35 Burst results for "Daniel X"

Breonna Taylor's mother: I'm trying to be patient

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 20 hrs ago

Breonna Taylor's mother: I'm trying to be patient

"Brianna Taylor's mother is hoping to hear soon if officers in Louisville Kentucky involved in Taylor's death will be charged to make a Palmer says she is trying to be patient every day still March the thirteenth that's the day police carrying a warrant burst into Taylor's home and shot her Pomerance civil rights attorney Ben Crump met with Kentucky's Attorney General Daniel Cameron she says this is much more than just Brianna Taylor and black lives matter it's about bridging the gaps between us and the police Palmer says the Attorney General told her he doesn't want to rush for me I'm trying to to accept that and be patient with that because I definitely want him to come out with the right answer I'm a Donahue

Brianna Taylor Louisville Kentucky Palmer Ben Crump Daniel Cameron Donahue Attorney
Breonna Taylor's mother: I'm trying to be patient

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 20 hrs ago

Breonna Taylor's mother: I'm trying to be patient

"Brianna Taylor's mother is hoping to hear soon if officers in Louisville Kentucky involved in Taylor's death will be charged to make a Palmer says she is trying to be patient every day still March the thirteenth that's the day police carrying a warrant burst into Taylor's home and shot her Pomerance civil rights attorney Ben Crump met with Kentucky's Attorney General Daniel Cameron she says this is much more than just Brianna Taylor and black lives matter it's about bridging the gaps between us and the police Palmer says the Attorney General told her he doesn't want to rush for me I'm trying to to accept that and be patient with that because I definitely want him to come out with the right answer I'm a Donahue

Brianna Taylor Louisville Kentucky Palmer Ben Crump Daniel Cameron Donahue Attorney
Eugene Levy receives lifetime achievement award at Newport Film Festival

Donna and Steve

02:44 min | 1 d ago

Eugene Levy receives lifetime achievement award at Newport Film Festival

"The Newport Beach Film Festival obviously could not be held in public this year, so The event. Organizers instead decided to do something kind of fun, and they did this with the help of that broadcast on pop TV, and they surprised Eugene Levy. They want to give him the lifetime achievement award. And so they thought, we'll do it like kind of via video conference, and then they said, Well, we've got a surprise. We're not the only ones who wanted to congratulate you. But there are a couple other friends who also wanted to say a few words. And then it goes into this 10 minutes. Essentially, ah, tribute video to him from various people now, too, that you will hear from including cast members from Bleeps Creek there on this is well, but the two that you'll hear from our his longtime pals. Steve Martin and Martin Short, who pop up probably four different times. In this tribute video keeps bouncing back, which is really cool for the video. It's not like you hear four minutes from Martin Short. It's 10 seconds here. 15 here eight seconds with this guy 30 seconds with that girl, Here's Steve Martin and Martin Short toasting. Eugene Levy. But you know, Eugene, you're special because You. Our person, You know, I see people on the streets, sometimes in crowd sometimes alone. I think Eugene could be down the street. He is a person and I happen to know At the Newport Beach Film Festival wanted to give this to a person he was becoming this absolute living legend. Eugene. I was telling everyone how you become a legend. It's just that it's his son, Isaac Daniel Daniel Levy, his son, a fellow co star and co creator of Bleeps Creek, hey is featured throughout Angela Harris, his former co star from SC TV. He Barton, short, Angela Martin and a few others, John Candy, I believe for a time. Over an SC TV. This Canadian improv sketch comedy group and television show Catherine O'Hara was Catherine O'Hara. Yes, yes, And, of course she opposite. She's upset him in Bleeps Creek as well, but it's really It's just sweet and it's fun. And so many people just talk about his kindness. In Ah, how sweet of a guy he is and how much of a professional he waas on set there and just really took the acting and I I think he said, Look, we don't want to play this for laughs, Bleeps Creek. He was like we'll play it as it's written, and he knew that it would result in laughs, but he didn't want extra Ham up everybody's lines all the time to try to hit you over the head with it. Chris Elliott, his Bleeps Creek Co star appears with the longest thickest white beard. You've ever seen. It puts David Letterman's to shame. It's really something.

Bleeps Creek Eugene Levy Martin Short Bleeps Creek Co Steve Martin Newport Beach Film Festival Catherine O'hara Eugene Isaac Daniel Daniel Levy Lifetime Achievement Award John Candy Angela Martin David Letterman Chris Elliott He Barton Angela Harris
Late bullpen miscues cost Seattle Mariners, who head into off day after loss to Rangers

First Light

00:13 sec | 1 d ago

Late bullpen miscues cost Seattle Mariners, who head into off day after loss to Rangers

"Todd Frazier scored the tie breaking run on a wild pitch while the Rangers plated five in the bottom of the eighth to beat the Mariners 7 to 4. Last night. Texas rallied after Austin Nolan Daniel Vogel back homered in Seattle's four run second

Austin Nolan Daniel Vogel Todd Frazier Mariners Rangers Seattle Texas
Kentucky attorney general meets with Breonna Taylor's family

Terry Meiners and Company

00:33 sec | 1 d ago

Kentucky attorney general meets with Breonna Taylor's family

"General meets with the family of Briana Taylor. Here's Haley Hanson. Attorney General Daniel Cameron met with Taylor's mother to make a Palmer Jr Palmer, Bianca Austin, the family's attorneys, as well as Louisville activists. The attorney general's office says the meeting was an opportunity for Cameron to personally express his condolences to the family. Taylor was killed by Louisville police during a raid at her home back in March. Last week, Cameron said his office was still waiting on ballistic evidence from the FBI crime lab. Haley

Briana Taylor Daniel Cameron Haley Hanson Louisville Attorney Jr Palmer Bianca Austin FBI
Kentucky attorney general meets with Breonna Taylor's family

Terry Meiners and Company

00:21 sec | 1 d ago

Kentucky attorney general meets with Breonna Taylor's family

"Daniel Cameron has bet with the family of Briana Taylor, the woman who was killed by Louisville police and whose death sparked protests. Cameron met with Taylor's mother and the family's attorneys this morning and in a statement, Cameron says he personally expressed his condolences to the family. The attorney general is investigating Taylor's death.

Daniel Cameron Briana Taylor Louisville Attorney
Biden VP pick: Kamala Harris to join Biden in Delaware

Tony Katz Today

00:57 sec | 2 d ago

Biden VP pick: Kamala Harris to join Biden in Delaware

"Ready to go to work. I'm Chris Foster of Fox News. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris will be together in Wilmington, Delaware. Today whereby lives their first appearance as the Democratic Party's presidential ticket. The Biden campaign. Releasing a video of hair is accepting the offer to serve as vice president. If elected. First of all, is the answer, Yes. The words I'm ready to do this with you for you. I know just just only on a very exciting Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel notes that Harris was critical of Biden during the primaries when she was running for president, too. She said that obviously he was part of mass incarcerations. We've seen his rhetoric recently where he said all black people think the same. He called an African American journalists a junkie. She's gonna have to write some of the wrongs that the biting campaign is committed in the gas that Joe Biden continually makes with Daniel there on Fox and Friends. President Trump has an event

Joe Biden Kamala Harris Vice President President Trump Fox News Democratic Party Republican National Committee Chris Foster Ronna Mcdaniel Delaware Wilmington FOX Daniel
The Biden-Harris Ticket

Derek Hunter

00:52 sec | 2 d ago

The Biden-Harris Ticket

"And Kamala Harris will be together in Wilmington, Delaware, today whereby list their first appearance as the Democratic Party's presidential ticket. Biden campaign. Releasing a video of hair is accepting the offer to serve as vice president. If elected. First of all, is the answer. Yes, work. I do this with you for you. I know just just very say. Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel notes that Paris was critical of Biden during the primaries when she was running for president to she said that I obviously he was part of mass incarcerations. We've seen his rhetoric recently, where he said all black people think the same. He called an African American journalists a junkie. She's gonna have to write some of the wrongs that the Biden campaign is committed in the gas that Joe Biden continually makes. Daniel. They're on Fox and friends.

Joe Biden Vice President Kamala Harris Ronna Mcdaniel Democratic Party Republican National Committee Delaware Wilmington Daniel FOX Paris
New Mobile Coronavirus Testing Site Being Set Up At Miami-Dade's Tamiami Park

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:33 sec | 3 d ago

New Mobile Coronavirus Testing Site Being Set Up At Miami-Dade's Tamiami Park

"Funnel cakes of free temporary Corona virus testing site is opening this morning at the Tammy Emmy Fairgrounds in West Miami Dade. It is not a drive up location, you'll be walking up and we have the test ready. We have individual that would be providing the test on site as well. And then you should be receiving your results within 48 72 hours. State representative Daniel Perez worked with other elected officials to make this two day event a reality. Adults getting their cheeks swab do not need to have symptoms or appointments. Global health experts, meanwhile, say

Tammy Emmy Fairgrounds West Miami Dade Daniel Perez State Representative
Los Angeles - Crisis looms if lawmakers don’t act with eviction ban to end soon in California

KNX Evening News

01:06 min | 4 d ago

Los Angeles - Crisis looms if lawmakers don’t act with eviction ban to end soon in California

"Now for renters across California, there's increasing concerns about a ban on evictions that's going to be ending this week. Up to a 1,000,000 Californians could be forced onto the streets and for those who faced evictions before the pandemic, the county sheriff's Department is now enforcing those notices. People who lost work and couldn't pay rent during the pandemic. They're still safe. But if your case dates back before the pandemic, you could be forced out. That does not sit well with Elena Pop, executive director of the L. A based eviction defense network. Every single person who ends up on the street is likely toe suffer from the pandemic likely to get affected and unlikely to affect others. But Daniel Colson of the Apartment Association of Greater Rally, which represents landlords, Says landlords have rights to these people that had lost cases well before the eviction moratoriums have not been paying rent. But the property owners have been unable to get a lock out because the sheriff's department was doing walkouts anymore. The county decision follows actions already taken in Orange and San Bernardino counties, Chris C. Eden's keychain next 10 70 news

Sheriff's Department Apartment Association Of Great Daniel Colson Elena Pop Chris C. Eden Executive Director San Bernardino California Orange
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:59 min | Last week

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal. I one hundred percent agree into because of that I think about what the solutions, all the problem. I always come back to equity. And that's ultimately I think about risk driving for and I think what makes this time so ready Angry special in many ways, is that the asking leadership to support us with? Of. Traditional tax. Supporting. Mental. Internships I think already doing now is we're actually asking our structures like quite literally reopen is themselves to include us and then from where all collectively dying today. Tearing structures, things I. think that's really the only way that detained from a call out that house structure best is the Cha I'm. Deploying mechanisms to. Erase. Racism, I I think it is about equity. Entering do you have anything to add to that? Now I think this are. Really great points. I. It's definitely. A lot of things that Lindsey and my style and the executive or have been working on in terms of. What our goals out of its in having a long term strategy with friends is really essential. There's no way you can teach someone to unlearn something that was you know systematically in place for all of this time. So it's essential for us to not only educate work alongside people who are really willing and ready to make those changes. Over time in for us, it's a three to five year period with benchmarks and timelines and touch points. To see where are in how they are evolving

Founder Black Fashion Council Harlem Sandrine Charles Salting Sandrine Charles Charles Henrietta Galina Brandon Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay United States Brandis Daniel Chief Executive NBA Consultant Lindsay People Chairman Executive Editor Branston
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | Last week

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Black Fashion Council Founder Henrietta Galina Brandon Sandrine Charles Sandrine Charles Salting Harlem Charles Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay Brandis Daniel United States Chief Executive NBA Consultant Chairman Lindsay People Executive Editor CEO
Mass Hauntings

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:12 min | Last week

Mass Hauntings

"Mass haunting 's in Gettysburg for over one Hundred Years Gettysburg Pennsylvania's been flooded by reports of paranormal activity from Phantom cries, wounded soldiers, lifelike apparitions, many visitors to Gettysburg of untouched by haunting. Past Gettysburg was a site where confederate and union armies clashed on July. First, eighteen, sixty, three, the battle. Was Day bloodbath that will change American history forever when cannon smoke clear the union soldiers had one but nearly five thousand horses and fifty thousand men lay dead or dying ninety. The confederate soldiers never received a proper burial now, more than fourteen decades. Later, these unsubtle spirits may still linger and Gettysburg. This historic town is home to a surprising number of Phantom. Forms captured in photography including the ghost of what appears to be General Robert e Lee the Daniel Lady Farm was used a confederate army field hospital soldiers. He suffered from artillery wounds usually lot of chest wombs lost limbs were brought to the farm to recover suffer through the final moments of their lives. The farmhouse and barns saw their share of ghastly horror. The ghosts of general. Isaac you'll and his ten thousand men still reportedly off the farm cash town and just eight miles west of the tiny town cash town was the site where the first soldier was killed during the Gettysburg campaign of the civil war. The current owners believe they have proof of their ghastly and ghostly visitors chat Palomino in his wife had. Pictures from nineteen, Eighty, seven through two, thousand, seven, a strange orbs and skeleton showing up in photos according to Mr Palladino he and his guests have heard their share of thumping doors. They've also witnessed lights turning on and off on their own doors lock IAN unlocking themselves. The history of Gettysburg hotel is filled with tales very haunting 's a ghost of A. Woman. Who has been seen dancing in the hotel's ballroom paranormal investigators believe the spirit of Union soldier James Colbert on of company K Pennsylvania reserves still roams around the hotel or the Bala dairy in offer spectacular views of the countryside. It's sometimes gives visitors a terrifying glimpse of life after death located on hospital road in served as a union field hospital during. Day Two of the battling Gettysburg Suzanne Lawn key. The owner has collected dozens of stories of photos of her guests ghostly encounters according to a psychic. The in appears to be haunted by confederate soldiers buried underneath a nearby tennis court. The ghost train tourists could take a ninety minute ride on the ghost train the only ghost tour. Gettysburg that takes visitors across. The actual battlefield. One of the tour storyteller says he and the passengers of smelt cigar smoke and see the souls of soldiers roaming on the train or near the tracks won't traveling across historic battle mass

Gettysburg Gettysburg Hotel Gettysburg Pennsylvania Daniel Lady Farm General Robert E Lee Mr Palladino Isaac Tennis James Colbert IAN Bala Dairy A. Woman K Pennsylvania
1 Dead, 2 Hurt in Gold Coast Shooting Tuesday, Chicago Police Say

WBBM Evening News

00:36 sec | Last week

1 Dead, 2 Hurt in Gold Coast Shooting Tuesday, Chicago Police Say

"Chicago's Gold Coast. One man is dead, two others wounded after police say four people pulled up in two cars on Oak Street between Russia and Michigan and opened fire late this afternoon onto a sidewalk. Police Deputy area chief Daniel O'Shea are detectives are in the midst of recovering. Some video from AA lot of the stores that may have captured the incident and were seeking out. Witnesses. Police say a 26 year old man was killed. A 36 year old man is in serious condition at the 26 year old woman who was sitting in a parked vehicle was also shot. She, too, is in serious condition.

