4 Burst results for "Daniel Leach"

"daniel leach" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

04:54 min | 6 months ago

"daniel leach" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"You just got to worry about your horse and make sure your horse is ready to go. Yeah, are you a pretty good handicapper, Daniel? I bet every once in a while, but I don't bet on my own horses. That's bad, that's bad luck. Really? Yeah, I don't bet on my horses now. Are you a superstitious guy? I'm not, but every time I thought, you know, I thought I would win for sure. I'll bet money and then I don't. So it's like, you know, it hasn't worked out for me so far. Yeah, I can certainly understand that. And I'm not to the point where, you know, I wear my blue boxers and I wanted to write, so I got one of my blue boxers every day. I'm not at that point. You're just getting started, give it a little while. You'll develop this. It'll happen. Trainer Daniel leach here on trainer talk presented by phasic tipton. He is the private trainer for Katie rich farms out in midway, Kentucky and started in that role last September taking over from our Hubble and has gotten off to a really fast start doing some wonderful work with them and as you can tell. He's all about putting the horse first and letting the horse take him there. And Daniel, I've had a lot of trainers tell me the key to being successful is patience and it sounds like you have that in spades. Yeah, yeah, patience for sure. You can't rush nothing in this game. Really, I mean, if you rush a horse into something and then they don't like it, then you're just going backwards with them. They're just going to start refusing. They're going to, you just can't do it. You just got to take your time and make sure they're ready. You talked about or mentioned it briefly a little while ago when we were talking about tabit and you said that your writers like tabi and like these horses that you haven't. How does that work? Is it your call and your call alone when it comes to selecting a writer for a certain horse and are there riders that you look for knowing a horse's intricacies and their personality? Yeah, if they're lazy, I try to look for more of aggressive rider, more of a get into them and that. But usually I like, you know, if you come out and work a couple horses out, you know, I'll probably most likely put you on. As long as you work them and if you're good, you got to be a good hand, you know? I'm just not going to throw anybody on a horse, but for sure, my thing is if you come and work, I mean, you know the horse, then, you know, I would definitely give you a chance, you know? If you know the horse and you like them, I'll definitely give you a chance, so. I think that's an element of the game that's totally overlooked. You're saying it's critical that a rider gets to know the horse before they're on them in the afternoons. Yeah, it's not a big, big thing, but it's part of it. I mean, it's kind of, I'm trying to figure out another way of putting it, it's like the basketball player going into a different arena that he's never played in before, you know? And you expect him to go out and shoot ten for ten or something like that. You just got to know, you got to know what you have, you know? Yeah, you have to get familiar a jockey has to get familiar with the horse in some form or fashion. Not that we don't see jockeys all the time that get a leg up for the first time on a horse and they end up winning. That could be simply the talent of the horse, the talent of the jockey, whatever it might be. But I see what you're saying. It certainly makes sense, and it's especially what maidens has never ran. You know, I want somebody that worked in a couple of times or the older horse that's, you know, you got replays and you know how they are, then that's not a big thing, but with babies, for sure, you would, I would want the guy to get out and come out and work them a couple of times before they ride. If you had to win one race to save your job, save your career. What jockey are you putting on that horse? Hi, I read. He's the best right now. I read Ortiz. Yeah. Either of the Ortiz brothers, right? Yeah, well, either of the Ortiz brothers or say he's really good as well. Yep. Yep. Yeah, there's some comments out there. And some good trainers too, including Daniel Lee. She has been my special guest here on trainer talk presented by phasic tipton. Daniel, we're coming down to the final 16th of a mile on the show. We're inside of a minute and a half or so. Very quickly, outside of horse racing, you get a little time away from the farm. What else are you going to be doing? What other hobbies interests? I like to go fishing and hiking. I have a dog. We go hiking every once in a while. I'll go running. I'll go play basketball with my nephews. Just whatever I go to the track and bet if I don't have.

phasic tipton Trainer Daniel leach Katie rich Daniel midway Kentucky Ortiz basketball Daniel Lee
"daniel leach" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

