would have imagined would be affective the deal nap is between ten and twenty minutes long after twenty minutes or so you begin to develop what's called sleep inertia, which is at groggy. Boggy feeling you get but super short naps incredibly effective. And I know some people have gotten on that bandwagon. There's even certain companies that have nap pods and things like that. But if you work at a place where? Where that's not supported. How can you still do that is I know people who they're really tired during the day? They it really get that ten minutes and benefit from it. How do they work that in? It's tough to do stuff to do especially in open office. But you have an if there's any kind of space available where you can just squirrel away for twenty five minutes in might be worth doing. Now. I happen to work in a small office by myself. So it's easy for me to do. But what I do the way I approach is put on noise canceling headphones. I sit in a comfortable chair. And I set my phone timer for twenty five minutes. And I if I if I fall asleep in ten minutes and along those twenty five I've got a fifteen minute nap. That's right in that sweet spot of of nap length time, and what kind of difference. Does it make in you before? And after an app, you know as silly. As sounds obvious. I feel more awake. You know? I I don't have that kind of groggy period. And here's the thing. Our brain power. Doesn't stay the same throughout the day. This. It's it's it's really important in your Nashville. Right. I am. Okay. So let's talk about the predators. All right. Your hockey team. Okay. Here's what naps are like. All right. The predators. Play the first period against whoever the Washington Capitals are the Tronto Maple Leafs or whatever. Okay. And then you look at the ice after the first period. Right. What is the ice? Look like, it's all scuffed up. It's chipped. It's messed up, right? Then what happens? Some dude comes out in Zamboni in smooths out the ice. All right. Naps are like that. Zamboni right. We get all these Nixon scuff over the course of a day. A nap comes in and and smooth that out. But again, it's not these long naps. It's not the nap at a six month old child takes ten twenty minute. Naps can be normally affective. You're right, though, that in many cases, many companies really really really really looked on that. So if you're thinking about doing it, you know, be at least at the beginning B, discreet about it. Saying you're saying don't curl up under your desk, and just have certainly don't curl up on your desk. That's probably even worse. Well, one thing I do want to get to. And you know, we're we're getting the end of our time. So this is absolutely perfect. But I loved where you talk about the effect endings have on our memories and our behavior. So can you you spend a few minutes talking about why the way something ends is so important. I mean, the y of it is actually complicated..

Nashville hockey Nixon Washington twenty minutes twenty five minutes ten minutes ten twenty minute fifteen minute twenty seconds twenty feet six month
"daniel pink" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"So in the Denmark example, that I gave you one of the remedies, and it was very effective was braked. If you give those afternoon test-takers a twenty to thirty minute break to have a snack run around a little bit on the playground. They actually get their scores back up in this part of a larger body of research on breaks as a performance enhancer. We have totally undersold the importance of breaks as a way to maintain our mood maintain our mid mental acuity breaks are much more important than we realize because we tend to think I've got a power through this work day. And what you find what you tell us is if you'll take a break and walk away from it for a bit. You're going to actually get more done in less time precisely. Precisely we think that that the way to get. But that's our goal is to get more done. Get more work done in better work done. And somehow we've been seduced by the belief that the way to do that is to power through the powering through is is the pathway for getting more work done in better work done and sort of like the morning people like morning people is idea that that that early risers are morally superior also made some in the same thing is true with like powering through as morally superior than taking a break. Both of those notions are nonsense absolute nonsense. You know, a lot of people believe that amateurs take breaks in professionals. Don't when in fact, it's precisely one hundred percent. The opposite professionals take amateurs don't take breaks. Can you tell us what kind of impact at has what kind of results did you see between people who took breaks and people who didn't? Oh, it's it's massive. So we know that evidence from the standardized. That taking tests in the afternoon brings those scores back up. We know that in in medicine, for instance, that having these these intentional vigilance breaks can dramatically reduce the number of medical errors. We know in hospitals where there were mentioned there was this big decline in handwashing inside of hospitals in the afternoon. One of the remedies for that was to give especially the nurses more breaks. But also particular kinds of bricks social breaks breaks with other nurses, because we know that the research is telling us it breaks with other people are more restored of brakes on our own. We know the breaks outside or better than breaks inside. We know that breaks were removing are more effective than breaks where were stationary. And so you see some also some interesting research, you might have covered. Some of the work of unders Eriksen in deliberate practice has been sort of adjacent to some of the work in positive psychology one of things that he did in his study of high performers in this. Particular case violinist is that the elite violinist took more breaks longer breaks than the naughtily violinists. And so there's a lot of evidence we have to start thinking of breaks differently. We have started thinking of breaks as part of our performance rather than a deviation from our performance. That's what federal athletes do fresh athletes high level musicians understand this the rest of us need to start following their sterling example is that something you should schedule in at the beginning of your day..