Daniel O'shea Gold Coast Russia Chicago Michigan
Judge Salas: 'We are living every parent's worst nightmare'

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:30 min | Last week

Judge Salas: 'We are living every parent's worst nightmare'

"New Jersey Federal judge Esther Solace is going public for the first time since her son was killed and her husband was shot at their home last month. A madman Who I believe was targeting me because of my position as a federal judge came to my house. The federal judge who lost her son in ambush attack is demanding change. We're living Every parent's worst nightmare. Making preparations to Barrett Bury our only child. No. Judge Salas said the family was cleaning up after hosting a birthday celebration for 20 year old Daniel and Daniel said, Mom, Let's keep talking. I love talking to you, Mom. It was at that exact moment that the doorbell rang. And before I could say a word. He sprinted upstairs. Within seconds. I heard the sound of bullets and someone scream. No, police say the alleged gunman, self described anti feminist attorney Roy den Hollander killed himself the next day in my case. The monster knew where I lived. And where and what church we attended. And had a complete dossier on me and my family. At the moment, there is nothing We can do to stop it and that Is

Judge Salas Esther Solace Daniel Roy Den Hollander New Jersey Barrett Attorney
The Rules of Insider Trading

Invested: The Rule #1 Podcast

05:24 min | Last week

The Rules of Insider Trading

"Everybody listens to. BILLTOWN. Daniel town. Up to the PODCAST. We are here to teach and learn about. Investing. Mostly. Ler. Mostly. Teach. Although I have to say. I always seen in my life that you learn I learned the most when I teach something. You certainly, I've learned on this podcast that you certainly learn. where the holes are where you've sort of. Lightly. You know treated lightly intellectually that you've sort of breezed through some major point and you've been amazing it kind of poking. The holes out and saying here. And I. Don't understand this and this doesn't make sense and so on. So that I've learned a lot actually on this podcast. About how to teach it maybe. That's Nice I wasn't trying to poke holes. I was just trying to understand what's the best the best rationale for poking holes trying to understand. So we're wrapping up something here. What are we wrapping up? The management of the business were understanding the management of the business? As one of our major checklist items and we've covered. The fact that management is is good if the company has little or no debt Rico, his high again smaller R. E is high nuggets smaller. It's got low maintenance capital expenditures. Free cash flow is a big chunk of earnings. Owner earnings is a big chunk of earnings. CEO's experienced. Got A great track record. Believe they have integrity pay is reasonable based on long-term success so they're on the same side of the table is us which we talked. About. Is. Somewhat. problematic. Super Interesting. Last thing is that management is buying their stock. which is wait a second. Okay. I write each one down. And I make a little check box because it's a checklist. Say it again. The whole thing? No. Just in the newest one Lewis one the last one. Number management is buying their stock. Is. Buying their staw. That means insider trading. We'll show that the management team is reporting that they're buying their own stock out in the market and pain real money. Okay so you set a couple of things there. One is they're buying it off. The market rate public market. So. What you're talking about there is that when somebody who's an insider like an executive is they have to report to the SEC in the US is how it works. They have to report to the SEC that they have bought the stock of their company and the se then puts it out publicly so that we all know what's going on and if they sell, they have to do the same thing. So we just know kind of like what's happening Rather, quickly to forty eight S. yeah. And they have to tell us what price they paid for it. How many shares they bought? True. It's quite. Quite comprehensive and we get to see. that. All important information why is that important? because. They only buy their stock for one reason. and. That's because it's GONNA go up. There's a lot of reasons why somebody might sell a stock who's in a management position But if it's a significant purchase, we'll talk about that in a second. There's only one reason that management make significant purchases of their own stock at market prices through the public market, and that is because that is going up in their opinion doesn't mean they're right. All the time, but it is a heck of a great signal. That something good is in the works you may not see in the numbers. But these guys are the on the very inside and it's not illegal for them to do that. That's. Think. Really astonishes some people. because. Obviously, management knows things that have not been disclosed to the to the. Public. And yet they can buy their own stock based on that inside information. When if they told me if if somebody from Armada Hoffler for example, which is like a family owned company largely public company, but our family owns a big chunk of it. If. If someone on the inside of that company told me something. About the company that had not been released to the public and I went and bought the stock. I go to jail. Go to jail. That's what they got. Martha. What's her name? Martha Stewart Mother Stewart. Martha. Stewart. They didn't actually get it for inside trading I. Think they could. They got her for lying about it. Yeah, and she went and did jail time. So this is a really interesting loophole in the law for insider trading, and that is a management team absolutely combined their own stock without disclosing this new information to the public. As long as they. File with the SEC within forty eight hours that they bought the stock. So this is important information because it's kind of the equivalent. Of going public with some new information.

Martha Stewart Mother Stewart SEC Rico Daniel Town CEO United States Armada Hoffler Lewis Executive
Ben's Red Carpet Ban

Nightly Pop

05:16 min | Last week

Ben's Red Carpet Ban

"Welcome to pop your source for nightmare weddings and Yoga. Ball sits. Big Round of applause I like get. Nina's often that you guys but hunters here has always and so is actress producer and. Legend. Viviana. A. Welcome. Back. Welcome where we are so excited to have you hundred GonNa Flirt with you. The entire show get prepared for them. Time Vivica just walked taping. That works for me baby just a little. Just a little took us. Describe my style of flirting. So this is. My God I'll. Little tickle we can get started now. All Right Ben Affleck was just banned from arm his upcoming James Bond Premiere at least that's what the tabloids are claiming. It's probably total but supposedly bond producers are afraid the couples pedia will overshadow the movie and Daniel Craig's okay. They have like a you've obviously you're a lot more famous than both hundred and I combined you too many movie premieres yet we like it. It's a big win for us tonight on nightly pop. If you going to an event and for movie you were in and producers said, listen you're man can't come how do you handle that challenge? Cry. Let's start right there. We've never look here. Work showed up gave as our how I not shining I. If this is true is totally unfair. Why does the girl not have to shot because she's in a grid we? Away from. She has died. He has done for them hunter. What do you think about if you could not bring me to a movie premiere as a standing date for you because your girl canceled? Would you be asset? That's okay with me and I think if they really don't want Ben Affleck showing up, put it in a city that doesn't have Dunkin donuts. I guarantee you. Not Going. There for some reason I mean honestly I have to say I don't know why I'm leaning towards this being true but I sort of believe it. I kind of feel like this sort of makes sense I mean I don't know if Ben Affleck is going to overshadow Daniel Craig's something about them always walking those. Dogs which I Got? Every day. Why it's always just so staged feeling for some reason I I do believe. I kind of believe that they're like listen just leave your boyfriend at home or moving on. While Shirley's there and knows what she wants when it comes to a relationship and the first rule is she's not going to live with anybody you guys. She recently told the mirror that she's not sure that she could live with somebody again and that he may have to buy the house next to her. She's just too old for this. Like it okay. I just want a new. And nobody's coming up here running thing but me so I'm all with their Charlie's let them know when it's happening to come over and do the deed. With after other than that stale ass next door right you. My God. First of all, my type of woman this is Great Vivica. I'm happy to buy any house near Your House I'm going GonNa have to save up a little bit but I can do it and then seconds I see where they're coming from but it also feels like Charlie's is coming from a place of she hasn't had healthy relationships lately maybe or she hasn't found that person you do want to live with I. Think we all kind of think that after we go to break, we're like no more of the opposite sex ever again taking that much of my personal mind and then raging you find someone. And you can grow with and maybe they start outside the house maybe eventually you're like, Hey, let's have toothbrushes in the same room. Let's try that out for a little while. Yeah, I feel like with Charlene I think that also when you are single for such a long time, you kind of get set in your ways and just having the idea of someone come in and just rearranging things becomes really daunting and just quite frankly really annoying and to be honest Shirley's does not need to settle. She doesn't need to do anything that is inconvenient for her at all. So like I. Totally under understand her mindset of like I don't. Yeah. Come over when you need to do the deed otherwise I don't need to be moving my cashmere sweaters for you to put your jeans and the next door take your time says the girl that got engaged in seven months. I was like, all right give it to me okay Brian. Austin. Green is getting defensive about dating multiple women after his split for Meghan Box Ryan was on the Hollywood raw podcast you listened to that a lot right with DAX holt an atom. Glenn where he said he isn't playing anybody but the whole point of dating is to talk to several people at once. What people normally do when they get out of something is they date they they talked to multiple people at once I'm not playing anybody like this is. My life is just is much more under a microscope. Let me ask you. So should he have to tell the woman? He's dating that he's seeing other people I'm GONNA ask Hunter Africa's I can't wait to hear the assay. I appreciate honesty to be very honest with you in their plans. Call dating onto someone says it's meeting. You is called dating I. Think the biggest problem is when it's rubbed in other people's faces

Shirley Ben Affleck Daniel Craig Charlie Vivica Viviana Ball Nina Producer Hunter Africa James Bond Glenn Charlene Brian Austin Meghan Box Ryan Dax Holt Green Hollywood
Nikki And Brie Bella Welcomed Their Babies One Day Apart

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:41 sec | Last week

Nikki And Brie Bella Welcomed Their Babies One Day Apart

"Professional wrestler is celebrating a double delivery Today. The Bellas have given birth to baby boys just a day apart. Former wrestling stars Bree and Nikki made their announcements over the weekend, Bri went first announcing she delivered Saturday. Two hours later, Nicky followed, revealing she'd actually beaten her sister with a Friday birth. Each posted almost identical photos of moms, dads and baby's hands. Interlocked Bree has a three year old daughter with husband and pro wrestler Daniel Bryan. It's a first for both Nikki and her fiance, Pro dancer Artem Chick, Vince Ev. The Twins retired from the W W E last summer after Nikki found out she had a brain cyst. Deborah

Nikki Bree BRI Bellas Artem Chick Daniel Bryan Vince Ev Deborah Nicky
"daniel x" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:30 min | 3 weeks ago

"daniel x" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Because sometimes that can be a hard thing like we have. In Society sometimes in especially I, think in some of our institutions like we want to push people into like very specific directions. was there anything that helps you with this wonderful dilemma that you had a broad curiosity? Yeah, to assert have two responses. One is what helped me, but I think the world has. Since I was in an undergraduate. As an undergraduate I was I, remember distinctly taking an engineering class, and there was a professor, also sitting in on the class is very rare. At the time and he opted to sit next to me. And he was a biologist wanting to learn more engineering. And we got to talking in. Just found that fascinating that you could mixie's to. There was no such thing as a bioengineering department did not exist back in the time of no. But. His name was Orrin. Porter and he melded physics and biology in a very interesting mixture of heat, transfer and animals in different climates and I just found that fascinating. After a while, he said Hey, do you WanNa? Join my lab and be a Grad student and I didn't actually know what graduate school was. I said sure and. So that that got me going in this interface, a I think today we are really doing more and more to break those barriers, so there are bio engineering departments. And candidly the word bio comes in front of lots of worse bioengineering. biomethane matic's biophysics biochemistry so tell us a little bit about your research that you did as a graduate student. Yeah, I! Get two different things. I started a masters degree in Wisconsin and I got my PhD Duke at Wisconsin because I was really interested in fluid mechanics. That faculty member said you know, fish swim really fast. <hes>, why is that and <hes> there were? There was this theory of building in the literature that there's something novel about the Polymer Coating Fish. Mucus. And nobody had really looked at it in any. Detailed Way and so. He got me into his lab. We started doing fluid dynamics experiments on what was called. Polymer drag reduction. And I ended up publishing as second year graduate student, a paper on polymer drag reduction of the novel. Chemistry physics of the slimy covering of fish. That's right began. And so like. Whenever I hear fluid dynamics like agan sort of visualize the Naria stokes, equations and <hes>, and my my exposures to fluid dynamics has always been less about the analytical modeling more about computer simulation of these systems of where you doing computer simulations stuff in your graduate work. Not. Then <hes> so Kevin After. Remind you of era. This is the nineteen seventies. And yes I did computer simulations of flow in my undergraduate classes? It was Fortran and we had to write our own numerical solutions. To very very simple things okay? The project I worked on in my master's was much more <hes> of mixture of experimental fluid mechanics. An imaging flows okay interesting then. Ah Duke I moved on to looking at a couple of different flow problems in biology. We got very interested in the fluid mechanics of insect feeding like mosquitoes, blood, feeding, and things like that. What what is going on that allows the mosquito to feed on blood vs related to disease transfer like malaria. What are the relationships there and also locomotion influence movement influence so? So it was a variety of things like that, and again a mix of computational work, and then <hes> experimental

