30 Burst results for "Daniel Dickinson"

Somali Refugee Farmers Put Down New Roots in Rural US

UN News

02:09 min | Last week

Somali Refugee Farmers Put Down New Roots in Rural US

"A group of somali refugees descended from slaves who escaped extortion rape and death in their home country and to live for years in baron refugee camps in kenya planting the seeds of a new life literally as immigrants in the united states. We did not Since nineteen ninety-one after now so we got the sense of peace the sense of community. We have been this. Is daniel dickinson and for this. Lead is on podcast from u. n. news. I've traveled to maine a strikingly fertile. Rural state in the north east of the us to learn about how a community of former refugees has started a farming association to preserve their indigenous culture and support their resettlement and integration enjoy new american life muhammad muhammad house these stony earth on his one tenth of an acre plot of farmland just outside the twin cities of lewiston open in maine dressed in a t. shirt shorts and a colorful woolen hat. He's energetic and committed to working the soil by hand as the midday sun beats down on him. He's nurturing beans and corn on hulu better. And i'm happy because i am waking the lund. I'm sitting a lot. So i'm getting good physics. I will use some of the beans under the corn for the family and the rest. I will sell. Muhammad muhammad is growing african friend corn a grain which somalis used to make a traditional flat. Bread called moo fall right now. The seedlings are just a few inches high bought within two to three months. And with the right care though grow into seven foot plants way down by numerous as of tasty corn.

Daniel Dickinson Muhammad Muhammad Maine Baron Kenya United States North East Lewiston Hulu
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

UN News

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

"This is Daniel Dickinson for U. N.. News an estimated half a million people from the Roma minority perished in Europe during the Holocaust but that persecution under Nazi rule is still widely ignored today according to an expert on the issue Dan Pavel doggy senior adviser on Roma and Sinti issues for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe or. SEC says the Roma people should finally receive seve the justice. They deserve Mr Doggy attended a United Nations Holocaust memorial events at U N headquarters in New York where he spoke about the importance importance of education to help fight racism and discrimination against vulnerable minorities you and uses an Komo's started by asking him about the fate of the Roma under the Nazi regime. It was a similar fate as of the Jewish people because besides the Jewish People Roma were also specifically targeted for extermination on racial grounds. There were considered subhumans onto mention impure a danger for the block. pull off the Air Ian Muster race. How does this reflect in the Rome incentive in their lives today in our society would go back a little bit before the Holocaust Rama arrived on the European continent approximately one thousand years ago and they were met with reluctance fear and then consumed they were prosecuted There's a history of slavery in many many countries. I'm from Romania. Rama were slaves For five hundred years there and only liberated like one hundred seventy years ago And liberated mance they were set free to go without possessing any anything UNEDUCATED TO IN POOR health unskilled skittled for professional labor and so on So there is a history of exclusion persecution and oppression and it also so culminated with the deportation of Roma and And they're killing During the Holocaust still a an issue with a proper recognition of the Roma Holocaust It's often called the forgotten Holocaust because it's not widely known and both states and to historians and scholars. They were not very open to document. The situation of Roma acknowledged the suffering of Roma and ended experience as being an integral parts of the Holocaust even nowadays. The Holocaust definition focuses primarily on juice and then an an ad group is mentioned secondly within the Roma community This hurts because we always believed that the what happened into Roma what happened to us is an integral part of the Holocaust. And I've mentioned that today that it's time for justice format to be done and maybe that's it's a Holocaust definition to be corrected and amended to properly reflect the Roma as being part of the Holocaust. What do you think is the reason why this was never properly knowledge lack of the communication? Of course there's a lack of information But I would. I would rather say this is more about the power play. Roma were always week On on the fringes of society uneducated without their own organizations self represent themselves politically and the and so on so It was easy for a group that is traditionally considered marginal to be just ignored but decades after decades more more of the Roma survivors. Sti Slowly opened up and spoke about their experience during the Second World War and then a number of Romo activists and advocates have advocated a for a proper recognition and it took quite some time at least for the Roma genocide recognized But but this recognition is not a uniform When we speak of Intergovernmental Organizations OAC UN Council of Europe and so on we worked with different terminology analogies and we were different commitments? For instance within the see in the action plan on improving the situation of Romance indie adopted in two thousand and three you by fifty seven participating states. There is a One chapter focusing on education and there is one provision within that says that participating states states should promote and develop teaching educational materials about the experience of Roma. Aw during the Holocaust so even there there is no proper nation. So it's like the Holocaust and then some of the things happen in parallel and that's also the case of in Council of Europe The Roma genocide is recognized Then the European Parliament events has adopted recently resolution that recognizes second of August as the European Roma Holocaust Remembrance Day so the terminology of Roma Holocaust is partially used by by some of the bodies But we strive for proper and recognition. And it's about time seventy five years after the ending of the Second World War. Do you feel that your presence here. Today is part of that steps that we should take a the. I would like to believe so and I made it very clear. perhaps it It goes beyond the formal boundaries But I'm also Romo myself and would like to believe that I can express myself or what I think is just an important for the Roma people. Can you talk on the kinds of discrimination. These groups face nowadays. Especially in the way that is affecting specially women and girls so there are different layers of exclusion and also discrimination even within the Roma community but the biggest and the most harmful it comes from outside and that's historical already. There are all sorts of discriminations in every walk of life. possible Whatever you you have a challenge or a bad situation situation If if YOU'RE TO MAKE SCALE RAMA tend to or overwhelmingly always at the very very bottom uh-huh and that's an indication of the level of racist and prejudice and that can can be demonstrated by the kind of attitudes of the society towards Roma that is not different whether we speak of countries from the Post Communist bloc which are still struggle with democracy and economy and so on versus countries in very well advanced democracies in the Western Europe. Romar Romar treated very often in a very similar manner and treatment is in no way good if one is curious and and do a little a bit of a check may be worth of a week of media research or empirical research if you want so the traditional traditional media as well as the social media it will be very easy to find News and information about Roma are targeted with the hatred and hate speech From top politicians from presidents of the country to Prime Minister to foreign foreign ministers they go out and say all stupid and racist things about Roma and very often with impunity. And and the kind of impunity that exists already in Europe it only emboldens the far right and extremist groups who see a top politician attention being outright racist without consequences. Why should why should they be? Shy so they're encouraged to go out and express their intolerance and extremists attitude towards Rama. And that takes very often. The form of racially motivated violence Samsung incidents. Every year we document situations of tax pogroms collective punishments Popular Justice done by people. A who who think it's absolutely okay to take justice and law in their hands and and harm can Education change and all of these behaviors and the conventional education is not an indicator for that because Schools throughout Europe not reformed and educational process and curriculum are not reformed enough to to educate the younger generations beyond a the substance of the courses but educate them about the society and about the respect for diversity. So maybe some countries are more advanced and you you may see a different different treatments With regard to other groups and minorities the religious minorities but the problem is that when it's about trauma. The treatment is unfortunately very similar throughout Europe. And it's one of rejection. We are here for one thousand in Europe and people still call outs. Forum ought to go back to India so they were never considered organically as being part of the countries where they were born and living for centuries and that's a huge problem or anything else that you think it should be covered in this interview. Setting the proper tone is essential and I made a call. Oh and I urged states and and politicians to be responsible. And they're doing because the way they set the roads that's how the policies will be implemented or or the kind of Pol policies that many have fought for decades and now they are in place and there are in principle sound policies. Never stand a chance for proper implementation because that requires political. Will that requires putting money where your mouth is in with regard to Roma in the past fifteen years or so maybe. Thirty countries have developed. Attend adopted Roma inclusion strategies and many Were already renewed twice or even three times but if you would like to to draw the line and see okay. These are in principle good strategies if most of the measures and provisions contained by strategies these would be implemented by now who we will speak a much better situation. The real problem is that it's all talk and it's very little that it's done..

Roma Europe Jewish People Roma Council of Europe The Roma Organization for Security and Romo Daniel Dickinson SEC Intergovernmental Organization Western Europe Mr Doggy Dan Pavel Rama Romania United Nations U. N Romar Romar senior adviser
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

UN News

10:13 min | 1 year ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

"Work because they enjoy what they do? They've found not only their passion but their gift and this is really moved. Moved me to think about work in a very different way. They talk about not being a family but being communities communities or people who come together to create something of value value for the rest of society to enjoy and this could be anything from a small business person who is running in advance beauty college in Los Angeles California to someone who is a crawler haller Looking at long haul trucking here in Louisiana. So what are you trying to achieve steve by traveling across the country and documenting all these different experiences. The International Labor Organization turns one hundred years old this year where the oldest oldest institution in the UN system We started the year with a report called the future of work creating a brighter future and in that report we make recommendations for as we look forward over the horizon. What would the world of work look like? And some of the voices we had heard were concerned that Algorithms Algorithms and technology we're going to displace people and that people would become the digital day workers that they would not have professions for themselves so in looking at this this and looking at the workers around us we realized that people will always be involved in work work is about the nexus between the social and the economic people and the interaction of people is what generates economy algorithms robots do not buy goods or services so people will always be a part of that work so he wanted to show the humanity of that. We wanted to show the quiet dignity that people bring to their job and their activities every day and we also so wanted to uncover the invisible. No one cares about the engine. Men cannock for jet engine as long as the plane stays in the air where no one cares if the food is great unless of course the food is tainted there are millions of people out there doing jobs so we don't even know that they're there we pass them by bus drivers Subway conductors People who are farming our food people who who are developing creative things for US developing software to improve our lives and we never even know that these people exist so we want to make the invisible visible so here in Louisiana. You met a crawfish former. Why is it important that people understand what that man douse on a daily basis? I'VE WORKED IN DEVELOPMENT FOR THIRTY FIVE years and most of my work has been overseas in the what we would call the developing world with the emerging economies and as the director for this office in the United States. I wanted to give people a picture of what work in the US was. I don't know of a lot of people. Well actually know the different professions that exist here but across farmer is similar to a fisherman Whether that person is in Malaysia Indonesia Asia or in Thailand There are people who do the same type of jobs here in the states that people do overseas they suffer the same elements of being out on the water of trying to catch the fish or raise the crawfish or to trap the lobsters to provide to people That ah again is very similar in action but across the world so there there is a connection between all these people because everyone that I have spoken to almost without tale have said I'm trying to develop a quality product and deliver that to people and when it makes them happy and I can provide a living not only for myself but but for those around me the people who work for me the people who depend upon my catch or the crops that I raise that they are actually responsible for creating jobs and everybody wants to have a job that will give them fulfilment that will give them identity and also be able to very basically put a roof over their head provide education for their children and provide for a happy life for themselves in their communities. So we're really talking about universal vessel experiences and universal values. Absolutely work connects us to reality and then reality whether you are in Botswana Orla Sutu Sutu or whether you in Argentina or in Mexico or you are in New Mexico California Washington State. There is a connection between all of must. We are in this web of our international globalized economy and again the the benefit from my position. Is that the ILO was set into motion at a time when this current economic system was one of many options and as we reflect back on these hundred years. We realize that we are all connected in this globalized economy but we are all connected as well too as people and families and communities so for me it has been an amazing journey that has changed my minded about how I think and speak and an advise about work today. So it's changed your mind. Is that because you've been surprised by the interactions you've had with people who've met. I have an an in small ways. It's you know. It's not big epiphany so for example I spoke up to someone and you know often. You know the word when we talk about when we liked the job we do. You know that we're a part of a family and the artistic director in the La Elliara said you know we're not a family. Were community that comes together. With skills and talents to create something of value for the society around us for their enjoyment and benefit benefit. I spoke to a small entrepreneur Who told me when he got into Creating his own business he thought it was because he wanted to be his own boss loss and the one thing that he realized after ten years was that when he became a businessman and ran his own business. Everybody became his boss when I spoke to a woman who was the fashion editor for a very well known Magazine that this was her passion but it was not her gift and and she shifted her career to bring the gift out because with her gift she was able to sustain her enjoyment of the work that she did and so many times. Today we see people who don't enjoy what they do that. It impacts upon productivity that impacts upon economic growth that impacts upon the individuals happiness in the workplace place so if people are passionate and have a gift for doing something and they bring that to bear the economy increases because you have greater productivity you have great deliverables and this is important not only to the employer but also to the employees. You've been asking these working people whether they're worried about advances in technology robots that may replace them take their jobs. What's been their reaction? I think overall what I've heard is that they they won't that. Technology is there but technology has always been there whether it is from a paddle to assail or a plow to a tractor today. You know we've moved beyond the technology that has helped us do the physical work. We are now confronted by the digital technology that is and the artificial intelligence elegance and machine. Learning that is coming out to help us do the analytical the calculations that increase the activities around the world economically and socially. So when when I spoke to for example the surgeon in the robotics laboratory in the Cleveland Clinic he says that you know this technology helps me do better work and reduces the discomfort and the scarring reduces hospitalization and. It is a better way of helping people so they feel that the technology yes it. We'll be there and we will use that technology and we will learn how to use that technology to improve humankind so people are not fearful by and large from my experiences. Experience is about the technology but they do understand that they need the learning lifelong learning that will make the technology serve humankind. This is is just a small obey very diverse. Section of the American workforce. Have you found people to be basically optimistic about. They working future absolutely anomaly. They're working future but the future of their children. I think what happens. Is that if we stand at one moment in time you know maybe we might see do things going too fast for us and and this happens when people retire or when people are in isolated communities and so but I think that the people that we have been speaking seeking to have been connected to the economy connected to the community and they have a sense of what is necessary for them so they have been understanding how the world and has been changing what we need to do and have been preparing not only themselves but their children for those changes. And the thing that I'm seeing more and more of now is that people people believe in their craft. They believe in their art. They believe in their skills and their talents and that is something that is really unshakable. A lot of people people now some may start on a path and they may change along the way there are no straight lines in life but by and large people have been very positive to meet these challenges. Lynch's not only with great Gusto but with anticipation of a better life for their children as well back at the crawfish farm in Scott. He says he hopes the legacy created by his father will carry on for generations adding that if his children want to go into the business they take it to the next level that means spending more time in the office building the business and less time knee deep in mud like their father. This is Daniel Dickinson in Louisiana for the lead is on this podcast and our new podcast uncomplicated. which mystifies it's the work of the UN and now available on Apple podcasts? And Google play. Thanks for listening.