Eriksen Denmark one hundred percent thirty minute
"daniel pink" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"That we tend to move through the day in three stages. A peek a trough a recovery a peak Atraaf recovery of peak is when were most vigilant were able to bat away distractions. The trough is usually in the middle of the day. When there's a big big drops in performance in recovery is for most of us later in the day or late afternoon early evening when we're better at doing creative kinds of work. Okay. So about eighty percent of people who aren't als moved to the day peak trough recovery and for them the peak often occurs in the morning, a Kerr's different times in the morning doesn't mean that everybody should get up before dawn. But in general eighty percent of us reach our peak early in the day rather than late. However, twenty percent of us people like you are very very different AL's reach their peak their cognitive peak much later in the day, you know, evening well into the evening, and so what we should be doing whether or locker and house, we should be doing our analytic. Nick heads down work during our peak. Whenever it is. We should be doing more creative work during recovery period. Which again eighty percent of us late afternoon early evening for AL's. It's a little bit more more more complex. But what we need to do is do the right work at the right time, regardless of our chronic type as exactly as you say. So I think that the corporate will certainly discriminates markedly against us. I was gonna ask about that. Next alleger won't go into that territory. Oh, yeah. The the corporate world in many ways is I think trying explicitly to crush the souls suffer life out of people like you. I mean in it goes against what the research tells us, what the research tells us is that people should be doing certain kinds of work during their peak for a lot of us that peak is the morning for fifth of us, including you that peak is in the evening in we should be doing our creative work much more at different times of day. Also this midday trough between the early at the early to mid after. The news is there's rampant evidence that forms declined significantly during that period significantly during that period. So you see it in education test scores. Go down you see it in healthcare hospitals or dangerous places in that part of the afternoon. You see it in jury decision making you see it into digital decision making you see it in corporate performance in. So the main thing we have to do is get synchrony between our type are we morning afternoon. People between our task is the work analytic or visit creative and the time of day. Once we put those things in alignment, we can do more work. We can do better work. We can be a little bit more satisfied. What I love about your book is it kind of guides people through this. So they can figure out like, oh, this is why I'm not doing well in my job because I'm trying to do this at this point in time or in my overall life. I'm not doing the timing. Right. And then you you can adjust it. So it fits you. Instead of your fitting into the schedules around you perfectly said. That's exactly the takeaway from this is that, you know, especially we have things like chronic types. The goal is not to like we can't have some kind of magical conversion therapy to convert you from Allah into a lark day, doesn't try doesn't work. It doesn't work that way. Because that's part of your it's part of your biology. All right. It's like it's like complaining that somebody. Oh, you're so frustrating to me because they're short. It's like, okay. What are you gonna do about that? Or so frustrating to me because he's tall what he's tall. What are you gonna do about that? What do you do about? When someone is. Sure tall is is you adjust the environment to them. You don't try to a long gate them or shrink them? You just the environment to them. And that's what we should be doing. So for people like like you and are very very interesting population because they're actually our personality differences between in the accurate between Allison and larks larks tend to be very conscientious extroverted AL's actually tend to have more problems things like depression and addiction. But. Also test higher on intelligence tests. They test hire on creativity..

AL Kerr Nick Allison depression eighty percent twenty percent
"daniel pink" Discussed on Live Happy Now