Chief Technology Officer Kevin Scott Hal Microsoft
"daniel x" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

07:55 min | 4 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"A little bit by Simone before who've The the famous famous feminist Who wrote a book? The second sex in the nineteen forties. I think it was It's quite extraordinary. It's quite attuned to get through. But one of the things she talks about is self-knowledge and the importance of Self Knowledge. And that won't provide happiness but it certainly sips the center of discover- discover you and I think to go through life without really understanding. Yourself is is a difficult thing to do. So she allegra. I did want one of mine. Tensions with writing the novel was to have somebody who had a lot of influences beaming down upon her but ultimately she became her own person. An important thing for assault rifle laughed at the way that you get all these inspirational. Samah Simone byerly quotes. And what did you mean out? All Joy has little penny tortoise. He should call some ended before Of course belonging to Liberty Club and being initially by United. I really revere snowing. So yeah if you'RE GONNA TORTOISE YOU'RE GONNA call US among other. Children have rights of passage where they can choose. The as Jewish religion has its permits viral and but Allegra was at a Catholic school so it was her first communion and she had some interesting choices will she didn't really get to choose what she war She was going to wear a school uniform but the material made her beautiful dress and her saint's name she could choose that but it was also grandmother joy who gave her. That suggestion is trying to come up with an out of thin material. Does not if enjoy maybe place both of them and of course you know this is. This is the constant state she was in trying to place by grandmothers. Joy decided that her name simply must be you know hisense name must be named after Saint Libra. It's it's it's actually down there. When you research at Saint Louis Barada was the patron saint of Women. Trying to escape difficult marriages ending in a If it's to put off a Sistan suitor she sprouted be overnight so joys involvement with the setting up of the refuge. The women's refuge and hurts assisting Women who found themselves living with domestic violence of course saint. Louis Borussia was an inspiration for her. You know she negra ends up with Saint Louis Barada and she said I really hope Christie's banning cards to choose the Saint. She wants to emulate not just as a high Pi- darn have to splash humorous at all with the series of but begin talked about allegro being a musical term and even in Music. The grandmothers have very different lifestyle. Aren't they there's joy who has Helen Reddy going? I am woman but then again who does materials teach a allegra? Older Bash? Says fans list is Matilda's favorite musician. Down of course was not just a very well known Hungarian composer but he was. He was the first of the composers and pianists of his time. Who had the piano tuning the piano around? So the audience could actually see the movement fingers across the case and he apparently had this incredible span hand span that made him you know exceptional with his piano playing and that was down to the fact he didn't have the normal webbing connectors between his fingers. So this is so true. I mean I sort of waving into the but it's all true so of course. Franz Liszt Hungarian being such an extraordinary pianist and I listened to a lot is music in writing. This book and I would often have it playing as I was writing. it's beautiful. It's really beautiful for those not familiar with him. I really urge you to listen to his to his music. Close to the museums chilled. You know is always cooking of course and one of the traits that she makes you know over and over. Gains is the traditional Hungarian Morello Cherry Strudel but she tells allegra that it must be made with list and of course Disney ingredient. He's the musician so he gives the right. Tempo with doe has to be thrown a hundred times exactly against the side of the ball and I watched lots of Youtube if he if you look at it out there. There is actually their youtube videos of Gary in you know traditional Hungarian women making the strudel that way. I had Franz going while I was acting out the throwing of the Joe. One Hundred Times too and then I checked with a friend who's with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. She's one of the violinist if that would in fact provide the right tempo and she. I'm sure also quite mad but came back and said that would so around the time the book was launched last year. I gathered my daughters and my cousins and doors and we all made that stood with Franz Liszt. And I can tell you it works and and it was a victory triumph the strudel. Congratulations well anyway. By the end of the Book Allegra knows who she is and a lovely quote. I hit home feeling thicker than an outline and more solid than a shadow. Susanne Daniels Novel Eleven. Three paths deservedly won the indie award for the best debut novel with its warp and Huma of a girl learning about herself and her family in the society. She's growing up in just one final thing places in the acknowledgement. She right of the. Who helped you but also you recommend a book by Noel. Lukman the first five pages. What set about so. That was a book. Someone recommended to me many years ago. When I kind of whispered that I would love eventually. One day to give it a crack to rush a novel and this person was a friend And she also had to literary agent and she said well. If you thinking that way get safe you can get your hands on. These spoke was basically outlines. What agents and publishers? Look for in the first five pages of manuscript because of of close inundated with them with manuscripts in have to sift through and make decisions to which ones they back in which they don't so I got that book and probably read it a note of the Yeast Thirteen Times And I found it really helpful so I just credited in the acknowledgements but that friend actually went on to become my agent Catherine Drayton sells very lucky to have her Because without an agent. I think you know it's rare to be able to them get published these days and it all worked it got your debut novel published and your so on the in the award will Susan Daniel. It's just a delight. Thank you so much for sharing your time. Your Book and your ideas with us and I was being speaking with Suzanne. Daniela Battle Book Allegra and three parts published by Pan. Macmillan thank you very much Suzanne. Thank you jen. You've just been listening to published. Oh not on three C..

Franz Liszt Allegra Simone byerly Joy Saint Louis Barada Hungarian Morello Cherry Strud Suzanne US Louis Borussia Sistan assault hisense Hundred Times Youtube Catherine Drayton Gary Liberty Club
"daniel x" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:11 min | 4 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Authors and ask them nitpicky physics questions about their wormholes and their warp drives, so we're having a lot of fun, and we answer a lot of listeners e mails. We had a whole episode recently where we just went through listener questions and answered all their questions from seven-year-olds to seventy seven year olds. Sorry, I just had to glance today's. Episode. was particularly familiar with any of the author, so they've talked to this. You y'all do doing. Kim Stanley Robinson by by chance No, we haven't yet, but we've talked to blake crowd. Should we talk to Hugh Award winning authors like an lucky and Mary Robinson Coal and Becky Chambers. It's been really fascinating to see like. How do you build a science fiction universe? At what point do you stop worrying about? Getting the signs right and just think about the story, and then also for me since I'm such a science fiction buff I, just get the fan boy a little bit and talk to all these famous people. This might be too loaded question. But if you could interview a now, deceased science fiction author and ask them some of these same questions, which one would you? Until I learned that he was also a jerk, I would have loved interview Isaac Asimov because. Created not just you know new technology fiction, but like his foundation series where he creates like actually a new field of science in his prediction of future. I thought that was really fascinating. I would love to just understand the the development of that idea how he built the story around it. But then it turns out like many greats. From the past. He was also a jerk to lots of people. He worked with all right well. Thanks again for for coming on the show and chat with us and yeah, we encourage our listeners to check out those episodes, and you know and hang with us. Thanks for calling in from your closet to talk with us as we call in from our closets. Don't expand out of reach. The next time we have on I hope I'll still fit in my pants for the next time I talked to. You guys very much. All right, thank you. Thanks Daniel in the meantime. If you WANNA check out episodes of stuff to blow your mind, head over to stuff to blow your mind, dot com Xu over to the IHEART listing for this show, but ultimately you can find our podcast wherever you get your podcasts.

Isaac Asimov Kim Stanley Robinson Becky Chambers Mary Robinson Coal Xu IHEART Hugh blake Daniel
"daniel x" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

08:27 min | 4 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Whiteson of Daniel and Jorges explain the universe. We are so privileged to have Daniel. Join US again today. Daniel say hi and introduce yourself for anybody who wasn't around last time. Hi Guys! Thanks so much for having me on great to be back. I'm Daniel. Lights and I'm a professor of. Of Particle Physics at UC Irvine, down, here in southern California, and I'm also the CO host of the PODCAST, Daniel and Jorges explain the universe, a podcast with my good friend and collaborator Whore Hey Cham- in which we talk all about the craziness of the universe, we try to answer questions. We try to share the wonder and the mystery of the universe in a way that makes it accessible and hopefully a little bit fun well. We really appreciate you joining us today. Daniel so. So. I wanted to invite you onto stuff to blow your mind today to talk about space. This is actually a subject I've I've wanted to tackle on the show for a while with the unifying question of what is base. Why is there such thing as the distance between the earth and the sun or between an atomic nucleus in the electron that orbits it because I think a lot of the time when we think about physical reality, we just immediately look past space to. To the things that occupy it, we, we assume space as a kind of given a defacto canvas on which physics can be realized, but I wanted to think about space itself. What is it? HOW DOES IT Exist? Do we know anything about where it comes from and where it's going? So maybe the easiest way to start off today would be to to get as simple as we can so in simplest terms in a sentence if you could do it, how would a physicist defined space? While all of space in one sentence, that is a pretty tall order. You know I'd have to say to be honest to say. We really have no idea what space is. That, you're asking this question. It's the kind of question that it takes like a maturity of science and philosophy to even understand why the question is interesting and important. You know it's like it's like we're fish scientists for thousand years swimming through this fluid and then only. Have realized that AIDS. It's something fascinating something to study something that has properties can do weird things, and so it's it's a deep an important question you know, and and just to digress a tiny bit more like it makes me wonder how many other crazy basic questions we aren't even asking, because we don't realize how rich the topic is, you know so I feel privileged that we're at this moment in science when we can ask this question would is space and understand that it is an important question. All right, so I totally dodged your question there. But I can try to give a one sentence answer. If you'd like, shirt will start simple, and then, and then we'll get more into the nuances here all right well. A simple answer to what is spaced is that. I. Mean I could try. It may be impossible. I'd say the simplest description I can give for what space is. Is something which has various properties we've discovered it had can contain quantum fields. It can expand, and it has relationships to other parts of space. So that's more a description of what we've what we've observed about. Space is not really an inherent understanding of what it is because we don't have that understanding will. Maybe this brings me to a question. I wanted to ask later on, but If. There is no good answer to this It can help ground us as we go forward, so I wanted to ask. Is there such a thing as a hypothetical physics without space? Does all physics assume space, and can we imagine say a possible world that exists, but does not contain space, or is that just inconceivable? That all physics that we do assume space like all of our modern theories, the standard model and quantum field theory they all operate in some space, and there are different kinds of theories of have, and some of those make different assumptions for what that space is my quantum field theory, you right down with the spaces in advance. He say I'M GONNA, assume space in three dimensions and extends all in all these directions, and then I'm GonNa. Talk about the fields that are in that space other theories. Theories like general relativity. Space is part of what you're trying to get at. It's not like the backdrop. It's the thing you solve for you so if I have this configuration, then what does the space look like? But they all assume space I mean space gives you a relationship between stuff. Right tells you this year, and this is not here and in the end all are trying to understand the world we live in and everything. We live in space, so it's pretty hard to grapple with. A non spatial theories or non spatial physics, so yeah I would say that we need space. Okay, but so if we could come from the exact opposite angle. He think you couldn't really have physics without space. Could you have a universe full of space with no matter energy in it? Could space exist without any contents? Good space exists without any contents and yeah, that is an awesome question, and it's fascinating because we have two theories of physics right now, quantum mechanics and general relativity, and they're both awesome achievements staggering insights into the way the universe works, and they give different answers to this question right so general relativity. Is Einstein's theory and he has a bunch of equations that say what the Universe look like depending on what you put in it and he is. And it's really hard to solve like this very few ways you can actually saw these equations. One of the very few ways actually can get an answer out is what they call the vacuum solution like to say, assume this nothing. Then what is the universe? Look like? If there's nothing in it, all right Einstein can solve that problem. Quantum, field theory though theory says hold on a second. Space is filled with all these quantum fields and particles and matter, and all the stuff that you make me and you are just like excited states of these fields. So when you look at an electron, it's not a particle. It's not a wave. It's a little ripple in some field, which is not in-space. It's part of space. Save all these fields of the electron field, the electro magnetic field, all the fields associated with each of the forces. Lots of them. We can talk about them later if you'd like. But some of them. Never relaxed completely. Some of them are always have some energy in them for example Higgs field. The Higgs field is an every part of space, and it's always got some built intention to it, and that means that this energy in every part of space so quantum field theory says no. You can't have space without some energy in it. There's some inherent energy to space, or the general says I can totally imagine it, and we don't know which theory is the fundamental truth theory of the universe if either. Either one, we can't seem to make them play together very well. And so this question really goes to the heart of like the nature of reality itself, fascinating kind of thing that in five hundred years visits will know the answer to and look back at us and be like man. Those people didn't understand anything about the nature of the universe. They were living in right. What a bunch of Caveman cavewoman like! Mrs, so I love that idea about quantum field theory. If I understand this right, you're saying that under the assumptions of quantum field theory, you could have a big block of space, and even if you were able to clear everything out of it, clear out all the hydrogen particles clear out all the dust, so there's no matter left in it you still you still really wouldn't have an empty void. Is that correct? That's right. Every unit of space comes with energy built in. It comes from the factory with energy already in it and. And in lots of those fields can't not cannot relax. A Higgs field is one example, but many of these fields cannot relax all the way down to zero, and so it's impossible according to these quantum theories to have space with no energy density in it at all, and and that stuff all stuff is is some kind of energy like the matter that makes me and you. That's just a form of energy, so to say that the space has seen. It really means it's not empty so what you're describing space..

