35 Burst results for "Daniel L"

'Happiest Season' Makes the Yuletide Gay

Tim Conway Jr.

02:07 min | 19 hrs ago

'Happiest Season' Makes the Yuletide Gay

"Actually got kind of Ah, new wrinkle in terms of Christmas films with happiest season, which is basically Hannibal Hallmark Christmas movie style. Look at a relationship between two lesbians in Love. Who go, Tonto. The family of one of the women. And obviously, mom and dad don't know about their daughter's Proclivities. And, you know, I guess hilarity ensues, but it zoom in here or is it a good nature? Romcom ish kind of thing, Or is it home isn't a hallmark E Christmassy. What is it? Yeah, I would say, you know if you ever said to yourself, where are the corny Hallmark Channel style movies about same sex couples at Christmas? This? Well, here's your answer. Happiest season is actually made the Elsa cut above most of those films because you have good actors involved here. Kristen Stewart that's right from the Twilight franchise and a few better films plays one of the young women and Mackenzie Davis, who some people will recognize as the android heroin from the recent Terminator movie. They're the two women and they're going to spend Christmas With the parents played by Victor Garber and Mary Steenburgen. They didn't stand in terms of the cast. You get Daniel Levy of that very popular Emmy winning a sitcom that has Creek in its name and Aubrey Plaza on the gas tire. It's a good cast and obviously You know you're gonna have some meat, cute stuff going on and some deception and what have you, but But truly, it follows the standard formula for these movies, except it's a couple of women in love. And of course, they've got to, you know, kind of keep the secret until everything is revealed and get a basically it generates some laughs and real emotional tension and, wow, moments it. You know, you could see it on Who, Lou, if you have

Hannibal Hallmark Twilight Franchise Mackenzie Davis Elsa Kristen Stewart Aubrey Plaza Victor Garber Mary Steenburgen Daniel Levy Emmy LOU
Cardinals-to-be kept in quarantine ahead of Vatican ceremony

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 1 d ago

Cardinals-to-be kept in quarantine ahead of Vatican ceremony

"To be here under locked out of the Vatican. It's because of covert, of course ahead of this weekend's ceremony when they get the red hats Pope Francis elevated 13 priest to cardinal status last month. For the past week. A handful of the problems have been under tight restrictions, even getting their meals left in the hot hallway outside their hotel rooms. The only American in the group is Archbishop of the Dart washed Indict D. C area of Wilton Daniel Gregory. He says he was tested when he arrived. It'll be tested again the morning of the ceremony. First one was negative. Hopefully the second one will be too But I'm observing the Vatican requirements for 10 days Quarantine that's on all members of the college of Cardinals, who are unable to travel because of the code restrictions will be able to join in virtually representatives of the Vatican will give them their hats and rings. On their end, and they'll participate in essentially a very fancy zoom meeting wins news Dive

Pope Francis Daniel Gregory Vatican College Of Cardinals
'God's Love We Deliver' sends thousands of Thanksgiving meals to the sick, homebound, and needy in New York

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:20 min | 2 d ago

'God's Love We Deliver' sends thousands of Thanksgiving meals to the sick, homebound, and needy in New York

"Back this this year year is is feeding feeding New New York's York's hungry hungry for for Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving. Scores Scores of of volunteers volunteers are are busy busy this this morning. morning. It's It's God's God's love. love. We We deliver deliver packaging packaging thousands thousands of of holiday holiday meals meals for for people people in in need need citywide. citywide. I've been delivering a lot more meals from their SoHo headquarters since the pandemic arrived is 10 10 wins Deuce Bang Glenn Schuck reports in the last week alone. 3000 New York City families reached out to God's love asking if they, too, could get something delivered for Thanksgiving head chef Daniel Metzger tells me they wouldn't want to be doing anything else. This isn't just my my job. job. This This is is my my life. life. You You know, know, this this is is my my passion. passion. I I would would rather rather be be doing doing nothing nothing else else in in this this entire entire world. world. What's What's your your message message to to the the New New Yorkers Yorkers today today who who are are really really Home Home and and lonely and upset and I'm in there with you. I'm nervous. I don't know what's gonna what's going to go on. But just know that communities come together during times like this now, with holiday music, playing dozens of volunteers working all night, socially distance, preparing turkey, yams and stuffing and pumpkin soup. One of them is Natalie, she says, especially during the pandemic thing feels like home. It's honestly it's so rewarding, and it's wonderful to think I kind of think about it in the way that we're all very lonely, but we're all lonely together. You know, we're all going through this together. And somehow that makes me feel a little bit better. When you leave here. You certainly are inspired by the level of compassion. Realize we're going going to to get get through through this this pandemic. pandemic. Gunshot Gunshot 10 10 10 10 wins wins

Soho Headquarters Glenn Schuck Daniel Metzger New New York York New York City Natalie
Mitchell Trubisky Likely to Start For the Chicago Bears vs Green Bay Packers on Sunday

Sports To The Max with Mike Max

02:38 min | 2 d ago

Mitchell Trubisky Likely to Start For the Chicago Bears vs Green Bay Packers on Sunday

"Not practice today. He has a hip injury made sure Boesky got the full workload in practice. He's a shoulder injury, according to NFL update. Matt Maggie will continue to monitor their health before naming a starter for Sunday night. You know what the Sunday Night football game is this week Trace its bears and packers. Gross. Go rose. If the Packers lose this one on M o r alert, it was last week to the Colts. All right, You're kind of beat yourself with all the turnovers. If you lose to the Bears. That's a big time. Problem could Sunday be a redemption night for one Mitchell? True biscuit. Now, regardless of the health, I was advocating that the bear should go back to true biscuit because I've seen enough of fools. Full stinks. Now? Yes, he stole a Super Bowl M v p, still Super Bowl champion. He's still a pro ball. I'm VP, but the guy stinks right now. He is not a good quarterback. He's never been a good quarterback for a long period of time. So you went to fools thinking he would not turn over the football constantly would be that veteran savvy presence and do enough to just keep the ship from capsizing with the bears. The Bears were at 1.5 and one One false took over the team. They did not have a single loss. Now they're sitting at five and five. So there is one report. I don't know how credible this report is. It's from Daniel Greenberg and his Twitter page says it's called shy sport updates and it says the official place for all the latest Chicago sports News. And this guy worked for Wrigley Sports. Fan sided and Chicago under school wolves. Has 21,000 followers this account. They've sent out a tweet breaking This is three hours ago. Chicago Bears QB Mitch, Your biscuit will start Sunday night against the Green Bay Packers purse source. So I think they should start your whiskey. And can you imagine Sunday Night football on NBC? Don't Dunton and on Dun Dun and I don't know. Downtown Toronto, Anton to Toronto. If Mitch, you're Boesky has the revenge game here. And has the I'm back kind of tour. And the Chicago Bears end up winning that game. Put it at a 6% chance I give thee There's a 6% chance of winning that game. I don't care how good

Boesky Matt Maggie Packers Bears Football Daniel Greenberg Colts NFL Wrigley Sports Mitchell Rose Chicago Chicago Bears Twitter Dun Dun Toronto NBC
Did Boston Celtics Overplay Their Hand?

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

04:04 min | 3 d ago

Did Boston Celtics Overplay Their Hand?

"Boston. Overplay its hand. There were a lot of reports in the hours. Leading up gordon hayward signing that the celtics and the pacers were discussing a sign and trade gary washburn over the boston globe. He suggests that the pacers were willing to throw in miles. Turner the celtics water a miles. Turner plus package whether it's miles. Turner and tj warren or miles turner and victoria depot. That that that celtics package seemed to highly unlikely to be something the pacers would go for. Tj warrant is coming off a monster performance in the bubble and victor oladipo for all his injury issues. last year is still an all star level player. You don't give up to players of that caliber to get a player. That play like gordon hayward frankly so the celtics. They didn't walk away with nothing because they do have tristan thompson. Now they do have jeff teague. But i can see jeff how miles turner would goodness celtics uniform. And the guy is a three point shooting mobile shot-blocking big man. He's not perfect. He's been called soft before there's questions about positional fit. But something tells me brad. Stevens could do well with versatile. Big man who can shoot three pointer. I i just. I wonder if we'll look back on this in a year and wonder if the celtics overplayed their hand because miles turner in addition to all the things i said he's got a reasonable contract by nba standards anyway. Eighteen million dollars per year over the next three. What do you think of that. Do you think there's a chance the celtics overplayed their hands here. I don't know. I don't think so. Crass t taking a slightly different tact on it. Because i wasn't all that a or the whole idea of only getting mile turner back in the deal. I understand everything you just said But the celtics certainly just made a a decision that that's what they were looking for excitement. Lucy gordon hayward elsewhere without getting any say return on. I don't mind that trying to get a little bit more in it. Not working out for them and again. I'm hearing all your points what you're saying about mouse. Turner but that's something maybe dearly age his staff. I'm not saying you're gonna go out and find another mouse. Turner application that production with a couple of different players here and there and whether it ends up being some kind of combination of daniel thais and looking down the bench and seeing what happens off from that point I just wasn't sure that you know. Look indiana if you really wanna gordon hayward i think you had to force them to really make you pay for it and i don't say that do would you come down to it. The pacers were willing to give up that much and so that sure indicates how much that they really wanted. Gordon hayward i'm fine with the celtics student what they did now. You could be ultimately correct. They may regret not adding that kind of player. Especially we get into the playoffs split I agent it is staff are more than willing to let that ride. It see if they can't come up with that kind of a similar player through the course of use it a couple of different players and seeing what they can do at the trade deadline. Yeah they did get tristan thompson. Which is exactly what they need in on that front line. They've got the more athletic up perimeter shooting floor spacing kind of guy. You've got robert williams who is athletic shop locked they didn't have the physical rebounding tough guy. And that's what tristan thompson is brings championship experience to that team which i think will be a valuable addition and jeff teague is fine. He's not a starter anymore. But you're not asking him to basically kemba walker insurance down there in case kennedy's to take time off that knee injury so it wasn't. It wasn't a failure of an off season for boston. I just. I wonder how we look at this this summer. The summer this fall we look at a couple years

Celtics Gordon Hayward Pacers Turner Tristan Thompson Gary Washburn Boston Globe Tj Warren Miles Turner Victoria Depot Victor Oladipo Jeff Teague Lucy Gordon Hayward Boston Stevens Brad Jeff
No Taste for Zero Waste

Slate's Dear Prudence

05:29 min | 4 d ago

No Taste for Zero Waste

"Hello and welcome back to the dear prudence show once again and as always. I am your host dear prudence also known as daniel m lavery with me in the studio this week. Is sarah hoagie or based in toronto. Canada sarah welcome to the show off. Thanks it's been a while it's been a few years. It's been a long time and last time weirdly. I didn't get to see your face in this time i do. Even though both times we were not in the same room. Yeah i mean it's it's really nice. I'm looking into your eyes. it's crazy. I it feels very you. I feel very close to you. I'm admiring eyebrows. Saw their powerful. I will not stop. I will praise your eyebrows for the entire. Oh my god yeah. Thank you so much. I love your shirt. Thank you for having such create eyebrows. Let's tell everyone how to live their lives and Just generally how to do better. Yeah i'm good at that. I'm good at time people what to do. You often do that to me via text. And i've always really enjoyed it so i'm just looking forward that other people get to have a chance to experience for themselves today. Would you read our first letter. Please alright subjects clean plate club dear. Prudence was raised in a zero waste environment. Where everything was composted recycled she now trying to implement policy in our own home. I try to waste as little as possible but occasionally i don't like something. She cooks or get fully. She gets extremely upset. When i was food i started secretly throwing it away. I feel like a child. When i do this and i keeping secrets. I also hate feeling pressure to eat food. I don't like or that. I'm not hungry for. I don't want to treat our future children this way. I want them to feel comfortable staying there. Done my wife. Also several pounds overweight. And i think a large part of this is due to her inability to just walk away from food. She's mentioned a desire to get more in shape but doesn't seem to draw the connection between her clean plate habits and her weight challenges at the same time. I don't want children to become food. Obsessed or worried about their weight. The seems like a fraud situation angles. What should i do agree. That seems fraught. There is a lot here. There's like maybe nine different questions. I the one thing. I wanted to start with although i realize it's not the most important issue is a while back. I was no longer going to be taking questions where people would write in and described their spouse x number of pounds overweight. Because people i have noticed. Have a real fondness forcing exactly how many pounds they think their spouses overweight. And they've always got it like ooh. I know within two pounds what the number is yet. It's really weird to see several pounds overweight because like that's very hard to notice. Yeah that's like probably pretty well within a range and human beings exists in rain. I don't know like to me. It feels like if you happen to think she should weigh three pounds less than you know what i mean. It feels very rachel mcadams and mean girls. Like i wanna lose three pounds. It's very specific. Yeah so i would just say. Don't worry about that one. Let that one go one solution to not liking what. Your wife cooks and feeling like a child is cooking yourself. I don't that's that's insane from this that this person's wife is always cooking because that was the vibe. I got the. I was like she cooks. I don't yeah. I mean it does seem like it's i mean if you don't like what someone is cooking you can easily just not eat or cook yourself or even at the very least i'll make my own food. Yeah you do that. And i'll do this kind of thing. But i i do think it is just a bit odd like how much control the someone have over you throwing away food or not you can. You can just do it right. I mean the thing was. She gets really upset when i waste food which i get. You don't want your wife to feel extremely upset. But she's also not gonna die if she gets upset so if you were to say i love you so much. I am not hungry for this anymore. Either put it in the fridge and eat it the next day leftovers. That's one common solution. There's so many solutions. Let her be upset and declined to secretly. Throw it to the dog later. That's that's not gonna work for you. I feel like maybe they. They don't understand the concept of leftovers perhaps but also another thing you can do is i. Don't know maybe ask her to make less food. I mean like it's like it's like meals have to come in one portion. That's the only portion you can ever make for. Whatever meal like. they're adaptable. But i do think there are so much more here because it's it does seem like you know maybe there is some type of eating habit thing that is a part of it which also i don't think is someone's problem to solve for someone else And i don't think having a fight about wasting food is the way to support someone who might have some sort of food issues or right and i think i wanna have patients for both of these people because it seems a little clear to me that they both have some food issues. Which i mean. Who doesn't also but i don't wanna say that is just like we all have food issues so these are just yours and you can't do anything about it so much as you know. It seems like the letter writer feels a certain degree of if someone else's upset with you about food you have to fix it

Daniel M Lavery Sarah Hoagie Toronto Sarah Canada Rachel Mcadams
Be uncomfortable at least once a day