Louisiana US UN director Los Angeles California International Labor Organizati Algorithms Algorithms Botswana Orla Sutu Sutu Google Thailand Daniel Dickinson Cleveland Clinic Malaysia Indonesia Asia ILO Lynch Apple known Magazine editor La Elliara
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

UN News

09:55 min | 1 year ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

"This is Daniel Dickinson for U. N.. News Passion and storytelling a tour of the key ingredients to become a wine expert according to so Michelle Gaetan. A certified smiliar based in New Orleans in United States biscay tone transition from politics to event management and then became came one of the minority of female semillas currently working in the US. She spoke to the International Labor Organization as part of a photography project to mark the the centenary of the establishment of the UN agency. The project cold dignity at work the American experience documents the working life of people across the United States Kevin Cassidy the director of the Islands Office for the United States sent down with her during a tasting event at a wind. Cornball in New Orleans we focus on education that's the main focus here at Swirl I'm a consultant. I work throughout the city. This is one of my main stays. It's one of the places to work at because people come in You know for education for Great Selection Beth. The owner does a great job of selecting electing wines. That are Boutique Artisanal. That's what we focus on so we pour by the glass we retail shop so by the bottles well and a lot of seminars seminars. Which I've been part of Teaching some of the seminars as well so lot of educational efforts here. Did you ever think you'd be doing this. Show twenty years ago I was in D.. We see in politics. I got the hell out of After a very successful race but after that I worked in event management and With a company that was global so I traveled the world but wine and food and people were passion New Orleans is home Tom. I came back five years ago. So what was the inflection point. When did you decide? This is what I'm GONNA do honestly. I was was working on a yacht in in Europe for the company I worked with and I was planning. I planned this big event I loved wine at the time I was interested but when it became a passion and it just became an obsession with this one point out on the after the event the stewardess of the yacht came up and said. Would you like a glass of wine. I was exhausted ahead. You know planned all the travel arrangements for everybody participating summating everything from sunup to sundown and when she gave me a glass of Chardonnay. And I wanted to call bull I tasted it and it was burgundy which I knew the difference between American Chardonnay and and French Chardonnay. But that was the moment when I realized that even within one region lesion burgundy you can have so many different styles ones so at that point it became an obsession and a star trek to get certifications and be where I am today. She wanted take to be certified a lot of drinking a lot of tasting a lot of study. It's very very difficult to test a hard Certification and then I've been through the third level To go on to get your masters I've had colleagues. That have stopped stopped working because they need to study for several years years I decided to move back to New Orleans. My job as a master here would not be worth it. I would have have to go elsewhere so I haven't pursued the master level but I'm very happy with where I'm at but it's a Lotta work. It's it's a lot of studying a lot of work and I don't think most people realize realized you drink for a living. Well really I mean kind of but It's it's it's studying is intense. You give me an example apple of something that you doing recently that you thought this is exactly why I do what I do. I mean that's almost every day. I work in my environment when I introduced somebody to something that they he wouldn't have fathomed. You know people people nervous they. They are scared to say a lot of people are scared to say. They don't know a lot about why but they say oh well. I love of calves but as soon as I give them what I love to do is just give them a simple TESA. Tell me you like bold reds and give you a taste of something completely different that you know you haven't heard of just now. I just poured a pig near leto sparkling wine which is from Italy for somebody and then this. It's amazing how good you know but it's to give people that experience that says. Wow this is cool. You just opened my you know. I just opened their mind up to something something new and different and unique and for me. I go home happy end of the day if somebody's had a unique experience because that's how am I passed. That's how I got started. I had a unique experience experience on a yacht. I like when people leave with a unique experience. I can go home and sleep. You really truly a teacher. I am an educator. I love a love. Educating three characteristics that really important in your business would've three skill sets. Maybe passion is number one because the money is not in this job. There's no there's a lot of money passionate number one number two is Yeah Culture and people and I feel like I'm from New Orleans is a lot of culture in my town in my blood but the the culture what I'm talking about when I say culture culture is the storytelling behind the ones. I think that's so important. It's not about like you said it's not about the technical. It's not about you. How long were the groups mass reading on the skins or how much Mala lactic fermentation to get through? Its you talk about the families and the people behind these wines. I I like stories. That's more of a selling point than the technical data in any level of understanding at my level. You know I appreciate it. Why less because of technical nickel data more because of the story and what? I'm tasting the experience of that moment to read to absolutely being in this industry for a long time and in different states and working in different positions from either selling wine or buying wine and working with customers. A lot of people. Ask me well. What's your favorite wine? which should I drink today tonight? which should I order woods. The best wine. What's the best pairing? My my first question is what do you typically like a woody in the mood for because if I give them my favorite everybody's different so you have to read people so you have to kind of almost dissect their pallet before you recommend to Just more on the kind of job side of things now. You mentioned that in order to go to the higher level. You'd probably have to move from New Orleans but your choice desires to stay here in your hometown so to speak so she wouldn't look mean to you. Workers Important obviously but family in culture very important to so for me. It's finding the balance between my work. My Passion my family culture. That's what working in Sydney. You're you're following it. It's not even just passion. What I often hear from people is that this is my gift on very good? I think I am. I've I've been told that but yes I it's not just passion you have to have maybe a gift or an act but I think that that gift. Your Napkin come with passion. You know you can develop that when you have the passion to develop it and mindedness Chris above until you work before in Washington and you've moved on and you've worked on that boat and you we're putting together planning for Party is now the some a and you have another job that you do as well to to make ends meet here. Yeah so what What have you learned about About yourself and the world around you in in the world of work shall we say and I have learned that that I love experiencing other people in other cultures but also a to be very open to opportunities and that has gotten me along way because there is some opportunities that came. They were presented to me that I I almost feared I've learned not to be fearful and if you if you can't get beyond that you can't be successful and you have to fail and fail and fail before you can be successful or feel like you're good and successful what you do Systems to your canoeist yes absolutely persistence. And yes and creativity to make ends meet. And I've hit rock bottom autumn and I've failed and I've you know lived in cars and sofas and couches and I had a great job in my twenties and I left it all from my passion. And what advice do you give to. For example young women were looking for the world of work looking forward to that. Follow your dreams. Don't let let fear get away and they very open to opportunities even if you don't think it's the right one even if you don't think it's within the realm of your study the or your sphere. I mean I was a political science and literature major so and dance his bed it all of my everything has been left entrance but those are. There's a good turns to tape..

New Orleans United States Daniel Dickinson International Labor Organizati Michelle Gaetan UN Kevin Cassidy Europe Boutique Artisanal U. N consultant leto sparkling Islands Office director Washington Tom Party Sydney
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

UN News

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

"This is Daniel Dickinson for U. N.. News a woman chef a New Orleans in United States has been telling you a news how the restaurant business business and cooking in particular has been a lifelong labor of love for her Roseanne Rosta. Kerr decided she wanted to be a chef at age fourteen and ultimately opened her own restaurant nine years ago she spoke to the International Labor Organization as part of a photography project to mark the the centenary of the establishment of the UN agency. The project called dignity at work. The American experience documents the working life of people across the the United States Kevin Cassidy the director of the Eiloz Office for the. US sat down with a following a busy shift at her restaurant. Red gravy in in New Orleans. We moved here in two thousand and ten my boyfriend and I and he gave up his law practice to down here and do this with me. I always wanted a restaurant some time I was ten years old. My mom had gone back to work. It was nineteen seventy two and prior to that it. It was a one income family. My father worked. My mother was home. Become you know the seventies you wanted things. It was time for the MOMS to go to work and she did. I had an older brother who was baseball. Football paper route all that that kept him out of the house younger sister that I had to come home and watch and get dinner started which I loved doing. I didn't mind at all. I used to watch Julia Child. And the galloping gourmet everybody else's watching bugs bunny and and and the other thing that's on but I learned how to make a rue when I was ten years old and I didn't even know what I was doing. I just knew that I could make Brown gravy. Maybe better than my mother. I knew that and it got to the point where I was giving my mother. The shopping list come. I'm too young too young to go to the market to give me this. Give me this this that and the other thing and they were coming home to meals that were you know they were good. I thought I was doing well and then when I wanted to go to cooking school in high school in Bergen County. They had a vocational high school. You could go to the public high school you go to a parochial high school or you go to the vocational school which was Bergen Tech and that was where I wanted to go. I knew I wanted to do when I was fourteen years old but they said No. You can't go no job for women. So I went to a parochial high school segregated from the boys which I didn't care for at all and that was the direction that I went when it came time to go to college. I asked again. Can I go to Johnson and Wales. Can I go to the culinary institute but my mom worked at Fairleigh Dickinson University Teaneck and as a result we could go to college college. They're for free so blue collar family. It's either we're going to spend money on the middle child to go to cooking school. Follow some pipe dream or we're all gonna go to fairly Dickinson and I went fairleigh Dickinson and I was going to be an English teacher. What can I do that gets me out of an office because I knew I didn't want to be in an office and I went to school to college for a semester and a half before I dropped out I had gotten engaged young when I was about nineteen years old and once my future husband and I had decided that so we were going to get married and I said well you know what. I don't want to be an English teacher. I know I don't WanNa do that so I quit. And I went to work for newspaper doing classified ads. We got married. We had our children. This is the mid eighties and in the late eighties early nineties when it was time for me to go back to work because my kids. We're old enough that they didn't need round the clock care and we could do daycare. I got a job at a company. Called Dak- I think it was called full working at the corporate kitchen of ups so's my first job as a professional cook. I live I mean the entire resume I said I had a catering business I said I did pies for the holidays but I knew how to do it. I just had to get my foot in the door. Four and it just so happened that it was a female chef who maybe wanted to give me a chance but she hired me and then I'm like okay. I got to talk talk. I need to walk the walk and within six months I was her sous chef so I pulled it off and we kept going. We worked together for a year at that particular account and it was a brand new kitchen. Everything was shining and sparkling and worked. And everything you wanted did there was three and four and then we lost that account because as is with corporate dining they're always bringing in new clients and you lose the accountant and you go work someplace else. So we went from this beautiful corporate kitchen of the United States Postal Service ups to ramp college. And I think the kitchen was five hundred years old. The Grease was certainly five hundred years old. The mice were five hundred years old and I took one step into that kitchen and Chinese and there wasn't anything everything was broken. The officers were small smell bad she left for another thing and they gave me the account. I'm running this account a year and a half after I first walked into the kitchen and managing a one point two million dollar recount. I have no idea what I'm doing. When it comes to the numbers I had to be taught how to take an inventory and I just kept moving up that ladder? I never wanted to stay with. They hired they hired me to make Tuna Salad Chicken Salad and Egg Salad and then from eleven o'clock until three o'clock work the Deli line making sandwiches for people some weird combinations. I mean there are people who put onions and mayonnaise and Salami the on the tuna sandwich. I've eaten some weird shit. I mean I had two babies. I know what it's like to eat somewhere you know. I'm trying to smile Lila. I'm preparing you all sandwich. The whole New York in May is now. I left that for a little while. I don't know how now honest you want me to be on this thing but I did leave the cooking industry for a little while to become New York. City's most vicious dominatrix and I did that. For about out. Five years I worked out of a studio in New York on twenty four while but I didn't like the commute and I didn't like sitting around and waiting to get picked. I don't like authority. And they don't like somebody to look at me and say no. No no I want somebody else so I went into business for myself and I turned the family basement sment into a dungeon slash studio told my kids never come downstairs and this is no place for you. A- and I continue to do that until nine eleven and then all the disposable income in New York dried up nobody wanted to spend money back on frivolity. If we might be going to war at any minute and I got the older I wasn't I wasn't young like the regular Dominatrix matrixes who were like twenty eight and do anything. I was in my late thirties at this so I did that for awhile while decided okay. I can't keep doing this. I'm too old. I'm certainly not GonNa just do anything these guys ask and I also wanted a lot of money. I was getting almost hundred dollars an hour to do this so talk about the lottery. I went back to work in the kitchen for half half of what I had been making eight years earlier but I very quickly work myself going back up again because I wasn't going to stay at that same level and by the time time I left to move here I moved here in two thousand ten. The last cooking job I had was the executive chef at the New York Stock Exchange won't and I left that to go to the county college of Morris to be the director of the account because I wanted to learn the back of the house a little bit. I want to learn the office. I knew how to cook. I knew how to.