Daniel Einstein Jorges US UC Irvine California professor physicist Higgs Mrs
"daniel x" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

05:53 min | 4 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on The Good Fight

"How do we think about this? Trade-offs how do we navigate was very consequential political decisions in the next weeks and months? Yeah we should have talked about this earlier. We shouldn't have waited till the because I think this is really decisive and I think it's quite dangerous in fact to complete aggressive response to genuine life threatening risks and authoritarianism so in other words to say that Donald Trump is passive is not to say he's democratic so the lack of an aggressive response shouldn't make us think oh liberalism and democracy are alive and well because in fact. I think it's actually very useful to kind of come up with a checklist and a set of criteria a kind of litmus test so to speak of what kinds of actions count as authoritarian and. What kind of actions are reasonable responses of a democratic state in trying to deal with the crisis and so some of the criteria? I would think hard number one restrictions on free media and punishment of media are not necessary for healing with an epidemic. And in fact you know. Having a free media is critical so anything that restricts the freedom of media is a problem. That's not a genuine response to nepotistic. That's using it for opportunistic ways. Anything that tries to weaken the opposition or had the effect of weakening the opposition by. Let's say not allowing for elections or by hampering elections. This is his also unexcusable. I mean to come up with the last week and look at what picked or on his doing these kinds of things. Shutting down of parliament's shutting down elections criticizing media. These are genuine threats to democracy. So when you see a political leader justifying assault on democracy by saying were trying to deal with the epidemic would be very skeptical on the other hand. There are things such as limiting the movement of people you know the ability of people to play in the park and kids to play on play structures and in Germany right now officially anyway not supposed to be more than one other person to people. Only gatherings of two people are allowed. When might say this is a restriction on freedom of association but this is not at all political? It's intended as a strictly as a safety measure. You know it's not permanent. There's a clear kind of endpoint. Several weeks It probably will be extended which you should make one nervous but that kind of thing is a real thing and I guess that final kind of criteria would be to. What degree is the opposition included in this process? Allowed to kind of opposition. Buying to this if you have opposition buy in for some of these measures than I think that extent it's less less not to say that he can't buy off the opposition and kind of corrupt way in but not to be aware of that risk. But you know skeptical opposition if it buys into some of these measures than that should make us less worried so again. I think it's really important to have clear distinction in our minds. The reason I in fact dangerous to conflate kind of reasonable measured responses to epidemics and assaults on democracy is that the absence of response reasonable measured responses that really address the crisis in fact feed into the hands of Authoritarians. Because if you don't deal with these crises in a real way in these challenges in these in these real life and death issues in a real way then you are opening the door to more extreme measures down the road so I think it's really critical to make this distinction. This seems to me to be the double danger office political moment so I think run. Danger is that we allow governments will for town ambitions to exploit this moment in order to take power in a permanent mana and I think in order to guard against that we have to insist on free conditions which I think all of which you mentioned in one way or another in what you're just saying. I'm the first of those. Is that the measures should be limited in time vision temporary. The second is that the needs to be some form of ongoing democracy and traditional control over them which means that the opposition has a real ability to help shape the nature of those measures that parliament's haven't ability to end them. They determined that they are no longer needed and that citizens can have recourse against an unjust unfair. Application of the third. Most important is that they have to be narrowly tailored strictly necessary. They can just be all kinds of things. Government would kind of like to be able to do they have to have a direct connection to the compelling state interest in the safety of citizens that make ruled about distancing necessary at the moment for example. Now having the second great danger is that we mistrust government so much and we are so willing to cry wolf that first of all unnecessary suffering and death rules out which is the most important potential danger but secondly that people will say oh all of you people keep going on about democracy and so on and because of you. People are now dying in the streets. So who cares about this democracy if you can't keep people safe? I think this is a test. The democracies would only has it been managed at the same time to stop in a four-time takeover and to take some of extraordinary measures. We need in order to keep citizens safe. I think that's a political venture would have to be following along for the next month. It's the old effectiveness and accountability. You kind of need both at the same time. There are these tensions but I think the way you've put it exactly right effectiveness and accountability. Dan Thank you so much for coming on this podcast and we'll just have to have another conversation about this. Let's say six months six. Eternity down the road. Yes thank you. Thank.

parliament assault Donald Trump Germany Dan
"daniel x" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

12:40 min | 4 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on The Good Fight

"Had this disease at large scale and that I'm far from about naturally in this podcast. I'm going to be thinking for the next few episodes through what's going on in the world it's plunges to pretend that you can have conversations about the world's amendment but don't in one way or another revolve around the corona virus so next week. I will have David miliband the former British foreign secretary and now had off the International Rescue Committee on the show to discuss what he considers the deepest political crisis of his lifetime. But now I have somebody coming onto. Podcast remark beating compensation for a very long time. And we've been planning to get him on the podcast for quite a while but he he finally is it's a Danza Danza. Blood is best known as CO offer of how democracies Di di good book. You should be reading alongside the people vs democracy. But he's also a professor of science of Government at Harvard University and off book but actually find in many ways even more interesting called conservative parties and the birth of democracy. An-and I try to think through the implications of the corona virus for populism but also for Arizona parts beyond populism in the next hour so I really hope you enjoy our conversation. Welcome to the PODCAST Daniel. It's wonderful to have a chance to talk. I've been meaning to have you on for so long and we talk a lot. But we've never done a podcast together now. I suppose we do it on the circumstances above trying to grapple with this strange political nice post biological moment making sense of global pandemic so I still WanNa make sure but we ended up talking about our wheelhouse which is democracy populism a little bit but I also think you know we're trying to understand the nature of the crisis itself. Some people have been saying. This is the most extraordinary political crisis they've lived through. Do share that sentiment and if so what makes it bad. I think it's extraordinary in the sense that it's unrecognizable or it's inexperienced for which we don't really have the right frameworks to think about. I mean I remember living through the collapse of communism in highschool so I wasn't fully alert. His I am now. I guess that seem more distant of course because I wasn't affecting our daily lives I was living in California at the time line. Eleven I guess is the other thing that people often refer to that also felt as if it was not there was a bit of an existential dread. You know in the very days around nine eleven but that was short lived and the political life sort of was recognizable. I do have the feeling that things feel less recognizable bearings that one has given away a little bit. So I think in that sense. If that's what you mean by extraordinary that's right one of the things that would be great to talk to you about is to what degree is that really true. Our whole patterns being unsettled our old patterns simply being reinforced ten years from now will we look back and take that wasn't as significant as we thought it's interesting to be living through a period where it's hard to even make that judgment either. That's exactly what I'm trying to think through. I'm the first thing to say which I feel. Confident about is kind of disdain for the people who have peddled the same solution for the last years and now we have. What does as you're saying feel like a very different kind of crisis? And what we do they say. Hey look for finger. That always been in favour office. Now been proven to be right and true of some of the people who are enemies of globalization on the right. I think it's also true of some people like say. Now Make Line. Who say you see? This is the reason why we have to bothers capitalism on laugh. I think both those knee-jerk reactions just a little bit too simple. Let's start with what should change. Perhaps before we go into what it will change things weren't necessarily up to each other though. It is odd because a pandemic is the reverend. Certainly I think shows the need to take take risks. More seriously chose a risk for having a healthcare system which can deal with or at least up to deal with much higher capacity in moments of crisis it clearly show has been need for having a strategic reserve for things like ventilators and therefore it may Colin Dow the extent to which some nations have outsourced production. Aw central goods is not obvious to me that it cools in doubt in a fundamental way the interconnectedness and for world. We'll trade a lot of the things that people are saying will be deeply impacted by it. What's your sense? This is sort of. The End of globalization is for any reason to think that either. It should be here. I haven't really thought about it. In terms of the economic effects because the people who make these arguments often are sitting comfortably in their houses with Internet connections and a steady supply of groceries so at some level those systems are still intact and we in fact depend upon those and people are eating fruit from all around the world that you're having oranges with my breakfast in Berlin in March. So I'm enjoying the fruits of globalization literally. One way of thinking about this is that it exposes our casts into sharp relief weaknesses and strengths in societies. That were already there and so I do think that the things that I think about our ca two levels one at the political level the degree to which you have affective states that can respond to genuine crises or alternatively to that kind of weak version of that is essentially. I think what we're seeing in the United States is kind of formal patrimonial state where you've had a hollowing out of the State. I think in some ways. Donald Trump is governance of the. Us is kind of Burien patrimonial leader where his family members? The lines between public and private are blurred kind of disdain for expertise because this is not in his direct purview and so all of that has hollowed out the state. I don't think it begins with trump but all of this makes clear that we need stronger more effective states who have greater role for expertise and I think actually more than just that Space within specially our national political institutions. But also the level where there's four of four experts to deliberate in one of the things I'm struck by is the sense that you know. There's a couple of experts who can speak in the press conferences everyday Assume behind them. There's armies of experts but I think really what we need in. What's missing is a kind of opportunity for economists. Public Health experts doctors to all get together and to lay out the various dilemmas. I mean the moment. This crisis emerged January. This is what should have happened. There should have been an opportunity for experts to get together to talk about. All of the potential weaknesses are dilemmas. Challenges that we're going to emerge. What are some responses? There's going to be trade-offs. There's no silver bullet to deal with this. And just to provide a kind of form of deliberation. I think that some ways missing or appears to be missing so that's the political realm at a social realm. I do think that this sort of cast in sharp relief. The importance of a category could think of is social resilience to degree to which societies or robustness. This does get into the realm of of social welfare and how well organized civil society is at some level the. Us's strong in this domain. Because you see this mass mobilization of people at the state level local level of people trying to cope with this but on the other hand the degree to which people don't have the resources to survive crisis because they don't have the social networks to support themselves one paycheck away from complete devastation. In their personal lives shows the vulnerability populated so I guess this sort of feeds into the sort of stories that are told about levels of inequality declining social mobility in the United States. I think all of this is also exposed again so I don't think this calls question that kind of value economic globalization but I think it just exposes the fragility of weak political institutions and also the fragility of societies. That are not as resilient as they ought to. Yes perhaps we should understand a little bit more about the nature of a response as it's happening at the differences between types of political jim between tops political leader between types of economic systems in different countries on managing to respond better or worse and then we might be able to get back to the question of whatever longterm implications on that. I feel like there's two categories of countries there's countries that are failing miserably and there's countries that Looking somewhat better by comparison but have also important ways been slow and ineffective in response. So let's start with the particular shocking examples. I've been writing a little bit about the fact that you should assumed but the United States would do particularly well in dealing with something like the Coun- pandemic I think most political scientists when asked who can deal especially well with an extraordinary crisis that puts many lives at risk would have pointed to a simple metric of state capacity in order to answer that question and all states depending on how you operationalized capacity is not necessarily country highest capacity NBA WORLD. But it certainly has a lot of state capacity certainly more than say or a democracy like India public health experts would have pointed to the number of hospital beds to the existence of experts who can develop a responses to the existence of a strong sitution NYC the CDC and in fact when the Public Health at Hopkins and too few people made a list a ranking of countries that would do particularly well in a public health emergency. You have a good preparedness system. The United States came out on top and yet at least as we're recording this on April first it fields as fo- better indicators for the United States is actually doing significantly worse than P countries and other developed democracies in Coordinating response in making test available to its citizens in sending a clear message in ensuring that this is not yet another piece of four culture war of how people should be acted. Should this change our view of the United States and its capacity of actually solving citizens and dealing with an emergency is United States as I wrote perhaps a little bit provocatively in a recent piece just paper tiger desperately searching for nearest Rutta or do you think that that's an overly pessimistic. Leading both of how amount has been responding to crisis. And of how generalize -able lessons it's always fun to talk to you because I think we're always often an opposite situation so here. I am an American living in Germany admiring the German response expecting a wonderful German response because I have great admiration for the robustness of the German state. Jerry German government defectiveness of German public institutions in Europe. German were. Germany are in America now but living in America with high expectations for America and so in a funny way my expectations of the US have always been much lower price than you are. Yes and probably. Your expectations of Germany are much lower than mine. And so I'm not surprised. I guess find this clue the. Us IS A robust democracy. I think despite the THREAT TO DONALD TRUMP. That's effective debate state. But I guess I've always been more skeptical. I mean there are these interesting parallels between Germany and the US differences. That I think are actually revealing more sort of general lessons. I mean one of the things that distinctive about the US state in US. Federalism is that partly through progressive era in particular through the new deal. You went creation of a highly effective national government the CDC was created in nineteen forty six. You had in the middle of the twentieth century..