Live Happy Now

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Live Happy Now

"One ninety three of live happy. Now. This is your host Paula Phelps. Thanking you for joining us today this week we have a really special guest Daniel pink is a New York Times bestselling author and with his latest book when the scientific secrets of perfect timing. He takes a fresh look at how we make decisions. Now we make decisions every day. And we ask ourselves what we need to do however going to do it. And sometimes why we need to do it. But with this latest book Daniel shows us, how the way we time our decisions can change our days, our jobs and even our relationships. Let's hear what he has to say Daniel thank you for joining us today on live happy. Now. It's really a pleasure to have you here today on our show. It's great to be with you this. You've looked at a topic. That is something. I don't think a lot of us have put a lot of thought into even though we are making decisions every day. We really don't look at timing. So what is it though that made you decide to start? Looking at the science of timing and how that affects us. Yeah. I think it was really more frustration than anything else because you know, exactly as you say, I was making all kinds of timing decisions in my own life. When I'm writer wind, should I do my writing winter to exercise in the day. When should I start a project when should I stop a project, and I was making those decisions in a very haphazard way that frustrated me, and I looked around for guidance did find it. And then they started just said, hey, I wonder if there's any research on this topic and turn it. There was a huge amount of research on this topic. The challenge was that it was not in a single discipline. So it wasn't there were some psychology. But it wasn't only psychology. 'cause there was some in economics, and it was in anthropology, and it was in molecular biology, and there's a whole field called chronobiology, and it was in endocrinology, and it was an anesthesiology and all of these disparate fields were asking very similar questions. So what's the effect of time of day on how we feel how we perform how do. Beginnings affect us how to mid points effect us how to endings affect us. And I took a long time to track through all the research. But once I did I feel like this research offers clues about how to make these timing decisions in a smarter shooter way. How does learning the power of when change the way that we make our decisions he said, we make them in Schreuder way. But how is that? Yeah. Well, I mean, this is what every level. So we think, but I'll the most obvious one which is that a lot of research tells us both ends again in psychology and aspects of biology in chronobiology, and even sociology gives us tells us this hour brain power does not remain the same over the course of a day. It changes it changes in contingent very significant ways it changes in predictable ways. And there are certain times of day when we are better at certain kinds of tasks simply knowing that in moving the. Right work to the right time can make a world of difference. Is it different for every person though? I read so many things I'm a night. Owl. I am not a morning person at all. And I read so many things about you happy. No matter what you have to get early. You have to do all these things. I'm so glad that you ask that because the idea that there is one size fits all is is nonsense. And this idea that the that the secret to high performance is getting up insanely early is is not sense. Here's what we know is this. So it begins with exactly what you're talking about. Which is what's called a chronic type chronic type is our propensity. Do we wake up early and go to sleep early or we like you to a wake up late and go to sleep late? Here's what the distribution looks like about fifteen percent of us are very strong morning. People larks about twenty percent of us people like you are very strong evening. People als in about two thirds of us are kind of in the middle. And what we know is that..

Daniel pink chronobiology Paula Phelps New York Times writer Schreuder fifteen percent twenty percent
"daniel pink" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"Information than the buyer. The seller can rip you off when the seller has more information than the buyer. The buyer doesn't have many choices of our doesn't have a way to talk back. The seller has a huge edge. This is why we haven't coded in our laws encoded in our cousins of commerce. The principle of buyer, beware, it's all about information, but here's the thing in we haven't wrap their minds around yet is that we are living in a world of information, a symmetry, less and less, and less and less and less and less and less. We are moving closer not perfectly to a world of information territory where buyers have lots of choices. Lots of information in lots of ways to talk back that has even the scales limit that to my mind is a world of seller. Beware. Now, the cell. Others are notice. And as a consequence, it's a really bad idea to take the low road. Not only is it bad morally? It's just not gonna work or at least for a very long. And so what you have to do, you have to take the higher road and the higher road we know from the social science is about these. These new ABC's not always be closing ABC's, but the ABC's these personal qualities that are necessary to flourish in this new world, a tune mint. Can you take someone else's perspective buoyancy? Can you stay afloat in this ocean of rejection? Clarity, can you go from accessing information to curate and as we were talking about before from problem solving the problem findings. And so the way to be effective in selling, actually today in a world of information parody is to actually act like a human being. And so they should disabuse themselves as notion that selling a sleazy to push it. It's not it one point. It risks being that way, but the underlying. Conditions for that have changed. Markedly. The other thing is that you know an put a very fine point on this is that if you have something that you think benefits the world, I think you have a moral obligation to try to bring it to people if you have something that's so extrordinary a solution, an idea, a piece of software design that is going to make a material difference in people's lives. I'm sorry, you don't have the luxury of sitting around waiting for people to come and knock on your door. You gotta go out and tell people about God, not only for your own economic solvency, but I actually think you have a moral obligation to the planet to tell us about if that great, that is so powerful and I am I'll I'll be repeating that and going back to that. And that gives so many people such permission and reminds them that they have value and purpose and and they shouldn't be apologizing for for wanting to create something. Absolutely. And I don't think it's permission. I'm going to see your permission raise you obligation. You know, that's what it is. You talk about how we need to understand other people's perspectives, and that's how we can take the high road and how important that is. And you talk about three rules for for doing that. How do we do that? Teach us how to do that so that when we're when we're contacting somebody were doing it from a place of being able to really be in their shoes and help them from where they are. It really depends on number of different factors. But one thing is that when we feel powerful, we're not very good perspective. And so when we're in a one position, we're when we're bossing people around, we tend to be pretty bad perspective takers and that really undermined the bosses. So a lot of bosses fail because they're they're bad perspective takers. And one reason they're bad perspective takers is that they feel too powerful. So one thing to do is put a check on.