03:52 min | 6 months ago

"daniel leach" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Them start building on the house and that so they let me do that when I got done with the horses that go and help build the house and that's how I met one day I was there going around two by fours and there was this guy there and I didn't know who he was and he was working right along. He was out working me and next thing and now I find out it's Larry donor was working right with us and you would never see anywhere else like that have somebody you know the owner working with you like that. It was just something to see and from that moment on I really just, I love the place just 'cause everybody's willing to work and everybody seems happy there and it's just a nice place. Yeah, it's a beautiful property too and I know Larry had has had a passion for horses for a very long time. That goes back to his time they spent at Saratoga, right? Yeah. He goes up to Saratoga every year. He lives up there most of the time. So yeah, it's such a cool story and such a great relationship now between Daniel leach and the owner's Larry and Karen Doyle over at Katie rich. And of course, as I mentioned, the email that I received from George Barnes was the president of Katie rich farms asking me if I thought that Daniel will be a good guest on trainer talk. He said, you know, George listens to the show all the time. And he said, I really think that our private trainer would make for a great guest and Daniel after hearing a bit of your story here in the first half of the show. I have to say he was spot on. I appreciate that. You know, everything right now, this first year of training and everything is just come at me so fast. It's like, it's still like, for me, I'm still waking up to thinking that I'm training, you know? This is always been a lifelong dream of mine that I thought would never come true, but you know, they gave me an opportunity of a lifetime and like I said, I have to run with it and do my best and so far I think I've been doing pretty good and you know we just got to keep the ball going and I got great help which is the main thing and yeah so how much time will you spend at the farm and then how much time do you spend at the track? How do you divide that up? I used to spend a lot more time at the farm than COVID hit so I kind of stayed away, you know? But and then I wasn't I wasn't living at the farm. I recently have been moving I live out there now but whenever I can, you know, whatever needs to be done like a breeding shed run I'll go on that or self prep in get involved on that. Whatever needs to be done, I help out. Are you breaking all the babies out there on the farm? Yeah. Yeah, we go out and break the babies. I go out and get on the pony. Go along with them in that. Tell me about the rest of the team then that works with you when you're breaking the babies. There have to be others that help you out. Yeah, we have David Ramirez. He's a, he runs barn one. He's been with the farm for longer than me. He's been there for 13 years. I want to say. And he's also really, really good hands. He's really, he cares about a lot about the horses and he takes his time with the babies really, really good time. And we also have Luciano, who's a really, really good writer. And he takes his time with the babies as well. Well, I know that there are several aspects that are critical to being a horse trainer. And as you've heard in this first half of the program, Daniel leitch has learned from the ground up being around horses from the time he could first pick up a pitchfork and he's been a passion and a love of his ever since and now he's making his dream come true is the private trainer for Katie rich farms in midway, Kentucky. Daniel stayed with me. We're going to get to a short commercial break. When I come back, we'll talk more about your.

Katie rich Larry Saratoga Daniel leach Karen Doyle George Barnes Daniel David Ramirez George Daniel leitch Luciano midway Kentucky
"daniel leach" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