United States Donald Trump Germany David miliband Arizona Harvard University International Rescue Committee professor California Burien secretary CDC Berlin NBA Colin Dow
"daniel x" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

06:58 min | 5 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on From Scratch

"Because I saw that as a as an expense to be caught rather than investment and then suddenly realized wow nine hundred ten people that try a kind bar become part of your franchise and so thanks to my partners. We built a phenomenal film. Marketing team to let people sample and so from the first dozen ninety one eight hundred thousand dollar budgets eight hundred dollars before and then today about thirteen million dollars that we go into just giving new kind bars to new consumers and then in spring two thousand fourteen. You bought back. Vm Cheese Steak for two hundred and twenty million dollars mostly cash deal which was basically thirteen times their initial investment. Things have have come a long way since that wall. Bohm's moment yes Hundai and the team that we have today in particular is every morning I wake up and I feel so blessed and so grateful to be working with people that are better than I will ever be on what they will. I'm just like a harass. You're listening to from scratch. My guest Daniel Lubetzky founder of kind healthy snacks. A Food Company that produces bars with whole nuts and spices and fruit among other products. Like GRANOLA IS. I want to go back to your family. For a moment you mentioned before that your father had this positive stance. Do you feel like that was a biological proclivity. That he was just an innately. That way you mentioned your grandfather was the same way That's a great question. I asked related questions all the time but not particularly that question's a really great question. I don't know I. I do think that you know I have for children. And from the day they're born you can tell that they have personalities and this fascinating wonderful to see how they really are their own person. They're quite different twins and they are quite different from each other but I also do think that nurture can guide a person and shape them. I think it's a combination of of DNA and genes and the environment. But then again you know how they'd my dad in such an environment manage. Be such an extraordinarily sweet warm and loving person was hit because by then by the age of nine he has already built it up. Do you meditate or exercise to enhance I take a lot of time to think. We are so barraged with inputs like inbox. Email voicemail tweeter messengers these that and you care you smartphone everywhere you go and you just constantly trying to keep up with the data and read more news and we our brains are craving those data points. So I- consciously try to find times in the day sometimes when you Iran But he might also just be. When you're taking a shower might also be read before you go to bed. He might be. Would you just half an hour to rest? And you're about to grab that foreign. Say You know what. Let me just be with myself. Let me talk to myself. Do you talk to yourself out loud. No I don't think I thought to myself because in Judaism the reason you pray out loud is not so that God could hear you only. It's so that you could also hear yourself. Well it's beautiful. Start paying attention to that. But I think it's more a just goosing you are a magician and magicians are entertainers. Making magic requires practice and repetition. In what way has Magic Influence Your Business? I think magic is definitely a big part of my personality and who I am both because it requires you to be innovative and creative and because of what you brought forth about how you need to be disciplined and practice practice practice. I think it's fun. I also me to my dad because my dad used to teach me magic when I was a little kid and then when I was in college a an and in studying abroad in Europe I paid my trips through Europe by doing magic shows in the streets of barriers and in Bulgaria and just had a lot of adventures doing magic. What's one of your favorites? One of my favorite magic changing the time on your watch. I Love Cartridge also speaking of cards. You have a kind card in your wallet. What is the meaning of this kind of this? Is Our latest. Nra for to try to find ways to creatively inspire kindness that challenging doing that is at kindness bites very essence. The reason it works is that it's a pure act with. There's no ulterior purposes. So how do you inspire is without destroying its authenticity? So we've been toying with for ten years in our latest discard schooled. Kind awesome cards. Were put somebody that has done a kind act already either to you or to a stranger then you celebrate them say you know that was really kind of union appreciation for your kindness would like to give you this card and you go to the website. Enter this code and we send you a couple kind bars plus another kind of card that you can then give to somebody else to celebrate when they when you spot an act of kindness that they do. Let's one act of kindness spotted on the street the other day Which caused you to take out this card and give it to a stranger Somebody seated their taxi to my wife and I was very very nice and well On. That's not necessarily thought I was going to give the money and I'm like no no. No this is what it is and then they were really happy. Or somebody Seeds their seats in the subway to somebody else or just you know on the six line on the subway lately. I don't know people can get really mean to each other and become like this laboratory of social behavior. I don't know if you ever saw the Batman movie with joker where he's like creating the social experiments metropolis and people are like. Are they going to do the right thing? And they're in the sixth train. A lot of times people are not doing the right thing. They're being really Jerky to charter. Trains are really delayed. And it's Kinda scary so when somebody behaves really kindly in those environments who I I give them one of those cards on the six chain the Lexington Avenue Line in New York City. You mentioned your wife briefly. She's a doctor. What kind of Doctor? She. She's a transplant. Nephrologist kidney you know when I I mentioned that nephrologist. I'm like who is that people that deal with dead bodies like no. That's crawler gist. Amana for ALLERGISTS KIDNEY DOT COM like okay. Good to know and a mother of four. I'm a mother foreign an incredible partner. The Swedish woman woman in the world and she goes to the Bronx to help For her job as transparent and fella gist. Thank you very much for joining us. Jessica thank you so much for having this really interesting questions. Guest has been Daniel Betsy. I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch..

Jessica Harris Europe Daniel Lubetzky Bohm Bronx Nra Daniel Betsy Food Company Iran Hundai Amana New York City partner founder ALLERGISTS Bulgaria
"daniel x" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

11:42 min | 5 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on From Scratch

"That's now I didn't know that was a word in Yiddish. There were many other words that I can't tell you right now because they're stronger than I thought were Spanish but actually it is. That's the desert world that I was raised in. I think my mom was the one that gave us the impetus to make sure that we always built relationships with people that were different from us. So here you are. You founded piece works. You were running this. This Mediterranean Food Spread Company. And what was the germ then for for kind bars? I was traveling all over. And those ray frustrated with my lack of healthy snacking options. It felt that if it was helpful and wholesome travel well and what would traveled. Well it was either tw- indulgent or tasted like cardboard or was just totally artificial. I didn't find something that fit with what I was looking for. So my impetus was trying always on the lookout for healthy snacks and Kind was the recognition that they were not those options. What did you grab before you concocted the kind bars? What are some of the things I truly did not have very good options? I I would take sometimes just nuts and fruit but then the Nazi over eight them because you can do portion control which nets almonds primarily Romans yeah of course I also eight muffins and I also still today. You know Some indulgence here and there. I'm not. I'm not perfect but more and more I think every day for me to journey to To improve my my lifestyle. I eat two cars every single day. No less than two two. They have had three so far. How many varieties as of now are there of kind bars? Think we have like twenty five flavors of kind mart. You were at all about the burden of choice. I enjoy your bars but I. I'm a little overwhelmed when I might just give me four choices. I agree to very very tough challenge. Did you read the book paradox of choice no but I understand the phenomenon. That's why sometimes you feel paralyzed by choice. So I think we do need to look at this constantly and are balanced because when we discontinue products the first person to pick up. The phone is my brother's like why do you always continue the ones that are my favorites because you always find someone that was the biggest fan of that. Walmart date or the sesame chocolate and they were. I'm alert lowest turning items but they had car following a fan so that's tricky in each of them is like your children. You love them all so you don't want to give the death joining but you have to. You have to discipline so returning to the early days of kind here. You are like Willy. Loman selling your your piece works. That's from death of a salesman by the way for him. Selling your piece work too. Well I can tell you my Willy. Loman moment please I'm in Walled Bounds. Which is a grocery chain their headquarters on Luke around it's all vinyl furniture from the nineteen sixties everybody's surrounding these like fifty years older than me and they all have sampling suitcases like mine. And I'm like wow what am I doing with my life and this was a very tough moment right before the launch of kind little did I know data after ten years of killing myself. Success was just around the corner. Oh my God we've been trying so hard and he just hasn't worked out and if Mediterranean spread company with the military's preserve rate province. But there was a very small niche. And there's a thousand things that I had done wrong and I'm just like wow you know I throw away my lava career. My Daddy's worried my mommy's worried and my ever going to get married and we're going to have children. But I I really you know having such a difficult time making ends meet just being able to make payroll and just take a twenty four thousand dollars salary for many years and many months. I could not even pay myself My my monthly portion. And then you know couple years later Sunday kind we would finally hit with kind and then he just expose it just shows you that when you believe in something you should be careful not to give up because he can be just around the corner in that dark place little. Did you know that the success of kind was almost in your grasp? You continue to go door to door still after over a decade of this piece works company. You were fortunate though because you had this distribution network in place albeit small that the Mediterranean spreads. Where's the Trojan horse for your kind bars? We were fortunate double that people liked us that people are these guys deserve a break and I think that was there was a lot of goodwill in there If you had asked me the year when we'll launch kind whether I knew that was going to succeed and be explosive. Course I believed in it otherwise I wouldn't be doing it but I to be sincere and I consider myself. A person has a good vision and can dream. I could have never imagined that kind would become what it became. One of the innovations of kind was that they were you know actual nuts and fruit and that they weren't pasty. Why are so many bars? Historically that are sold in retail kind of that. You know that pasty consistency. Well it's easier to run product through the line if it's a pace during the motion it's called a slob barring their space because it goes slobs of product falling the shooter and they are homogeneous and they'll run through the line very efficiently so it's a very efficient way to ron a of product very fast and when we came up with the temerity to try to think differently a lot of times. The manufactures that we just said you know it's not practical for us because you runs are very low and so much less efficient to run your product. It was hard to convince not just the manufacturers but even the retailers we would go with our products and show them our whole nut and fruit bars. And they'd say yeah. Where do I put your practically well next to all these other? Nutritional bars like no no no. That's not a nutritional bar. Let me show you what the show looks like. And they chose the are the slab arson. He was very hard to convince them to give us shot in those sets. You are selling your product that you would say that you could Whose ingredients you could see and pronounce and Why was the clear package You know such an innovation. Why were there opaque packages before I mean? It seems it seems like Common Sense. But you know what? What's so what's what's the big deal the most Obvious things may not seem obvious before they're done right so when when we were doing it. The conventional wisdom was that you had to use a paik film to prevent the problem from oxidizing from losing moisture. And that you needed to use aluminum foil or other opaque materials. We worked really hard in creating clear operas with technology that he could have all those properties through clear from. It's actually see deceptively simple. It was very hard to achieve that. I'm Jessica Harris. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is Daniel. A bet ski founder of kind healthy snacks. A Food Company that produces bars with whole nuts and fruit among other products. I WanNa talk about nuts. For moment I'm partial to almonds. There are rankings of of nuts. That are more nutritional than others and more rare and Teach me something about nuts Depends on which Industry Association? You talk to age are going to tell you that. There's are better but certainly I think. The consensus is that almonds walnuts. are among the most helpful or a very helpful category but everything that's nuts becomes Be Statues Cashews. Also have some role catches have more fat than than than almonds and walnuts but what's more important to highlight his. Did you read about the Harvard? Study? There was a study That came out by by the Harvard School of Medicine. That if you eat more nuts you live longer. It was like staggering. I actually used to when I even WanNa Watch kind and I knew it was a health problem. I used to be very careful about not eating more than one kind bar day because I just felt that I don't Wanna eat too many facts and the data indicates that what's powerful about nuts at a minimum is that they're highly satiate bing and so they displace empty calories. Then on top of that did not have the fats that are helpful to your Heart that help reduce your bad cholesterol levels so I do think that fundamentally nuts are an important building block you mentioned almonds and walnuts. Are they more expensive? Yeah on average I think almonds are increasing in price. We just had a very tough crop for our prices went way up. There's a huge problem right now. We Bee's bees are dying and almost like seventy percent of all of our human consumption is pollinated by bees and bees are dying by hordes and they have to transport them and pollinate different farms and then the transportation and the the mono pollination may be contributing to this problem of O B collapse. It's a very serious very scary problem. Regarding distribution was there an important relationship or kind of pivot That caused the floodgates to open on the distribution. Front it's all been very gradual We did it the right way. Stand because before as a starting I used to try to be everything everywhere as soon as you can. You really need to be smart about Jewish Jewish migration started. You need to first start with the stores where you most solid consumer and fans are going to be so. It's like the whole foods and natural in the specialty stores and so that's where we started and we still today focused enormous efforts and marketing with our core because that's where they have traffic and loyal consumers and only then will start going to national grocery chains and then convenience stores and specialty and alternative markets and only. Recently in the last couple years it was started Going into mass accounts like whole Walmart and target and clubs like Costco and Sam's was very steady and gradual. You mentioned before that you paid yourself. A twenty four thousand dollars celery And initially your marketing budget for the first few years. Was you know like eight hundred dollars of your sampling budget but your salary and the sampling budget took a turn in two thousand eight when you brought on private. Equity Investors in VM G. And they're a fund that invests in consumer products and Darius Bykov the founder of vitamin water or glass also made that introduction crew. How do you know Darius so Darius was friends with and Ian Melissa Calmer for my difference for many years and I was entertaining another transaction and asked Darius for advice and I said do I need to do it this way? This way this way. Which I'm being told him he said no you don't you can do it whatever way you want and let me introduce you to Asia and Will Invest what I had done right until then we come up with a concept with a product with with a good culture in the company. Would I had not done ride. Is that after fifteen years of being in the Wilderness. I was so scared to take risks and to invest in letting more people try our product. That's where sampling was eight hundred dollars..