ABC
"daniel pink" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"We do things because they are self determined, not determined by other people. We do things because we'd like to get better at stuff. We do things because we wanna make a contribution to the world. And that third drive I is, I think, really what makes us human beings that is other creatures on the planet, have a biological drive in a reward in punishment drive, right. I mean, the home, Karen stick metaphor comes from forces, and certainly every biological creature has bides very nature biological drive. So what makes us human, I think are the is this third drive in that, you know, again, we want to do things that matter. We wanna do things because they interest us. We want to do things because we're curious about them. We wanna do things because they make the world a little bit better because they help out of teammate because they were. Expression of who we are and that's their drive. I felt there's a rich body of scientific evidence showing that that those drives are powerful performance enhancers, but they're often neglected by companies who only take that two dimensional view of human being. And that's really fascinating because I feel like so many people listening right now are like trying to like shout through their headphones ago. I totally feel this. I mean, so often when you're at a job, you're not feeling like you are the best version of yourself. You're not feeling that the best stuff is coming from you and you're trying to access that. And so what can we do? What? What is it that we can do to to sort of curate that environment for ourselves to pull out from within us what we really have to offer to the world? How can we generate that and those ideas that we can actually perform better? Well, it's a very tough question and some of it isn't under the individuals full control. So one thing that one could do is do what I did and what. Many people have done, which is leave. Just set up your own shop that idea of trying to be out from being self, determined being out from under someone's thumb is a big impetus in people going out on on their own. So that's one possibility. So I've been self employed for two decades now, is it a land of milk and Honey do every day I wake up to a rainbow sprouting across my garage office and unicorns running past my large windows. No don't do not, but are some days a giant pain in the neck are some days you know, terrible. This Sunday's make me shake my head in wonder why Joe's to do what I'm doing. Absolutely. There's no question about that. But for me, at least compared to having a job where I have a boss appear to having a job where I don't have that level of autonomy compared to a job, whereas you say very astutely a job where I don't feel I can be the best version of myself. This absolutely preferable. So so I think for some people making that leap. Giving up your day job is the right path. I don't think that's true for everybody, but I think it's true for a lot of people. And in some cases, that's the only alternative. It was hard for me to imagine a work situation where I could do the work that I wanted to do that was meaningful to me the way wanted to do that within a structured larger environment. So now on the other hand, it's possible that enlighten organizations can create the conditions in the circumstances where people can do really great work. And what that requires though is again back to this, the set of design principles which is one, you gotta pay people well, so I don't want people to have the idea that you know were motivated by this third drive of doing things that matter and learning and growing that we don't care about money. Of course, we care about money, so organizations, you know who want to sit up, this kind of environment should pay people. Well, people very well at some level. The issue of money off the table. So we focused on the work rather than on the money. Once you do that, I think that these design principles which come from impart from a field of psychology called self determination theory, which was minted by two brilliant social scientists, Richard Ryan, and Edward DC twenty thirty years ago..

Joe self employed Karen Richard Ryan Edward DC twenty thirty years two decades milk
"daniel pink" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"Also, I could ask the leaders of these different groups whenever they. I feel like it once a week or every couple of weeks to send me sort of what's going on. And if there's somebody in the group that's doing really cool stuff, maybe they could kinda let me know and I would have more of a closer ear to what's going on, and I think it would just be cool to bring together all the people who might be in your town who are listening to this podcast who are really like minded who are creative, who are wanting to be doing more of what they really love and and to have friends like that. It's such a precious thing, and I think that we rise by lifting each other even more than we can on our own. So why don't we start our own? Don't give it age of group in our hometown, and I wanna do stuff to support you. And I wanted to giveaways just for the people who are doing these groups in part of being a part of this group because I think that we should reward action because we can think and thinking thinking things. But ultimately we've got to start doing and we gotta do a lot in order to start seeing things gross, I think creating for yourself ways of keeping yourself accountable and inspired and encouraged is really going to help a lot, especially looking into next year and twenty. Two thousand nineteen being on the horizon. The more we can set ourselves up and be part of something like this. I think that will actually get the results that we want much faster. So two things either go ahead and create your own group and then go on to Instagram and DM me and let me know that you created a group and tell me what city it's in and tell me your Email address so I can keep in touch with you and I can support you, and I'll notify you of ways that I can do stuff just to support these various groups. We can do some meet ups. We can do some video sessions and if you're having trouble in you wanna be part of a group like this. I'll go ahead and I'm gonna post a shared Google doc on the don't keep age of Facebook group so that people can put their name and Email address and you can put the city you're in. And then other people might join that Google doc and you can find each other and you can start a group that way. So I wanna do whatever I can't support you, but please let me know if you went ahead and started a group. I'm to be doing a giveaway just for people who are part of these groups, and I'm so excited to hear more about it. All right. So enough about all that. Let's dive into today's episode. So we're very, very blessed to have with us today. Daniel pink. He is so brilliant. You're in for such a treat. He's a best selling author of a ward winning book such as when the scientific secrets of perfect timing, which spent four months on the New York Times bestseller list, and it's on Amazon lists of best books. So far of two thousand eighteen his other books include the long running bestseller, a whole new mind, and the number one near times bestsellers drive n the book to sell is human. Each book is just so rich with these super interesting case studies and discoveries, you're going to get so many HAMAs from each one. So definitely go ahead and check them out. You may have heard him or seen him before. He's been on NPR PBS ABC, CNN and other TV and radio networks in the US and around the world. His articles have been in fast company wired the New York Times..