Licence to Coach

05:47 min | 4 d ago

Be uncomfortable at least once a day

"Our guest is a us marine. Who is helped entrepreneurs develop their businesses after being medically retired because of his service in the middle east. He became a certified dog trainer. He started a full service dog facility and continues to support Support the pet care industry to this day. His an interesting one with great lessons for all leaders. Please join me in welcoming dan splendor to the program. Welcome to the program daniel Appreciate you joining us today. Well certainly thank you for having me. Excellent i i i love your background so i'm really interested in hearing more about it and i was hoping you could maybe a a walk through your lures. Your leadership journey. I guess if you will Just kind. Tell us a little bit about About your background and how you've gotten to the point where you are today. Okay well. I i guess i'll just start off. I don't wanna make it long but to start off the entire life. I've always been a leader. And so one of the things that i realized very young when i was probably middle school in going into high school is that while i may not be the captain of every team that i've played sports on or anything like that Many my friends usually looked up to me for answers in directions and things like that and support germ and that actually slowly grew more as i left. Highschool enjoy the military I joined the marine corps. Right out of high school went to paris. Island and became a satellite in channel satellite technician. And so in the military. Obviously there's a there's a heart rank structure and everybody understands that so we are quickly thrown into the low man on the totem pole. When i joined the military but quickly it shows that shows up. Who's the leader news non. And who's going to be moving forward and heading up things and stuff like that. And that's fortunately one of the things i did. When i was in the military's i quickly moved up in taking leadership roles there. Unfortunately my military career was cut short due to getting injured in iraq in two thousand and three medically retired in two thousand four from ring core. And after that. I went back and actually finished up. Schooling in did some other basic work with the intention of starting my own company working with animals and so two thousand ten came around and i finally opened my business. And that's my one of my companies. I open it still in business today. I have four other companies. That i run a nonprofit and Taking over that leadership role if it slowly grown from small things into actually running companies and stuff like that. So i've gone through the entire gamut of things it sounds like it. Yeah i mean and by the way. I mean it's makes these days. It may sound cliche. But i've sincerely mean this. Thank you thank you for your service. I really sincerely mean that my father was a career navy officer so i I have a real appreciation for people like yourself. That have served the country. So i i do sincerely mean that now it you know for people that are outside of that environment. Maybe haven't been part of the military record. They they i know their idea. Their idea of what may be leadership is like in in the military is really different than what it truly is. I dunno fi comment makes sense but help me understand a little bit about what you learned about leadership as a result of having served in the in the marines for the time that you dan i think one of the biggest things nowadays unfortunately the current state of the world many people whoever they whatever generation you wanna call it. Don't see that they need to work for being leader. They just wanna come out in the current situations as having a twenty year old life coach at twenty years old. I don't think anybody has any experience. Be talking about how to be a life coach then again. That's one of the things at the military really gave you an experience because short of having a college degree in going in the officer program. Right out of college you came in as the low man on the totem pole. No matter what and you had to work your way up from the very bottom no matter. What and that again for becoming a leader. That's one of the best things you could ever do is start at the bottom. Work your way up because you how it works for everyone. And when you're put in that position as a leader now can relate to your junior marines at junior military members because you know what you went through back in that day in dealt with and that's the same thing for any other leadership position we hold unfortunately today side. A lot of people think they can just jump right into the general manager. They've no management experience. But they wanna go from basic employees. Do general manager just as they've been in business for a year or two and they don't understand that there's a lot of quality you have learned throughout that and again in the military is a perfect example. The first day in the military you were taught how to tie your shoes That sounds insane but not everybody knew how to do that. You started at the very basics. You're gonna put your leftover. You're right and tie your shoes. And from there forward you started learning more and more and they built you up from the ground up so that you knew everything you needed to notice a rod. And that's i think one of the best things about the military environment that helps rogue great leaders.

Dan Splendor Middle East Marine Corps Daniel Paris Iraq United States Navy DAN
Working With The Open Voice Network With Julie Daniel Davis

Alexa in Canada

01:49 min | 4 d ago

Working With The Open Voice Network With Julie Daniel Davis

"I think the thing i'm most excited about when it comes to boys right now is working with open voice network. We are currently. There is an educational steering committee that john stein has put together and this group of people. We've been meeting together for goodness every two weeks or what seems like forever. Don't even sure how long have been doing it. But we're right now in the process of creating lesson plans for teachers to understand what is conversational design. Help can voice assistant helped me with matt learning that type of thing so our goal is to do the new. What when where. Why create lesson plans around that so that we can start really young in helping student see this paradigm of voice and how it can impact as learners so is that geared toward or geared towards elementary school or is it all ages or what are you focusing on. Get good questions good questions. You're you're great year. actually true. Get geared for every level so we you know there are some ideas some concepts that naturally are bent toward certain age roots just a very basic of. Hey you're not talking to a real person when you're talking to a voice assistant that's stopping a kindergartener needs to know you know. They need to know the difference for ethical reasons. Her say but there were also talking about what is conversational design. That's a little maybe. Were you know middle school. And then later on really talking about how to create with and so that i would see more of the ice low mazing

John Stein Matt
Better Decision-Making with Andy Stanley

The EntreLeadership Podcast

07:13 min | 5 d ago

Better Decision-Making with Andy Stanley

"This is another question that so important for leaders because leaders have a leadership intuition. You know some people say you can develop it. Anybody can become a leader. I'm not so sure i. In experience there are people who just have a natural internal leadership intuition and so this is an important question for leaders is their attention. That deserves my attention. Here's what i mean by that. We're in the middle of making a decision. Everything looks good on paper. Everybody's all four it. Everybody's bought in. This is what everybody in our industry is doing. This is what all my friends are doing. You know whatever it might be but there's just something on the inside this like a red flag. It's something that causes us to pause and we don't know what it is and it doesn't make any sense and here's the hard thing and there's no information to you know make this make any sense. There's just an internal tension so one of the most important questions we can ask win. We're making a big decision especially a decision that involves other people is their attention. Is there something inside of me just like you know what i know what you're saying. I know what it looks like. I know that this industry standard. I know but there's just something inside of me. That's causing me to pause. And so in the book i talk. Say look don't brush by that. Don't rush by that and don't ignore it. let it get as big as it can. Possibly get is their attention. That deserves my attention. I'm curious about the tension because we we hear from leaders all the time who are making decisions and they feel that flag that spidey sense and it's it's often this challenge of deciphering whether that's fear or wisdom when there's attention it could be either of those things when you say let it get big and slow down and pay attention to that. I imagine we're we're trying to spend some time there to figure out. Is this fear is it was 'cause you may end up going with it after you've slept on it or prayed over it right baddie how do you know how do you pull that apart. Well generally what i tell people is when you're feeling pressured from the outside to russia decision. Then you just need a hipaa mom because generally speaking most decisions. We're feeling pressured to make there's not as much of a rushes is other people. Want us to feel so if you don't have to make this decision just wait just as long as if you're not a hundred percent on the inside because here's the thing about leadership you know if you're the point person in an organization and everybody in the organization for the decision but you're the point person you're the one that not only has to make your the one that has to market it and defended and if it goes bad it's your reputation. Not there's i mean they can all go work for somebody else. It's your name on the line. So if i'm not willing to stand up and one hundred percent sell something are move the organization in a direction or represent the organization in a direction. If there's an internal tension. I've got a wrestle that to the ground maybe not everybody else in the organization. But i have to in. You're exactly right daniel. Sometimes it is fear. Sometimes it's something else so the point of the question is to be honest. Is there a tension that deserves my attention in the book. I give several stations but for those of us in leadership this is not in a book. This may be relevant when we built our first building our first church building. We had the meeting with the architects and the designers and the contractor. Where everybody you know. There's there's this plans these giant. You know they don't call blueprints anymore. But all these cad drawings and we had to go through an initial the corner of every single page on those those big thick plans. Because we're saying to the architect into the contractor we have. We're signing off on this plan. This is what we want to build right so this is common practice so we had. We sat there and went through the whole thing. We all initial everything. We're finished we're about to build our first building and there was a guy on our leadership team actually One of our elders. He was not on staff just a just a business guy. Who's part of our team. And i talk about in the book that sometimes the tension is the hesitation is so small that we're not even aware of it until somebody else ask a question. Suddenly flares up big. And that's what happened in this case so we're about to end the meeting and we had a phase one phase two and we just signed off on phase one at the end of the meeting. We know we've put our initials on everything reggie campbell. Who has since gone to be with the lord. Reggie said before we leave. Andy can i ask you question. I'm sure he said. I want you to imagine that we've just had our first worship service in our brand new building. This was our first building any money and this first building. He said we've just finished our first service in this building when you're leaving the building and walking out to your car. What do you think you're gonna feel. Now what an irrelevant question. Based on the meeting that we just had. And here's the first thing that came to my mind. I said i think i'm going to wish. We built the second phase. How and we brought out the second phase after about forty five minutes of discussion and we all initial those plans as well and we built both all of that. This was a huge decision and it was the right decision. But i was to your point and there was a little bit of fear we talked about doing both. But you know it's a lot of money and are we sure we're brand new church but somebody asking that question sort of fueled that sense of. I wonder if we should just bite off more than we're biting off right now and it was the right decision but it took somebody to bring it up again. It just it just kind of feel that so in leadership is so important to listen. We talk about that all the time. Leaders who refused to listen will eventually be surrounded by people who have nothing helpful. Say so this is a multifaceted thing but the bottom line is is their attention. That deserves my attention. Is it attention. I've been living with or is it attention that someone else's question raised in me but the worst thing we can do is just ignore that tension moving on the fourth question is a question. My dad asked ten thousand times growing up. It's actually a question. I have written an entire book about. And the question is what is the wise thing to do And i call this the maturity question because it takes a lot of maturity to live our lives within the guardrails of wisdom. What's the wise thing to do rather than within the guard rails of. What's the legal thing to do. It's the ethical thing to what's the right thing to do. What's the moral thing to do. And our tendency of course to live right on the line of immoral unethical unhealthy. We all have tendency to do that. But mature people don't do that. They they asked the question. What is the wise thing to do. And i tease this out in three dimensions and a lot of my past experience. What is the wise thing to do. And light of my current circumstances my current state of mind. What is the wise thing to do. And this is the big one and light of my future hopes. Dreams what is the wise thing to do. And as a pastor perhaps nothing breaks my heart more than watching people undermine their own future

Reggie Campbell Russia Daniel Reggie Andy
Man Charged With Manslaughter, DWI In High-Speed Crash That Killed Queens, New York Hospital Worker

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 6 d ago

Man Charged With Manslaughter, DWI In High-Speed Crash That Killed Queens, New York Hospital Worker

"And Albany Man accused of driving drunk and high speed crash that killed the queen's health care worker has been charged with reckless manslaughter. Police a 22 year old Palomino man was drunk and going 97 Miles an hour when he t boned Daniel Crawford's car on Persons Boulevard and Union Turnpike early Friday morning. Profit was on his way to work at the Queen's Hospital Center. That's where he died after the accident on it was taken there to out taken in after the crash. He was arraigned yesterday and the manslaughter charge as well as drunk driving and more

Daniel Crawford Albany Queen's Hospital Center
Pompeo Attempts To Cement Trump's Legacy In Israel Ahead Of A Biden Presidency

Weekend Edition Sunday

04:09 min | 6 d ago

Pompeo Attempts To Cement Trump's Legacy In Israel Ahead Of A Biden Presidency

"Workers at the Capitol are dressing up the West Front for Joe Biden's inauguration, members of the current administration are rushing to cement Donald Trump's policies in place. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo was in the Middle East. This past week, he unveiled new pro Israel policies that could be hard for an incoming Biden administration to undo NPR's Daniel Estrin reports from Jerusalem. Compelled, became the first secretary of state to visit an Israeli settlements in the occupied West Bank. He had lunch at a winery that named one of its wines, Pompeo. The U. S used to take a dim view of settlements, seeing their growth as an obstacle to peace because they take up land Palestinians claim for an independent state. But Pompeo says Israel has a right to settle the land featured in the Bible for a long time State Department. Took the wrong view of settlements. It took of you that didn't recognize the history of this special place. Pompeo announced a new policy favoring the winery He visited products made in West Bank settlements must be labeled made in Israel when shipped to the U. S. A ghetto front with peace now and Israeli group against Settlements says this could make it hard for consumers who don't want to support settlements if people want to boycott Or not to participate in the occupation. They can do it by not buying products from settlements. This is going to be labors that his friends and they cannot know if it's from occupied territories. Then. Boyce is being revealed all of Israel. Pompeo announced another new policy last week. Today. I want to make one announcement with respect to a decision by the State Department that we will regard The global any Israel BDS campaign as anti Semetic BDS has boycott divestment and sanctions, a movement that calls to boycott Israel because of its policies toward Palestinians. Some Israel supporters see it as a threat because some boycotters oppose Israel itself as a Jewish state, But boycott activists say it's a non violent form of protest. So why unveil these new policies right before Biden takes over. Dead. Ravi V. And Israeli settler leader close to the Trump administration says Pompeo is playing chess with Biden one step before Checkmate. It's putting buy them some sort of check. If you really reversed his decision that were done by the constant ministrations. You might have to confront criticism. As to why doing it. Other administrations have taken steps on Israeli Palestinian policy right before leaving office, like when President Obama allowed the United Nations Security Council resolution condemning Israel's settlements. Scott Lisinski was an adviser for the Obama administration. President Clinton himself using his presidential transition, trying to move Middle East peace forward George Shultz at the end of the Reagan presidency. Negotiating a very careful formal diplomatic dialogue, the first ever between American and Palestinian leaders. These are examples of diplomatic opportunism. Palestinian leaders see this as their opportunity to make nice with Biden. They've agreed to resume security and economic ties with Israel after a six month stand still, and they say they might change a practice, Democrats criticized paying stipends to Palestinians convicted of attacking Israelis. Many Palestinians criticized the gestures like former Minister Nabil Armor in this video he posted. He had the infertile into Paloma that America, he says. Why give more ground before Biden enters office, while Israel is taking advantage of this time to announce more settlement construction. Israel got another boost yesterday with news that the U. S. Justice Department decided not to renew restrictions on the parole of former U. S intelligence analyst Jonathan Pollard. He was convicted of espionage for giving classified U. S documents to Israel and is now expected to move to Israel where he has popular support.