New York United States Daniel Dickinson New Orleans Fairleigh Dickinson University director Bergen County International Labor Organizati UN Kevin Cassidy Julia Child sous chef Roseanne Rosta Kerr Eiloz Office Bergen Tech baseball U. N fairleigh Dickinson
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

UN News

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

"This is Daniel Dickinson from UN news. Makina Fasso Mali and Niger. A facing toxic combination of escalating violence. Island's displacement hunger poverty and climate change which has driven the whole central Sahel region to the cusp of disaster. That's according waiting to World Food Programme spokesperson more award. who was in Burkina Faso just a few days ago already? This year civilian deaths. They're a four all times the level they were for the whole of two thousand eighteen and close to half a million people have been displaced. She spoke to you and uses met wells central which includes booking faster where I was last week Molly an year at the moment is on the cusp of disaster because the three countries countries are facing in toxic combination of a rapidly escalating violence on conflict. Which is leading to to population displacement hunger and wife but poverty and on top of that there is the effect and impact of climate change so these three factors are Turning Bukina facile into potentially a chaotic situation for the humanitarian community. That's on the ground at the moment. And of course there are side effects or there's byproduct of of a country of largest book enough also Descending ending further into lawlessness due to security and this will undoubtedly affect fee countries around ditching. Even possible human trafficking Because of the region is a route to migration those who are trying to migrate to Europe so we are looking at at very potentially a disastrous situation. Ticking bomb and that's why they're works program. There recently has declared the region of three countries. declared it a level three emergency which means the The countries countries are struggling to To survive and conditions are deteriorating and deteriorating massively in a very dramatic just excuse executive what you saw yourself in terms of how desperate conditions are facing civilians. Most of them of course a farmer's yes so during our visit visit there we were able to travel. Outside of Lega do Guzzo. We had access to about five kilometer kilometers north of of the capital and there. There were a series of camps which we visited one or the other to meet with the the not displaced families. The families are completely Wilder they are really unaware of the magnitude of what they're in it did strike me Not Be a very different environment from where I I Were previously. I was in Syria and people were able to grasp what was happening to them of course because the crisis was we've got long way longer whereas in Burkina Faso you you I got the sense that The people are not used to this. And they're just unable look to grasp the situation the the whole crisis that's unfolding which is of armed groups Trying to Take over the Suhel Region through violence in radicalization of young people to the one of the family that. I'm the families that I met told me that A standard story. which is that they? Their village was burned to read it Some of the the people in the village lost loved ones. Who who were shot at point blank or while shopping in the market Trying to buy produce this had led the entire village to Evacuate wait to lead to run away. And they've walked for hundreds of miles from this very dry area in health Southward to wear the camps. I'm touching setup where the world's were program and other agencies are providing Emergency assistance the journey is extremely tiring and exhausting. Taking that people won't stay arrive with nothing but literally what they're wearing and the babies they're carrying and maybe maybe just like a you know very simple in pull belongings They all they can think of is food and water that just the basic needs that you required quiet to survive and so this was one of their main concern is is that Will the food that we're receiving finish. Can you make sure that you keep providing fighting us with this Assistance we want this shelter we cannot live without it. We don't want you get displaced again. So what I saw also was the there was this communal support from the host communities in this area. Called coyotes is a city An hour and a half north. The Ouagadougou their neighbors have sort of absorbed too many of the it peas and of course. They're they're supporting them. They're spending the resources on them. So it's not really a sustainable situation. Five children showed severe signs of malnutrition. And I noticed. I also that this this could be potentially from waterborne diseases because some families were living under the shade of trees in the wild and they were drinking water from wells Just in out in the open underwater look dirty and murky and that's the kind of water that that people were a using to to cook with so so you so you can imagine what what. How did the effect of that on the health of of young children? Many of whom are that I saw. Were we're What clearly men malnourished so what's WFP doing to try and halt this vicious cycle? That's being perpetrated by violence. Extremist violence and intercommunal violence audience a combined with climate change and the the effects of having to just take off and leave their land start twenty nineteen w the and our partners we've been able to reach two point six million people with food assistance. That is the emergency food assistance. We know that we have people get displaced. They're on the move. They've lost everything so we Access them through our various field officers and and and logistically we have distribution points and we provide bad add but also through the resilience programming which we ran before the crisis. We had school meals for children to give their their parents an an incentive to send them and keep them in school it was very popular because In in a country where the poverty rate is high. Parents really like the idea that their child will. We'll get a meal and so they would send a child every day the class and of course you know the dog would eat and learn so we are keeping it running but we've turned it into an emergency emergency school meals program because not all the schools are open unfortunately Many of the schools were used in the past few months as as shelters. And we're we're we're also Running a program livelihood activities that that are targeting farmers and medium small and medium-sized farmers helping them to grow their own food. Of course climate change is a big problem in In Burkina Faso and I seen I witnessed it just looking at the. The number of of arid land or landed had the soil had dried up so much that that people have either and lost their crops or were unable to To to plan to grow anything so climate change is a disruptor in in the end. It tags It's changing the weather patterns and this is causing disruption in that delicate balance that was struck in the past ask between farmers and pastoralists who In the past where you sit using or sharing resources such as water and grazing land. Now there's fierce there's competition So each side is is fighting over You know the farmland that are no longer in abundance also partly because as if the violence And people being driven away from from their land so it's It's a very complicated mix and this is why we want global attention and for For Tina it's it's a very big crisis looming it already started but normally this region doesn't get a lot of attention I and this is why the World Food Program is. Is You know Setting the alarm to say donors and governments have to the have a structural approach to this area. It's not just a military intervention hero. There has to be matched with steady development work and humanitarian assistance..

Burkina Faso WFP Niger Daniel Dickinson Sahel UN Suhel Region waterborne diseases Ouagadougou Europe Molly Syria
Rebuilding lives after terror in Cameroon

UN News

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Rebuilding lives after terror in Cameroon

"Meru a bustling regional capital set in the dry and dusty plains of numbering cars ten times over they ferry people around the city of around Hoffa million people many who live here have been through the most matic experiences having been forced to flee villages close to the border which had been attacked by terrorists line to Boko Haram or other obs- How do we get these women or any victim to recover and rebuilder lives and that's of course much more complicated because it requires a lot of longer term assistance Daniel Dickinson and in this special UN use the leaders on podcast from Cameroon. I'll be looking at what can be done for people who have suffered at the hands of violent extremists people who through no fault of their own have lost everything and who now need somehow restart their lives it's noon and the hottest time of the day and Moore but trees provide comforting shape right at this outdoor workshop a couple of blocks from the main thoroughfare of this city one man and four women in brightly colored robes sit in a circle on the floor working diligently stitching leather sandals the leather has been cured from slaughtered animals and the souls and made from discarded vehicle tires it is one of the women in June two years ago she was forced to flee her home in the town of Mohra and what's the north of Moore after it was attacked by Boko Haram everybody got Amanda mckellar dignity coogan embody local there was fighting but I didn't realize I was frank read at the time my husband had gone to work he was killed there the local chief came by my house and told you that had to flee the children that day I was so scared had never felt feel like this before I don't know how to explain it I didn't eat a had no strength I was overwhelmed by the situation I'm in to Sally's home was burnt to the ground in panicked surrounding that attack she lost everything she still doesn't know what happened to her husband whose body she's never seen she now makes up to two passive sandals each week and sells vegetables on a small stand outside the workshop to make ends meet these offer only sources of income so she's pleased to have received the training I like walking IBP thanks because I would like to get more training and then maybe have the strength to raise my children my husband died two years ago and it's only now that I'm beginning a new life with I five hundred to sally as just one of around two hundred fifty thousand people who fled terrorist attacks in northeast Cameroon in the vernacular of the UN she's known as an internally displaced person or ADP body it's not just cameroonians reflected by terrorist groups like Boko Haram as I spoke to her some two hundred and fifty kilometers north tens of thousands if people were pouring across the border from the Nigerian town of Ram just a few miles away into the village of Gura in Cameroon honoring renewed attacks by terrorists

Cameroon Sally Daniel Dickinson Hoffa UN Moore Amanda Mckellar IBP Mohra ADP Gura Two Years Fifty Kilometers
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

"This is natalie hutchinson with you. On news a dusty dry and conflict affected area in the far north region of cameroon has been turned into a land of hope according to a mentor for people displaced by the activities of terrorists in the west african country. The small plot of land next to corgi town was once a no go area due to the presence of militia associated with the outlawed boko haram grew now has been transformed by local internally displaced people into a productive garden garden providing food to the community and an income to the participants ebrahim geogra- supports the internally displaced people in the garden which has been funded in part by by the u._n. Development program. He's spoke to you in newses daniel dickinson as the harvest a fruit and vegetables took place a my name is <hes> ibrahim geogra- <hes> <hes> peace activists walking with u._n. System here in far north region of cameroon specially u._n._d._p. Van de the mental so many i._d. Piece on haas people to give them up for them to develop do opportunity that can help them to have a livelihood and to support the families especially the <hes> like this woman my sister mahamadou she is an i._d. Piece we start to walk about with we've since <hes> t and now we meant to put in place a small business that can help him reclaim her. You see this assists defeats that mental refer all of them. Can you describe where we are and what's happening here. We are here in kogi. This is i._d. Fields <hes> sometime display is considered like <hes> no-man's-lands because even the community cannot oh come here to make activities like that to make a farm because so many people are very very afraid about the attacks offer book around and even around here a military checkpoints to block the people to enter into access for displays but today this no-man's-land displays of tier or have been transformed for the land of hope. Can you describe the fom tom how it looks in front of us get so many kind of a videotape here in this farm owner whose salads so many tomatoes toes on here is a call on it is a values buddy is buried with various vegetable that existing. What strikes me is that it's incredibly bradley green. We're surrounded by sahelian bush which is very sandy and very dry and suddenly we're in an oasis yeah when you see this farm and when you see these players is silent plus the genius of a these people great people especially a._d._p.'s host people fool put in place this kind of inner city to give the green vision of life and here this farm is a bio fund found door is not fetilizer i she michael fertilizer and why is it important to bring people together. Bringing people together is uh to give cuisine and social harp for all this committee have who have been suffering about the problem problem of crisis of boko haram because you know boko haram isa most catered group around the world and especially this town. Have i've been suffering. This is what we work with support if a u._n._d._p. On so many partners to develop this kind of initiative that can put people together to have a social tolerance and living together is it working is very walking because <hes> you you know we've just kind of get a now dig it. <hes> developed the initiative cds. It is to hit her. Maybe after decision they can get even five <hes> cease thousand dollar and it is very important for them to get up.