New York Times Google HAMAs Daniel pink Instagram Facebook US CNN ABC Amazon four months
"daniel pink" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Win, though that cognitive ability changes and how it changes is going to be key urgent in your ability to do your job. Yeah. And I think I think for many developers would ends up happening. Is those early hours in getting an? I'm kind of jumping ahead here and talking about, you know what? We, what we should ultimately do as a result of this information. But a lot of developers enough spinning the first couple of hours of their day doing their administrative stuff. Right? Which is a bad idea tear by. It also seems intuitive to do it that way to set up our day. We go through all the stuff that needs to be done and try to prioritize it by the time that we're finished doing that. It's time to go to lunch. Yeah. And that can be matter. Totally. And so what is the way that we may be able to avoid this? I mean, the main thing you You know. know, it's, it's, it's going to from person to person, but the the main idea is this what you want is you want synchrony between your your type, your task you're gone. So when when it comes type we're talking about chronic type and about that just means what your propensity is wake up early and go to sleep early or is the wake up late and go to sleep late about fifteen percent of us are strong. Early people larks about twenty percent of us, strong evening people als, but two-thirds of us are in the middle and what we know is it about, you know, it's basically divided between Allison non als, a als. Not AL's moved to the day p trough recovery peak, early trough, middle recovery later in the day, AL's much more complicated, they tend to hit their analytic much much later in the day. And so what you want is if your peak is late in the day or your peak is early in the day, you wanna do your heads down work that requires vigilance. That is where you don't wanna be distracted. You wanna do that during your peak. You wanna try to do as much of that as you can't during your p during the trough. When you're at where are worse, put your administrative stuff in there, and then during the recovery, you can try to steer some of you more iterative kinds of work. And what the research tells us is that that that time of day alone explains about twenty percent of the variance in how people perform on cognitive tasks. So that's a big deal. Yeah, that's that's a huge deal in. So what does this mean for for organizations? How do we, you know, of course, this is. This is perhaps a question for ten years from now or twenty years from now as work evolves and moves out of that efficiency perspective. Hopefully it will evolve in that way, but how do we organizationally accommodate for this? You know, does it mean that we do that we moved to flex hours? Do we break that nine to five mold and allow people to work in a more suitable way to their chronic time? I think that's part of it. And I also think it's really a question of intention -ality that a lot of what we do is unintentional. That is we make decisions about meetings. Okay. When we scheduled meetings in organizations, the only criterion that we use is availability. We say, Jonathan available is Jose available is Maria vailable and his conference room six l. open and that's it. And we don't say, hey, who's going to be at this? Who's going to be at its? Yeah, it's logistics and availability. We don't say, oh, what kind of meeting is this? Do need people to be vigilant. Need to be looser, who brainstorming is purely administrative, who's gonna be there is they're going to be lark. They're going to be out people in the middle. We just say, hey, it really doesn't matter. All that matters is availability and so we end up making a lot of our wind decisions on, you know, in a completely thoughtless default way when in fact, if we made them in an intentional way, we would do this performance considerably. Absolutely. So intentionally around these decisions, unloved to kind of run through some common kind of activities in. We're going to do that right after we.