08:01 min | 6 months ago

"daniel leach" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Is, you know, the next greatest thing. He thinks she's a breeder's cup horse, but you know, I ran her 5 for a long that was the first start and she got squeezed pretty bad out of the gate and got some mud in her face for the first time. So she never really got going, but she wants to go longer anyway. I hope she seems to be like she wants to go longer. I'm hoping she wants to go longer, you know? I want to run a mile and a 16th and you know in a good race. So she seems like she's going to be there. Like right now I'm at the barn and she's laying down as we speak. Yeah, yeah. How does a trainer Daniel deal with the scenario you just talked about? Where you put all the time in, you get the horse ready to run, they go to the track, you feel confident, they're going to be on their a game. And then they come out of the gate and all hell breaks loose and they get into trouble. They get stopped during the race, whatever it might be. And it's got to be very frustrating for a horse trainer to watch that happen. Yeah, it's very frustrating for trainers and especially owners that, you know, put all the money into it and are actually sponsoring us that they're the ones that really kind of upset but at the end of the day, it's horse racing, it's sports, anything can happen. You see rich strike, he's wanting the Derby, so I mean, at the end of the day, it's anything possible. So, I mean, it's frustrating, but it's part of the game if you don't, you know, if you don't like it, then you better figure something else out. Yeah, you better go do something else with your time. I'm talking with trainer Daniel leach here on trainer talk presented by phasic tipton. He is the private trainer for Katie rich farms in midway, Kentucky. He took over that position last September. You know, you made a statement at the beginning of the show, Daniel, where you said things like this don't happen to people like me very often. So who is people like me? Who is Daniel leitch? Tell me a little bit about you. I'm just a kid that, you know, his mom grew up, I grew up on the backside. I mean, my mom was exercise writer and you know, I really didn't have much as in like a background as an owner. Owner background, you know, back in, you know, big time guys backing me up, I just, you know, have my mom and, you know, I started just coming to the track when I was a kid and helping out whoever I could and you know, just working on the track and then I got, you know, opportunity of the lifetime here and I had to take it and run with it. So what track was that? Would you go to Keenan or are you talking about the track at Katie rich? My mom, she wrote, she was an exercise ladder for years. And when I was a 9 years old, I just come around the barn and I remember just watching her train the horses riding around and whenever I was old enough to pick up a pitchfork, I was picking up and clean installs, walking high, it's clean and water buckets, whatever it could be done and then, you know, when I got old enough, I just kept on working my way up and grooming and then hot walking and grooming and then eventually foreman and assistant and now I'm training. So when you're in that position as a young boy and you said as soon as you could pick up a pitchfork, you started mocking the stalls and helping out. Now that you look back on all that experience, do you think that that helps you as you go forward as a trainer? It helps you know in horses being around them. The more you're around horses, the more you know them, you know how they are mentally and you know you just know what they like, their habits, you know? 'cause every horse is different. Who were some of the horses in the early days there when you were a kid and you were growing up and you'd be around the track and where their horses that you still remember today you go, man, that was a good horse. I got a chance to be around. I remember being around for all for all we know. She won the Lexus here at Keenan. Yeah. My mom rode her and I remember her just going over there and being in the winter circle for that and then I remember being a little kid. I was ten years old, I believe it's a time and I grabbed the saddle towel off and I took it home and I hung it up and I thought it was the greatest thing ever and then that moment on, I just knew, you know, I just wanted to do more and more in the industry. Do you still have a bunch of saddle towels and memorabilia scattered around your place now? Somewhat, not all that much. No. I have my winning pictures. Yet those are nice, right? Those are the ones you want to cherish. I want to keep, yeah. Yeah. So did you ever think about doing anything other than horse racing? Or is this always it for you? You know, it's funny because my mom was on the track and then you know I was grazed by my grandma because my mom was going to Florida for the winter and then coming back up here and then when she was up here I'll go to the track where they're in that. But when I was in high school, I got really into running track and field and I actually won a state championship in 2012 and I was dedicated to that. Yeah, I was dedicated in the track and in high school. So I really kind of got out of it for a while just because I was more focused on that and then you know I got to figuring more with all the injuries and I got planned fast yeah, it's pretty bad that you know do I really want to run in college and the rest of my life and you know I just figured it wasn't it wasn't it wasn't meant to be because I got plenty of plantar fasciitis pretty bad and I was sore there for a while and I kind of run anymore. So but it was just that's what I was you know I was hoping to be a runner but it didn't pan out. What high school did you go to? I went to Brian station here in Lexington. Yeah. Did you start getting scholarship offers too? I got a couple of scholarship offers from like spalding and Maria just small schools. Yeah, it's such a cool thing. So I think that's an interesting tie too because here you are a top runner on the human side and now you're hoping to train top runners on the equine side. It all ties together, right? It was meant to be. And I'm kind of putting some of that towards my training, you know? 'cause we kind of did like a peak peak like when we trained for track, we kind of did like a peak system. So I'm trying to kind of put that into a horse training as well. What does that mean? What's a peak system? I'm just trying to get them to run their best at the race. I'm not, you know, I don't want to use this race for it to set up for the next race. You know, I don't, you know? But sometimes it works like that, but you know, I want them to run good every time. I don't want to use this race to set up for the next one, you know? So how do you get a horse to peak on a particular race day, whether it's a Saturday, a Sunday, a Wednesday night, whatever it is. How do you get a horse to peak on a certain day? What's the key? You just got to make sure they're all the way there. I mean, eating up training really well. I mean, everything, everything's got to be right with this horse to really get it to peak. Do you ever think back in wonder what would have happened if you didn't have the plantar fasciitis and have to deal with that? And you went on and ran in college and all those kinds of things. Do you wonder what your life might look like now and how much different it might be? Yeah, I do. Having a day off. Nah, not really, just 'cause I love the horses so much. And it's just, I mean, people don't think about it, but running 8 to ten miles a day, it's a lot, and it takes a lot of time. It's a lot, so I'm not really looking back at it as a bad thing, but I'm happy where I'm at, and I'm happy the way everything turned out to be. We have it. Did you say 8 to ten miles a.