cameroon ebrahim geogra natalie hutchinson daniel dickinson ibrahim geogra kogi haas michael fertilizer a._d._p. thousand dollar
Cameroons place of terror now a land of hope

UN News

04:31 min | 2 years ago

Cameroons place of terror now a land of hope

"This is natalie hutchinson with you. On news a dusty dry and conflict affected area in the far north region of cameroon has been turned into a land of hope according to a mentor for people displaced by the activities of terrorists in the west african country. The small plot of land next to corgi town was once a no go area due to the presence of militia associated with the outlawed boko haram grew now has been transformed by local internally displaced people into a productive garden garden providing food to the community and an income to the participants ebrahim geogra- supports the internally displaced people in the garden which has been funded in part by by the u._n. Development program. He's spoke to you in newses daniel dickinson as the harvest a fruit and vegetables took place a my name is <hes> ibrahim geogra- <hes> <hes> peace activists walking with u._n. System here in far north region of cameroon specially u._n._d._p. Van de the mental so many i._d. Piece on haas people to give them up for them to develop do opportunity that can help them to have a livelihood and to support the families especially the <hes> like this woman my sister mahamadou she is an i._d. Piece we start to walk about with we've since <hes> t and now we meant to put in place a small business that can help him reclaim her. You see this assists defeats that mental refer all of them. Can you describe where we are and what's happening here. We are here in kogi. This is i._d. Fields <hes> sometime display is considered like <hes> no-man's-lands because even the community cannot oh come here to make activities like that to make a farm because so many people are very very afraid about the attacks offer book around and even around here a military checkpoints to block the people to enter into access for displays but today this no-man's-land displays of tier or have been transformed for the land of hope. Can you describe the fom tom how it looks in front of us get so many kind of a videotape here in this farm owner whose salads so many tomatoes toes on here is a call on it is a values buddy is buried with various vegetable that existing. What strikes me is that it's incredibly bradley green. We're surrounded by sahelian bush which is very sandy and very dry and suddenly we're in an oasis yeah when you see this farm and when you see these players is silent plus the genius of a these people great people especially a._d._p.'s host people fool put in place this kind of inner city to give the green vision of life and here this farm is a bio fund found door is not fetilizer i she michael fertilizer and why is it important to bring people together. Bringing people together is uh to give cuisine and social harp for all this committee have who have been suffering about the problem problem of crisis of boko haram because you know boko haram isa most catered group around the world and especially this town. Have i've been suffering. This is what we work with support if a u._n._d._p. On so many partners to develop this kind of initiative that can put people together to have a social tolerance and living together is it working is very walking because <hes> you you know we've just kind of get a now dig it. <hes> developed the initiative cds. It is to hit her. Maybe after decision they can get even five <hes> cease thousand dollar and it is very important for them to get up.

Cameroon Ebrahim Geogra Natalie Hutchinson Daniel Dickinson Ibrahim Geogra Kogi Haas Michael Fertilizer A._D._P. Thousand Dollar
Advancing womens rights in Saudi Arabia, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals

UN News

06:22 min | 2 years ago

Advancing womens rights in Saudi Arabia, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals

"This is daniel dickinson for your news. In new saudi women will now be able to apply for passports those over twenty one won't be allowed to travel for independently without permission from their so called guardians other steps taken by the kingdom of saudi arabia over the past few years in advancing advancing women's rights include giving women the freedom to continue their education and to seek employment without having to guarantee permission from a male relative tiv- these positive changes show the kingdom's progress towards women's full and equal participation in all parts of society and dr in line with the u._n. Sustainable development goals but more action is needed to fully dismantle other restrictions. You end users. May your coop spoke doc to u._n. Women's dr moosa al shady and started by asking her what those steps represent for the region taken by the kingdom of saudi arabia over the the bus few years in advancing women's right are commendable not to believe these steps include amending the guardianship system to allow the women to drop it or teen passport at the age of twenty one and ebeling woman to register trial bears marriage and divorce and to be a digital as guardian to children who are minors also giving women the freedom to study at university and seek draymond without seeking permission from a male relative lifting the ban on women driving those encouraging the participation of saudi woman men and the workforce throw the kingdom's vision twenty thirty plan and everything the need for equal pay for equal work. These are positive steps that could further advance the kingdom's progress towards achieving the sustainable development goals. We hope that the kingdom continue and despise and make even more progress towards ensure woman's full and equal participation in all parts of society as you just mentioned many positive steps including allowing saudi women to drive. What do you attribute the great change in saudi arabia towards women's rights yeah to be honest with you. We are seeing a trend in the region where we're lows and policies have just to providing greater advancement woman's right including in saudi arabia the kingdom's vision twenty thirty plan is aligned with the sustainable development agenda. It took to the need to develop women's cup ability in order to contribute to the development of society and the economy. This is critical as we know that women must be meaningful participants in the economy across all sectors and indeed the ship was well if we are to achieve jib that <hes> twenty thirty agenda for sustainable development the kingdom's vision prentice to sit a goal of increasing women's but spacious and the workforce from twenty twenty two percent to thirty percent over the next seven years at you and woman we are hopeful that saudi arabia would continue to make progress toward achieving this goal. We also believe that the kingdom is taking an important step in highlighting women's empowerment as a priority area to focus on its g twenty presidency presidency next year a joint statement issued recently by u n special rapporteur on the right to privacy and the u. n. Working group on discrimination against against women and girls welcomed the positive step towards abolishing the guardian ships. They pointed out door to numerous restrictions including including tools and apps allowing male guardians to extend control of women to digits fear and to restrict their freedom freedom of movement. Is you woman in touch with saudi government tackle those issues does you and women offer any expertise or good practices undiscovered yeah yes u._n. Woman is committed to all eu member states and supporting the advancement of women right we work with member states adele request to provide policy guidance and technical expertise for example this year during the sixty third efficient <hes> on the commission of states of women you one woman <hes> and its partner launch artistic called the strategy and equality and low for women and girls by twenty this strategy developed by you and women international stakeholders and many other you an ngo partners seek to fasttrack abuse or a revision discriminatory low in one hundred countries by twenty t to twenty three. We expect to address the rieger need of over fifty million women and girls over three years. This is just one example of how you and women work with member states regional organization and many other stakeholders to advance gender equality and women's empowerment. What are the programs and projects that you an women is doing coming to raise awareness about women's human rights in the arab region as a whole yeah and i don't beijing you end women has a robust presence and out of region actually agent office for arab states located in kyle covers seventeen countries. It's provide technical assistance and policy advice to members estate at their request and also focused on programs to advance gender equality and women's empowerment for example. You and women has broken on decatur to understand andrew scores of gender inequality region that engagement and boys as part of the solution the program in tighted men's and women's for gender equality use used in space and capacity building to enhance enter equality in the region also you and women also work with member state and the league of arab states implimented for the woman basic agenda this work focuses on building regional capacity ensuring that women's <hes> voice here in conflict situations and and highlighting women's participation in peace process <hes> furthermore you and women work with entity and u._n._f._p._a. and esquadra carry out out joint study indicted agenda justice and the low covering eighteen countries in the region it provides a comprehensive assessment of laws and policies affecting gender equality not and protecting against gender based violence in other countries. We believe it's quite restrictive. Mobbing each country's key just later development and gaps in relation to

Saudi Arabia Saudi Government Daniel Dickinson Prentice Decatur Rieger Beijing Tighted EU Andrew Partner Kyle Twenty Twenty Two Percent Thirty Percent Seven Years Three Years
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

UN News

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

"I'm daniel dickinson and this is u._s._a. News the history of the global slave trade concerns all humanity as has it impacts on modern societies according to the assistant director general for social and human sciences at the u._n. Cultural organisation unesco go now dr al-nashif was speaking to you and news ahead of the international day for the remembrance of the slave trade and its abolition celebrated needed annually on the twenty third of august twenty five years ago unesco launch the slave route project resistance liberty heritage a landmark initiative if that helped break the silence rounding the slave trade and slavery and a komo began by asking nada alma chief about the impact of the project given the origins of unesco our foundation obviously with the u._n. System on the ruins of the second world war <hes> creating peace in the minds of men and women was the ultimate <hes> core of the constitution and the fact of ignoring and obscuring major historical <hes> events with something that we wanted to redress and this was the hidden history of course that unesco wanted to have societies come to terms comes with and we believe that much of the issues actually remain today <hes> what's happened twenty five years ago. I think the most significant achievements were having decided to pursue this in a scientific way. <hes> we chose a a concept of route because of the dynamic movement that's his implicit <hes> and i would say that we have managed to foster to raise a much bigger awareness of the ethical but also of the political socio economic the cultural consequences of this entire exchange of people in civilizations <hes> we have prompted home to the development of research universities publications of books <hes> many pedagogical materials films and of course this <hes> many many debates and public engagements <hes> so and i think by giving the slave rate this universal dimension <hes> we have made sure everyone everyone understands. This is not a partial history the history that concerns the whole of humanity and we need to <hes> to discuss it. Maybe if i can just add a <hes> two things was a main accomplishment of the project was the fact that <hes> it's contributed to the recognition of the slave trade and slavery as a crime against humanity entity which is a specific category of crimes by the world conference against racism racial discrimination xenophobia in durban south africa two thousand and one <hes> and then also it allowed to advocate for the international decade for the people of african descent which is ongoing <hes> now <hes> and <hes> to which which we have many many attributes among them. I don't know if you've seen it but <hes> we contributed to the erection of a beautiful permanent memorial dedicated to the victims of the slave. They've trade inside the compound near the visitor's entrance one of these essential aspects of telling the history of slavery. It's not forget it so it's not repeated what lessons can be learned more. Specifically amongst the use wendy are exposed to the history of slavery and slave trade. Unfortunately as i said many of all of these issues are recurring and so it is very important for us at young people understand the caroline. <hes> as i said this is about freedom. It's about human rights. It's about dignity <hes> and it's about the culture of emancipation and what we want to do is make sure that young people in particular understand how we can see memory in a positive way i mean despite all the pain that is in memory and the healing that has to happen <hes> we want to turn this into a constructive pivots for young people to know what must not happen again and i think fighting thing racism in particular is a very important part of what we do so <hes> some things is for example making sure that people understand that these <hes> <hes> now. We have things that we call sites of memory. It's bringing everything to the surface and especially investing. I think for young people into understanding this as part of cultural social heritage we have now a label which was created in two thousand and thirteen cool site of memory associated with the slave roots and we have excuse of memory in africa and south america north america europe indian ocean and the caribbean we have produced resource books for example food and the handbook for new approaches in interpreting and representing slavery in museums again. There is a lot of exchange. Now and young people are participating participating from the perspective of cultural expression <hes> about how we represents this issue in these public domains all of that is very important and maybe <hes> maybe finally under this thing. There are many cultural creative activities that we enjoy today that come from the resistance of those who were enslaved slave. I wanna talk about jazz reggae hip hop kappa wera <hes> and i think these are all methods through which we reach younger the people <hes> more more intimately. I think and more profoundly what do you think it's the role of the artists specifically in with the healing the pain that comes with this period of history well. I think artists have a remarkable obviously for for for unesco cultural expression is a core commitment but it's also a corps belief <hes> in the sense that we rely not on our artists so we have a fantastic coalition of artists who've been working with us <hes> on the general history of africa including understanding slavery in fact for <hes> today marcus miller the great jazz artists recorded according to the message for us <hes> his voice is an easy amplification of the messages. You know so we have material. We have the scientific evidence. Don't we have this study but the artists in their own creativity. I think can reach a much wider audience <hes> so that's in the sense of music and art but also these new issues that we're trying for example the concepts of tourism of memory you you know the idea is to help develop a tourism <hes> which helps to sensitize visitors to various countries around the world where there's already a lot of movement and we we are trying to rely on artistic insights as to how to make those experiences more accessible to ordinary people <hes> and i think this is all a very big role was for artists who have been very very generous in extending their support to us <hes> four events or advocacy mainly as the until reaching out to many many parts of the population. Can you talk a little bit onto obstacles encountered and <hes> what our future prospects of the project the difficulties of course are the fact that it took a long time for us to <hes> billions the body of knowledge we have an international scientific committee tea and it took time of course to build these specialists that who come from very different backgrounds and regions <hes> in fact they are this scientific the committee meeting today in china and then on where we launched the original project so <hes> you know when we met for the first time the project was conceived conceived in one thousand nine hundred ninety four in bene- it was widow and we have an event today in rita to commemorate that <hes> but <hes> ah the subject matter one of the challenges of course it's subject matter is very sensitive. It is very emotive. It is <hes> deeply deeply psychological. It is traumatic. <hes> so the notion of bridging conversations of facilitating the exchange exchange is very very complicated. We were in a meeting in virginia last year where the estates monticello president lincoln and so on are very active in the issue issue of reparations now but to get to that you have to come to tom <hes> with the legacy itself first of all and another another challenge is the acceptance of the recognition so we had someone come from for example the university of wisdom which is just understanding now that many of the oldest most wealthy families bristol made their money from the slave trade so the accountability <hes> understanding <hes> <hes> how this approach needs to be sensitive but very clear <hes> because it is about human dignity she and the end is very very complicated <hes> and then i think what we'd like to do you need to link to the fight against racism and discrimination because there are many new forms of enslavement and exploitation. I mean it's it's milt true <hes> that this is something of the past i think until the mid ninety s we thought of slavery as a thing of the past but we now understand from the human rights campaigners from many ngos there are many forms of contemporary slavery that still exists and there are many governments still working on anti slavery <hes> and i think this is a little bit the the future what we'd like to do is to understand given this relevant how we can really <hes> further. I think popularize is knowledge and focus for example on initiatives that helped cities to develop philip affirmative action policies how we can work with lawmakers to repair or correct historical distortions <hes> and how we can really <hes> put together coalitions of people who are committed to making a change in the spirit of the poor commitments commitments set any of the united nations but the broader community to human rights in this day and age. We believe that the burning issues that we face in today's the world if you read the headlines just today in fact the new york times <hes> this morning <hes> has an article on what they're calling sixteen nineteen projects which examines the legacy of slavery in america just today but if you look at equity <hes> development human rights cultural pluralism dialogue reconciliation conciliation most of all prevention. I think <hes> what some people have called the black hole in history. <hes> this is what we are dedicated zip through. This is why we have this international day to remind everyone and we look forward to close cooperation across the globe to make this really a marker of never again..