AL Allison Jonathan Maria vailable Jose twenty percent fifteen percent twenty years ten years six l
"daniel pink" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Developer Tea

"You don't use to on purpose, right? If you're doing this intentionally or unintentionally, you're going to do something in some frame of time of lawyer in in your research is showing that that frame of time actually has an effect on the different things that you do and the outcomes huge huge affect bigger than we realize. So another true, not only in terms of like time of day, but it's also true in that beginnings exert one influence on our behavior, mid points, exerted. Another influence endings exert yet another influence. So one example that we can bring up very quickly is that we're doing this interview at one o'clock in the afternoon, perhaps a great time for a discussion like this because it's a little bit of a slump we're having to do a lot of creative output and I'm kind of giving away a little bit of the punchline of the book here, but our I is multiple punch lines. But one of the main themes of the book is, is that mid point slump or or the afternoon slump a, I'd love for you to share what, what do you think was the maybe the most surprising. Revelation that you had when doing the research for this book? Biggest surprise for me was how much are cognitive abilities change over the course of a day. No one ever told me that, you know, I would feel maybe sharper or duller at different times of day, and I always thought that was a character weakness or sign of laziness or something. When in fact, the evidence tells us that very clearly, our cognitive abilities do not remain static over the course of a day. They change. They can change in predictable ways they can change in dramatic ways. And so that to me was just one of the, you know, the big, big, big, big takeaways. And so your cognitive ability at a eight AM depending on your chronic type which we can talk about in just a moment, but it is going to be significantly different and not only better or worse, but also characteristically different than the in the evening. Yes. So so the gist of it isn't a human beings who typically move through the day in three stages, a peek, a trough and a recovery peak atrop-, and. Covering most of us moved through in that order. People who are night owls end up moving in a different path with night owls. The main thing is at their peak is. Is much much later in the day, and what we know is during the peak, that's when we're most vigilant. So an individual's means we're able to battle away distractions and and that's what we should be doing. Our heads down work work that requires vigilance during the trough which most of us is almost all of us is the middle of the day. That's when we should be. Doing our administrative work, our performance drops significantly. So we should be doing things that don't require massive creativity or heavy cognitive load. And then during the recovery, which for most of us is late night after noon in early in the evening, that's when our vigilance is down, but our mood is up. So we can do things that require greater mental looseness like brainstorming. And what the research shows is that you actually perform better if you do the right work with the right time, depending again, depending on your chronic type. Do your analytic work in the p, your administrative work in the trough and your insight work during the recovery. Do you think people have naturally discovered this for themselves over the years? A great question. Yes and no, I think some people have and so they've reoriented their schedules. I think other people have a hunch that haven't necessarily acted on a hunch. And so if you so you see things like. If you see things like this thing about. I was gonna say. Joke, it's yeah. So so thinking about things like cultures that had a siesta. All right. There's a logic to that because our, you know, again, during that midday, our cognitive abilities, Wayne, our mental acuity, Wayne's our energy levels drop. And so there's a logic to having that kind of mid daybreak on the same. We should revive that in modern times, but I think people who did that had a sense that, hey, something's happening..

Wayne
"daniel pink" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Developer Tea

"So let's let's let's take the example like stuffing envelopes. Okay, we've stuffing envelopes controlling mechanisms can be affective. So if you say to people, if you wanna wanna envelope stuff, pay people, you know parental, if you'll get a lot more influence stuff than payment. Flat, right? There's no question about it. You know, you might get more. You might get more envelopes stuffed in at least in the short term. Certainly, in the short term is if you have monitoring cameras to make sure that everybody is stepping their envelopes, if you have people walking back and forth to make sure the people are filling their under envelope, stuffing quota. But when it comes to things that require judgment, discernment, creativity. People don't do their best work under conditions of control. We're not creative when we're always being measured. We're not creative when somebody is monitoring us, we're not created. We're we're less creative when there is this when we have to do it within a scaffolding of contingent punishment. Contingent rewards. Yeah. And this is definitely true for for development. If you pay your developers, you know per line of code than your code is gonna long coat. Yeah, exactly. Right. You'll get good co. You'll get long code. Absolutely. Yeah. And because in it's the same thing that the discussion on game fine. You know, the rats, the rats, tails. I'm sure you've heard this. Believe is in London. Experiment was done where a London as city or some city. I'm probably getting the details wrong, but they paid per the tale of a rat. And so what ended up happening is people outside of the city started farming rats and they would bring the tails in after they farm the rest. And so, yeah, the the system will be game finance, not. Necessarily because there's nefarious, you know, people, there's not rat farmers all over in the tech industry necessarily. But because what you reward is is what you're going to optimize for. Right. Exactly. Thank you so much for listening to today's episode of developer t the first part of my interview with Daniel pink. Daniel was so gracious to come on the show, and I hope that you enjoyed this first part and I hope you will subscribe whatever podcast app you're using now. So you don't miss out on the second part of this interview. You may notice that we didn't have a sponsor for this episode and this was on purpose. We actually have an ad free version of developer t and if you wanna listen to more episodes like this one that are uninterrupted by ads, then I encourage you.