Katie rich Daniel leach phasic tipton Daniel leitch Keenan Daniel midway Kentucky Brian station spalding Florida Lexington Maria
"daniel leach" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

06:03 min | 6 months ago

"daniel leach" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Course, podcast on major podcast platforms all over the world each and every week and really appreciate everybody tuning in. However, you're listening to trainer talk here on this Wednesday afternoon or maybe even a bit later listening on the podcast. Well, throughout the history of thoroughbred racing, there have been some incredibly successful partnerships among trainers who have taken private jobs for owners in the business and names like suge mcgahey and the FIPS family immediately come to mind. Neil Howard and his magical run with the Ferris family and lane then, and then you had Kira McLaughlin in the maktoum family and that relationship that worked so well for so long. Well, my guest on today's show isn't ready to count himself among those legendary pairings just yet. But he's also just getting started in September, he took over as private trainer for Katie rich farms in midway, Kentucky. He has saddled 6 winners from his first 26 starters. That's not a bad start. And at just 27 years old, the sky certainly appears to be the limit. As a matter of fact, how about this, in his first 8 months on the job, the native of Lexington, Kentucky, has made such a powerful impression that George Barnes, the president of Katie rich farms, took time to email me and had nothing but praise for their young trainer. Please join me in welcoming trainer Daniel leach to trainer talk presented by phasic tipton. Daniel appreciate the visit. Oh, I appreciate you guys calling me. Fun. You know, in his email, George made it a point to say that you've done a fantastic job and the team at Katie rich is convinced that you have a really bright future. It sounds like the perfect marriage. Oh, I mean, I love everybody out there and you know, they've given me an opportunity of a lifetime and you know stuff like this don't happen to people like me every day and when you get opportunity like this, you got to run with it and you've got to, I mean you got to make everything possible happen and if it does it's good, it's all good if not figure something else out but I just get in a really good opportunity and I love everybody over Katie rich and they're like family to me. When did you or what do you remember about the moment when you got the news that you were going to be promoted to head trainer? Well, it was kind of all in the work within probably four years, 5 years. So I started taking horses for Mark with the old trainer and I started shipping horses around for him like the Ohio to Virginia to just different little tracks that would needed to run and I'll run in for him, satellite and then bring him back and then I wanted to start doing more and more and so I got another job with ray handel down in Florida and I went down with him for a little bit and I wanted to stay with rape for a little bit longer, but they called me. They wanted me to come back and Mark was getting older and I just they wanted me to be around the barn more and help him ship and that. So I just decided to come back and it would just all going all good and you know it was you know I knew it was gonna happen but I just need to get my license so once I took the test and passed the test and actually got my license, I just figured it would be a matter of time before it happened. So you mentioned Mark and that's Mark Hubble who was the longtime trainer at Katie rich and he trained right up until last year. Is he training anything this year at all? No, he's not, he's actually retired. I think he's in he has also had the house in Colorado and breckenridge and I'm pretty sure he's out there right now. I've seen him every once in a while. He texted me after races every once in a while. He's like a father figure kind of and you know he helped me out a lot and I always loved Mark so he had some pretty good horses too for Katie rich. I think he saddled well let me see, I looked it up on echo base. It looks like 275 career winners more than $5.2 million in purses. So Mark Hubble was around some pretty good horses too. There was that one, I'm trying to think, was it your round? Was that the name of the Katie rich horse that he trained that was so good? Yeah, he had your round. He had missed Mary apples. He had misread delicious, which those are a part of the same family. Yeah, those are the better ones that he had, yeah. What things did you learn from Mark that, you know, that you're taking with you now is you're the head guy. Just a horseman, a lot of just a lot of horsemanship. Marquis, he always figured, you know, if the horse did want to do it, or just figuring out the horse and figure out what the horse liked. That's what I've learned a lot about that from Mark. How do you do that? You know, if they go, I mean, if they're going out, if they're going out and training and they're come back happy, I mean, they like it. And if they come back with their head and between their legs and they don't seem to give their refusing or if they're going on the track, spinning around and that they don't, you know, they don't like it, something's going on. You got to figure something else out, some to do something different with them. Is that something you can figure out relatively quickly? Or does it sometimes take a little time to do it? No, it's just all about the horse if it's whatever the horse likes to do. If the horse is training really good then keep on going with it, if not, then you gotta figure something else out. You know, you mentioned the name ray handled too and ray has been on this program, this trainer talk show. Tell me about working with ray and what you learned from him. Ray, he's also a really, really good horseman. And I've learned really just pick your spots with horses. He's.

Katie rich suge mcgahey Neil Howard Kira McLaughlin George Barnes Daniel leach phasic tipton Mark Hubble Mark Kentucky maktoum ray handel Ferris midway Lexington Mary apples Daniel George breckenridge