Darius Bykov Walmart founder Loman Jessica Harris Willy Harvard School of Medicine Costco salesman arson Asia Walled Bounds ron Food Company Harvard Daniel Ian Melissa Calmer Industry Association
"daniel x" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

11:40 min | 5 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on From Scratch

"Daniel is also the founder of peace works. Our producer of Mediterranean spreads such as top nods Hamas and Baba Gana piece works aims to foster business relationships among neighbors in the Middle East and other groups in conflict. As a way to reduce conflict in those regions Daniel grew up in Mexico City and speaks Spanish English Hebrew and French and a little bit of Yiddish. Snow welcome thank you. Thank you so much Jessica before we dig into kind. I WanNa talk about peace works. Which was the company you founded in? Nineteen Ninety three that focuses on Mediterranean spreads. What was the germ four founding this food company in early nineties? I didn't know it was going to be a food. Company was more about trees business as a force for bringing Arabs and Israelis together. That was what I was very passionate about since Writing my college and Law School work about how to use market forces to help trading partners shatter culture stereotypes cement relations with each other. So that was the impetus of what I was doing and it became a foot company. Because as I was looking for ventures I was looking in peril. I was looking in Dead Sea Minerals and food became the area where I found my passions best They didn't understand that minerals twelve but stood food and it's hard start so food was secondary to the primary mission was to facilitate joint ventures among conflicting neighbors. So what's an example of a collaboration which you established at Peace Works Between two conflicting groups will the flagship venture which still exists. Today which is how we started was My discovery of Asandra tomato spread. And when I've long story short found out the company had gone bankrupt because he was sourcing. Its glass jars from Portugal and Sandra tomatoes from Italy and it was very expensive and when I came to your banish the Israeli manufacturer and told them about my yes he had Arab friends and he really believe in the philosophy of World War. Two piece works but it also showed him that he could benefit economically that he could buy the glass jars from Egypt instead of Portugal. The Sunday tomatoes from Turkey suppliers instead of Italian ones so. They started buying Basil and olives and olive oil from Palestinian citizens of the West Bank and Gaza. And that's how it started. How did you secure distribution in the United States with peace works? Can you walk through that process? Because in a way you piggybacked on that In with kind well I didn't know what I was doing. So I emptied my brick my legal briefcase literally these big briefcase for carrying Legal documents and they filled it up with jars with some tomato spreads basil. Pesto sauce breads and out. Start at the top of Broadway. One hundred and twenty seconds streets on the west side and then just started walking store by store till I would go seven. Am in the morning till I would end at seven PM at night and the bottom of Wall Street. And then I would cross the next day and it would go up Broadway and the other side of Broadway and brother was an important choice because it was a the avenue that I found to have the most concentration of grocery store so I knew Second Avenue Third Avenue. Madison they did all of them. But Braulio was the juiciest and I would not go to the next store unless I got either an order or an explanation for what I needed to different in order to get an order the next time and I drove many people not s- because everything was wrong but they were basically taught me like Scott Gold China and Mr Zave are from sabres. Basically taught me what the consumers were looking for. So I really learned a lot of what I do today from all the store managers and buyers at the grocery shops Bodega in New York City. What is an example of something that Mr Xaver taught you everything I mean? I came in and they didn't have much patience because they had thousands of consumers going around and here I am and I don't know what I'm doing but the they really liked that I really cared about my mission and I think they just have patients with me. So they taught me how what is the margin requirements for for retailer for these tributary and for yourself? So that you can run a ongoing business They taught me about the labels how to make sure that the name is cleared. The jars back then were using olive oil out of them. That was not acceptable. So it was a lot of sessions. You mentioned that you had a law degree you went to Stanford Law School and you became a lawyer And the idea for peace works came out of a paper your thesis that you wrote which I believe was entitled Incentives for Peace and Prophets federal legislation to encourage enterprises to invest in arab-israeli joint ventures become a very famous document among doctors. Because if you were having insomnia were having trouble falling asleep that would give it to you would read it and you'd fall asleep. Immediately was the most theoretical boring thing in the world. They was just totally devoid of practical use. But it was beautiful. Theoretically you dabbled in the law Before starting businesses you had a stint at Sullivan and Cromwell You clerked for Supreme Justice in Texas. Did you think that you might WANNA career in law? I love the law was not that I was trying to escape the law. I just had this. You call germ. I had this bug inside me that that I just really felt that my mission in life was to try to build bridges and two and the Arab Israeli conflict. And here's the peace process. All my ideas that I've been sharing for several years. Suddenly they go from being delusional to being slightly tenable. And I'm like all right how to try to pursue it and have to try it. He also had a kind of a social ethos in your family. Your father was a prominent figure in your upbringing. And the way you think about the world he was a Holocaust survivor. Having survived Dhakal the concentration camp in Germany. Can you talk a little bit about him? Yeah my that was My greatest hero and role model He was the most humble person he built himself from. Scratch came to Mexico after the war. He was fifteen and a half years old when the war started sixteen when he got to Mexico. He didn't speak Spanish shoring leash he's from Lithuania. Originally he was born in Riga Latvian. Raise in Lithuania when he was nine years old. Nineteen thirty nine The war started. And I'll tell you the story. It's a little strong but He was coming back with his Father to their apartment house where they lived and the superintendent showed them into the garage was and he opened the door of the garage and there was a pile of bodies and he told my grandfather. You see all these people. They're older juice in the building. And you lucky that you always were nice to me and treated with respect and kindness. So I spared you on your family but get out before I change my mind. So that my father who's nine years old and his brother and my grandfather and grandmother packed whatever they could carry and then they left into a ghetto and That was a story that my that told me when I was nine years old and my mom said Roman. What are you doing? This kid is nine years old. You know you're GONNA. What are you doing? Please stop telling these my that said look. He's nine years old and he needs to hear it. I was nine years old and I needed to live it but the other thing that was no less powerful and important with the stories that he told me about people that in the worst of circumstances would rise open. Do something kind like this. German soldier that through a potato to him and might used to tell the story about how he felt he was going to die and he was really malnourished and that potato man for him the difference in survival and dog soldier to caress by giving him food for for the soldiers. So those were the stories that I most admired the way. My that always remembered the moments of kindness. I mean the darkest moments and There's a quote that I really love that connects to that about from Rabbi Hillel. That says Innis plays where there's no humanity strive thou to be human so the the name kind healthy snacks did. Your father have influence on the naming of the product. The main kind was created by my team. And I really fascinating that we finally zone Dean on it. Because he wasn't today so obvious that that's perfect name for us but back then we had all these crazy ideas for the name. The reason we came up with kind is that it had human attributes that we were really trying to aspire to be to define us to do the kind thing for your body to the kind thing for your taste buds onto the kind thing for your world. It's striking that your father. was very forthcoming with his stories and chose to talk about the wartime versus others who really receded and did not tell their family Such stories just a more for self preservation families preservation than anything. What was the impetus for your families? your father's moving to Mexico of all places. A religious comment on this is really important. I was surrounded by other survivors growing up and the I love them dearly. But you could tell they were consumed by the horrible horrid. They had gone through and they can have a positive outlook. And my dad or there were others that were able to just shut it out and just have a positive left wing forward. My Dad had the strength to recall those horrors but in a positive way instill he was such a sweet kind hearted man Vega has always making people laugh always almost like he saw his mission to make people have a better day and make people laugh. Did you see the movie Life is beautiful so when I saw that movie I cried a lot and then I was a little trouble I felt guilty to be laughing also and I asked my that. You never cross my mind that in such horrible circumstances you could actually say jokes in the middle of a concentration camp and my that said the opposite the only reason why that felt that he survived is because my grandfather was a really funny joke teller and he would retain the Jewish inmates and the German soldiers with funny stories and make people more humane and more human by making them laugh and just find particularly those dark moments. Some levity you are brought up in Mexico City hell was being Jewish in a predominantly Christian place. While I also lived in our very insulated cocoon you pointed out earlier. I learned Yiddish an early age and I learned before I learned Hebrew or English in for my mom was very important that die build bridges so she introduced me to this kid named Louis. Who would we make play dates in our neighborhood for me to be friends with him and since such cocoon that you know? We're playing once and I said you know if you do this. I'M GONNA kick you into house. And he says what what is his thing. And I'm like stop joking to his to. Sion your back you behind your ass. And he's like no..

Mexico Mexico City Daniel Lithuania Portugal Middle East Jessica Dead Sea Minerals Stanford Law School Turkey New York City United States producer founder Gaza Mr Xaver Asandra
"daniel x" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:46 min | 5 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on Amanpour

"For example we know lots more women come into the grass roots level house represent right and but I think the problem is for that very apex and the way the American system is structured is so about one single person the actually anything feels like a risk you now an all white fail for example in the same way and people say you know on the Democratic side we just want to beat this Guy Donald Trump. Who can we afford to take a risk? Now you are also a political writer and you cover politics here and everywhere for the Atlanta. Yeah before for the New Statesman and you obviously have your finger on that pulse. I think it's really really interesting that I spoke to when you talk about the likeability factor of women in politics women in any endeavor. Frankly I just spoke to jill wine banks who come out with her own book called the Watergate go she was actually a prosecutor during Watergate was very young but she was a prosecutor and had come up through. Obviously you know. The education system in which no students who are female made up. Miniscule percentage something like three to four percent of her class for women at law school and this is what she told me about. The likeability factor. That women still have to pause. You're in a tough situation because as a woman you have to be careful not to be so assertive that you're viewed as I don't know if I can say this on television but you're viewed negatively as overly aggressive. Does it with the Yes it? Does you got it exactly? So it's it's a tricky situation as to how you talk back and I've used a lot of different strategies in dealing with sexism and sometimes you have to be nice about it. Sometimes you have to bring a man in to help you. Did you find that with some of these historic women? I was GONNA say. Did I bring a lot of men in doubt that to definitely did the books dedicated to my husband and one of the things? That's really important about that is that he made cups of tea and dinners while I wrote the book and I think it's something that holds back female political candidates. They're expected to have a family. Yup Praise on because it's evidence your well rounded person but that leaves you with a lot less time for your career and that's not necessarily the double binds that men facing in quite the same way but the likability thing is is so fascinating that success is positively correlated with likability. We like successful men. We admire them and it's not the same for women us all. If we think that you know she must be selfish or ambitious or not kind people. We still have this idea that women are supposed kind of everyone's mom kind of you know putting him on the head and soothing their sore knees well you profile. Sportswoman who is definitely not. Everyone's mum leaper before Megan Rappeneau playing soccer or football here in England in one thousand nine hundred eighteen so describing this massive than six foot Tall Lancashire and yet and she was gay Meghan Rappeneau so she is openly Yes she lived with her her partner for some years actually when she she had to retire from football at the age of all of I think well semi professional age of sixteen so she was some the period of the first World War period of enormous change for women in Britain. One point five million then went into the factories because the men were way the front. I'm while they were in the factories. What did they break time? They kicked a ball about women's leaks. Seem form because the premier league had been suspended for for the duration of time and so lily. Parr is an incredibly naturally talented footballer. She's got incredibly strong. Left footed kick or not great football expert and she as much in one day in front of fifty thousand spectators. They go on a tour to France. Once the the war is over and kind of get driven past all these terrible battlefields. But in one thousand nine hundred ninety one the F. aid decides the football coach decides that all of this is a bit too much too radical. There's already been legislation. Saying women have to give up their jobs for soldiers coming back home and go back into the home and the FAA then says we think that the sport of football is not suitable for females and should not be encouraged and they get banned from playing on men's pitches and that's that's it really keeps on playing. I should say should play the last game at the age of forty and she scored and she worked in a hospital. But the you know the women's football and people keep saying to me over the last ten years there's no appetite for no wants to watch that's rubbish right and you put it on a main channel you have little girls can now see women using their bodies running round at different type of feminine We kind of sending the edges of some people coco. Chanel is another extraordinary example so she is in good night stories for rebel girls the bestselling. Children's book as in this kind of Feisty. Empowered woman who didn't take no finances. Well she was very probably the lover of Nazi officer and possibly even also is fine for that patient of World War. Two right so one and the same way that lots of people in World War Two survived by making nine like squalid corrupt. Little deals I and that's not. That's not part of the U. Gogol story right. You don't think that's the kind of empowering thing to do but it's what real humans did to survive. What do you want people to take away from the story of these difficult women two things? The first is to be a little bit more forgiving about. Everyone's human frailty you know. I think this particular debates about language people get jumped on using slightly the wrong language when they didn't mean anything by it. We are incredibly puritanical in that way and to be slightly more generous minded and how we treat people and the second thing is to move from consciousness raising which. I think the Internet has been brilliant for in terms of feminism to looking at legal structures and we talked about. Nda's that's an obvious. One others being used in incorrupt ways in ways that actually favour abusive men. Really Interesting Helen. Lewis Ultra of difficult women. Thank you very much. Indeed.

football Donald Trump prosecutor writer Atlanta France FAA Sportswoman Nda Lewis Ultra Megan Rappeneau Parr Meghan Rappeneau Chanel soccer England officer
"daniel x" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