developer Daniel pink London
"daniel pink" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Yeah, in-incredibly trophy. It's it's true, especially in tech. If you would go into a startup in San Francisco, you can identify the person who doesn't want you to talk to them. They're the ones that is when they're wearing the headphones, and it's it certainly stereotype, right? And a lot of developers plan to this because there's some kind of Dimity that that is forming their in. Perhaps perhaps it's a personal identity, but also this organization identity. The idea of having pingpong table. Hopefully we're slowly moving past. And I think that's that's something that is changing in the tech industry removing little bit past the know unlimited paid time off. And while everybody knows that that's actually not true. And so if you were really to take limited time off, you wouldn't even work there anymore. Right? So there's there's these identity, things that were building and maybe breaking, and there's kind of this post PO start up culture that's emerging from that as well. Yeah, probably probably. I mean, again, I think that you raise another good point about about identity identity identity matters much more than a lot of conventional. I think business and political thinking. Account accounts, Yana. I also believe that the values discussion that you brought up earlier plays heavily into that, right? Yeah. And so we're, we're trying to form in perhaps it's because you know, we have difficulty expressing our own values and something that I created this show to help kind of evolve the listeners ability to express their own values. Because if you can't express your own value than perhaps someone else can help you express it. Right. And so we adopt values of our neighbors readopt the values of company that we were in, this is how we have these kind of homogenous groups of people that clustered together because they're geographically, or you know, some other kind of collection of people. They start to adopt each other's values and this is very normal, isn't it? Yeah, totally. I mean, we are social creatures. We human beings and so we are deeply influenced. Spy who's around us when we decide how to behave, we look for q about from people in our midst. And so, you know, this is where you know complicated where complicated creatures. And again, a lot of times that the way that we think about business away, the organizations doesn't account for that kind of complexity doesn't account for the multidimensional multiple Multidimensionality of many human beings. Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Yeah. In this, this drives pun intended back to some of your original kind of or perhaps your most well known works about autonomy, mastery, purpose. You know, how can we? How tightly would you say those values and. Interact with purpose. For example. Yeah. Well, I think if you look at. The research on the values of Tana master in purpose. I actually pretty deep in fairly universal that has in some ways. I think they can cut across out certain kinds of values. So if you look at something like Tommy atonomy doesn't mean. You know, you know, screw them in and I'm going to go off on my own like a cowboy in the American west on what it means. It means basically self direction, having some sovereignty over yourself, and I can be in the service of something collective as it would be in places like in East Asian places, or it can be in the service of something purely individualistic as it is here in the United States often in the United States, but the idea that people want to be self determined, they wanna have they wanna have sovereignty over themselves. I think that's universal and it's perfectly compatible with, you know, a sense of collective desire or or collective purposing. The same thing is true with from like Masri which is desire to get better at stuff that cuts across all cuts across values. Just think about in the same thing is true with herpes. That is, I think people wanna know why they're doing something. Brother, just how religious how to do it, and everybody's purposing necessarily gonna line. But I think everybody does have an animating sense of purpose that helps drive the that that helps that helps drive what they do. So if you think about like the difference in value that these are after viewed this actually more like human nature resin values..

United States San Francisco Masri Tommy atonomy
"daniel pink" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Developer Tea

"We need to. We need to radically them. There are some people out there on something like the death penalty where you say, well, death penalty isn't a perfectly appropriate punishment for the most grievous crimes. Are the people saying no under no circumstances should stay take the life of somebody on things abortion you have, you know, you know, is, isn't abortion the killing of a human being and their people who say, well, yet is because life begins at conception. There are other people who say, well, of course not because that embryo is not a human being, and and so even even then there are these, you know, the. Five at the moral level that we sometimes don't talk about those things about killing and death penalty and abortion, things that we don't talk about it when we typically are aren't germane to a lot of organizations. But some of these other underlying moral issues are especially when, as I said, when it comes to things like hollering, when it comes to things like ambiguity, a thority. When it comes to things even like order plan leanness Campos. Those are big deals in organizations can be talking about these things in more useful ways. Would you agree with us? Totally. So how can we, how can we have better conversation values? Maybe that's maybe that's a good question that we don't necessarily have an answer to. You know, I think that there is, you know, in general allot of what happens in organizations, the interactions and certainly conversations in some sense are performed run than rather than lived. We're all playing certain now. Now it's now it's sociologist. Now the the, you know, were performing some of these roles in there sometimes not offensive conversation. I think authentic conversations inevitably surface some of these deeper issues. I think that the. China conversations. Keep those things you know behind a locked door, which. Manages their diminishes their usefulness. So you know, and you see things like I mean on a Monday. In example, you see somebody like, you know, the conversations of people haven't performance reviews. I mean, those that that's a completely performance give encounter somebody playing the role of boss, somebody's playing the role of employees. It's not the kind of conversation that people would have when they're out having a beer with someone they're comfortable with, right?.