africa america daniel dickinson dr al-nashif assistant director durban the new york times unesco south america wendy china south africa united nations marcus miller virginia philip university of wisdom
Heroism and resilience of Somali people in face of ongoing attacks

UN News

11:36 min | 2 years ago

Heroism and resilience of Somali people in face of ongoing attacks

"Somali people have demonstrated heroism and resilience in the face of ongoing insecurity caused by senseless terrorist is to tax that's according to the u._n.'s most senior representative in the horn of africa country james swan who is the u._n. Secretary general's special representative for somalia was speaking you and headquarters in new york ahead of briefing the security council on wednesday somalia continues to be affected by insecurity caused by terrorists organizations like al-shabaab it will so struggles regularly with drought and his chronically underdeveloped. Mr swan arrived in somalia just two months ago so daniel dickinson began by scheme for his first first impressions. It's been some years since i was last in mogadishu and so overall. I've been impressed by signs of progress signs of life that i've witnessed recently coming back from meetings. I've seen young people playing football in the streets. I've seen <hes> signs of economic activity vity shops even a traffic jam which suggests that the capital is indeed <hes> coming back to life after many years of difficulty that said of course i the security situation remains a concern for all of us but especially for the somali population that has suffered over many years from senseless attacks six civilians. That's right. I mean there's almost a daily threat of attacks in mogadishu. How does that affect somalis who live there while they continue with their lives. Despite these threats they open businesses. They send their children to school. They have weddings. They care for one another. They simply have had to move on and continue with their lives and livelihoods in spite of these threats and i think it's really testimony to their resilience eh to their strength really to their heroism in the face of these senseless terrorist attacks. The mayor of mogadishu was assassinated recent. He's one of those those casualties of the civil unrest. You'd actually met him earlier. In the day you know what was he like. And what impact is that going to have on mogadishu on somalia. Well the mayor known as a engineer. Your resume was a well known political figure and leader in mogadishu and more broadly in somalia he'd he'd held number of senior ministerial and advisory portfolios in multiple governments <hes> he had spent many years abroad in the diaspora and i think he was a an example an impressive example of many somalis who have returned from abroad to help rebuild their country entry to invest their time their energy their expertise and their commitment <hes> <unk> trying to make somalia a better place he was an an example of that <hes> he will be missed but at the same time somalia's shown great strength in overcoming <hes> previous losses <hes> and from. I'm talking to those on his staff. I have no doubt that they will continue his work and seek to build on his earlier accomplishments as they move forward in the future. I i think the image that many people get from the international media is of a country in a continual political crisis. Listen to me. How far is that. There are many important political decisions that need to be made in somalia in the coming months. If national priorities <unk> are going to be achieved in two thousand twenty there are important objectives for twenty twenty <hes> including <hes> organizing national level elections including a continuing to make progress on security operations and broader security sector reform and advancing the the national development agenda including a by obtaining <hes> debt relief that would allow for predictable financing going forward. These are important priorities. He's <hes> they require a political agreement. They require a consensus among main <hes> somali leaders <hes> in order to achieve the success is that we're all hoping for in two thousand twenty so yes there's constant political debate <hes> constant political competition within somalia as within other other countries but what's most important now is that we move ahead with more consensual process <hes> leading into these key goals for twenty twenty but most levels of government still struggle to perform that basic functions. Is there any way that that's going to change in the near future. I've in fact been impressed. <hes> since my return <hes> to somalia and in the two months that i've been <hes> in country i've had the opportunity to visit <hes> all of the federal member states as well as somaliland and overall. I have been impressed by the quality and capability of <hes> the administration's astray shins that i've encountered in these different locations. I think we're seeing a many well educated. <hes> dynamic committed committed <hes> individuals increasingly young leaders who are assuming responsibilities and roles <hes> at the in the administration's both at the national channel level and at the federal member state level so they give me a great optimism really that the country is on the right path and that these individuals are we're going to make a significant further progress in being able to respond to the needs of the somali people. You've mentioned twenty twenty next year. What wysocki year it's a key year partly because of the political cycle in somalia the presidential mandate <hes> is four the years <hes> and so there is to be an election and another transition in twenty twenty or perhaps early twenty twenty one <hes> so <hes> a- as with any period or mandate in government <hes> this is a moment to try to consolidate progress and complete <hes> important goals that have been elaborated since the beginning of the president's term so among those are the importance of completing the electoral process itself this will require adoption of an electoral code before the end of this year <hes> and other technical preparations <hes> including of course identifying and funding the necessary budget twenty twenty. We'll also important for consolidating further progress on the security pretty front <hes> both in expanding on very promising operations that have been undertaken in lower shebele since the beginning of of april <hes> and that are continuing <hes> but also to ensure that other security sector improvements advance this involves not just the military police justice corrections so that <hes> the somali people can live in an environment of greater security and justice us and finally as i mentioned there is an important milestone in the national development agenda related to debt relief the government has has been working very hard on this priority it requires some further <hes> consultation and support with the legislature and with the federal member states <hes> but this would be a key benchmark of accomplishment if somalia's able to meet the requirements for debt relief in two thousand twenty darrell however if <hes> groups operating in the country i'll ship app for one which don't want that progress to be made. Well al-shabaab offers a negative suggestion data for the country's destructive agenda that is seeking to disrupt efforts by a well-meaning somalis and somali leaders to see the country advance. I think it's to the credit of the overall somali population that al-shabaab has been unsuccessful zestful in halting the progress that <hes> that we've seen in recent years and that despite the persistence of terrorist attacks six the national priorities continue to advance and we want to see them further consolidated in the coming year. What role can the u n play a in helping somalia on its path towards a better future i mean do you get the impression when you meet somali leaders that they're confident the u._n. Is doing good work. The united nations family is engaged in a wide range of programming across the full all united nations country team this includes work on women's empowerment it includes work on youth inclusion it includes outreach to civil society groups it includes humanitarian response through the world food program and the food and agriculture organization and unicef coordinated by the office of the coordinator for humanitarian affairs that includes work on cultural and educational issues and an array of other priorities. It also includes important support in the security sector notably through the u._n. Support office for somalia so i think across a wide range of issues the united nations family is contributing in close partnership with somalis. I would ed also of course the united nations assistance mission to somalia plays a role in terms of good offices and efforts is to support political and community reconciliation and to see the national political project including further democratisation <hes> move forward in the country so i think across a broad range of priorities that the somalis themselves have established. We are important contributing partners as you said. You've been working on somalia for <hes> more than a couple of decades. What's the best case outlook for four the country ten years hence. How'd you like to see somalia ten years from now. I think there's a widely shared vision that we would like to see somalia at peace in the country and with its neighbours we'd like to see it governed <hes> peaceably sibley and with stability and with significant public participation through a broadly accepted electoral process we'd like to see it on the path to sustained development <hes> with involvement not only by <hes> development partners but by an active private-sector. That's contributing to the lives and livelihoods of the somali people. I think these objectives are widely shared shared. I think we would like to see those objectives also be inclusive. Inclusive in terms of participation by women participation by young people apple seventy percent of the country is under thirty five years of age seventy percent of the population so the future is now in many ways for somalia so i think that is the objective that is shared vision that is guiding all of us as we try to work in partnership for a better somalia.

Somalia Mogadishu Al-Shabaab United Nations Daniel Dickinson Football Mr Swan Representative New York Africa Engineer Legislature Somaliland President Trump Coordinator Seventy Percent Two Months
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

"This is n._p._r. News young people in charge are joining outlawed terrorist groups because of ignorance according to traditional either in one of the most insecure and unstable parts of the west african country yusuf and boom ba me he's the chief of the canton of boll and presides over a large swath of lake chad an area area where many young people have been recruited or forced to join terrorist groups such as boko haram daniel dickinson travelled with yousufi boom ba me to the island of doc meeting do where up to three hundred men women and children were abducted at gunpoint by boko haram fighters in two thousand fifteen we are now a the village is the island of gamero. The length of the island is about five kilometers the population out sorry about five thousand seven hundred and fifty annoying ireland rural <hes> population so you no some depend on the means of the population. Some homes have have a <hes>. You know houses is a uh compound made of halves. You know as eli seeing boko haram has visited this island on many occasions. What did they do when they came in the year. Two thousand fifteen boko haram invades village ends a have the forced people men women young people to join them <hes> so as a forces them to jane so about two to three hundred people young people women's and even adults. It's in those they forced them to bring that to join boko haram in nigeria territory and what did boko haram due to the village was a came they invade some bonus even the k- <hes> some compound and some <hes> you know crops and they get the cattles people has pledged to to flee and abundance a village. Did they kill any people as as thought as installs a slaughter three to three to five people as in this religion. We're sitting in a meeting place in the center. The village outside and we're surrounded by many men of the village how many of these men were forced to join boko haram. I'm what was their experience. When the koran invade this village they took about two to three hundred pickles so among these people that are someone who joined and but they came as they have been forced to so many. I've been foster to to something you cannot. The you know consciously speaking cannot <hes> stay so the have <hes> succeeded in freeing the rank of requirements came back to the village you too so now. Is it a the relative security. What did they do. During their time with booker haram bukharan came to <music> sanchez a new religion is new islamic religion so many people has to go in to john's his new megyn but <hes> <hes> what makes people goes is knows ignores. People has not gone to school. They have not be educated saw aw they cheated them to go by saying that when you will you join because you will get plenty money you'll become rich rich and wednesday when some of the poll has reinforced <hes> because there are in poverty in poverty very high situational precarity so they went the when we have realised than have been cheated you know even because of been obliged to vote decided to to freesias ankle during combat divisions not inhabited and how is the village now the j two stains village agenda that go by our activities jesus by farming cattle haddon.

cattles daniel dickinson lake chad nigeria sanchez freesias jane john five kilometers
Young Chadians join terrorist groups due to ignorance