12:18 min | 5 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on Amanpour

"Lewis and there's always some aura off unpredictability around him anything's possible where the gesture. German Literary Star Daniel Cowman on his smash new novel till an absurd look at a brutal time in history seen through the eyes of a mythical prankster then the meritocracy trapped Yale. Professor Daniel Markovits on how the myth of upward mobility destroys America's middle class. Welcome to the program. Everyone I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. Sunday is International Women's Day focusing this year on raising awareness of the equality gap in all areas of our lives which makes this new stat from the United Nations particularly distressing close to ninety percent of people around the world. Hold some sort of bias against women. Despite progress in key areas like the metoo movement women's rights appear to be backsliding in much of the world. The ongoing fight for equality can be even more difficult than we realized which is why in her new book or the Helen. Lewis says it comes down to difficult women to lead the charge. Newest takes an unvarnished look at a collection of complicated even deeply flawed heroes who broke through the greatest barriers to equality. I also why it's so important to take an honest look at these women in all their complexity. Helen Lewis Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me so look difficult. Women what is it that made you choose that title? Who is it that made you choose that title? Well actually it was a male friend who suggested it to me because it happened around the time that if you remember trees in May was then. Prime Minister was described by. Ken Clarke who had been in her cabinet as a bloody difficult women. An aunt he meant that kind of admiringly. But I think it's a. It's a double edged sword. Isn't it the idea of being difficult as a woman? It means that you probably GonNa get a lot of stuff done but people aren't going to like you necessarily four okay. So that is really really interesting. The age old problem that persists to a great extent today. But you go back your your subjects. Here are most historical figures. And let's take the most famous one we recognize. Marie stopes who was absolutely sort of a pioneer in the birth control movement and yet there were other aspects of her character that you outline that made an just a difficult but maybe not even an admirable woman so just describe why. Marie stopes with somebody that you really want to focus on so Mary so exposes some personality issues. She was incredibly dictatorial. She was impossible to work with. She was determined that she was gonna be the figurehead for this. May We knew. She claimed a lot of credit. She was not prepared to stand at the back. But there is also this kind of doll. Parts of the fact that she supported eugenics. She supports the idea that you should control populations through breeding that some people should be allowed to have children. Some people maybe shouldn't and there was a huge amount of naive about that in the nineteen twenties about where it might lead which we then later in the century. And that's something that's common to both the birth control movement in the UK and the US. This interplay of both huge freedom for women bound up with the slightly unpleasant political overtimes. And would you say that the reason why we haven't focused on the dark side is because the social cultural and you know the freedom actually the birth control? The health that birth control brought in was so much more important. I think there's a tendency. Knee exactly not want to tarnish that. Would this unpleasant legacy that is called? Because you're exactly right. In terms of women's life expectancy in terms of their achievements. We know all around the world near the best way to lift. Countries out of poverty is to educate women. They'll have babies later in. Life will have fewer babies and that then becomes a very unpleasant thing and it is also you know sometimes you get push back in countries when they say this is a western imposition and this is about stopping. Us HAVING ENOUGH BABIES. Kinda white people coming in with telling us what to do with our our women. We discussed who was the for the title. But what was the inspiration for you? Why did you want to focus on difficult women? Well I wanted to write a history without airbrushing and it felt to me. There were a whole spate of books that were about inspiring young women. I think that's a wonderful thing but not if it comes at the expense of distorting history so I think you get this weird situation where we kind of worry about. Why is it that there aren't any heroines that we can believe in? Now why do they all have feet of clay all? That's always been the case. You always have to pick and choose the bits you like about someone but if you turn passed into this kind of playground where no one did any bad things and things were very obvious and black and white and immorality was easy. It makes it hard if you to deal with the complexity of now. This book is buying large in fact entirely about British women. And let's face it. British women have been way ahead of the curve. We got the right to vote here before in America There have been British prime ministers here in other words government leaders here where they have not been American female presidents or indeed vice presidents. So I understand why you focus on this but I also am so interested in for instance Aaron Prissy. This was somebody who is fairly modern. I mean you actually met her and she was really sort of revolutionary in that she started these refuges for for women. Tell me about what was important about. Just the idea of a safe space for women. At that time. What was the imperative? The letter led her to do that. I think it's really hard for people I was born in one thousand nine hundred to understand what the seventies contempt a feminism. The kind of utopianism. The feeling that everything was up for grabs and part of that was a revolution in the way that we talked about domestic violence the concept itself before then there was wife-beating and it was more or less excused or wait happened in lower class has but not to middle class has there was no no a tool attempt to tool to understand. This was just a huge universal problem. Erin busy did is found a women's refuge Chizik and she had one rundown house and the council gave her and no money and she basically filled it with women who would otherwise have nowhere else to go but she left feminism. She fell out. Dramatically with feminism. And now she's a men's rights activist and now she says that feminism was destroyed. The family okay so I find that really really interesting. So there's just take what she did you talk about Chizzy. It's an area of west London. Today is the largest charity of its kind. Apparently nearly three hundred refuges in England with about four thousand beds. So it's a big deal but as you say is a complicated character you right. I regarded busy as a warning. The plurality of politics the petty dictators the naval gazing all. This seem very familiar except my peers. Were not the radical feminists of the seventies but the Internet feminists of the twenty tens. What do you mean about that? Particularly in relation. I guess to the story of Erin busy. Who left the movement? And I think it's a useful now when we talk a huge amount of our council culture and things like that right and purity on the Internet. Definitely you're seeing it now playing in the. Us Presidential Race Right. The idea of who is the purest candidate and then old people who last time round said why can't vote for Hillary Clinton but Elizabeth Warren. I'd love her and actually this time round the going. Oh Maybe Not Elizabeth Warren maybe that she Bernie Sanders and I think that's fascinating to see that women have to. I think often in politics particularly got up to a higher standard but the particular point with Aaron Pizzi is the idea that history of feminism has to include people. Don't describe themselves as feminist. You don't see themselves as feminists. I think I'm comfortable in saying that. There are people who are alive because Aaron Pizzi. But she's not part of the feminist movement she didn't want to be. What do you mean about? She went into men's rights. People would say hang on. Men have all the rights. That's why there is a feminist movement to try to level the playing field. What what does she mean so? Men's he's a big caucus on the Internet of talking about for example. The idea of false rape culture right idea that there are too many rape accusations that they're not investigated properly and it is unfair to men that they can't defend themselves from these. So that's that's a big strain in the I did actually. There's a huge amount of domestic violence against men that goes unreported. And the idea that feminism is is a hate group devoted to bringing men down there. Just come with a conspiracy theory about this called the Patriarchy and the difficulty. I find with talking about this. Is that in some ways. I do agree with some of that. For example they're all male victims of domestic violence both in gay relationships in straight relationships but nonetheless the statistics overrule are incredibly clear. Domestic violence is agenda problem. It is primarily by men attacking women and we know that unfortunately from the homicide statistics which the most visible sign of it and statistics. America quite similar but here in Britain. It's one point. Five women are awake moded by their partner former partner and that the same as just simply not true for man. I want to bring it to the metoo movement because we just had a major verdict in the Harvey Weinstein trial to be honest with you. Even the plaintiffs and their lawyers were worried that they might not get any conviction and they did on two of the counts and so many women who brought the original charges and went public originally a so grateful that actually this means something Harvey Weinstein has been held accountable in a court of law. You wrote this book before that but you talk about me too and you weren't sure that me too would lead to accountability. What is your feeling now off. You heard that verdict. I was very pleased to see that voting because what we need to have is due process and there have been situations where in the metoo movement people felt. It's been very unfair to men because accusations have been made that they weren't able to go through four prices they weren't able to defend themselves and I do think that's unfair one of the big arguments that I make in the book. Is that the last ten years of FEMINISM UP. An incredible in terms of consciousness raising those things need to now be embedded in legal economic structures. A metoo movement. I think has been incredible. It is also the result of a profound failure. Those people should not have had to come forward and say what they said in the court of public opinion about Harvey Weinstein because it should have been that should have been process in place in his workplace. That should have been caught. Actions that actually lead to something when there were credible complaints. Nda's and payoffs and an older and so the interesting question for me is. How do you stop the next Harvey Weinstein before it happens and that to me? Is the job of feminism. Now what are the structures in place that will stop that you feel having done this historical look having seen what's happening now this watershed you feel hopeful? That going forward society will actually enact those legal cultural protections standard. I feel incredibly optimistic about feminism which sends a very old thing to say the time when I think feels quite a time of backlash one hundred fifty years ago. In Britain women couldn't own property. You know just a one hundred years ago. They couldn't vote. Nine thousand nine hundred. Ninety one rape in marriage was officially declared to be criminal now this century of enormous change for Britain. And although it's really the result of an enormous amount of hard work there are campaigns. I see out there still doing incredible work in the last couple of years. For example. We've had the first conviction for female genital mutilation. These things aren't avant saying but progress can often take a lot longer than I think the Internet would like. You did talk about Hillary Clinton And now Elizabeth Warren CNN did a poll recently. Finding that there are still a lot of Americans who believe a woman cannot be beat a man in the presidential race in five one in five women who asked said that a woman cannot win the presidency. This is a huge issue. I mean what what? What do you make of that one? I think is fascinating when you dig into those findings you say to people. Would you be against having a woman president and they go? No of course not. I'm not I'm not a sexist. Do you think other people would be and they say yes. He's thinking about thirty people. Think other people have a problem with it? So what happens is it's not S- People's own sex by the fear that a woman is an electable and in the system when you're picking your best possible candidate there is always the worry. Is it a risk to go for a woman and I think that's why you've seen lots more women going into the hands..

Harvey Weinstein America Helen Lewis rape International Women Hillary Clinton Britain Marie stopes US Erin Christiane Amanpour Aaron Pizzi Daniel Cowman Elizabeth Warren Professor Daniel Markovits London United Nations
"daniel x" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

07:46 min | 7 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"<Music> <Speech_Music_Female> this. <Music> Go foes <Music> driving my <Music> car. We concern <Music> on music <Music> and rule <Music> induced induced <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> school for <Music> Dr somewhere <Music> <Music> outside. <Music> It's lovely lovely <Music> day. <Music> We can put <Music> on our seatbelts. <Music> And <Speech_Music_Female> operas <Music> lie <Music> down <Music> <Music> <Music> O ooh <Music> <Music> <Music> around <Music> <Music> the music <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> really lie <Music> went on own <Music> garden <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> down round. <Speech_Music_Male> Not <Music> Too fast. 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I <Speech_Female> loved sharing your <Speech_Female> music with our <Speech_Female> ear snacks friends <Speech_Female> but there are something <Speech_Female> that we forgot to ask <Speech_Music_Female> you and it's probably <Speech_Female> the most <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> probably the most pressing <Speech_Female> question Jin <Speech_Female> that anybody <Speech_Female> has ever asked <Speech_Female> any music <Speech_Female> person <Speech_Female> ever about <Speech_Female> where music <Speech_Female> comes from and <Speech_Female> why it's important <Speech_Female> to connect all <Speech_Female> of humanity eighty <Speech_Female> to each other. <Speech_Female> What is <Speech_Female> the meaning of it? <Speech_Female> All and <SpeakerChange> the question <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> like Best Dash Shoe <Speech_Female> ice <SpeakerChange> cream. 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"daniel x" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

03:12 min | 7 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"Ask Bill how old are y'all. Hey Girl Elise eight years old step you are in five and five. I have already said. Daniel is a Nashville based singer songwriter. And he just put a wonderful kids album called. I love rainy days and it. It is nominated for best children's album this year in the sixty second grammy awards. I don't know if you know this about Daniel but we also love rainy rainy days. It's true we did a whole episode about rain so we're wondering what are some of your favorite things to do on rainy days I'll go first Hot Chocolate Oh yeah checkers. What do you like Tinkerbell Plum Canyon? Jump Roping Roping. I don't think I can't play piano while I jump rope following. You can try you. You could dry it out later but another question for Y'all is how did you come up with ideas for these songs well I kind of I thought of one has them the all the letters. Yes Yeah Tinkerbell L. sounding good there yet. Tinkerbell saying that Daniel I love the sounds of this record you have raindrops in car. Sounds and lots of different. Sounds of the world Can you tell us some other. Sounds like yeah. Go ahead tilly. Sh what does that Hershey law. uh-huh okay we know that you you work with a lot of talented people in music writing songs and producing them like Casey mass graves and other awesome Nashville. People you've worked with and it sounds like there are some some really talented people on this particular album to tiger lily digger. Can you tell us a little bit about working being with those superstars and what they brought to this project. That made it special for you. Yeah how does working with your daughter is compared to working with Casey. Musk graves I would say. Hey that it's pretty similar you know Casey's one of those people that immediately improves the sound of Song with her voice and I would say that My daughters are the the same way when you have a song. If it's a good song they sing on it. It just becomes better till a children's album Now I'm on the Jim too. I think it's kind of like cold like like us. Children and our children's L. it just kind of makes it more unique. It's lovely day. Let's go for Dr. You feel like it. Let's let's go for.

Daniel Casey mass Tinkerbell Plum Canyon Nashville Tinkerbell L. Tinkerbell Bill grammy Hershey Jim
"daniel x" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

08:02 min | 11 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on From Scratch