Campos China
"daniel pink" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Daniel pink jason i have discovered that if i've got a show and i don't know if there's drew for you also dan but when i'm doing a bunch of interviews like you are on your book tour if i've got something booked at three pm it's not my best work and if i've got something booked at four pm you should probably cancel it because if it doesn't go in the host is not on point i'm just going to hate that person forever and it's not fair to them now yeah yeah no that's a fair point so when so what we saw what we should what you should do is that so for people who are in the who are morning people even people who are intermediate people about they tend to have their p in the morning and the peak with a peak means is simply this narrow what made it simply means that's when you are highest we are highest in vigilance vigilance what does it mean to be vigilance vigilance means that you're able to bat away distractions and you're able to focus and that makes the peak the best time to do analytic work work that requires that heads down focus and attention analyzing data writing a report all right so for about eighty percent of us remember twothirds of us are in the middle fifteen percent are larks you know so it's roughly eighty percent of us we tend to have our p r analytic peak our vigilance peak in the morning now for the twenty percent of people who are evening types who are night owls it's different they have their analytic p much much later in the day so they're the ones who are better off doing like let's say if you're a writer you know they're better off doing writer who are nine are much better off doing their writing at seven eight nine ten pm whereas me i'm not i'm lucky i'm not as much of a large as you i'm much better off doing my writing in the morning and that's how i've reconfigured my day so that i do my writing when on my writing days i always right in the morning and i clear the decks to make sure i don't even have any temptation i'm ben at batting way distractions but i can reoccupy environment to even keep even more distractions of bet we figure on our krona time and then we can plan our day around.

Daniel pink writer dan eighty percent fifteen percent twenty percent
"daniel pink" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Very isolating so in these spaces you can connect with real humans and all the while you space more efficiently and cost effectively which makes you end your business better equipped to face the challenges of today and tomorrow we work now has more than two hundred locations so you can find great spots all over the world so head over to we dot co for slash tim that's we dot co ceo we dot co ford slash tim to become a part of the global we were community at the very least i encourage you to check out pictures of some of the locations around the world there are some incredible spots check it out we dot co ford slash tim lopez and girls this is tim ferriss and welcome to another episode of the tim ferriss show mike guess today is daniel h pink at daniel pink on twitter he is the author of six provocative books including his newest when subtitle the scientific secrets of perfect timing when is a new york times wall street journal usa today washington post end publisher's weekly bestseller that's a lot of lists picks other books include the long running near times bestseller a whole new mind and the number one new york times bestsellers drive into sell is human his books have won multiple awards had been translated into thirty seven languages at last count he lives in washington dc with family you can also find his work his various goings on at dan pink dot com and facebook is your thing facebook dot com forward slash daniel h pink.

ceo tim lopez tim ferriss twitter publisher ford mike daniel pink wall street journal washington york times facebook
"daniel pink" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"daniel pink" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Hello and welcome to the monaco weekly among who'll 24 with me talk and riverbound today we looking at the art of timing things right behavior i'm busy specialist daniel pink who is with us to discuss his book when the scientific secrets of perfect timing later in the show we'll also hear from the film director judea to kuna about some of the finest films from our home country france and she should note having created one of last year's very best rule i will be finishing off on a high caffeine related one anyway with the oath a jeff cola his book where the wall coffee grows traces the story of the world's favorite bean plus henry's sheridan will be here with some of next week's possible big stories and would enjoy some good news it to as right here on the miracle weekly on multiple 24 glad you're here we find ourselves on a sunny sunday at noon we limping over the line or are we running through the tape well un gone bid by i gotta i've had a good generally have been yuppie most mostly off the booze john redwood yeah pretty good yeah and but i'd enlighten jenry the swimming about the dark and in london has been lashed by snow and rain on is being accusing dark generate some interested to have this conversation we will have later about the right time for doing things 'cause in january icon quite find the right time for doing anything just on friday there was a bit of a can of warmth in the sun for the first time and he so i she i remember think will spring i'm looking forward to it i'm a little bit confused of cot deaths those out in front and back gardens would we think that last that's bizarre isn't it did you give big ones which ones bigger we went for many deaths of these is he classic okay yeah stroller exotic.

daniel pink france caffeine henry monaco weekly director kuna sheridan london