Pompeo Israel Biden Mike Pompeo Daniel Estrin West Bank State Department Joe Biden Donald Trump Middle East Ravi V. Trump Administration NPR U. Jerusalem Boyce Scott Lisinski Obama Administration George Shultz Bible
FDA allows emergency use of antibody drug Trump received

KYW 24 Hour News

01:30 min | 6 d ago

FDA allows emergency use of antibody drug Trump received

"Company. Fizer asks for quick emergency approval to start shipping its covert 19 vaccine, The Food and Drug Administration okays the emergency use of a second antibody drug. Regeneron's to drug cocktail that was given to Mr Trump when he had the virus, CBS News Medical Contributor Dr David Vegas as we build our medications to treat the virus, it's certainly encouraging. The real hope is the vaccines that should be reviewed by the FDA in the near term, and hopefully we're available before year's end in the country. But in the meantime, long feared worst case scenario is now being felt across the country. Several states issue new restrictions in a desperate attempt to slow the surge. Most of California is under a 10 p.m. mandatory curfew. Despite a week of unprecedented spread. There's mixed reaction. We're a lot more we need to be doing We should be over this. I don't think the corona virus is hiding in the tree waiting till midnight or 10 o'clock. The orders contributing to a surge of panic shopping shelves, once again wiped clean of the essential correspondent Daniel Bacchus. And then there is this where a mask You know, I don't like it either. It's not enjoyable to have this thing on your face. But It's far better than being in the hospital on a ventilator without your family, wondering if you're gonna make it or not. She knows where she speaks Advice from Tennessee Mother to be Emily Brown. She was admitted to the ICU with serious covert. 19 woke up weeks later with her new baby born. This is

Fizer Regeneron Mr Trump Dr David Vegas FDA Cbs News Daniel Bacchus California Emily Brown Tennessee ICU
Southridge football's perfect season ends in Class 3A semistate against Danville

The Daily Mash-Up

04:28 min | Last week

Southridge football's perfect season ends in Class 3A semistate against Danville

"An impressive win for the Danville Warriors tonight over a very good South Ridge Raiders team. No doubt about it. Bob Danville. They're just really, really good on both sides, the football and you know, like South Ridge had much of the season. Daniel had a lot of playmakers and It was just too much Danville, And sometimes that happens, no matter what you do the other guy on the other side of the field just better on that night and South Ridge nothing to hang their head about a great season. But Danville just really, really solid. Did they get started to Danville? Start out. Get on the board first and can't get ahead. Stay ahead kind of ball game. Well, Daniel did score to make it seven Nothing. Those South Ridge, then answer back on the very next possession with a five yard touchdown run by Carson, the house to tie the game. It's seven within Danville scored a couple of touchdowns. Heading into the locker room at halftime to go up 20 to 7 at the break and kind of, you know, just added on from there, and South just couldn't get anything going offensively. Even with the playmakers we've talked about all season long. It was just really impressive Danville defense of effort and they scored a couple of touchdowns in the second half. To make that final margin. 32 7. So that let's go back to that Flory there at the end of the half. What spurred that for the Danville? They had a flea flicker type of play on a double reverse. They pushed back the quarterback of pain, and he fired it down The field, got him inside the 10 yard line, so they punch it in from there, then get another stop defensively and move the foot ball down the field with their running back. Ethan Dutra hey, was just unstoppable on that fullback spot. He carried the ball 22 times for 172 yards for Danville. Usually he's their short yardage back. In the things that I've watched heading into the game, But he just carried Southridge defenders all night long, and he really was impressive in that little two touchdown Flory once they got the ball inside the red zone. Alright, so second half again, You know it's hard to spot a team like Danville that much going into halftime and you know, it's just all too is your game plan when you're playing from behind. No doubt about in southwards. Traditionally is that trouble coming from behind because they're more of a running type a team and it just seemed like Danville had 18 players instead of 11 on the defensive side of football against South Ridge. They turned him over on south of his first possession, coming out of the break on a fumble and had a short field and again just kept that margin in a comfortable, Ah, pace there, and it was just too much to overcome for South Ridge tonight. What a great year, though for south rich. I mean, if you would seriously at the beginning of the year if you thought you would still be doing games on semi state Friday, uh, You would have taken that opportunity. I think so, Bob, you know they southwards when those programs that reloads every year, but it seemed like they lost a lot of great players some last year, And of course, we've talked about it before. They've been success up to three A with basically a to a roster, and they would never use that. And it's right. Not an excuse, But you know what? Football? That's just the way it is. You know, you have a short roster compared to other strong three teams, but Pain on to make your questionnaire and my answer shorter to your question. I didn't anticipate them going on a run like this, even though they are a really good program. It's just a really, really nice season that we had a season to begin with. And to see it. You know, progress like this has been great for South or just program and Justin, outstanding season. Yeah, And you know what it Scott being is one of them. One of the good guys. Jamie Comber, The damsel coach won the war. The impressive young coaches in our state. And it just two solid, solid guys into programs with rich tradition. As you point out, yes, southwards. We know about them, and I'm not that familiar familiar with sandal, but not just on the surface, but you know they've got good athletics there and deal with the warrior program. And, you know coach coming over from Western Boone, where he had great success and help Western boom beat South Ridge a couple of years ago in the to a semi state. I'm impressed with the way Coach Homer's got Danville going here is the head into that championship game with

Danville South Ridge Danville Warriors Bob Danville Daniel Ethan Dutra Southridge Football Flory Raiders Carson House Jamie Comber BOB Justin Scott
Trump Administration Labels Movement To Boycott Israel 'Anti-Semitic'

Morning Edition

03:36 min | Last week

Trump Administration Labels Movement To Boycott Israel 'Anti-Semitic'

"Martin. The clock is running out on the Trump administration. But Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is making pro Israel policies that could last after he's gone. Pompeo has spent a couple of days in Israel this week and in areas under Israeli occupation, which is a controversial move in and of itself, and he is stepping up U. S support for Jewish settlements. That could complicate things for the incoming Biden administration. NPR's Daniel Estrin joins us Now from Jerusalem, Daniel Good morning. Good morning. So, as you know, everywhere, a top U. S official goes in the Middle East is seen as symbolic in some way by some party, Which is why these itineraries air so carefully planned. Having said that it with that context, Where has Pompeo gone? A lot of symbolic places. First of all, he visited the museum affiliated with the U. S evangelicals, and he was the most senior U. S official to visit the Golan Heights, which Israel annexed from Syria, and most countries do not recognize that but the Trump administration has. He also was the most high that the highest ranking U. S official to visit an Israeli settlement in the West Bank. He visited an Israeli settler winery, which has a wine label called Pompeo. That's an honor of pump. Oh, saying that Jewish settlements in the West Bank are legitimate. Now. Activists point out that the vineyards of that settlement winery are on lands that Palestinian land owners say are there's Thea's Railly, who runs the winery lives in a home on a Palestinian landowner's property, they say, so there's even an Israeli demolition order on on that home. And the bigger context. Most countries say that the very presence of Israeli settlements on occupied land violates international law and hurts the chances of Palestinians being able to establish their own state there. But Pompeo signed the winery guestbook, referring to the West Bank by its biblical name. He sees this as the land of the Bible, and there's speculation he's thinking about a presidential run in 2024. So perhaps these visits can help him with evangelical voters. It's not just where he's going right. It's what he's saying to he's announcing new new policies. That's right. He made two new Decorah declarations. He said that a pro Palestinian movement to boycott Israel is anti Semetic. Now, most or many U. S. States have passed laws against these kinds of Israel boycotts and some boycott supporters. Say that Israel should not exist as a Jewish state boycotters say this anti Semitic label is wrong and an attempt to delegitimize a nonviolent protest in support of Palestinians. Of the second declaration that Pompeo made is that when the U. S imports products like wines, for instance, from Jewish settlements in the West Bank, they must be labeled as made in Israel. Now the West Bank is not Israel. Israel has not officially annexed those lands. But here again, Pompeo is siding with the Israel's claims to the land. So how how is all this going to box in the incoming Biden administration? Pompeo is clearly trying to cement you know his view and the administration's view of settlements before leaving office, And this does point put Biden in a bind. One Israeli settler leader compared it to chests and Pompeo declaring check. So now it's Biden's move. He has opposed settlement expansion, and if he reverses these policies that could lead to tensions with Israelis. Of course, Pompeii was not the only one trying to influence the Biden administration. Now I should mention that Palestinians themselves are taking steps to create warm relations and the Palestinians just re established security and economic ties with Israel that could Be something that buy them would would recognize and and

Pompeo Trump Administration Israel West Bank Mike Pompeo Daniel Estrin Daniel Good Biden Thea's Railly U. Golan Heights NPR Martin Jerusalem Middle East Syria Bible Biden Administration
Detroit Lions' Matthew Stafford played through hand injuries before and it has not been pretty

Cat Scratch Reader

00:43 sec | Last week

Detroit Lions' Matthew Stafford played through hand injuries before and it has not been pretty

"Matthew stafford questionable to. Oh he is okay. his hand is hurt. Oh okay is right hand. So it's not like it's his important hand his ex were negative. I don't know what the exact specific injury is And matthew stafford. So i mean. He tried to play through a broken back last year. Yeah so. I'm sure if he has to be like lion sure if he can like Physically hold of football. he'll play. yeah that does add a little bit of a wrinkle to the to the prognostic. The prognosis of the game. They're backup is chased. Daniel

Matthew Stafford Football Daniel
Israel Rushes To Advance A New Settlement While President Trump Is Still In Office

All Things Considered

03:23 min | Last week

Israel Rushes To Advance A New Settlement While President Trump Is Still In Office

"A. King. No, I'm definitive. You're supposed to use top representative to the Palestinians tried to talk down the protesters Shut up! Shut up! Shut up! Spin, Kundan Burgdorf said. Hello, Peace and Hebrew But he gave up. I will not give a statement on that The circumstances wave my move to our cars and then we talk. Israel froze plans to build here years ago and President Obama's request. Juts between part of East Jerusalem and the West Bank, where Palestinians hope to have their capital and independent state. But Mickey's are a lawmaker close to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Tweeted that the plans settlement is quote an opportunity that will not return to strengthen our grip on the land of Israel. Jerusalem Deputy Mayor King worries what the Biden presidency will mean for settlements by then. We don't know so much about him, but he is no tramp. I'm sure about that it at the club was like by Trump Lab that Israel has accelerated its settlement building plans under Trump that worries you, representative von Bergdorf, deciding at this critical juncture. Meaning after a new president elect in the U. S. Has been voted give some observers the impression That the authorities want to create facts on the ground before the new president will take up office. In the past, President elect Biden has spoken out against settlement expansion. European diplomats say they're trying to stop this settlement plan. But a Palestinian man living next to the hilltop doubts they can. The European have no influence in this region. They can't object. We can also object, but I don't think that we can win, plus 82 year old retired gynecologist, Mohamed Othman. Thinks it's too late for a Palestinian state, with so many Israeli settlements dotting the land. Oh, situation is very, very, very critical now. The Palestinians. We have Nothing. And I think that the whole state will be Under Israel should control 10. Years ago, Biden was in Jerusalem when Israel announced building plans in another settlement. Biden came late to a dinner with Netanyahu and released a statement condemning the move. Just last week, Israel announced more new homes in that very same settlement that had worked biting before. Daniel Estrin. NPR NEWS Jerusalem

Kundan Burgdorf Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netany A. King Biden Trump Lab Von Bergdorf U. S. East Jerusalem West Bank Mickey Jerusalem Mohamed Othman Barack Obama Netanyahu Daniel Estrin NPR
Ryan Cabrera and WWE Star Alexa Bliss Are Engaged

Notsam Wrestling

10:56 min | Last week

Ryan Cabrera and WWE Star Alexa Bliss Are Engaged

"I think that social media is a reality in this world In the world that we live in in the world of sports entertainment. And i think that we have to learn how to live with it and i think we can actually use it as a tool for example recording this on sunday and today yesterday at the time this podcast comes out. It was everywhere. Alexa bliss announces that she's engaged A lot of alexa bliss fans are so happy for her lot of alexa. Bliss fans are very sad. Because i guess they thought that alexa bliss was going to marry them until she got engaged. It was so you're saying there's a chance. I saw on the not sam wrestling discord room. Where all are not. Sam shells that are signed up to patriot. Dot com slash. Sam wrestling. That we all get to chat There were a couple of them. That were upset. That alexa was engaged because they thought that that was going to be them. Unfortunately it's not but don't worry you still got the patriot community. You still got us. Not sam shells that are there for you. it's not. it's not all bad news but it was everywhere. She posted this video of of ryan. Cabrera popstar cabrera who she's been very publicly dating Proposing tour beautiful thing. You love is a wonderful thing and seeing join in holy matrimony and become even happier is wonderful. It's one of the happiest things if you are with the right person. The day the night the evening the afternoon that you get engaged one of the happiest times ever just such an expression of joy. It's beautiful. I love it but everybody's talking about it. I mean alexa. Bliss is a huge star. You know you've got. Wwe tweeting about it. And i probably should be. It's it's a little bit absurd to ignore it. You know not only is one of the biggest stars really realistically alexa. Bliss is one of the biggest stars in. wwe male or female. She's one of the most famous people in. Wwe so you know. And this is big. Wwe is big time. Now you got sasha banks over here on the mandalorian which you see. Sasha banks one of the big another one of the biggest stars in wwe and probably the biggest tv show. that's on the air right now. You see that happening which weird. The wwe isn't making a bigger deal out of that. Like if i were. Www shouting it from the rooftops. But you've got that going on at the same time you got to cherry public engagement. You know i mean. I feel like we should let's angle for a reality show. Let's get on the phone. I was watching total balas over the weekend. And i was like you know what i miss. When they would go to wrestlemainia. I was just sitting there waiting for them to go to wrestling. Like oh wait. There is no more wrestling. And that's when. I realized that i was watching total bells for the wrestling parts. They still got daniel bryan on the show. Obviously no more john cena. They're not going to wrestling shows anymore. So it's like oh. I like the balanced. But i'm still you know living in brima to seven but they're not gonna wrestling shows anymore so yes so let's get alexa. Bliss rang cabrera. Let's get blissfully something or other. You know you got bliss already in there you you got it. But here's what. I think needs to happen now that we've acknowledged. Wwe is acknowledged it's all over wwe social media platforms. I think that you gotta lean into it. And i think that you should use it. I think that this can be a lot of fun. Especially because ryan cabrera is also a public person. Here's the way. I think this needs to go. You had this segment on raw last week. Where nikki cross is talking to alexa. And there's this acknowledgement that they used to be friends. Which i think is great. We're not pretending that the election nikki partnership never happened is a big part of. Wwe at the time you know. We're still acknowledging it and alexis doing that. Weird phony friendly like almost like i'm in a trance. Peewee herman thing and nikki cross tells her alexa you gotta pick mere the fiend and alexa. As if it doesn't bother it all goes. Oh okay. I pick him. And walks away and nikki crosses befuddled by the whole thing befuddled. I love this. I think we need to keep this going. You know i look. This is the type of stuff. I want for alexa bliss and the this is why i say. Keep the fiend away from the universal championship. Keep the fiend away from the wwe championship because these are the types of stories. You can tell you know. I think that we should go back and look at who are friends. Were in annex t the start telling those stories and have somebody come out. Go like lexi. What are you doing things. You're you're not the same person what what's happening. I pick him and you know over. The course of a couple of weeks have her abandoning oliver. All friends and then finally ryan cabrera comes out on raw and it's like real life now it's like is this alexa. Bliss is this. What's her name lexi kaufman in real life. I don't know. I only know people by their wrestling names. But is this the real alexa. Bliss from real life. is the character alexa bliss now. We're mixing everything up. Which is what we should all be doing. That's the way wrestling is at. Its best mix everything up. And you've ryan cabrera out on raw and he's like alexa. I love you and she's like i love you. Do you know like yeah. Of course it you love me. I love you. We're we're doing great and he's like well. You're not the same person i thought. When we got engaged it would shake you out of this transfer inches. I'm not in a trance. I'm just seeing things for what they are for. The first time ryan cabrera goes lexi. I need you need you to pick you. Pick me or the fiend. She's kind of taken aback. She's like i didn't realize he felt that way. Ryan that's how i feel and she's like well net case i pick him. He's like what and then you hear bumble bumble bumble and the lights go out. Eat whatever those sounds are and tom phillips going. Oh no not here that's alexa. Bliss fiance pop sensation ryan cabrera and the red lights come on and the fiend is behind ryan cabrera and ryan cabrera's looking around and he's looking at alexa bliss. I what are you doing here. Like this is our real life and then he realized he gets his goosebumps. You realize the fiend is right behind him so he turns around and the phoenix cox's head and sticks his tongue out of his mask grabs ryan cabrera vice skull dips him over gives him a kiss on the forehead and he sister abigail ryan cabrera. Alexa bliss is real life. Fiance get sister abigail an alexa bliss just standing over him smiling. I love it man. I mean i i think that why not why not. I feel like it would be good for everybody involved. Like let's let's blur the lines here guys. Let's not pretend there's two separate entities as it's happening eventually we can tell the story of how like. Oh this is so wild in my personal and blah blah blah but while it's happening muster blending these lines with blurred altogether be like. That's a real fiancee right. Yup like the best is when you're trying to explain to a non wrestling fan. What storyline and what's not storyline. And they get confused because you're a little bit confused because you're not one hundred percent sure where the lines are and who's getting worked by what maybe. wwe tweeting about this was part of the storyline. All along are they even really engaged. I don't even know anymore. I don't know anything anymore. I guess i'm just going to sit here and watch monday night. Ron finds out. Find out what happens next. Because that's the way we should be watching anyway. Just let it play out and see what happens. I would love that if that happened. I would love it if that happened. Socket in our discord room. Says i love that. Sam has cabrera taking bumps like the fiend doesn't use the middle claw. He hit the mandible claw. After maybe alexa bliss puts the mandible claw him or something like that but is taking sister abigail. I mean we are laying out ryan cabrera. 'cause i want e. news. I want entertainment tonight. I want whatever extra whatever. Entertainment shows are left on television. I want people magazine. People dot com. I want everybody posting videos of being like popstar ryan cabrera. Remember him. Well i remember. I remember will now. He's getting laid out by the fiend on monday night raw. Because here's what happens. If you have a pop star that you grew up idolizing and he's getting laid out. Here's the way that works. You get the people who don't watch wrestling to not only get a glimpse of monday night raw but they get a glimpse of the theme. The is one the most unique properties the wwe has. The fiend is the type of visual. That went a non wrestling fan watches. They go what the hell is that. I'm going to have to tune in and see what that's all about. That's one of the strengths of the fiend. And if you got footage of ryan cabrera eating a sister. Abigail and his real life fiance alexa. Bliss is looking on happily in that weird fien state. You got money bro. you got money. I hope they're already thinking in that direction. If not. i'm in text. Bruce richard because somebody has to tell them get ryan cabrera on that show and lay that out. I think it'd be great. I think it'd be great. Congratulations to the two of them. But i have to believe that ryan cabrera. Whatever time of his life. I know i would if my fiance was a wrestler and she was like hey would you mind coming to raw and having the fiend. Give you sister abigail. I'd be like number one. That's awesome number two. After the show me. I get a picture of him in full gimmick. I really wish i could do that. I really wish i mean. I wish. I wish that. I could have one of the shows that i was at the fiend was at too. I wish i could just go like hey bro. Can we take a picture with you. Still in your gimmick and not. Be a weirdo. That doesn't deserve to be backstage. Because man do. I want that picture a really really. Do