UN News

04:27 min | 2 years ago

Young Chadians join terrorist groups due to ignorance

"This is n._p._r. News young people in charge are joining outlawed terrorist groups because of ignorance according to traditional either in one of the most insecure and unstable parts of the west african country yusuf and boom ba me he's the chief of the canton of boll and presides over a large swath of lake chad an area area where many young people have been recruited or forced to join terrorist groups such as boko haram daniel dickinson travelled with yousufi boom ba me to the island of doc meeting do where up to three hundred men women and children were abducted at gunpoint by boko haram fighters in two thousand fifteen we are now a the village is the island of gamero. The length of the island is about five kilometers the population out sorry about five thousand seven hundred and fifty annoying ireland rural <hes> population so you no some depend on the means of the population. Some homes have have a <hes>. You know houses is a uh compound made of halves. You know as eli seeing boko haram has visited this island on many occasions. What did they do when they came in the year. Two thousand fifteen boko haram invades village ends a have the forced people men women young people to join them <hes> so as a forces them to jane so about two to three hundred people young people women's and even adults. It's in those they forced them to bring that to join boko haram in nigeria territory and what did boko haram due to the village was a came they invade some bonus even the k- <hes> some compound and some <hes> you know crops and they get the cattles people has pledged to to flee and abundance a village. Did they kill any people as as thought as installs a slaughter three to three to five people as in this religion. We're sitting in a meeting place in the center. The village outside and we're surrounded by many men of the village how many of these men were forced to join boko haram. I'm what was their experience. When the koran invade this village they took about two to three hundred pickles so among these people that are someone who joined and but they came as they have been forced to so many. I've been foster to to something you cannot. The you know consciously speaking cannot <hes> stay so the have <hes> succeeded in freeing the rank of requirements came back to the village you too so now. Is it a the relative security. What did they do. During their time with booker haram bukharan came to <music> sanchez a new religion is new islamic religion so many people has to go in to john's his new megyn but <hes> <hes> what makes people goes is knows ignores. People has not gone to school. They have not be educated saw aw they cheated them to go by saying that when you will you join because you will get plenty money you'll become rich rich and wednesday when some of the poll has reinforced <hes> because there are in poverty in poverty very high situational precarity so they went the when we have realised than have been cheated you know even because of been obliged to vote decided to to freesias ankle during combat divisions not inhabited and how is the village now the j two stains village agenda that go by our activities jesus by farming cattle haddon.

Cattles Daniel Dickinson Lake Chad Nigeria Sanchez Freesias Jane John Five Kilometers
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

UN News

09:23 min | 2 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

"This is Connor Lennon from news, the Peacedale between government and opposition forces in south Sudan, hangs in the balance. But there is an overwhelming desire from people in the East African country for an end to the five year long conflict there. That's according to David Shearer, the special Representative of the UN secretary, general facade with Sudan, some four million people have been forced to flee their homes since fighting broke out between the government, led by Salva Kiir and opposition forces, loyal to the former vice president Reik, Michelle south, Sudan, one of the poorest countries in Africa only gained its independence, from its neighbor, Sudan, in twenty eleven speaking to you a news in New York mister sheriff said that it was up to the country's leaders to ensure the people's desire for peace is fulfilled. Daniel Dickinson, spoke to Mr. Shera and began by asking him for the latest on the revitalized peace deal, which was agreed late last. Year. The good news is that the ceasefire is holding the political violence levels have dropped with the exception of one part of the country in the equator is in the south, which means that on pass trans hundreds of hundreds of people are alive today that, that possibly wouldn't have been if, if the word contend on around about half a million people have moved back to their homes over the past few months since the signing of the peace deal the Peacedale itself is being negotiated in Juba between opposition groups are moving freely around Origene doing that. I have to say it slow it's not proceeding as, as quickly as we would like so what's holding things back. It's, it's frankly, a lot about the, the logistics the strategy of how we going for, particularly with the unification of forces different armies that need to be brought together the need to be. Downsized, and that's taking time. I do think that what we have seen as a increase in trust, and confidence. We've seen a lot of meetings at the grassroots level with opposition soldiers and government soldiers have come together and agree to work together. In fact, I would say that they grassroots is a head of the national leadership in the national elites who are negotiating nationally. There's a real palpable desire for peace in South Dakota. And how's it working at a national level? You have the president Salva care and you have his longtime rival Rickman, Machar presumably, they don't get on a toll. Well, they've been at war for several years. Yeah. Traditionally, they haven't they're probably been fighting to the more than are being together. But Sydney over the since the peace agreement by of shown a willingness to try and move things forward reaction showers currently in Khartoum, but his number two, and in his wife, who plays a Angelina tinny who plays a very big role in the in his movement are Ingeba negotiating around things. So what we would like to see in one of the key issues is to make sure that react, Mashad doctorate, Michelle and president Salva Kiir meet together. They can meet together regularly before November when the new government supposed to be formed it, we've got a much better chance of it being successful. If they don't then they kinda called start right from the. Very beginning coming together without having that sort of warm up conversations that they think they've disparate need to have, and why aren't they having those meetings? Certainly president cure is invited. Ram shouted come to Juba. There's obviously rent Michelle himself has some security concerns about coming back, but I think it's got to a point where it's becoming in some ways, one of the biggest obstacles in that these are the two main leaders, these are the two that hold the Sydney the power of the gun, if you like and they need to come together and and, and work out a lot of the outstanding issues. I believe that many of these issues can be resolved between the two people. That's that is taking weeks at a lower level of concern of discussion. You know, president Salva care where you see him on a pretty regular basis. Is he the sort of politician, the sort of leader who's going to make this work? I think he does. I believe it when he says he wants to make it work. I think he was profoundly affected when he went to meet the pipe and the pipe kiss. The feet of all of these leaders and said, you must work towards PC's. He's a Roman Catholic himself. So I think it had a big impact on them. And my feeling is that he wants to see peace. I mean he's he's, he's been the president then now for a number of years. And, and the lead person in south Sudan, his legacy should be about leaving south Sudan, peace with a stable future. I'm what can you tell me about Rickman? Michelle is he the sort of man who's, who's going to be able to make pieces, well, speaking till on a number of occasions, that Sydney the impression he's, he's, he's left me with he said that he wants to have peace in terms of, you know. Power dynamics. He's out of the country, not in the country. So he's in at a disadvantage, but it's really about both sides need to accommodate each of the sides need to understand that if they're going to move forward, that's going to have to be some compromise. They're going to have to step back from some of the sort of long held positions, and that they're able to work together and understand that self sit on can never be at peace, while these two men are not able to talk to each other. So they, they need to be able to work together inside a government and be accountable to the citizens, which up to now hasn't happened. And to what extent does the Peacedale rely on the past Nalitzis of these two main protagonists, a great deal, not completely, but certainly, a great deal? The way that the peace agreement has been designed as the president Keer will remain as president, and doctorate, Michelle will become the fist, vice president. So you'll be working. Closely together, if they are able to work together, collectively within one government and work affectively their decision making will be they'll be accountable for the decision making right across south Sudan to the citizens right now, we have is the opposition outside the government and the government, effectively still taking decisions. And it's I don't think that's a an ideal situation. I think people want to see them to come together and work together. And what role is the UN playing in this process from the bottom to the top basically, obviously, we have a big role in Tim's of protection of civilians L peacekeeping troops are patrolling, all across the country and trying to at least create the, the, the stability, and certainly some of the stability that enable have has enabled people to come back home. But on the peace process at the grassroots level has been a, a read about one hundred thirteen different reproche months different meetings that have happened where position and government of come together the mitt. Together have agreed to how they're going to work together, and we've facilitated at least a quarter of those, you know, I was in, in Marie de recently, where the opposition came in for the government governors came together with several hundred people sitting around par partaking in this in these peace discussions. And you've have you have people sitting there who were at war together just a few months ago talking about how they built pace at the grassroots level. That's very important that work that we do. And then at the national level, we've providing all sorts of expertise in both the security sector in the issue of how many states this should be rod across the board in terms of providing the, the support, that's needed in order for the for the peace process to go ahead, not, not for not stumble because of the lack of expertise. I know you're not mystic man. What, what's your gut feeling about how this is going to be all resolved? I think it. Hangs in the balance. I'm really encouraged by the, the degrade to which when I meet with ordinary people when I go out into various parts and locations around south sedan hell strongly desire for pieces. And that's what encourages me more than anything. I think it's really up to the leadership to make sure that, that desires fulfiled. So I think it's in some ways it, hang it hangs in the balanced. But we are possibly seeing the best chance for peace that south sedans had in a number of years. And it's just a matter of making sure that we keep them in maintain going. We keep these groups talking to each other. And we slowly surely, consolidate each step to make sure that we don't slide backwards. So yeah, I'm an optimistic guy, I'd like to see. And I think south sedan deserves it deserves piece spin longtime where they haven't had..

president Michelle south Salva Kiir south Sudan Sudan Peacedale Sydney vice president UN Juba South Dakota Rickman David Shearer Daniel Dickinson Africa Connor Lennon Origene secretary
South Sudan peace hangs in the balance

UN News

09:23 min | 2 years ago

South Sudan peace hangs in the balance

"This is Connor Lennon from news, the Peacedale between government and opposition forces in south Sudan, hangs in the balance. But there is an overwhelming desire from people in the East African country for an end to the five year long conflict there. That's according to David Shearer, the special Representative of the UN secretary, general facade with Sudan, some four million people have been forced to flee their homes since fighting broke out between the government, led by Salva Kiir and opposition forces, loyal to the former vice president Reik, Michelle south, Sudan, one of the poorest countries in Africa only gained its independence, from its neighbor, Sudan, in twenty eleven speaking to you a news in New York mister sheriff said that it was up to the country's leaders to ensure the people's desire for peace is fulfilled. Daniel Dickinson, spoke to Mr. Shera and began by asking him for the latest on the revitalized peace deal, which was agreed late last. Year. The good news is that the ceasefire is holding the political violence levels have dropped with the exception of one part of the country in the equator is in the south, which means that on pass trans hundreds of hundreds of people are alive today that, that possibly wouldn't have been if, if the word contend on around about half a million people have moved back to their homes over the past few months since the signing of the peace deal the Peacedale itself is being negotiated in Juba between opposition groups are moving freely around Origene doing that. I have to say it slow it's not proceeding as, as quickly as we would like so what's holding things back. It's, it's frankly, a lot about the, the logistics the strategy of how we going for, particularly with the unification of forces different armies that need to be brought together the need to be. Downsized, and that's taking time. I do think that what we have seen as a increase in trust, and confidence. We've seen a lot of meetings at the grassroots level with opposition soldiers and government soldiers have come together and agree to work together. In fact, I would say that they grassroots is a head of the national leadership in the national elites who are negotiating nationally. There's a real palpable desire for peace in South Dakota. And how's it working at a national level? You have the president Salva care and you have his longtime rival Rickman, Machar presumably, they don't get on a toll. Well, they've been at war for several years. Yeah. Traditionally, they haven't they're probably been fighting to the more than are being together. But Sydney over the since the peace agreement by of shown a willingness to try and move things forward reaction showers currently in Khartoum, but his number two, and in his wife, who plays a Angelina tinny who plays a very big role in the in his movement are Ingeba negotiating around things. So what we would like to see in one of the key issues is to make sure that react, Mashad doctorate, Michelle and president Salva Kiir meet together. They can meet together regularly before November when the new government supposed to be formed it, we've got a much better chance of it being successful. If they don't then they kinda called start right from the. Very beginning coming together without having that sort of warm up conversations that they think they've disparate need to have, and why aren't they having those meetings? Certainly president cure is invited. Ram shouted come to Juba. There's obviously rent Michelle himself has some security concerns about coming back, but I think it's got to a point where it's becoming in some ways, one of the biggest obstacles in that these are the two main leaders, these are the two that hold the Sydney the power of the gun, if you like and they need to come together and and, and work out a lot of the outstanding issues. I believe that many of these issues can be resolved between the two people. That's that is taking weeks at a lower level of concern of discussion. You know, president Salva care where you see him on a pretty regular basis. Is he the sort of politician, the sort of leader who's going to make this work? I think he does. I believe it when he says he wants to make it work. I think he was profoundly affected when he went to meet the pipe and the pipe kiss. The feet of all of these leaders and said, you must work towards PC's. He's a Roman Catholic himself. So I think it had a big impact on them. And my feeling is that he wants to see peace. I mean he's he's, he's been the president then now for a number of years. And, and the lead person in south Sudan, his legacy should be about leaving south Sudan, peace with a stable future. I'm what can you tell me about Rickman? Michelle is he the sort of man who's, who's going to be able to make pieces, well, speaking till on a number of occasions, that Sydney the impression he's, he's, he's left me with he said that he wants to have peace in terms of, you know. Power dynamics. He's out of the country, not in the country. So he's in at a disadvantage, but it's really about both sides need to accommodate each of the sides need to understand that if they're going to move forward, that's going to have to be some compromise. They're going to have to step back from some of the sort of long held positions, and that they're able to work together and understand that self sit on can never be at peace, while these two men are not able to talk to each other. So they, they need to be able to work together inside a government and be accountable to the citizens, which up to now hasn't happened. And to what extent does the Peacedale rely on the past Nalitzis of these two main protagonists, a great deal, not completely, but certainly, a great deal? The way that the peace agreement has been designed as the president Keer will remain as president, and doctorate, Michelle will become the fist, vice president. So you'll be working. Closely together, if they are able to work together, collectively within one government and work affectively their decision making will be they'll be accountable for the decision making right across south Sudan to the citizens right now, we have is the opposition outside the government and the government, effectively still taking decisions. And it's I don't think that's a an ideal situation. I think people want to see them to come together and work together. And what role is the UN playing in this process from the bottom to the top basically, obviously, we have a big role in Tim's of protection of civilians L peacekeeping troops are patrolling, all across the country and trying to at least create the, the, the stability, and certainly some of the stability that enable have has enabled people to come back home. But on the peace process at the grassroots level has been a, a read about one hundred thirteen different reproche months different meetings that have happened where position and government of come together the mitt. Together have agreed to how they're going to work together, and we've facilitated at least a quarter of those, you know, I was in, in Marie de recently, where the opposition came in for the government governors came together with several hundred people sitting around par partaking in this in these peace discussions. And you've have you have people sitting there who were at war together just a few months ago talking about how they built pace at the grassroots level. That's very important that work that we do. And then at the national level, we've providing all sorts of expertise in both the security sector in the issue of how many states this should be rod across the board in terms of providing the, the support, that's needed in order for the for the peace process to go ahead, not, not for not stumble because of the lack of expertise. I know you're not mystic man. What, what's your gut feeling about how this is going to be all resolved? I think it. Hangs in the balance. I'm really encouraged by the, the degrade to which when I meet with ordinary people when I go out into various parts and locations around south sedan hell strongly desire for pieces. And that's what encourages me more than anything. I think it's really up to the leadership to make sure that, that desires fulfiled. So I think it's in some ways it, hang it hangs in the balanced. But we are possibly seeing the best chance for peace that south sedans had in a number of years. And it's just a matter of making sure that we keep them in maintain going. We keep these groups talking to each other. And we slowly surely, consolidate each step to make sure that we don't slide backwards. So yeah, I'm an optimistic guy, I'd like to see. And I think south sedan deserves it deserves piece spin longtime where they haven't had.