"Budget but your salary and and the sampling budget took a turn in two thousand eight when you brought on private equity investors in Vm G. and they're a fund that invests invest in consumer products and Darius Bykov the founder of vitamin water or glass so made that introduction crew. How do you know Darius so Darius. Darius was friends with and the and Melissa Calmer for my difference for many years and I was entertaining another transaction and ask Darius for advice and I said do I need to do it this way this way this way which I'm being told him he said No. You don't you can do it. Whatever way you want and let me introduce you to Asia. Asia and will invest what I had done right until then we come up with a concept with a product with with good culture in the company. Would I had not don. Reid is that after fifteen years of being in the Wilderness I was so scared to take risks and to invest in letting more people try our product. That's where sampling thing was eight hundred dollars because I saw that as a as an expense to be caught rather than investment and then suddenly realized wow nine hundred ten people that try a kind bar become part of your franchise and so thanks to my partners we built a phenomenal film marketing team to let people sample and so from the first dozen ninety one eight hundred thousand dollar budgets eight hundred dollars before and then today about thirteen million dollars that we go into just giving new kind bars to new consumers consumers and then in spring two thousand fourteen you bought back. VM Cheese Steak for two hundred and twenty million dollars mostly cash deal which was basically basically thirteen times their initial investment. Things have have come a long way since that wall. BOHM's moment yes Honda and the team that we have today in particular is every morning I wake up and I feel so blessed and so grateful to be working with people that are better than I will ever be on what they will. I'm just like a harass. You're listening to from scratch. My guest Daniel Lubetzky founder of kind healthy he snacks a food company that produces bars with whole nuts and spices and fruit among other products like Granola. Is I want to go back to your family for a moment moment you mentioned before that your father had this positive stance. Do you feel like that was a biological proclivity that he was just an innately that way you mentioned your grandfather was the same way that's a great question. I asked related questions all the time but not particularly that question's sends a really great question. I don't know I I do think that you know I have for children and from the day they're born you can tell that they have personalities and this fascinating meaning wonderful to see how they really are their own person. They're quite different twins and they are quite different from each other but I also do think that nurture can can guide a person and shape them. I think it's a combination of of DNA and genes and the environment but then again you know how did my dad in such an environment manage to be such an extraordinarily sweet warm and loving person was hit because by then by the age of nine. He has already built it up. Do you meditate or exercise to enhance I take a lot of time to think we are so barraged with inputs like inbox email voicemail tweeter messengers these that and you care you smartphone everywhere or you go and you just constantly trying to keep up with the data and read more news and we our brains are craving those data points so I- consciously try hey to find times in the day sometimes when you Iran but he might also just be when you're taking a shower might also be read before you go to bed he might be would you just half an hour to rest and you're about to grab that foreign say you know what let me just be with myself. Let me talk to myself. Do you talk to yourself out loud no. I don't think I thought to myself because in Judaism the reason you you pray out loud is not so that God could hear you only. It's so that you could also hear yourself well. It's beautiful start paying attention to that but I think it's more a adjust goosing you are a magician and magicians are entertainers making magic requires his practice and repetition in what way has magic influence your business. I think magic is definitely a big part of my personality and who I am. I'm both because it requires you to be innovative and creative and because of what you brought forth about how you need to be disciplined and practice practice practice. I think it's fun. I also connects me to my dad because my dad used to teach me magic when I was a little kid and then when I was in college a an and studying abroad in Europe I paid my trips through Europe by doing magic shows in the streets of barriers and in Bulgaria and just had a lot of adventures doing magic. What's one of your favorites one of my favorite magic changing the time on your watch. I Love Cartridge also speaking of cards. You have a kind card in your wallet. What is the meaning of this kind of this. Is Our latest testing our effort to try to find ways to creatively inspire kindness that challenging doing that is at kindness bites very essence. The reason it works is that it's a pure act with there's no alterior purposes. So how do you inspire is without destroying its authenticity so we've been toying with for ten years in our latest discard schooled kind awesome cards were if we split somebody that has done a kind act already either to you or to a stranger then you celebrate them and say you know that was really kind of union appreciation for for your kindness would like to give you this card and you go to the website enter this code and we send you a couple kind bars plus another kind of card that you can then give to somebody else else to celebrate when they when you spot an act of kindness that they do. Let's one act of kindness spotted on the street the other day which caused you to take out this card and give it to a stranger somebody seated their taxi to my wife and I was very very nice and well on that's not necessarily thought I was going to give them money and I'm like no no no this. This is what it is and then they were really happy or somebody. seeds their seats in the subway to somebody else or just you know on the six line on the subway lately. I don't know so people can get really mean to each other and become like this laboratory of social behavior. I don't know if you ever saw the Batman movie with joker where he like creating this social experiments in metropolis and people are like are they going to do the right thing and they're in the sixth train. A lot of times people are not doing the right thing. They're being really Jerky to charter. The trains are really delayed and it's Kinda scary so when somebody behaves really kindly in those environments who I I give them one of those cards on the six chain the Lexington Avenue Line in New York City. You mentioned your wife briefly. She's a doctor what kind of doctor she. She's a transplant nephrologist kidney. You know when I I mentioned that in a frolicked and I'm like who is that people that deal with dead bodies like that Sunday crawler Gist Amana for allergists kidney dot com like okay good to know and a mother of four. I'm a mother other foreign an incredible partner the sweet as woman in the world and she goes to the Bronx to help for her job as transparent and fella gist. Thank you very much for joining US Jessica. Thank you so much for having this really interesting questions. I guessed has been Daniel Betsy. I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch..

Darius Bykov Asia founder Jessica Harris Daniel Lubetzky Melissa Calmer Europe Honda Reid Daniel Betsy Bronx New York City Iran partner Bulgaria eight hundred dollars ninety one eight hundred thous thirteen million dollars twenty million dollars
"daniel x" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

11:16 min | 11 months ago

"daniel x" Discussed on From Scratch

"Sold in diversity of locations including whole Foods Costco Amtrak trains a newspaper stands Daniel is also the founder of peace works our producer of Mediterranean spreads such as top nods. Hamas and Baba Gana piece works aims to foster business relationships among among neighbors in the Middle East and other groups and conflict as a way to reduce conflict in those regions. Daniel grew up in Mexico City and speaks Spanish English Hebrew Hebrew and French and a little bit of snow. Welcome thank you thank you so much Jessica before we dig into kind. I WanNa talk about peace works. which was the company you founded in? Nineteen Ninety three that focuses on Mediterranean spreads. What was the germ four for founding this food company in the early nineties. I didn't know it was going to be a food. Company was more about trees business as a force for bringing Arabs and Israelis rallies together. That was what I was very passionate about. Since writing my college and law school work about how to use market forces to help trading partners shatter culture stereotypes cement relations with each other so that was the impetus of what I was doing and it became a foot company because as I was looking for ventures I was looking in peril. I was looking in Dead Sea Minerals and food became the area where I found my passions best they didn't understand that minerals twelve but stood food and it's hard start so food was secondary to the primary mission. Shen was to facilitate joint ventures among conflicting neighbors so what's an example of a collaboration which you established at peace works I between two conflicting groups will the flagship venture which still exists today which is how we started was my discovery of Asandra tomato spread and when I long story short found out the company had gone bankrupt because he was sourcing its glass jars from Portugal and Sandra tomatoes from Italy Lee and it was very expensive and when I came to your banish the Israeli manufacturer and told them about my yes he had Arab friends and he really believe leaving the philosophy of World War Two piece works but it also showed him that he could benefit economically that he could buy the glass jars from Egypt instead of Portugal Sunday tomatoes NATO's from Turkey suppliers instead of Italian ones so they started buying Basil and olives and olive oil from Palestinian citizens of the West Bank and Gaza and that's how it started. How did you secure distribution in the United States with peace works. Can you walk through that process because in a way you piggybacked on that in with kind mind well. I didn't know what I was doing so I emptied my brick my legal briefcase literally these big briefcase for carrying legal documents documents and they filled it up with jars with Sunday tomato spreads Basil Pesto spreads and out start at the top of Broadway one hundred and twenty seconds streets on the west side and then just started walking store by store till I would go seven. Am in the morning till I would end at seven PM at night and the bottom of Wall Street and then I would cross ask the next day and it would go up Broadway and the other side of Broadway and brother was an important choice because it was a the avenue that I found to have the most concentration intrusion of grocery store so I knew Second Avenue Third Avenue Madison they did all of them but Braulio was the juiciest and I would not go to the next store unless I got either an order or an explanation for what I needed to different in order to get an order the next time and I drove many people not it's because everything was wrong but they were basically taught me like Scott. Gold China and Mr Zave are from sabres basically taught me what the consumers were looking for so I really we learned a Lotta what I do today from all the store managers and buyers at the grocery shops Bodega in New York City. What is an example of something thing that Mr Xaver taught you everything I mean I came in and they didn't have much patients because they had thousands of consumers going around and here I am and I don't know what I'm doing but the they really liked that I really cared about my mission and I think they just have patience with me so they taught me how what is the margin requirements for for retailer for a distributor and for yourself so that you can run a ongoing business they taught me about the labels how to make sure that the name is cleared the jars back then were using olive oil out of them. That was not acceptable. So it was a lot of sessions you mentioned that you had a law degree you went to Stanford Law School and you became a lawyer. and the idea for peace works came out of paper a your thesis that you wrote which I believe was entitled. Incentives for peace and prophets federal legislation to encourage enterprises to invest in arab-israeli joint ventures become a very famous document among doctors because if you were having insomnia were having trouble falling asleep that would give it to you would read it and you'd fall asleep immediately. MMEDIATELY was the most theoretical boring thing in the world. They was just totally devoid of practical use but it was beautiful. Theoretically you dabbled in the law before starting businesses you had a stint at Sullivan and Cromwell you clerked for Supreme Justice in Texas. Did you think that you might might WANNA career. In law I love the law was not that I was trying to escape the law. I just had this. You call germ. I had this bug inside me that that I I just really felt that my mission in life was to try to build bridges and two and the Arab Israeli conflict and here's the peace process all my ideas that I've been sharing for several years certainly they go from being delusional to being slightly tenable and I'm like all right how to try to pursue it and have to try it. He also had a kind of social. Ethos those in your family. Your father was a prominent figure in your upbringing and the way you think about the world he was a Holocaust survivor having having survived Dhakal the concentration camp in Germany. Can you talk a little bit about him. Yeah my that was Mike greatest hero on role model he was the most humble person he built himself from scratch came to Mexico after the war. He was fifteen and a half a few years old. When the war started sixteen when he got to Mexico he didn't speak Spanish shoring leash. He's from Lithuania. Originally he was born in Riga Latvian raise in Lithuania yeah when he was nine years old nineteen thirty nine the war started and I'll tell you the story. It's a little strong but he was coming back with his father to their apartment house where they lived and the superintendent showed them. I'm in to where the garage was and he opened the door of the garage and there was a pile of bodies and he told my grandfather you see all these people they're older juice in the building and you lucky that you always were nice to me and treated with respect and kindness so I spared you on your family but get out before I change my mind so that night my father who's nine years old and his brother and my grandfather and grandmother packed whatever they could carry and then they left into a ghetto oh and that was a story that my that told me when I was nine years old and my mom said Roman what are you doing. This kid is nine years old. You know you're GONNA. What are you doing? Please stop telling these my that said look. He's nine years old and he needs to hear it. I was nine years old and I needed to live it but the other thing that was no less powerful and important with the stories that he told me about people that in the worst of circumstances would rise open open do something kind like this German soldier that through a potato to him and might used to tell the story about how he felt he was going to die and he was really malnourished and that Potato Tayo meant for him the difference in survival and dog soldier to caress by giving him food for for the soldiers so who those were the stories that I most admired the way my that always remembered the moments of kindness I mean the darkest moments and there's a quote that Ah I really love that connects to that about from Rabbi Hillel that says Innis plays where there's no humanity strive thou to be human so the the name kind healthy snacks. Did your father have influence on the naming of the product the the name kind was created by my team and I it's really fascinating that we finally zone dean on it because he wasn't today so obvious that that's perfect name for us but back then and all this crazy ideas for the name the reason we came up with kind is that it had human attributes that we were really trying to aspire to be to to define us. You know to do the kind thing for your body to the kind thing for your taste buds onto the kind thing for your world. It's striking that your father was very forthcoming with his stories and chose to talk about the wartime versus others who really receded and did not tell their family such stories just just more for self preservation families preservation than anything. What was the impetus for your families. your father's moving to Mexico of all places a religious I just comment on because it's really important I was surrounded by other survivors growing up and the I love them dearly but you could tell they were consumed by the horrible horrid they had gone through and they can have a positive outlook and my dad or there were others that were able to just shut it out and just have a positive left wing forward forward. My Dad had the strength to recall those horrors but in a positive way instill he was such a sweet kind hearted man Vega Very Greg areas always making people laugh always almost like he saw his mission to make people have a better day and make people laugh. Did you see the movie. life is beautiful so when I saw that movie I cried a lot and then I was a little trouble I felt guilty to be laughing also and I asked my that you never cross my mind that in such horrible circumstances you could actually say jokes in the middle of a concentration camp and my that said the opposite the only reason why that felt that he survived is because my grandfather it was really funny joke teller and he would retain the Jewish inmates and the German soldiers with funny stories and make people more humane and more human by making them laugh and just find particularly those dark moments some levity you are brought up in Mexico City. Hell was being Jewish in a predominantly Christian place while I also lived in our very insulated cocoon. You pointed earlier..

Mexico Mexico City Daniel Lithuania Middle East Hamas Portugal Jessica Dead Sea Minerals Baba Gana United States Stanford Law School founder producer Mr Xaver New York City NATO
"daniel x" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"daniel x" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Daniel jio a new the new law the dan pretty show the day thank you but then there thank you with his own please is coast to coast am now here's your guest host jimmy church by welcome back what a great great track right there a susan western ghost moon she got it she figured it out she tweeted jimmy you are my rush more thank you for that he had got it and that was our theme tonight you guys got about half way through the tracks before he finally figured it out i thought it was easier than that but he has a good this is coast to coast am and sitting in on this friday or saturday tight i was gonna say the weekend amir's jimmy church and now this is this the deal have you checked out paranormal date there's a dating and friendship site right now everything that we've.

Daniel jio jimmy church amir
"daniel x" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

MMA Junkie Radio

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"daniel x" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

"Wow wow daniel right now at the black and white weak they were like we got the main event tuning donald with bp i'm like i'm not doing it you guys jumping in recital after you something hey great britain to be clear to see you home or a lot for aka so you know every i it's i don't know um i i i think fighters need to lighten up a little bit her that different though right like like light with my guys white like any he made very thing i'm always going to pick up it's unfair you though like even ufc to 21 or walk will fighting a romero they asked me to do the uh the the color commentary and i was like that's impossible there's no way i can be unbiased in the lukewarm whole fight still had the declined d c now you've you've kinda given us a glimpse of when the career will come to an end i want to talk about a few things that will happen afterwards and i'm gonna share a story with you here in the sports book uh we like to watch football into on on sundays and i heard a kid talk about the analysts troy aikman and he kept saying analysts the analyst over and over but never did he ever allude to the fact that the guy's a super bowl champion he had a great college career are you prepared to later on in the future perhaps this newer generation may be forget about daniel cormie the fighter and may be a them only know you as the analysts are the color commentator i've ever thought about that.

donald britain romero football analyst troy aikman super bowl