Alexa Bliss WWE Ryan Cabrera Wrestling Nikki Cross Alexa Sam Shells Cabrera Sasha Banks Brima Peewee Herman Lexi Kaufman Lexi Daniel Bryan Bliss John Cena Sasha
Using Stories to Market Your Business with Amy Porterfield

The EntreLeadership Podcast

07:00 min | Last week

Using Stories to Market Your Business with Amy Porterfield

"Hey is this happened in your business. Last month was a bad month so this month. We're going to run a sale. A big promotion. We're gonna email list and say by now because it. We gotta get some cash in the door. It's not really a marketing plan. You know what that's called. It's called spray and pray from the ramsey network. This is the entreleadership podcast where we help business. Leaders themselves their teams and the prophets. I'm your host daniel tardy and my guest today. is amy porterfield. She's a longtime friend of entreleadership. She's also an online marketing expert to helping entrepreneurs and small business owners win. Aim is going to share with you. Why you have to have a plan for your marketing and the good news is it doesn't have to be complicated in fact the foundation it simple because marketing starts with just telling people's stories so when you tell the story especially about somebody else that you served and you've helped when you tell the story right meaning you talk about the struggles and the challenges in the fears that they had the winds and what that meant for them and what they've overcome people can see themselves in those stories so much easier than you. Just saying i've got this great product. It has amazing benefits in features. You need it. That's one thing but also when you sell when you promote no matter how much your audience loves you. They put up a wall whether it be just a little while or really big wall. There's always a little defense up there and we're going to talk about it later. But i do webinars to sell my digital courses and on a webinar for the first forty five minutes you are giving giving giving and so when you do ask for them to buy your product. Their defenses are all the way up. Because you were giving and you were inviting them in in different ways in offering value so the same thing with the story when people see themselves in other people's stories and they can relate and resonate. They those defenses. Come down and they say i want a piece of that i if she could do it i can do it too and so i'm all about helping. People put their guard down. Because it's a natural thing to put it up especially when you're asking someone to spend money so i noticed you said when you tell the story right. Yeah what's the right way to tell the story. Well you had talked about donald miller when we were off camera and you had mentioned and you know that man is have learned so much from story brand in how he tells his story but if you can tell the story and somebody can literally put themselves in that story because they can relate to it. I feel as though the story is is doing the work it was meant to do. And so to me. You have to have all those important elements that donald miller talks about in terms of putting a story together in order for it to resonate and a lot of my students who are just getting started though one and tell the story but with a one tells i hope so and so get x. Results they were this way. I and now. They're this way now like there before and after and done. But when i when i think about telling a good story i want to talk about the richness of it and i have a student. Her name is niro. she lives in los angeles. She's a single mom of three. Her mom lives with her. She was a not making barely any money as a baker and she knew she wanted a different life for her kids and she was working two jobs. One like chucky cheese and one baking out of her kitchen but then she realized how to create a digital course and she created her first digital course to create caramel candy apples. Who would have thought that a caramel candy apple. Digital course how to do it would be a huge success but she made over sixty thousand dollars on her first launch and then she did it again had the same success and when i asked her deniro what does this mean for you and she said all i wanna do is retire. My mom she cleans houses. She's she supported me. She is an amazing support to our family. I want to help her retire when when she told me that like my heart. Don't been but when i tell that story i don't just say how much deniro made in. What digital course she created. But i talk about what it means to her. And i think people can relate to that part of the story more than anything Yeah i mean just as you tell that story. I think everybody's going whoa caramel apples. And how could either something similar and caramel apples. That i'm going to sell an what did you do again. What did you teach on that web and like it just it pulls you win when you tell a story like that. So what What keeps us from telling the stories you know. I think we probably cognitively most business owners that have been around for a few years. Understand the power of story to some degree. I i know some of a struggle with feeling like we're wasting our audiences time or were belaboring things or it's not worth it. Why do we hesitate when it comes to this powerful mechanism you know. I can totally relate. When i first started telling stories. I would rush through him so quickly because i thought i was wasting. My audience is time like they wanted me to get to get to the point. And i i often Surround myself with a great storyteller. Because i love a good story and if you really think about your let's say you're out with some friends you're sitting around a fire and you all are just having a good time in someone tells a story and the when they add more detail when they add more layers to it when they really pull you in. You're like tell me more i'm here. I'm fully there. So you love that when they add the details and they really bring it to life. So why would it be any different. When you're telling your audience these really rich stories versus rushing to the punch line. It's the same kind of feeling they get on a webinar or had a campfire. And so i realized i needed to slow down so i did the exact thing that most of my students do they want to rush through it because they think they should and so. That's one thing another part in and this is gonna sound silly. And i've never really talked about this but we had to make it a practice in our business to get the stories like if we didn't have a process in the company to get these stories in the most richest way possible with all the details. I wouldn't be able to tell the stories so backup a little bit. We put a process in place where people can send us in their wins their results their satisfaction with our product and then we reach out to them on zoom and Someone on my team will do an interview and just ask them tons of questions and record it and transcribe it and then we kind of bring it into a story while my team then gives me all the details of that story so what my point was going to be is that i had to practice these stories if i want to add layers and richness to a story on a webinar or in a facebook. Live or on a podcast. I need a practice at a little meaning. I can't look at a bunch of bullets until the story. Well

Daniel Tardy Amy Porterfield Donald Miller Deniro Baker Los Angeles Facebook
"daniel l" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:39 min | 2 weeks ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"That's right so we never owned got tested before him both covert. Nasd's it'll be a full screen. Oh yeah okay okay. You said mercedes has been the best formula one for eight years or so. In fact they just this weekend sealed up the manufacturers cup for the seventh year in a row which is now a record in f one no other manufacturers over one at seven years in a row. Okay well mercedes. Drivers have won. Nine world champions. So lewis hamilton is one what six for them. I don't know you need to say these things earlier from to trash. Okay okay but two thousand and twenty two thousand eighteen two thousand eighteen two thousand seventeen two thousand and sixteen thousand fifteen two thousand fourteen nineteen fifty five thousand nine hundred fifty four big. Oh that's a big big boy up so seven years in a row for the driver to. Yeah well i think lewis has been driving for them. Every year they. I watched his letterman. Yeah yeah i mean Yes this world. Except now. I know everything 'cause daniel yami and then i watched that show and i thought it was really interesting seeing this sports so niche and we'll also nation also. There's this trend in sports that when a black athlete breaks through this kind of white ceiling. It's so exciting. Like when tiger woods did they may golf so popular. Yeah i think lewis. Hamilton's been so amazing for the sport because there just weren't black drivers and then all of a sudden the one that shows up is now the greatest of all time so it's really cool so cool and it was even crazier when they show him because he's the only black family out there it okay. So that's one thing. I don't know the people and i definitely do not understand is like go-carts how people start but go karts is not i- pitcher go-carts is like a it's hundred and twenty miles like i have a shifter kart and mangoes one hundred twenty five miles an hour kids..

lewis hamilton mercedes Nasd daniel yami Hamilton
"daniel l" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:39 min | 2 weeks ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"That's right so we never owned got tested before him both covert ns. Td's it'll be a full screen. Oh yeah okay okay. You said mercedes has been the best formula one for eight years or so. In fact they just this weekend sealed up the manufacturers cup for the seventh year in a row which is now a record in f one no other manufacturers over one at seven years in a row. Okay well mercedes. Drivers have won. Nine world champions. So lewis hamilton is one what six for them. I don't know you need to say these things earlier from to trash. Okay okay but two thousand and twenty two thousand eighteen two thousand eighteen two thousand seventeen two thousand and sixteen thousand fifteen two thousand fourteen nineteen fifty five thousand nine hundred fifty four big. Oh that's a big big boy up so seven years in a row for the driver to. Yeah well i think lewis has been driving for them. Every year they. I watched his letterman. Yeah yeah i mean Yes this world. Except now. I know everything 'cause daniel yami and then i watched that show and i thought it was really interesting seeing this sports so niche and we'll also nation also. There's this trend in sports that when a black athlete breaks through this kind of white ceiling. It's so exciting. Like when tiger woods did they may golf so popular. Yeah i think lewis. Hamilton has been so amazing for the sport because there just weren't black drivers and then all of a sudden the one that shows up is now the greatest of all time so it's really cool so cool and it was even crazier when they show him because he's the only black family out there it okay. So that's one thing. I don't know the people and i definitely do not understand is like go-carts how people start but the cards is not i- pitcher go-carts is like a it's hundred and twenty miles like i have a shifter kart and mangoes one hundred twenty five miles an hour kids..

lewis hamilton mercedes Td daniel yami Hamilton
"daniel l" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:53 min | 2 weeks ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Every bridge you drive from the early eighteen hundreds. That was some guy get laid though you started at nine which is really encouraging. I'm in a very similar situation. I think as your dad. Which is i have made enough money. That i can do it. Recreationally and i want my daughter more than anything to show some interest in it. So i can just go all in on it and i keep thinking man. She's seven now. When's the cutoff of when i got to get her in a cart and i guess it was a little relieved to see that you started at nine. Is that a little late in general. I think these days. I mean some can start like four or five. I guess you could say. I don't wanna say light but it's it's not the earliest but i'm always also a bit tolan with. I think if you start something so young you're gonna kinda pull out of love with a by the time you're twenty years old or something. I'm happy i started at knowing. you know. it was playing the sports. You know when i was a kid so i kinda had other interests. I think which kept the racing fresh for me. I think max for stop. And i think he started. Maybe like four so you can do it. That does not surprise me. I gotta tell you. I'm not sure who's rivals and who's not. But i gotta say what keeps me so interested in. F one is you and max. I love watching him. And i love watching you because there seems to be an automobile. Clear this up for me. And i also don't even know what you're allowed to say but what makes it really exciting mercedes just. Has this incredible profound advantage. It's very obvious. Their cars the best their teams the best. It's ben for. I don't know now. Eight years or something you would know so when you or verstappen podium to me that just screams driver and also what's really fun is all these teams where people don't watch it. There's two cars in every team's really. There's ten teams of two cars that make up twenty cars so when daniel who last race was on the podium third place for car the renault car he drives the yellow renewal. And you know. The other renaults nowhere near that podium and likewise the other red bull cars. Nowhere near that podium. So that tells me. Is that. Danny and max can drive the shit out of those cars. It makes it really exciting and heartbreaking. Because i'm like why the fuck isn't danny or max in that number two mercedes. Nothing against botas. I want to see someone that can drive like hamilton in the same cars hamilton. I would argue. This would kind of save f. one in that. If you had to from the hip shooters bad asses like you or max against hamilton. Every weekend it would be so exciting. I mean you guys would crash each other. A ton cost them a lot of money. But don't you think that would be so exciting to see three of the premier drivers in the same car. Yeah absolutely. I love you passion for it. I don't get me wrong. Like we'll think that..

daniel hamilton Danny
"daniel l" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:52 min | 2 weeks ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Okay okay wow sorry for the delay. It's early for us. This is too early for us. We're night owls college. Is i hope you take it as a compliment. I can't think of anyone else. I look it up early for like this. Thank you except where are you at right now. I'm in portugal at the moment so we got the next race this weekend so yeah. We don't stop till pretty much those day with like media and marketing stuff and then practiced off friday when you have a race weekend. How early do you get there first of all. You don't live in portugal do you know. Okay okay well. We're base in europe to roy's like around. That's too vague. What are you talking about base in. Yeah i'm based in north america. Is that helpful. Alga sounds or something. Yeah okay that makes sense. That's like people here. I don't know if you know this but people who have gone to harvard if you ask them where they went to college they'll go. Oh i went to school in boston. Everyone's like okay. I like to play a lower case. But yeah sean based on code but we move around and this is basically just compressed everything into europe so far like overseas races today. You question to go like to austin. Probably because i like the city but i'll get there like company the monday before the race just to get a few days. Also get over the jet lag. Yeah i was gonna wondering that you go to all these awesome places like the f one calendar takes you. You know the most amazing places people would definitely want to go visit. But i assume i imagine it's kind of like when i go somewhere to do a movie. It's like i'm excited to go. And then i just don't do one thing i. I'm in my hotel room. And then i do the work on their to do so. I'm wondering like how much do you actually get to enjoy. The city's you go to try and make a habit of if it's a city i'm excited about all trying to go early will stay off data but yeah it's not a waste away with commitments afterwards with the team all sponsors but yeah like the first few years so one. I was very much like hotel track apple and also just very like this is and that's it. Yeah but now. I try to make a habit of spending a at a time and destination and actually either learn a bit about the place. We'll just try and say the place so when it's all said and done i can actually say i did more than just drive around a racetrack. Yeah i'm so glad you have that perspective because you know there might be a pursuit. That's more goal oriented than yours like. It's just all about how you finish on that sunday so to learn to enjoy the process and not miss the whole experience. I have imagined so many drivers ended up just missing the entire experience. Because you're so myopically focused on that one moment in time. So i'm very delighted to hear that you're just kinda prancing around these places and brackets memories. yeah absolutely. I had a bit of a moment. It was a few years ago..