President Trump Michelle South Salva Kiir South Sudan Sudan Peacedale Sydney Vice President UN Juba South Dakota Rickman David Shearer Daniel Dickinson Africa Connor Lennon Origene Secretary
Partnerships at core of sustainable development

UN News

04:47 min | 2 years ago

Partnerships at core of sustainable development

"Partnerships are at the core of efforts to reach the sustainable development goals, the poverty, and environmental targets agreed by world leaders in twenty fifteen that's according to digital Boyd, the United Nations resident coordinator in Thailand, the UN's most senior official in the country. The seventeen goals also known as the Gs and which meant to be realized by twenty thirty include one focused specifically on partnerships which seeks to bring international organizations like the UN together with governments civil society, the corporate world and individuals in order to achieve the other sixteen goals, Daniel Dickinson, spoke to digital Boyd on a recent visit to u n headquarters in New York. And also what partnerships means in the context of the sustainable development goals. Partnerships is much at the core of the sustainable development goals. There's such a broad such an ambitious set of goals at the world has set itself. It's clear to us in the UN that that's no question that these can be achieved by us alone, or even by us alone as the UN with are working with our governments, we really have to involve everyone. It has the sustainable development goals have to mean something to everyone and everyone has a role to play in across this system. Development goals and presumably, it means different things to different people and different countries. Absolutely. It's a very broad term partnerships. And if I look at Thailand Thailand, for example, is not a poor country. It's not a rich country either at falls into the category. We call upper middle income, so we're working when the country, which has a lot of capacity which has already dealt with many of the major issues of poverty of access to health services. So our role is the UN is really to strengthen the partnerships harness the of all of the, the people, the organizations in Thailand to, to achieve the sustainable development goals is this about money or is it about getting people to discuss the, the goals, it's not necessarily about money. I mean, we do need partnership so that we can ensure that we have enough global financing to actually achieve this sustainable goals, but partnership goes beyond money, certainly goes beyond discussion because it's, it's. Really about action. I mean, I think Thailand has one very interesting example of the power of partnerships. That that's also they relevant globally. If we look at the HIV and aids epidemic. This was something that really required partnerships because we had to reach out to people affected by and aids. And quite often, those are groups, such as people who inject drugs, people who work as sex workers, so to reach out and to harness the power to the people themselves who are affected by HIV AIDS. And I strongly believe that the only reason that we've actually come to the point where we are in controlling the HIV AIDS epidemic is ju- to activists due to those people who were directly affected. I think is a really good sign of, of partnerships. Thailand has managed to go from having quite a serious problem with HIV and aids to now being one of the countries that has won the first countries in Asia to eliminate mother-to-child transmission, for example, we were. I have got to this point without partnerships without involving everyone without discussing communicating an taking action on the ground to reach the most vulnerable people these partnerships at grassroots level, at governmental level, and presumably everything in between. Absolutely partnerships is court what we do, because it's the United Nations, we work with our Member States are host, governments. But we also need partnerships. Now, I think this is something the sustainable development goals is very clear on with a wider group of people private sector has a huge role to play. Now, we also have the global compact, which brings together those private sector actors who are really committed to the sustainable development goals, and are committed to applying them in their own business practices in Thailand. We have what's called a local network of global compact that brings together large private sector companies. And these are people, we can work with to advance issues such as business and human rights. Very important issue. Thailand. The government is currently working on an action plan on business and human rights will be the first in Asia, but we have to involve private sector because it affects the hiring practices affects the supply chains and their views have to be taken into account, if we're going to have something that works. So I think this is another example of how institutions like the global compact who work at the local level, bringing together. Private sector can really help us support the sustainable development goals,

Thailand Thailand United Nations HIV Aids Thailand Asia Boyd Daniel Dickinson Coordinator New York Official
Global counter-terrorism situation remains very worrying, says senior official as UN-EU sign new agreement

UN News

05:03 min | 2 years ago

Global counter-terrorism situation remains very worrying, says senior official as UN-EU sign new agreement

"This is Daniel Dickinson the United Nations and the European Union have agreed to work more closely together to fight the scourge of terrorism in a week that has seen more than three hundred fifty people killed by extremist suicide bombers in shrill anchor alone during a high level meeting at the United Nations in New York on Wednesday, senior officials from the UN office of counter terrorism and the European Union's security and defence section signed a framework agreement to promote a new spirit of practical collaboration and have more of an impact in countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia speaking to you, a news ahead of the signing Vladimir voronkov, the head of the UN counter-terrorism office said that the UN and the EU have been working on common project since last year, including greater engagement with young people to root out violent extr. Premium petro, Serano deputy secretary general for common security and defence policy and crisis response at the European external Action Service represented the e you at the signing Wednesday in New York and spoke to you and uses Jordi true Jarl's is an occasion, I share assessment of the threat assessment. Where are we right now? And and actually we are in a very worrying situation. I think we agree with that with the United Nations could leagues and then to review the different programs that the United Nations is pursuing with the support also many of them of the European Union in order to fight terrorism and to prevent violent extremism, and the conferences that are being prepared in order to mobilize international community to which European Union is also participating now very important today. We will be signing a framework agreement with the United Nations on. Fight against terrorism which would provide stability to the engagement of the European Union with the United Nations in this common endeavour, and this agreement for sees regular meetings and and identification of focal points, which will we will render even easier and more intense the already very important cooperation that is underway. I can you provide one or two specific examples of now with the U N, and the are working more closely together, we're working on a number of programs that the office of the counter-terrorism coordinator has developed in particular program on counterterrorism travel, and which helps and would enhance the capacity of partner countries to prevent detect investigate and prosecute terrorist defenses and their travel by collecting and analysing passenger data. Both advance passenger information and passenger name record data, and it will address target countries that are most affected by foreign terrorist fighters. I would be one example. A very concrete project from which we're working together. We're also working together in a program called strive with strengthening resilience to violent extremism, and and this notably in Asia. And the idea is to help countries to prevent and counter violent extremism and promoting whole of site approach, including governments security actors and civil society and private sector in addressing the challenges of the violent violent radicalization. You in the basketball run all of the approach. What does that mean? Well, fight against terrorism is a very complex phenomenon in which you can not only address the security aspects, you have to an even address them the security aspect. It's an south conflict complex because it's not only typical police work its own. So the certain surveillance of. Of cyber actions and activities and communications it also requires engagement in the fight against radicalization, which reaches to issues such as -education and cultural activities it requires also control of financial transactions. So it really needs whole mobilization of all the instruments of estate, but also of civil society in fighting this scourge of terrorism that is what we mean by by of any other aspect is there any other aspect that you would like to talk about that. They didn't ask you just to mention and reiterate the importance of the copperation with the United Nations. The fight against terrorism is a fight that has to be undertaken by the entire international community, and and no better actor to mobilize international community that the United Nations and therefore the European Union is proud to support you UN efforts and to be one of. The first partners of the United Nations and different.

United Nations European Union European External Action Servi Asia Daniel Dickinson Vladimir Voronkov Middle East New York Petro Africa Deputy Secretary Serano Basketball Jordi Jarl Coordinator Partner
100 years on, how the League of Nations made the UN what it is today

UN News

04:11 min | 2 years ago

100 years on, how the League of Nations made the UN what it is today

"This is Daniel Dickinson. The world has seen huge changes. Since the league of nations was born one hundred years ago bought its twin aims of promoting peace and wellbeing live on today in the work of the United Nations. That's the strong belief of Blondine blue catch Lewis fell chief of the institutional memory section at the UN library in Geneva who explained to Daniel Johnson of UN news how the league was also ahead of its time in raising the alarm about climate threats such as pollution. She was speaking at an event to celebrate the first international day of multi-lateralism and diplomacy for peace held at the Palais day Naseem, the original home of the league of nations actually is not one reason. I think there are many reasons we are living in a complex world with many polygon issues, but also many economic and social issues that are more. A more complex and the to involve more and more actors and stick on this. And I think military's is a is an answer to that. How is the world today different to one hundred years ago when the league of nations was founded is it comparable is multi-lateralism. Still in the model, we need to improve people's well-being and fight inequalities. I think the principles are still more or less the same. We've just screened video today showing the activities of the league of nations and a lot of the people in the audience set of we still do the same. Actually, we do the same in terms of principles by the same time. The Joe politics have changed at the time of illegal nations. It was a time of Karenina which no longer exists. So states have different interests and way to behave. But also issues are more more global like climate change. For instance, the league already tackled this issue. You did the league. Nations. Tackled climate change came a change, but actually environments issues like pollution of the there was a convention in nineteen twenty six about solution of the. But of course, nowadays climate change is bigger issue than it was at the time. And this is something we need to talk together. And in your workers, the archivist of the UN legacy here of you like it the Polly denial in Geneva. What's one of the most interesting things that you've found in the course of your word in the course of organizing this event on multi-lateralism? There are so many things I'm here for twenty years. This year is also the university. Congratulations for twenty years, the beauty of being in the library and heading the archives. Every islands something we've found things in the archives everyday. I think what I've learned is that a lot of things that the UN is doing was done already steps were taken by the league. It's amazing. You we were talking about environment and pollution. It was there. We when preparing this event and other events in the sensory activities, we try to match sustainable development goals with activities at the league had an we barely one or two that do not have links with what the league did. And as the historian of the UN archive here in Geneva. What is very different about the UN today compared with the league of nations. It can't just be size. Maybe it's in terms of the civil society participation. Is there anything that really strikes you? So there are many things, of course, which are different. Of course, there's a legacy from the league, but not everything is done same way, and also instantly economic and social dimension has be taken into by the UN from the very beginning by having an economic and social council, which did not exist to the league, which was recognizing importance of these activities in maintaining peace. You don't maintain peace only by doing political activities and disarmament? But also in developing this. Activities. And also, I think the involvement of civil society. It started the time, but it has exploded. It's not commensurate to what they did.