portugal europe harvard north america boston sean apple roy austin
"daniel l" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:51 min | 2 weeks ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Okay okay wow sorry for the delay. It's early for us. This is too early for us. We're night owls i apologize. I hope you take it as a compliment. I can't think of anyone else. I look it up early for like this. Thank you except where are you at right now. I'm in portugal at the moment so we got the next race this weekend so yeah. We don't stop till pretty much those day with like media and marketing stuff and then practiced off friday when you have a race weekend. How early do you get there first of all. You don't live in portugal do you know. Okay okay well. We're base in europe to roy's like around. That's too vague. what are you talking about. Base on based in north. America is that helpful alga sounds or something. Yeah okay that makes sense. That's like people here. I don't know if you know this but people who have gone to harvard if you ask them where they went to college they'll go. Oh i went to school in boston. Everyone's like okay. I like to play a lower case. But yeah sean based on code but we move around and this is basically just compressed everything into europe so far like overseas races today question to go like to austin. Probably because i like the city. But i'll get there like company the monday before the race just to get a few days. Also get over the jet lag and stuff. Yeah i was gonna wondering that you go to all these awesome places like the f one calendar takes you. You know the most amazing places people would definitely want go visit. But i assume i imagine it's kind of like when i go somewhere to do a movie. It's like i'm excited to go. And then i just don't do one thing i i'm in my hotel room and then i do the work on their to do so. I'm wondering like how much do you actually get to enjoy. The city's you go to try and make a habit of if it's a city i'm excited about a i'll try and go early will stay off but yeah it's not a ways away with commitments afterwards with the team all sponsors but yeah like the first few years so one. I was very much like hotel track apple and also just very like this is and that's it. Yeah but now. I try to make a habit of spending a at a time and destination and actually either learn a bit about the place. We'll just try and say the place so when it's all said and done i can actually say i did more than just drive around a racetrack. Yeah i'm so glad you have that perspective because you know there might be a pursuit. That's more goal oriented than yours like. It's just all about how you finish on that sunday so to learn to enjoy the process and not miss the whole experience. I have imagined so many drivers ended up just missing the entire experience. Because you're so myopically focused on that one moment in time. So i'm very delighted to hear that you're just kinda prancing around these places and brackets memories. yeah absolutely. I had a bit of a moment. It was a few years ago..

portugal europe America harvard boston apple roy sean austin
"daniel l" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:49 min | 2 weeks ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"He's fantastic enjoy. Daniel ricardo louis or supported by me under the under the media. Miandi this holiday season. We actually have an excuse to not go to aunt. Karen's house undies is stove. Say they're cozy lounge wearing coming on. These will be your holiday hibernation uniform. This.

"daniel l" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:18 min | 2 weeks ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Sleep tight I don't know whether to do my australian accent or my italian god. There's so many options because our guest his ethnicity is a talion. Or as i say italian yet he is also so you would do us. Because would you do an indian accent for me. You probably would get offended before. I knew you i might have but now i've changed my ways. Yeah all right so. Let me say the danielle rookie card. L. sounds nice. Good i done. You'll care they'll it's getting worse. Daniel ricardo is kind of tied for my favorite formula. One driver. He was awesome. You'll nervous right no. I wasn't nervous. I just like i don't know anything about this and i'm probably going to have to count sheep in my head during the interview or something because i'm just i'm just not interested but then i was super interested. Well right. I guess what i meant. Your fear level was is that is a race car driver correct for the show like is that something that would interest arm cherries. And i think we were both relieved to see that. He is so dag. Nabet charming that he transcends that that sport totally now. I love this sport. Now is my favorite sport. You started watching the netflix show. Yeah daniel ricardo. Which if you're in italy you would pronounce it daniel ra- though because it's got to cease. But he is in alsi so he says rick hairdo. He probably didn't say that way anyways. He is currently a formula one driver and he won some awards two thousand fourteen. Lorenzo bandini trophy. And the two thousand and fifteen laura's breakthrough of the year. He has seven wins in formula one. Thirty one podiums and three pole positions. He's fantastic enjoy. Daniel ricardo louis or supported by me under the under the media. Miandi this holiday season. We actually have an excuse to not go to aunt. Karen's house undies is stove. Say they're cozy lounge wearing coming on. These will be your holiday hibernation uniform. This is your sign. Stay in and cuddle up. Be a bear in lounge pants and hibernate your little butt off now. I broke out me lounge. Wears me onesies. When i was visiting aaron emissions of so chilly there but now it's getting chilly here so i've been in me.

Daniel ricardo rick hairdo Daniel ricardo louis Lorenzo bandini daniel ra netflix Nabet alsi aaron italy laura Karen
"daniel l" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

01:45 min | 2 weeks ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Nine. Sleep tight I don't know whether to do my australian accent or my italian god. There's so many options because our guest. His ethnicity is a or as i say italian yet. He is in alsi. So you would do us because would you do an indian accent for me. You probably would get offended before. I knew you i might have but now i've changed my ways. Yeah all right. So let me say the danielle rookie card l. Awesome nice good. i done. you'll care they'll it's getting worse. Daniel ricardo is kind of tied for my favorite formula. One driver. He was awesome. You'll nervous right no. I wasn't nervous. I just like i don't know anything about this and i'm probably going to have to count sheep in my head during the interview or something because i'm just i'm just not interested but then i was super interested right. I i guess what i meant. Your fear level was is that is a race car driver correct for the show like is that something that would interest arm cherries and i think we were both relieved to see that he is so dag nabet charming that he transcends that that sport totally now. I love this sport. Now is my favorite sport. You started watching the netflix show. Yeah daniel ricardo. Which if you're in italy you would pronounce it daniel ra- though because it's got to cease. But he is in alsi so he says rick hairdo. He probably didn't say that way anyways. He is currently a formula one driver. And he's won some awards two thousand fourteen. Lorenzo bandini trophy. And the two thousand and fifteen laura's breakthrough of the year. He has seven wins in formula one. Thirty one podiums and three pole positions..

Daniel ricardo rick hairdo alsi Lorenzo bandini daniel ra netflix laura italy
"daniel l" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

05:53 min | 8 months ago

"daniel l" Discussed on The Good Fight

"How do we think about this? Trade-offs how do we navigate was very consequential political decisions in the next weeks and months? Yeah we should have talked about this earlier. We shouldn't have waited till the because I think this is really decisive and I think it's quite dangerous in fact to complete aggressive response to genuine life threatening risks and authoritarianism so in other words to say that Donald Trump is passive is not to say he's democratic so the lack of an aggressive response shouldn't make us think oh liberalism and democracy are alive and well because in fact. I think it's actually very useful to kind of come up with a checklist and a set of criteria a kind of litmus test so to speak of what kinds of actions count as authoritarian and. What kind of actions are reasonable responses of a democratic state in trying to deal with the crisis and so some of the criteria? I would think hard number one restrictions on free media and punishment of media are not necessary for healing with an epidemic. And in fact you know. Having a free media is critical so anything that restricts the freedom of media is a problem. That's not a genuine response to nepotistic. That's using it for opportunistic ways. Anything that tries to weaken the opposition or had the effect of weakening the opposition by. Let's say not allowing for elections or by hampering elections. This is his also unexcusable. I mean to come up with the last week and look at what picked or on his doing these kinds of things. Shutting down of parliament's shutting down elections criticizing media. These are genuine threats to democracy. So when you see a political leader justifying assault on democracy by saying were trying to deal with the epidemic would be very skeptical on the other hand. There are things such as limiting the movement of people you know the ability of people to play in the park and kids to play on play structures and in Germany right now officially anyway not supposed to be more than one other person to people. Only gatherings of two people are allowed. When might say this is a restriction on freedom of association but this is not at all political? It's intended as a strictly as a safety measure. You know it's not permanent. There's a clear kind of endpoint. Several weeks It probably will be extended which you should make one nervous but that kind of thing is a real thing and I guess that final kind of criteria would be to. What degree is the opposition included in this process? Allowed to kind of opposition. Buying to this if you have opposition buy in for some of these measures than I think that extent it's less less not to say that he can't buy off the opposition and kind of corrupt way in but not to be aware of that risk. But you know skeptical opposition if it buys into some of these measures than that should make us less worried so again. I think it's really important to have clear distinction in our minds. The reason I in fact dangerous to conflate kind of reasonable measured responses to epidemics and assaults on democracy is that the absence of response reasonable measured responses that really address the crisis in fact feed into the hands of Authoritarians. Because if you don't deal with these crises in a real way in these challenges in these in these real life and death issues in a real way then you are opening the door to more extreme measures down the road so I think it's really critical to make this distinction. This seems to me to be the double danger office political moment so I think run. Danger is that we allow governments will for town ambitions to exploit this moment in order to take power in a permanent mana and I think in order to guard against that we have to insist on free conditions which I think all of which you mentioned in one way or another in what you're just saying. I'm the first of those. Is that the measures should be limited in time vision temporary. The second is that the needs to be some form of ongoing democracy and traditional control over them which means that the opposition has a real ability to help shape the nature of those measures that parliament's haven't ability to end them. They determined that they are no longer needed and that citizens can have recourse against an unjust unfair. Application of the third. Most important is that they have to be narrowly tailored strictly necessary. They can just be all kinds of things. Government would kind of like to be able to do they have to have a direct connection to the compelling state interest in the safety of citizens that make ruled about distancing necessary at the moment for example. Now having the second great danger is that we mistrust government so much and we are so willing to cry wolf that first of all unnecessary suffering and death rules out which is the most important potential danger but secondly that people will say oh all of you people keep going on about democracy and so on and because of you. People are now dying in the streets. So who cares about this democracy if you can't keep people safe? I think this is a test. The democracies would only has it been managed at the same time to stop in a four-time takeover and to take some of extraordinary measures. We need in order to keep citizens safe. I think that's a political venture would have to be following along for the next month. It's the old effectiveness and accountability. You kind of need both at the same time. There are these tensions but I think the way you've put it exactly right effectiveness and accountability. Dan Thank you so much for coming on this podcast and we'll just have to have another conversation about this. Let's say six months six. Eternity down the road. Yes thank you. Thank.

parliament assault Donald Trump Germany Dan
"daniel l" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

12:40 min | 8 months ago

"daniel l" Discussed on The Good Fight

"Had this disease at large scale and that I'm far from about naturally in this podcast. I'm going to be thinking for the next few episodes through what's going on in the world it's plunges to pretend that you can have conversations about the world's amendment but don't in one way or another revolve around the corona virus so next week. I will have David miliband the former British foreign secretary and now had off the International Rescue Committee on the show to discuss what he considers the deepest political crisis of his lifetime. But now I have somebody coming onto. Podcast remark beating compensation for a very long time. And we've been planning to get him on the podcast for quite a while but he he finally is it's a Danza Danza. Blood is best known as CO offer of how democracies Di di good book. You should be reading alongside the people vs democracy. But he's also a professor of science of Government at Harvard University and off book but actually find in many ways even more interesting called conservative parties and the birth of democracy. An-and I try to think through the implications of the corona virus for populism but also for Arizona parts beyond populism in the next hour so I really hope you enjoy our conversation. Welcome to the PODCAST Daniel. It's wonderful to have a chance to talk. I've been meaning to have you on for so long and we talk a lot. But we've never done a podcast together now. I suppose we do it on the circumstances above trying to grapple with this strange political nice post biological moment making sense of global pandemic so I still WanNa make sure but we ended up talking about our wheelhouse which is democracy populism a little bit but I also think you know we're trying to understand the nature of the crisis itself. Some people have been saying. This is the most extraordinary political crisis they've lived through. Do share that sentiment and if so what makes it bad. I think it's extraordinary in the sense that it's unrecognizable or it's inexperienced for which we don't really have the right frameworks to think about. I mean I remember living through the collapse of communism in highschool so I wasn't fully alert. His I am now. I guess that seem more distant of course because I wasn't affecting our daily lives I was living in California at the time line. Eleven I guess is the other thing that people often refer to that also felt as if it was not there was a bit of an existential dread. You know in the very days around nine eleven but that was short lived and the political life sort of was recognizable. I do have the feeling that things feel less recognizable bearings that one has given away a little bit. So I think in that sense. If that's what you mean by extraordinary that's right one of the things that would be great to talk to you about is to what degree is that really true. Our whole patterns being unsettled our old patterns simply being reinforced ten years from now will we look back and take that wasn't as significant as we thought it's interesting to be living through a period where it's hard to even make that judgment either. That's exactly what I'm trying to think through. I'm the first thing to say which I feel. Confident about is kind of disdain for the people who have peddled the same solution for the last years and now we have. What does as you're saying feel like a very different kind of crisis? And what we do they say. Hey look for finger. That always been in favour office. Now been proven to be right and true of some of the people who are enemies of globalization on the right. I think it's also true of some people like say. Now Make Line. Who say you see? This is the reason why we have to bothers capitalism on laugh. I think both those knee-jerk reactions just a little bit too simple. Let's start with what should change. Perhaps before we go into what it will change things weren't necessarily up to each other though. It is odd because a pandemic is the reverend. Certainly I think shows the need to take take risks. More seriously chose a risk for having a healthcare system which can deal with or at least up to deal with much higher capacity in moments of crisis it clearly show has been need for having a strategic reserve for things like ventilators and therefore it may Colin Dow the extent to which some nations have outsourced production. Aw central goods is not obvious to me that it cools in doubt in a fundamental way the interconnectedness and for world. We'll trade a lot of the things that people are saying will be deeply impacted by it. What's your sense? This is sort of. The End of globalization is for any reason to think that either. It should be here. I haven't really thought about it. In terms of the economic effects because the people who make these arguments often are sitting comfortably in their houses with Internet connections and a steady supply of groceries so at some level those systems are still intact and we in fact depend upon those and people are eating fruit from all around the world that you're having oranges with my breakfast in Berlin in March. So I'm enjoying the fruits of globalization literally. One way of thinking about this is that it exposes our casts into sharp relief weaknesses and strengths in societies. That were already there and so I do think that the things that I think about our ca two levels one at the political level the degree to which you have affective states that can respond to genuine crises or alternatively to that kind of weak version of that is essentially. I think what we're seeing in the United States is kind of formal patrimonial state where you've had a hollowing out of the State. I think in some ways. Donald Trump is governance of the. Us is kind of Burien patrimonial leader where his family members? The lines between public and private are blurred kind of disdain for expertise because this is not in his direct purview and so all of that has hollowed out the state. I don't think it begins with trump but all of this makes clear that we need stronger more effective states who have greater role for expertise and I think actually more than just that Space within specially our national political institutions. But also the level where there's four of four experts to deliberate in one of the things I'm struck by is the sense that you know. There's a couple of experts who can speak in the press conferences everyday Assume behind them. There's armies of experts but I think really what we need in. What's missing is a kind of opportunity for economists. Public Health experts doctors to all get together and to lay out the various dilemmas. I mean the moment. This crisis emerged January. This is what should have happened. There should have been an opportunity for experts to get together to talk about. All of the potential weaknesses are dilemmas. Challenges that we're going to emerge. What are some responses? There's going to be trade-offs. There's no silver bullet to deal with this. And just to provide a kind of form of deliberation. I think that some ways missing or appears to be missing so that's the political realm at a social realm. I do think that this sort of cast in sharp relief. The importance of a category could think of is social resilience to degree to which societies or robustness. This does get into the realm of of social welfare and how well organized civil society is at some level the. Us's strong in this domain. Because you see this mass mobilization of people at the state level local level of people trying to cope with this but on the other hand the degree to which people don't have the resources to survive crisis because they don't have the social networks to support themselves one paycheck away from complete devastation. In their personal lives shows the vulnerability populated so I guess this sort of feeds into the sort of stories that are told about levels of inequality declining social mobility in the United States. I think all of this is also exposed again so I don't think this calls question that kind of value economic globalization but I think it just exposes the fragility of weak political institutions and also the fragility of societies. That are not as resilient as they ought to. Yes perhaps we should understand a little bit more about the nature of a response as it's happening at the differences between types of political jim between tops political leader between types of economic systems in different countries on managing to respond better or worse and then we might be able to get back to the question of whatever longterm implications on that. I feel like there's two categories of countries there's countries that are failing miserably and there's countries that Looking somewhat better by comparison but have also important ways been slow and ineffective in response. So let's start with the particular shocking examples. I've been writing a little bit about the fact that you should assumed but the United States would do particularly well in dealing with something like the Coun- pandemic I think most political scientists when asked who can deal especially well with an extraordinary crisis that puts many lives at risk would have pointed to a simple metric of state capacity in order to answer that question and all states depending on how you operationalized capacity is not necessarily country highest capacity NBA WORLD. But it certainly has a lot of state capacity certainly more than say or a democracy like India public health experts would have pointed to the number of hospital beds to the existence of experts who can develop a responses to the existence of a strong sitution NYC the CDC and in fact when the Public Health at Hopkins and too few people made a list a ranking of countries that would do particularly well in a public health emergency. You have a good preparedness system. The United States came out on top and yet at least as we're recording this on April first it fields as fo- better indicators for the United States is actually doing significantly worse than P countries and other developed democracies in Coordinating response in making test available to its citizens in sending a clear message in ensuring that this is not yet another piece of four culture war of how people should be acted. Should this change our view of the United States and its capacity of actually solving citizens and dealing with an emergency is United States as I wrote perhaps a little bit provocatively in a recent piece just paper tiger desperately searching for nearest Rutta or do you think that that's an overly pessimistic. Leading both of how amount has been responding to crisis. And of how generalize -able lessons it's always fun to talk to you because I think we're always often an opposite situation so here. I am an American living in Germany admiring the German response expecting a wonderful German response because I have great admiration for the robustness of the German state. Jerry German government defectiveness of German public institutions in Europe. German were. Germany are in America now but living in America with high expectations for America and so in a funny way my expectations of the US have always been much lower price than you are. Yes and probably. Your expectations of Germany are much lower than mine. And so I'm not surprised. I guess find this clue the. Us IS A robust democracy. I think despite the THREAT TO DONALD TRUMP. That's effective debate state. But I guess I've always been more skeptical. I mean there are these interesting parallels between Germany and the US differences. That I think are actually revealing more sort of general lessons. I mean one of the things that distinctive about the US state in US. Federalism is that partly through progressive era in particular through the new deal. You went creation of a highly effective national government the CDC was created in nineteen forty six. You had in the middle of the twentieth century..

United States Donald Trump Germany David miliband Arizona Harvard University International Rescue Committee professor California Burien secretary CDC Berlin NBA Colin Dow
"daniel l" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

11:40 min | 8 months ago

"daniel l" Discussed on From Scratch

"Daniel is also the founder of peace works. Our producer of Mediterranean spreads such as top nods Hamas and Baba Gana piece works aims to foster business relationships among neighbors in the Middle East and other groups in conflict. As a way to reduce conflict in those regions Daniel grew up in Mexico City and speaks Spanish English Hebrew and French and a little bit of Yiddish. Snow welcome thank you. Thank you so much Jessica before we dig into kind. I WanNa talk about peace works. Which was the company you founded in? Nineteen Ninety three that focuses on Mediterranean spreads. What was the germ four founding this food company in early nineties? I didn't know it was going to be a food. Company was more about trees business as a force for bringing Arabs and Israelis together. That was what I was very passionate about since Writing my college and Law School work about how to use market forces to help trading partners shatter culture stereotypes cement relations with each other. So that was the impetus of what I was doing and it became a foot company. Because as I was looking for ventures I was looking in peril. I was looking in Dead Sea Minerals and food became the area where I found my passions best They didn't understand that minerals twelve but stood food and it's hard start so food was secondary to the primary mission was to facilitate joint ventures among conflicting neighbors. So what's an example of a collaboration which you established at Peace Works Between two conflicting groups will the flagship venture which still exists. Today which is how we started was My discovery of Asandra tomato spread. And when I've long story short found out the company had gone bankrupt because he was sourcing. Its glass jars from Portugal and Sandra tomatoes from Italy and it was very expensive and when I came to your banish the Israeli manufacturer and told them about my yes he had Arab friends and he really believe in the philosophy of World War. Two piece works but it also showed him that he could benefit economically that he could buy the glass jars from Egypt instead of Portugal. The Sunday tomatoes from Turkey suppliers instead of Italian ones so. They started buying Basil and olives and olive oil from Palestinian citizens of the West Bank and Gaza. And that's how it started. How did you secure distribution in the United States with peace works? Can you walk through that process? Because in a way you piggybacked on that In with kind well I didn't know what I was doing. So I emptied my brick my legal briefcase literally these big briefcase for carrying Legal documents and they filled it up with jars with some tomato spreads basil. Pesto sauce breads and out. Start at the top of Broadway. One hundred and twenty seconds streets on the west side and then just started walking store by store till I would go seven. Am in the morning till I would end at seven PM at night and the bottom of Wall Street. And then I would cross the next day and it would go up Broadway and the other side of Broadway and brother was an important choice because it was a the avenue that I found to have the most concentration of grocery store so I knew Second Avenue Third Avenue. Madison they did all of them. But Braulio was the juiciest and I would not go to the next store unless I got either an order or an explanation for what I needed to different in order to get an order the next time and I drove many people not s- because everything was wrong but they were basically taught me like Scott Gold China and Mr Zave are from sabres. Basically taught me what the consumers were looking for. So I really learned a lot of what I do today from all the store managers and buyers at the grocery shops Bodega in New York City. What is an example of something that Mr Xaver taught you everything I mean? I came in and they didn't have much patience because they had thousands of consumers going around and here I am and I don't know what I'm doing but the they really liked that I really cared about my mission and I think they just have patients with me. So they taught me how what is the margin requirements for for retailer for these tributary and for yourself? So that you can run a ongoing business They taught me about the labels how to make sure that the name is cleared. The jars back then were using olive oil out of them. That was not acceptable. So it was a lot of sessions. You mentioned that you had a law degree you went to Stanford Law School and you became a lawyer And the idea for peace works came out of a paper your thesis that you wrote which I believe was entitled Incentives for Peace and Prophets federal legislation to encourage enterprises to invest in arab-israeli joint ventures become a very famous document among doctors. Because if you were having insomnia were having trouble falling asleep that would give it to you would read it and you'd fall asleep. Immediately was the most theoretical boring thing in the world. They was just totally devoid of practical use. But it was beautiful. Theoretically you dabbled in the law Before starting businesses you had a stint at Sullivan and Cromwell You clerked for Supreme Justice in Texas. Did you think that you might WANNA career in law? I love the law was not that I was trying to escape the law. I just had this. You call germ. I had this bug inside me that that I just really felt that my mission in life was to try to build bridges and two and the Arab Israeli conflict. And here's the peace process. All my ideas that I've been sharing for several years. Suddenly they go from being delusional to being slightly tenable. And I'm like all right how to try to pursue it and have to try it. He also had a kind of a social ethos in your family. Your father was a prominent figure in your upbringing. And the way you think about the world he was a Holocaust survivor. Having survived Dhakal the concentration camp in Germany. Can you talk a little bit about him? Yeah my that was My greatest hero and role model He was the most humble person he built himself from. Scratch came to Mexico after the war. He was fifteen and a half years old when the war started sixteen when he got to Mexico. He didn't speak Spanish shoring leash he's from Lithuania. Originally he was born in Riga Latvian. Raise in Lithuania when he was nine years old. Nineteen thirty nine The war started. And I'll tell you the story. It's a little strong but He was coming back with his Father to their apartment house where they lived and the superintendent showed them into the garage was and he opened the door of the garage and there was a pile of bodies and he told my grandfather. You see all these people. They're older juice in the building. And you lucky that you always were nice to me and treated with respect and kindness. So I spared you on your family but get out before I change my mind. So that my father who's nine years old and his brother and my grandfather and grandmother packed whatever they could carry and then they left into a ghetto and That was a story that my that told me when I was nine years old and my mom said Roman. What are you doing? This kid is nine years old. You know you're GONNA. What are you doing? Please stop telling these my that said look. He's nine years old and he needs to hear it. I was nine years old and I needed to live it but the other thing that was no less powerful and important with the stories that he told me about people that in the worst of circumstances would rise open. Do something kind like this. German soldier that through a potato to him and might used to tell the story about how he felt he was going to die and he was really malnourished and that potato man for him the difference in survival and dog soldier to caress by giving him food for for the soldiers. So those were the stories that I most admired the way. My that always remembered the moments of kindness. I mean the darkest moments and There's a quote that I really love that connects to that about from Rabbi Hillel. That says Innis plays where there's no humanity strive thou to be human so the the name kind healthy snacks did. Your father have influence on the naming of the product. The main kind was created by my team. And I really fascinating that we finally zone Dean on it. Because he wasn't today so obvious that that's perfect name for us but back then we had all these crazy ideas for the name. The reason we came up with kind is that it had human attributes that we were really trying to aspire to be to define us to do the kind thing for your body to the kind thing for your taste buds onto the kind thing for your world. It's striking that your father. was very forthcoming with his stories and chose to talk about the wartime versus others who really receded and did not tell their family Such stories just a more for self preservation families preservation than anything. What was the impetus for your families? your father's moving to Mexico of all places. A religious comment on this is really important. I was surrounded by other survivors growing up and the I love them dearly. But you could tell they were consumed by the horrible horrid. They had gone through and they can have a positive outlook. And my dad or there were others that were able to just shut it out and just have a positive left wing forward. My Dad had the strength to recall those horrors but in a positive way instill he was such a sweet kind hearted man Vega has always making people laugh always almost like he saw his mission to make people have a better day and make people laugh. Did you see the movie Life is beautiful so when I saw that movie I cried a lot and then I was a little trouble I felt guilty to be laughing also and I asked my that. You never cross my mind that in such horrible circumstances you could actually say jokes in the middle of a concentration camp and my that said the opposite the only reason why that felt that he survived is because my grandfather was a really funny joke teller and he would retain the Jewish inmates and the German soldiers with funny stories and make people more humane and more human by making them laugh and just find particularly those dark moments. Some levity you are brought up in Mexico City hell was being Jewish in a predominantly Christian place. While I also lived in our very insulated cocoon you pointed out earlier. I learned Yiddish an early age and I learned before I learned Hebrew or English in for my mom was very important that die build bridges so she introduced me to this kid named Louis. Who would we make play dates in our neighborhood for me to be friends with him and since such cocoon that you know? We're playing once and I said you know if you do this. I'M GONNA kick you into house. And he says what what is his thing. And I'm like stop joking to his to. Sion your back you behind your ass. And he's like no..

Mexico Mexico City Daniel Lithuania Portugal Middle East Jessica Dead Sea Minerals Stanford Law School Turkey New York City United States producer founder Gaza Mr Xaver Asandra
"daniel l" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

07:46 min | 11 months ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"<Music> <Speech_Music_Female> this. <Music> Go foes <Music> driving my <Music> car. We concern <Music> on music <Music> and rule <Music> induced induced <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> school for <Music> Dr somewhere <Music> <Music> outside. <Music> It's lovely lovely <Music> day. <Music> We can put <Music> on our seatbelts. <Music> And <Speech_Music_Female> operas <Music> lie <Music> down <Music> <Music> <Music> O ooh <Music> <Music> <Music> around <Music> <Music> the music <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> really lie <Music> went on own <Music> garden <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> down round. <Speech_Music_Male> Not <Music> Too fast. 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The the <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> job <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> The <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> Red Light <Music> Green Light. <Music> <Music> <Music> I can't tell <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> they. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Should <Music> we get an ice cream <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Want <Music> <Music> Dashiell <Music> <Music> that's what kind China's <Music> getting <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> you're <Speech_Music_Female> listening to ears <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Female> I'm Andrew <Speech_Female> and I'm poly <Speech_Female> and we have <Speech_Female> really really. I <Speech_Female> loved sharing your <Speech_Female> music with our <Speech_Female> ear snacks friends <Speech_Female> but there are something <Speech_Female> that we forgot to ask <Speech_Music_Female> you and it's probably <Speech_Female> the most <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> probably the most pressing <Speech_Female> question Jin <Speech_Female> that anybody <Speech_Female> has ever asked <Speech_Female> any music <Speech_Female> person <Speech_Female> ever about <Speech_Female> where music <Speech_Female> comes from and <Speech_Female> why it's important <Speech_Female> to connect all <Speech_Female> of humanity eighty <Speech_Female> to each other. <Speech_Female> What is <Speech_Female> the meaning of it? <Speech_Female> All and <SpeakerChange> the question <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> like Best Dash Shoe <Speech_Female> ice <SpeakerChange> cream. And <Speech_Female> what's up with that. <Speech_Male> Okay wait. <Speech_Male> Can I explain this. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> So what happened <Speech_Female> was we. <Speech_Female> Did this. Rooms like four <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and he asked me. <Speech_Female> What type of ice cream <Speech_Female> do you WANNA get? 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"daniel l" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

03:12 min | 11 months ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"Ask Bill how old are y'all. Hey Girl Elise eight years old step you are in five and five. I have already said. Daniel is a Nashville based singer songwriter. And he just put a wonderful kids album called. I love rainy days and it. It is nominated for best children's album this year in the sixty second grammy awards. I don't know if you know this about Daniel but we also love rainy rainy days. It's true we did a whole episode about rain so we're wondering what are some of your favorite things to do on rainy days I'll go first Hot Chocolate Oh yeah checkers. What do you like Tinkerbell Plum Canyon? Jump Roping Roping. I don't think I can't play piano while I jump rope following. You can try you. You could dry it out later but another question for Y'all is how did you come up with ideas for these songs well I kind of I thought of one has them the all the letters. Yes Yeah Tinkerbell L. sounding good there yet. Tinkerbell saying that Daniel I love the sounds of this record you have raindrops in car. Sounds and lots of different. Sounds of the world Can you tell us some other. Sounds like yeah. Go ahead tilly. Sh what does that Hershey law. uh-huh okay we know that you you work with a lot of talented people in music writing songs and producing them like Casey mass graves and other awesome Nashville. People you've worked with and it sounds like there are some some really talented people on this particular album to tiger lily digger. Can you tell us a little bit about working being with those superstars and what they brought to this project. That made it special for you. Yeah how does working with your daughter is compared to working with Casey. Musk graves I would say. Hey that it's pretty similar you know Casey's one of those people that immediately improves the sound of Song with her voice and I would say that My daughters are the the same way when you have a song. If it's a good song they sing on it. It just becomes better till a children's album Now I'm on the Jim too. I think it's kind of like cold like like us. Children and our children's L. it just kind of makes it more unique. It's lovely day. Let's go for Dr. You feel like it. Let's let's go for.

Daniel Casey mass Tinkerbell Plum Canyon Nashville Tinkerbell L. Tinkerbell Bill grammy Hershey Jim
"daniel l" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

10:08 min | 11 months ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"To take place next week the farm is a a party hall an institution on the west side it's been seized by the IRS to rule will be put up for auction next week the owner Daniel L. says Sir says that the iris sees the property is putting it up for auction begin because he failed to pay a hundred twenty six thousand dollars in payroll taxes it's up for auction on January the twenty second ND he's putting out a the owner is putting out a please have someone stepped forward and actually I guess pay the back taxes in the eye according to according to else answer the farm and dell hi is worth about one point five million dollars in hopes to leverage the real estate to secure a loan to pay the back taxes not when that when this is transpired this takes many many many months is doesn't happen overnight now the words when an employer takes money out of employees paycheck and holds it in trust you have to in many cases match that amount if it's certain kinds of withholding and then send a check or have the seizure of your account to to the government and so the farm knew or should have known for many months this day was coming and you can't only a hundred and some thousand dollars when the property is worth millions and I would assume it's worth that but I I've been by it a few times of have not been in a in a very long time and so at this point we're not sure what's going to happen L. Sasser says the farm is serve the community for like seventy years they want to stay in business and we're asking the public to pray for the farm late at night before I go to bed I always say a prayer for those of my friends and buddies that are hurting generally physically but also emotionally I'm not going to put the farm on my list of those I'm praying for the match started by doing he says a rubber chicken there I'm told some fried chicken and some green beans but as a business owner that's not your money when you take money out your employees paychecks you take the money out and then you have to transmit it within a quick period of time I think it's a week or ten days to the government either the IRS withholding taxes and or to the state where the money is owed for example a match diamonds big paycheck you gets twice a month there's a chunk of money I'm sure thousands of dollars that are higher media takes out of his paycheck and for withholding the exact character and then it's your job as the employer you have the tax ID number is to send that money to the appropriate government authority and if that hasn't happened that's a crisis speaking of that memo have you been to the farm and dell hi because it's been seized by the IRS the farm no longer exists I've not been there why not I even you have invited I'm not going there are no I'm I'm I'm waiting for your invitation not a secondary front I would have little or no interest in tonight's game with Joe burrow into comes into except for the fact that we got a quarterback who is a Jew is he a generational quarterback reminds me of a Peyton manning some of that character who says he wants to play for the bangles yeah this is almost impossible yeah you raise the idea a bit a while ago that maybe it's possible the number one draft choice would not want to be a Bengal and go to federal court to overturn the whole system I repeat I raised that possibility yeah well okay another Joe burrow it does they gave a more interesting you that on the other one has less interest to me because now I'm gonna watching it through the lens of bangles fan fearing that something bad's gonna happen to Joe burrow I need the referees to do their job tonight in the first Tim put him in a cocoon ID Clemson to run the football dominated time of possession let's get this bad boy over about two hours and forty so you don't want to wait at all I I'm I'm could not care less about who wins I'm looking is through the lens of if it can't go wrong for the bank yeah well he does it well and what we haven't had is the presumptive number one overall pick who's gonna come to Cincinnati and be you know the guy that's going to lead this team into the into the next decade and save professional football in Cincinnati going down with some sort of injury tonight the compromises his his NFL view that would be perfect yeah no one people was over I'm watching this game tonight through that lens only I'm not going to enjoy this I hope Joe plays well I you know would be cool if if the Bengals had a national championship quarterback on some level and from an NFL standpoint there's a thousand dies on both teams were gonna play on Sundays so the Bengals have huge draft it's not to say that the bangles can just wrap job world that they can draft a lot of guys on the field tonight but more than anything I want this to be over I want this to be over I want Joe Berle as well as Joe Berle walks off the field I win you know what a good job a Carter moment you don't wanna Carter moment got injured in his first preseason game against the Detroit Lions in nineteen ninety five right this would be this would be that that would be perfect is would be next level yes so at this point we're gonna hope meant mainly he's in like bubble wrap yeah that nothing bad happens let's let's hope the the LSU offense of line does its job let's hope that the Clemson Tigers dominate time of possession or Joe burrow in Ellis you so thoroughly blow them out in the first half that he doesn't have to play that he's playing a whole I think I saw on ESPN this morning he's like two hundred sixty yards from setting the Alice you from them from the most yards in the most points ever scored their close to some national record that he's going to go for it yeah this is his last opportunity any as such respect and love for L. issue because them taken out of the high state situation that he wants the plane was the way I can't conceive of this being a blow out no I think it's gonna be a really good game and and you have tonight the quarterback who is probably gonna go number one overall this year and the guy who I would imagine as the front runner to go number one overall next year playing the same position and Trevor Lawrence know that this should be a really fun game it should be a really high scoring game and you know let's face it as much as people beat up on Clemson's a non league schedule they are the reigning champion they did not beat Ohio state though this one is over the last three for SEC official they they took advantage of a horrible overturned on that touchdown that was raised apples and possession it was awful it was awful that said they're still down sixteen to nothing early after having been dominated against the team that I think Willie is maybe the best college football team to not play for a national championship over the last ten to fifteen years they had to come back to do that and one Ohio state kicked it away to on the Clinton took over I think at the six yard line they needed points for Lawrence went down the field and got in for place so they deserve to be here now I agree with a lot of Buckeye fans they got host there's that's inescapable but that doesn't mean you have to discredit the Clemson who again won it last year as a coach is beatnik saving the national title game twice so this is a formidable challenge for Ellis you I think it's going to be a really good game what what I think is going to be interesting those to see of Clemson can hang with them score for free four score for score if Ellis you scores almost at will which is what they did against Oklahoma I don't think you can do that against Clemson but you go into this game thinking Ellis use going to get at least twenty eight to thirty five points can Clinton match that that's the question answers yes because the team that beats next say been twice neighborhood in a way to beat him last year complete domination then with Ohio state to March ninety four yards when they had to do it to win they went and did it when you're down sixty boys now one might argue I station about up twenty one to nothing or twenty in a pilot more yes and the bad calls to the SEC officials and the replay officials from the SEC screw this thing up so that their team Alice you would not play Austin I'm not conspiratorial enough all I believe I believe no I I I think Jeffrey upstream for example was murdered I'm a lot of people for a lot of people share that view he was a lot of people share that Ohio state was murdered Ohio state was screwed no I don't think there was anything malicious or nefarious supply here I think it was a matter of just basic human error and replace then you look at that and say three feeder down I don't resent it it's it's absurd did make a football move what the hell's that football movie about three steps you had found it all as a football analyst you in that moment got screwed now they had the lead with less than five five minutes to go and the football and Clemson territory and they decided upon it away right or wrong there's a lot of coaches that would have kicked it away they had a chance to get a stop in if they get it they're probably playing tonight so ends as we mentioned there up sixteen nothing it felt like it should've been twenty four nothing maybe twenty eight off Dominic so they had opportunities bots yeah in that instance they got screwed and if I don't know if I'm an Ohio state fan I'm having a hard time watching tonight because they should have won that game USA today has a column up about the lack of diversity in the NFL that Marvin Lewis should about heart somewhere as opposed to the coaches that were hired the person in charge of the diversity committee the National Football League is Katie Blackburn brown do you sense there needs to be more affirmative action with the hiring of coaches no and if so how about players in the NBA who are overwhelmingly not white sure we have white players picked to play in the NBA to represent the population it is the flip side of that coin equally good and we're not going to do that in the NBA I think what has to happen in the NFL is if you want more African American coaches there need to be more African Americans in court in a rolls and assistant roles now about the enemy the enemy deserves a job he deserves to be out of the offense to Casey how how was that yesterday with that there will getting wailed fifty one points twenty four and up the the argument that well he doesn't call plays is lazy they that there's there's the the the characteristics you need I think to be a successful head coach in the NFL have little to do with how you call please can you lead up can you set a tone can you communicate can you make.

IRS Daniel L.
"daniel l" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

15:31 min | 1 year ago

"daniel l" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Our guest this week on the chronicles is Daniel Durso. He is a US Army veteran run of World War Two he served in a tank battalion in the European theater. Anisa thank you very much for being with US thank you. Let's start at the very beginning of your story. When and where were you born why I was born in a small town in northeastern Pennsylvania freeland Pennsylvania the years at most of us were nineteen twenty four four and talk about growing up in that community As a child. Obviously when you're about five or so the Great Depression hit What was it like in your family? Well I'll tell you what growing up during the depression as a teenager was a tremendous challenge. There was all kinds of sacrifices that had to not made and there are a lot of stories that I could tell that took place in my family and during the depression days and one was as an example where they were eight children so Eight children and my mother made nine people now. The ice cream store down in town so to dips of ice cream. Dip of ice for a dime and each Friday. We would get three ice cream cones each person would either get a ice cream or a ice or cone and this was set up in such an efficient way that it revolved evolved and everybody's got an equal treat all the time now. That was one of the kinds of things that happened within the family and other in fact back. That's where we got our first radio by the way we got our first radio in nineteen thirty seven and that was quite a treat in something big change in our family something that maybe might be worth saying that during that time. President Roosevelt had a program called the new deal and part of that was the WPA the APPEA- a most people may not have heard of that. It was the workers program for married men and each person received forty three dollars a a month just to put some money in the House and another plan was CCC where young men were taken to work out in the open and Their pay was eighteen dollars a month. They were given food and they were giving a place to sleep so with growing up. Most of the soldiers in the ages. I'm thinking from like maybe nineteen to twenty six grew during the depression and we grew up with great sacrifices. No pleasure no entertainment and we carried the same belief the same lifestyle right into the army and it gave us an opportunity to challenge the demands the request that make a good soldier and I think this was one of the things that thousands and thousands of men in the army grew up during that period and took that within successfully into the service. Mr Durr so you were roughly seventeen years old. When Pearl Harbor was attacked by the Japanese? What do you remember about that event? You know many people ask that question about her harbor day. You know. I was in a situation where I did not hear that till the next day so I All the news was all all spread by then and of course I did have that real jolts that many people did have because I wasn't there that first day but everyone one was really in a state of shock and surprise and now knowing that maybe life would be different. When did you join the service? I entered the service march of nineteen forty three. I was nineteen years old and from there I was called to to where the group of US recalled together at the under the canopy of the rest. which theater in Freeman where? There were cheers. There were tears and many people crowded around. You know a lot of people didn't work and have worked so there was a lot of crowds as we boarded. The bus. Say Man's band played played. God bless America and off. We went to Indian town. Gap Indian town gap was the indoctrination center. And what I remember about that. That right there you lust your identity. You suddenly became part of this big thing everybody after one day or wearing the same clothing. Everybody's being the bunk. You're surrounded by a group of men almost all the same age and you now became part of that. And you're no longer were who you were. That was my assumption. That is I recall it wherever you sent for training. Well I was very lucky. I was very lucky because I went to Camp Campbell Kentucky and they never told us to. We got there as a matter of fact. Five of the men from freeland from my own town also went to this location. We went there for the formation of a tank Battalion The seven hundred second tank battalion and and that was a tremendous advantage because it was like like starting a clash everybody started from the beginning. The training was right down the line and it was very effective and much better than walking into a organization that was already operated and try to fit in. We had the opportunity of being part of something brand new and it was really pretty exciting. And what role did they give you in the tank battalion. Well after it was short while you were assigned to different responsibilities I became the governor. I became the governor and one of the forty five tanks and the Talian and or training went from there to Tennessee where we went to Tennessee. Maneuvers talk about how easy or difficult it was to learn what was like to operate at tank. Frankly was was not a hard to learn because it was so interesting and so challenging that it became like like fun and you were among men with happy attitude and and everybody had the same challenge and everybody was trying to get the same results so actually it. It wasn't it wasn't much of a challenge. It was more of of something new in life a new experience and it all went on from there. What type of ammunition were you firing out of your gun well tank? Ah We had a Sherman tank Sherman tank. We'd thirty two ton. The main gun was a seventy five. Millimeter it also had a fifty caliber on talk. I had a fifty caliber. Also as part of my queuing in and there was a thirty millimeter down front thirty caliber. I'm sorry thirty caliber. We're down front. A fifty caliber on top and a seventy five millimeter in the heavy. We're speaking with World War veteran Daniel Durso. US Army veteran of world were to. We'll be right back on veterans chronicles. Welcome back veterans chronicles on the Radio America network. I'm Greg Columbus. Thanks for being with us on it to be speaking today with Daniel L. Durso he's A. US Army veteran of world. War Two from Kentucky you were sent to Kansas and then eventually to New York before heading overseas sees how well prepared do you. Did you feel at the time to eventually go into battle. You know the whole thing was so well planned that I think we almost almost felt like professional soldiers. At least that was the attitude among the group there. We knew each other from the very first day everybody was part award of this big family. You might say and the moving from Kentucky in the summertime Tennessee in the fall and into the Winter Kansas in the cold of the winter and then to New York we hit all four seasons which gave us a great opportunity of being able to handle any type of weather there which is a big factor if you're on the field or in the army and then from there You know we went To New York when crush the Mauritania we went to the Martina which was a ship. I guess an English boat transported into a guests to army transport. There were thousands of men on the boat from there. We landed and it's interesting because it was just a complete plan out each step you move closer and closer to Berlin we went to. We landed at In England and we went down through England through the middle of England in fact we ended up in cannock the very center of Kingland and an interesting experience there. The German planes would come over every evening they would go north. They would go south and they would go east but they never dropped one shell on cannock while we were there and we happen to be billeted there for over five weeks and I will say we left a tremendous league league good impression with that community. Happy a couple of dollars walked away with wives and it was a kind of town like most little American towns and we fit fit right in so from there then we went to Southampton quish. You know would follow sat absolutely. We just got a couple of minutes here before we had our first break. Talk about going into France. When did that happen yes? We landed at France. Oh I guess about the middle of July why and this was five five or six weeks after half D. A. and we landed on a Sunday morning a bright sunny morning in a couple of miles south of Utah. Utah Beach and from there. We go I must say the harbor was loaded with boats as I remember remember and it was one beautiful scene and all of some of these were unloading. I guess several of them were waiting to unload and this was still in that lake almost like a plea track of one thing following another. They were supporting what was going on. On land fulfilling commitment that was destroyed and so forth was almost like a built. Okay like a built from one in each end developed as you got there and and actually the government and the army head is planned out pretty well our guest today on Veterans Chronicles Daniel Durso. He's a US Army veteran he served in the seven hundred second tank battalion alongside the eightieth division in the European Theater and Sarah when you got to France to south of Utah Beach Your unit unit engaged in some skirmishes with German. So that is the first combat that you faced. What was the real thing like compared to what you expected why we didn't get into combat right off the bat because we were used to kind of blockade some of the areas areas where the Germans might breakthrough and it was a small thing so we wear like moving around quite a bit the first three or four weeks just doing that and Having very very little position and but then we finally ended up that Satan Lamont's is in in Saint Lamont. We are joined up with the eightieth division. Now we are joined up with eightieth division and of course at that point we were told that there was something going on at a place called the gap and the gap was a great battle as it turned out and this was is the word so they moved us onto words the gap and where was that in France. Well now you're asking questions that maybe I would have to pull out a map again but let me say that. It was probably the south west of Paris because Paris was the battening we could really happen. was that after. After the Normandy success it was felt by the American leaders that Germany would pull behind across sane scene river and they set up a great defense and that his we're the great battle was to take place but as it turned out the Germans stayed back and continued to fight and this took about six weeks as I recall of wasted time wasted time in in the sense that are allied troops should have advanced according to our plan but was affected by the German staying behind and during this fighting writing they were kind of pushed over to the West somewhat and into kind of a pocket and this pocket was in the situation unworthy allies or the American troops were in one side the British and the Canadians on the other side and as the German try A to escape out through this opening this out was highway. I don't recall number of it but it was an outlet. We happen to gather with the British but prior to that when we went down to the gap to fight. We ended up in a tone tone call organ teen. We're going team was the name of the town or near. There is where we were set in. So we we weren't well prepared. We we got there and we jammed into battle quickly. We weren't prepared and we were spread out a little too for and we moved through the open in the area and approached the German troops on the outskirts of the town it was wooded area and we didn't expect this but suddenly there was everything thing but she gunfire some heavy shooting and as a matter of fact a tiger tank the first time we called it a tire tank. This tank moved out from behind the building and it got the tank to my left. It first shot we now. We were pretty close. We weren't more than then maybe five hundred yards they shot hit the lower track of the tank to my left hand. Seventy the side of his tank faced me and myself in a tank to the far left really plummeted that Tiger tank and put it out of action very luckily so we really. I guess it was felt that we were being pushed back a little so we pulled out. We went back into BIVOUAC. Reorganized prepared came back the next day and went right into battle and had a good fight and in fact had locked down the tanks because we got so close that the take commander didn't want his head out so we locked down the top and we were operating completely by periscope and it was pretty successful in the end and we got through that now. There's something I really wanted to tell you about that experience when we went back and I never saw this personally but the tank next to me when it was hit that was the tank that was hit by this tiger. The three men up in the Turret attempted to escape from the top and and supposedly from the Tang any other side. The commander saw a man. One of those men Lop Off..

Daniel L. Durso tank battalion army US Army France Tennessee cannock Pennsylvania England Utah New York commander Pearl Harbor US A. US Army Kentucky Paris Mr Durr
"daniel l" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"daniel l" Discussed on From Scratch

"Budget but your salary and and the sampling budget took a turn in two thousand eight when you brought on private equity investors in Vm G. and they're a fund that invests invest in consumer products and Darius Bykov the founder of vitamin water or glass so made that introduction crew. How do you know Darius so Darius. Darius was friends with and the and Melissa Calmer for my difference for many years and I was entertaining another transaction and ask Darius for advice and I said do I need to do it this way this way this way which I'm being told him he said No. You don't you can do it. Whatever way you want and let me introduce you to Asia. Asia and will invest what I had done right until then we come up with a concept with a product with with good culture in the company. Would I had not don. Reid is that after fifteen years of being in the Wilderness I was so scared to take risks and to invest in letting more people try our product. That's where sampling thing was eight hundred dollars because I saw that as a as an expense to be caught rather than investment and then suddenly realized wow nine hundred ten people that try a kind bar become part of your franchise and so thanks to my partners we built a phenomenal film marketing team to let people sample and so from the first dozen ninety one eight hundred thousand dollar budgets eight hundred dollars before and then today about thirteen million dollars that we go into just giving new kind bars to new consumers consumers and then in spring two thousand fourteen you bought back. VM Cheese Steak for two hundred and twenty million dollars mostly cash deal which was basically basically thirteen times their initial investment. Things have have come a long way since that wall. BOHM's moment yes Honda and the team that we have today in particular is every morning I wake up and I feel so blessed and so grateful to be working with people that are better than I will ever be on what they will. I'm just like a harass. You're listening to from scratch. My guest Daniel Lubetzky founder of kind healthy he snacks a food company that produces bars with whole nuts and spices and fruit among other products like Granola. Is I want to go back to your family for a moment moment you mentioned before that your father had this positive stance. Do you feel like that was a biological proclivity that he was just an innately that way you mentioned your grandfather was the same way that's a great question. I asked related questions all the time but not particularly that question's sends a really great question. I don't know I I do think that you know I have for children and from the day they're born you can tell that they have personalities and this fascinating meaning wonderful to see how they really are their own person. They're quite different twins and they are quite different from each other but I also do think that nurture can can guide a person and shape them. I think it's a combination of of DNA and genes and the environment but then again you know how did my dad in such an environment manage to be such an extraordinarily sweet warm and loving person was hit because by then by the age of nine. He has already built it up. Do you meditate or exercise to enhance I take a lot of time to think we are so barraged with inputs like inbox email voicemail tweeter messengers these that and you care you smartphone everywhere or you go and you just constantly trying to keep up with the data and read more news and we our brains are craving those data points so I- consciously try hey to find times in the day sometimes when you Iran but he might also just be when you're taking a shower might also be read before you go to bed he might be would you just half an hour to rest and you're about to grab that foreign say you know what let me just be with myself. Let me talk to myself. Do you talk to yourself out loud no. I don't think I thought to myself because in Judaism the reason you you pray out loud is not so that God could hear you only. It's so that you could also hear yourself well. It's beautiful start paying attention to that but I think it's more a adjust goosing you are a magician and magicians are entertainers making magic requires his practice and repetition in what way has magic influence your business. I think magic is definitely a big part of my personality and who I am. I'm both because it requires you to be innovative and creative and because of what you brought forth about how you need to be disciplined and practice practice practice. I think it's fun. I also connects me to my dad because my dad used to teach me magic when I was a little kid and then when I was in college a an and studying abroad in Europe I paid my trips through Europe by doing magic shows in the streets of barriers and in Bulgaria and just had a lot of adventures doing magic. What's one of your favorites one of my favorite magic changing the time on your watch. I Love Cartridge also speaking of cards. You have a kind card in your wallet. What is the meaning of this kind of this. Is Our latest testing our effort to try to find ways to creatively inspire kindness that challenging doing that is at kindness bites very essence. The reason it works is that it's a pure act with there's no alterior purposes. So how do you inspire is without destroying its authenticity so we've been toying with for ten years in our latest discard schooled kind awesome cards were if we split somebody that has done a kind act already either to you or to a stranger then you celebrate them and say you know that was really kind of union appreciation for for your kindness would like to give you this card and you go to the website enter this code and we send you a couple kind bars plus another kind of card that you can then give to somebody else else to celebrate when they when you spot an act of kindness that they do. Let's one act of kindness spotted on the street the other day which caused you to take out this card and give it to a stranger somebody seated their taxi to my wife and I was very very nice and well on that's not necessarily thought I was going to give them money and I'm like no no no this. This is what it is and then they were really happy or somebody. seeds their seats in the subway to somebody else or just you know on the six line on the subway lately. I don't know so people can get really mean to each other and become like this laboratory of social behavior. I don't know if you ever saw the Batman movie with joker where he like creating this social experiments in metropolis and people are like are they going to do the right thing and they're in the sixth train. A lot of times people are not doing the right thing. They're being really Jerky to charter. The trains are really delayed and it's Kinda scary so when somebody behaves really kindly in those environments who I I give them one of those cards on the six chain the Lexington Avenue Line in New York City. You mentioned your wife briefly. She's a doctor what kind of doctor she. She's a transplant nephrologist kidney. You know when I I mentioned that in a frolicked and I'm like who is that people that deal with dead bodies like that Sunday crawler Gist Amana for allergists kidney dot com like okay good to know and a mother of four. I'm a mother other foreign an incredible partner the sweet as woman in the world and she goes to the Bronx to help for her job as transparent and fella gist. Thank you very much for joining US Jessica. Thank you so much for having this really interesting questions. I guessed has been Daniel Betsy. I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch..

Darius Bykov Asia founder Jessica Harris Daniel Lubetzky Melissa Calmer Europe Honda Reid Daniel Betsy Bronx New York City Iran partner Bulgaria eight hundred dollars ninety one eight hundred thous thirteen million dollars twenty million dollars
"daniel l" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"daniel l" Discussed on From Scratch

"Sold in diversity of locations including whole Foods Costco Amtrak trains a newspaper stands Daniel is also the founder of peace works our producer of Mediterranean spreads such as top nods. Hamas and Baba Gana piece works aims to foster business relationships among among neighbors in the Middle East and other groups and conflict as a way to reduce conflict in those regions. Daniel grew up in Mexico City and speaks Spanish English Hebrew Hebrew and French and a little bit of snow. Welcome thank you thank you so much Jessica before we dig into kind. I WanNa talk about peace works. which was the company you founded in? Nineteen Ninety three that focuses on Mediterranean spreads. What was the germ four for founding this food company in the early nineties. I didn't know it was going to be a food. Company was more about trees business as a force for bringing Arabs and Israelis rallies together. That was what I was very passionate about. Since writing my college and law school work about how to use market forces to help trading partners shatter culture stereotypes cement relations with each other so that was the impetus of what I was doing and it became a foot company because as I was looking for ventures I was looking in peril. I was looking in Dead Sea Minerals and food became the area where I found my passions best they didn't understand that minerals twelve but stood food and it's hard start so food was secondary to the primary mission. Shen was to facilitate joint ventures among conflicting neighbors so what's an example of a collaboration which you established at peace works I between two conflicting groups will the flagship venture which still exists today which is how we started was my discovery of Asandra tomato spread and when I long story short found out the company had gone bankrupt because he was sourcing its glass jars from Portugal and Sandra tomatoes from Italy Lee and it was very expensive and when I came to your banish the Israeli manufacturer and told them about my yes he had Arab friends and he really believe leaving the philosophy of World War Two piece works but it also showed him that he could benefit economically that he could buy the glass jars from Egypt instead of Portugal Sunday tomatoes NATO's from Turkey suppliers instead of Italian ones so they started buying Basil and olives and olive oil from Palestinian citizens of the West Bank and Gaza and that's how it started. How did you secure distribution in the United States with peace works. Can you walk through that process because in a way you piggybacked on that in with kind mind well. I didn't know what I was doing so I emptied my brick my legal briefcase literally these big briefcase for carrying legal documents documents and they filled it up with jars with Sunday tomato spreads Basil Pesto spreads and out start at the top of Broadway one hundred and twenty seconds streets on the west side and then just started walking store by store till I would go seven. Am in the morning till I would end at seven PM at night and the bottom of Wall Street and then I would cross ask the next day and it would go up Broadway and the other side of Broadway and brother was an important choice because it was a the avenue that I found to have the most concentration intrusion of grocery store so I knew Second Avenue Third Avenue Madison they did all of them but Braulio was the juiciest and I would not go to the next store unless I got either an order or an explanation for what I needed to different in order to get an order the next time and I drove many people not it's because everything was wrong but they were basically taught me like Scott. Gold China and Mr Zave are from sabres basically taught me what the consumers were looking for so I really we learned a Lotta what I do today from all the store managers and buyers at the grocery shops Bodega in New York City. What is an example of something thing that Mr Xaver taught you everything I mean I came in and they didn't have much patients because they had thousands of consumers going around and here I am and I don't know what I'm doing but the they really liked that I really cared about my mission and I think they just have patience with me so they taught me how what is the margin requirements for for retailer for a distributor and for yourself so that you can run a ongoing business they taught me about the labels how to make sure that the name is cleared the jars back then were using olive oil out of them. That was not acceptable. So it was a lot of sessions you mentioned that you had a law degree you went to Stanford Law School and you became a lawyer. and the idea for peace works came out of paper a your thesis that you wrote which I believe was entitled. Incentives for peace and prophets federal legislation to encourage enterprises to invest in arab-israeli joint ventures become a very famous document among doctors because if you were having insomnia were having trouble falling asleep that would give it to you would read it and you'd fall asleep immediately. MMEDIATELY was the most theoretical boring thing in the world. They was just totally devoid of practical use but it was beautiful. Theoretically you dabbled in the law before starting businesses you had a stint at Sullivan and Cromwell you clerked for Supreme Justice in Texas. Did you think that you might might WANNA career. In law I love the law was not that I was trying to escape the law. I just had this. You call germ. I had this bug inside me that that I I just really felt that my mission in life was to try to build bridges and two and the Arab Israeli conflict and here's the peace process all my ideas that I've been sharing for several years certainly they go from being delusional to being slightly tenable and I'm like all right how to try to pursue it and have to try it. He also had a kind of social. Ethos those in your family. Your father was a prominent figure in your upbringing and the way you think about the world he was a Holocaust survivor having having survived Dhakal the concentration camp in Germany. Can you talk a little bit about him. Yeah my that was Mike greatest hero on role model he was the most humble person he built himself from scratch came to Mexico after the war. He was fifteen and a half a few years old. When the war started sixteen when he got to Mexico he didn't speak Spanish shoring leash. He's from Lithuania. Originally he was born in Riga Latvian raise in Lithuania yeah when he was nine years old nineteen thirty nine the war started and I'll tell you the story. It's a little strong but he was coming back with his father to their apartment house where they lived and the superintendent showed them. I'm in to where the garage was and he opened the door of the garage and there was a pile of bodies and he told my grandfather you see all these people they're older juice in the building and you lucky that you always were nice to me and treated with respect and kindness so I spared you on your family but get out before I change my mind so that night my father who's nine years old and his brother and my grandfather and grandmother packed whatever they could carry and then they left into a ghetto oh and that was a story that my that told me when I was nine years old and my mom said Roman what are you doing. This kid is nine years old. You know you're GONNA. What are you doing? Please stop telling these my that said look. He's nine years old and he needs to hear it. I was nine years old and I needed to live it but the other thing that was no less powerful and important with the stories that he told me about people that in the worst of circumstances would rise open open do something kind like this German soldier that through a potato to him and might used to tell the story about how he felt he was going to die and he was really malnourished and that Potato Tayo meant for him the difference in survival and dog soldier to caress by giving him food for for the soldiers so who those were the stories that I most admired the way my that always remembered the moments of kindness I mean the darkest moments and there's a quote that Ah I really love that connects to that about from Rabbi Hillel that says Innis plays where there's no humanity strive thou to be human so the the name kind healthy snacks. Did your father have influence on the naming of the product the the name kind was created by my team and I it's really fascinating that we finally zone dean on it because he wasn't today so obvious that that's perfect name for us but back then and all this crazy ideas for the name the reason we came up with kind is that it had human attributes that we were really trying to aspire to be to to define us. You know to do the kind thing for your body to the kind thing for your taste buds onto the kind thing for your world. It's striking that your father was very forthcoming with his stories and chose to talk about the wartime versus others who really receded and did not tell their family such stories just just more for self preservation families preservation than anything. What was the impetus for your families. your father's moving to Mexico of all places a religious I just comment on because it's really important I was surrounded by other survivors growing up and the I love them dearly but you could tell they were consumed by the horrible horrid they had gone through and they can have a positive outlook and my dad or there were others that were able to just shut it out and just have a positive left wing forward forward. My Dad had the strength to recall those horrors but in a positive way instill he was such a sweet kind hearted man Vega Very Greg areas always making people laugh always almost like he saw his mission to make people have a better day and make people laugh. Did you see the movie. life is beautiful so when I saw that movie I cried a lot and then I was a little trouble I felt guilty to be laughing also and I asked my that you never cross my mind that in such horrible circumstances you could actually say jokes in the middle of a concentration camp and my that said the opposite the only reason why that felt that he survived is because my grandfather it was really funny joke teller and he would retain the Jewish inmates and the German soldiers with funny stories and make people more humane and more human by making them laugh and just find particularly those dark moments some levity you are brought up in Mexico City. Hell was being Jewish in a predominantly Christian place while I also lived in our very insulated cocoon. You pointed earlier..

Mexico Mexico City Daniel Lithuania Middle East Hamas Portugal Jessica Dead Sea Minerals Baba Gana United States Stanford Law School founder producer Mr Xaver New York City NATO