United Nations League Of Nations Geneva Daniel Dickinson Palais Day Naseem Daniel Johnson Lewis Karenina JOE Polly One Hundred Years Twenty Years
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

UN News

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on UN News

"This is Daniel Dickinson for the first time, the U N health agency WHO has released guidelines on how long very young children should be spending in front of a screen the World Health organizations recommendations also suggest how much exercise and sleep under-fives need to grow up fit. And well in an interview with you, a news is Daniel Johnson WHO's, Dr wanna Wilmsen explains the lifelong potential harm that can be caused by sedentary behavior over extended periods of time. So this is the first time that we as WHO have developed guidelines for children under five looking at both physical activity sedentary time and sleep which are such important into connecting us Bax of the twenty four hour day for a child. Now, a lot of people are going to look at this report and say that your recommendations on screen time, a water most interesting and most challenging for parents. So what exactly you? Paying for children under one year old for example. So the evidence that was reviewed indicates that children under one year of age. They shouldn't really have sedentary screen time. This is passive screen time. It's not necessarily screen time where you're interacting with a caregiver or where child is being encouraged move, but rather very passive time that has no interaction, and then as they get slightly older you recommend that no more than sixty minutes of passive screen time for two year olds and three and four year olds. But what you do put focus on is increasing physical activity. So for children aged two and above two to five we recommend not more than one hour of passive sedentary screen time per day, but three hours of active play, and as they get older that one of these hours should be moderate to vigorous active play this is because plays really the way that children learn and it's very important for them to have those opportunities both to develop their motor and cognitive skills. So watching a cartoon on TV, that's passive, but inter. Acting with grandparent over Skype isn't so passive screen time is the type of screen time where child isn't interacting with somebody all moving such as watching a cartoon or playing a passive game that doesn't involve movement. It doesn't include interactive time that could be chatting with a parent over digital media or watching a program that encourages children to move or copy actions or dance those are very positive interactions. Why is it that it's twenty nineteen? And this is the first report we've had on screen time and physical activity and indeed sleep because there was a big focus on this being a twenty four hour period and sleep is very important for particularly young children, the evidence base for developing these recommendations has really grown in the past few years, certainly in terms of sedentary time and there've been more studies about screen time, particularly in young children for this reason. We're now able to review the evidence and make these recommendations whereas before the evidence based simply wasn't large enough. But presumably this report is. The result of concerns about children being overweight and not getting enough exercise above five because for children above five. We already have some evidence. Maybe you could tell me where we are with regards to children's general level of health for over five fif- children over five years of age from five to nineteen. We have new recent global estimates that indicate that obesity rates have actually increased tenfold in the last forty years, which raises a real issue of concern in terms of the obesity epidemic and even for younger children five point nine percent of younger children under the age of five or already overweight. So we think it's very important to start abusively prevention as early as possible in life, but also to encourage physical activity, not just for the prevention of overweight and obesity, but for the value that physical activity has in terms of overall health in the population in general.

overweight and obesity obesity Daniel Johnson Daniel Dickinson Dr wanna Wilmsen World Health Bax Skype U N twenty four hour one year sixty minutes nine percent forty years three hours five years four year one hour two year
Play time  and not screen time - is so much more important for kids, says WHO

UN News

03:51 min | 2 years ago

Play time and not screen time - is so much more important for kids, says WHO

"This is Daniel Dickinson for the first time, the U N health agency WHO has released guidelines on how long very young children should be spending in front of a screen the World Health organizations recommendations also suggest how much exercise and sleep under-fives need to grow up fit. And well in an interview with you, a news is Daniel Johnson WHO's, Dr wanna Wilmsen explains the lifelong potential harm that can be caused by sedentary behavior over extended periods of time. So this is the first time that we as WHO have developed guidelines for children under five looking at both physical activity sedentary time and sleep which are such important into connecting us Bax of the twenty four hour day for a child. Now, a lot of people are going to look at this report and say that your recommendations on screen time, a water most interesting and most challenging for parents. So what exactly you? Paying for children under one year old for example. So the evidence that was reviewed indicates that children under one year of age. They shouldn't really have sedentary screen time. This is passive screen time. It's not necessarily screen time where you're interacting with a caregiver or where child is being encouraged move, but rather very passive time that has no interaction, and then as they get slightly older you recommend that no more than sixty minutes of passive screen time for two year olds and three and four year olds. But what you do put focus on is increasing physical activity. So for children aged two and above two to five we recommend not more than one hour of passive sedentary screen time per day, but three hours of active play, and as they get older that one of these hours should be moderate to vigorous active play this is because plays really the way that children learn and it's very important for them to have those opportunities both to develop their motor and cognitive skills. So watching a cartoon on TV, that's passive, but inter. Acting with grandparent over Skype isn't so passive screen time is the type of screen time where child isn't interacting with somebody all moving such as watching a cartoon or playing a passive game that doesn't involve movement. It doesn't include interactive time that could be chatting with a parent over digital media or watching a program that encourages children to move or copy actions or dance those are very positive interactions. Why is it that it's twenty nineteen? And this is the first report we've had on screen time and physical activity and indeed sleep because there was a big focus on this being a twenty four hour period and sleep is very important for particularly young children, the evidence base for developing these recommendations has really grown in the past few years, certainly in terms of sedentary time and there've been more studies about screen time, particularly in young children for this reason. We're now able to review the evidence and make these recommendations whereas before the evidence based simply wasn't large enough. But presumably this report is. The result of concerns about children being overweight and not getting enough exercise above five because for children above five. We already have some evidence. Maybe you could tell me where we are with regards to children's general level of health for over five fif- children over five years of age from five to nineteen. We have new recent global estimates that indicate that obesity rates have actually increased tenfold in the last forty years, which raises a real issue of concern in terms of the obesity epidemic and even for younger children five point nine percent of younger children under the age of five or already overweight. So we think it's very important to start abusively prevention as early as possible in life, but also to encourage physical activity, not just for the prevention of overweight and obesity, but for the value that physical activity has in terms of overall health in the population in general.

Overweight And Obesity Obesity Daniel Johnson Daniel Dickinson Dr Wanna Wilmsen World Health BAX Skype U N Twenty Four Hour One Year Sixty Minutes Nine Percent Forty Years Three Hours Five Years Four Year One Hour Two Year
Service and Sacrifice: Irish forces in Golan well trained to deal with challenging situations

UN News

07:18 min | 2 years ago

Service and Sacrifice: Irish forces in Golan well trained to deal with challenging situations

"Rish military personnel. Serving under the UN flag in the Golan Heights. If been well trained to deal with challenging situations, according to the head of the contingent there there are one hundred thirty I rish nationals, including seven women currently deployed to the Wendy's engagement observer force that you went peacekeeping mission which was established in one thousand nine seventy four to monitor ceasefire between Israel and Syria. Many have served previously in other UN missions, including in Liberia, Lebanon, Kosovo, and Western Sahara, recently, the Irish contingent has been clearing mines. So that you enforce it can take positions again in areas, which had to be evacuated as a result of the civil war, which was taking place in Syria. Daniel Dickinson has been talking to the commander of the Irish forces Lieutenant Colin Lewis Flynn. I'm the contingent commander for the contingent which makes the fifty ninth if regroup on the we provide the Responsibility Act as the force observe. Company under the direct command of the enough force commander in order to achieve this task. And we maintain a credible in robust presence in the Golan to uphold the mandates and the Irish continued operates out of come forward. Which is where the force headquarters is located we maintain a quick Russia force and also reserve force within the amfar times, the quick reaction force is a small highly mobile unflexible force dot com. Respond to requests made by the force commander within fifteen minutes. Twenty four seven the requests can range from the evacuation of personnel from you in positions for various emergency reasons to routine patrols of the Bravo line on the east side of the areas of rain. The unisom also is self sufficient in that we have our engineering medical ordinance transport on the disk personnel who provides the capability for us to. To operate as in a self-sufficient manner. Are within our Mondays what role does the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force to give it it's it's official title. What role? Does it play? It's Mondays to maintain a credible presence in the Golan onto us best efforts to maintain the ceasefire between Israel on the Syrian Arab Republic. And to see the observed and what are the operating conditions like in in the region. I would put the operation conditions as challenging the area of perations is primarily focused on recall, the area separation between the alpha and Bravo lines. Both lines stretch for a distance of about seventy five kilometers from hermit in the north to the Jordanian border in the south area. Both lines in between. Both lines is known as the area's separation at the whitest point the area's operation stretches to nine kilometers, and is two hundred meters wide at the narrows point is that a particularly active area are the things. On every day, which peacekeepers need to react to on has over the last number of months has been reestablishing its its footprints in the area separation ju to the civil war which was on going in the area, the security situation deteriorated to such an extent that on withdrew most of its its presence from the area separation from the series from the Syrian side. Correct. They moved onto the side of the area separation until the last number months. We've moved back onto the onto the problem side and the Irish contingent is providing a level of engineer specialist search which we can go in and clear. Previously occupied a UN posts to ensure that all residents of war and Debbie are a safely cleared removed. So that can be occupied by UN forces. So that creates a challenging environment as technically difficult, but we have exceptionally well trained unqualified personnel to do those tasks wise it. Important for Ireland to contribute to on of I suppose since Arden's independence. We've been committed to a number of international bodies in the league nations between the world wars the UN after World War Two more recently the European Union on its predecessors at so it's a pragmatic assigned of our farm policy at a small state. So she's can commission on involve itself in the international order and provide a immeasurable presence in international peacekeeping on the world stage at wall sort of challenges do your troops face, especially those ones who who were on a UN peacekeeping mission for the first time. The first challenge is the the preparation on training is conducted at home before we deploy overseas normally takes approximately three months preparation period, where we'll go through the full remix of professional military training in the various specialities that we will bring with us. From dismounted infantry to the engineer specialist. Search teams to our ordinance disposal team our medical teams communications, so we can integrate fully as a robust mobile and competent enforce reserve and also getting understanding cultural or Stein of where we're going what we're going to do. And how we go about doing that an important in that is that we haven't ability to operate with our international partners owned the UN flying the other contingents within the on off mission. So that we can become more interoperable as we conduct operations. And but then there's also the personal Ed challenges even have obviously were leaving our friends and family behind in our in for for six six months tour, Judy. So there's an emotional price that personnel play. What do your men and women tell you about their experience serving as a as a blue helmet overall? I would say it's hugely positive 'em. They rise to the challenges by an allows of members of the arts festival will join the ability to to travel abroad to provide a real improvement in the conduct of the mandate admissions and to add a positive legacy to their service in the defence forces. So the professional satisfaction that they were saved and also the opportunity to operate with a multinational force, whom they wouldn't necessarily get the opportunity to operate with an also the exposure to a much wider civilian an NGO non-governmental organizations that operate in the area, we fully understand that the broadest level of peacekeeping and your mandate missions that military provide one elements of the solution and as far wider area covering call the comprehensive approach where all of the other. Non-governmental actors and aid agencies and provides support to the to to the to the wider conflict, and you're always benefit from not during experience seeing how people engage in tackle problems in a different way using a different lens of experience. So that's a huge using positive.

UN Commander Arab Republic United Nations Disengagement O Israel Golan Heights Engineer Daniel Dickinson Wendy Liberia Western Sahara Russia Kosovo Perations Amfar Times Colin Lewis Flynn Ireland Lebanon
Nigeria refugees too traumatized to return as UN News witnesses thousands fleeing over Cameroon border

UN News

02:41 min | 2 years ago

Nigeria refugees too traumatized to return as UN News witnesses thousands fleeing over Cameroon border

"This is my wells at UN news. Well, Nigerian refugees are too traumatize to return anytime soon, according to a senior official from the UN humanitarian affairs office ocher talking to you news on the border with Cameroon around thirty five thousand fled from extremist violence in the northeast Nigerian town of ran in just the past two weeks with dozens killed during a large scale, Boko haram assault today's ago, will they not Jerry enforces have reportedly taken back control said Oprah's Joan Sebastian muni Daniel Dickinson was at the border for you a news on Friday and began by asking Mr. muni to describe the scene around them. Why it's what we used to call an massive influx of populations in distress. I mean, there is people have crossed for their safety. And right there you can see hanging around. There was a lot of fucking edition coming to help. But it's very what we call an acute emergency. We have around us about twenty seven thirty thousand people that just arrived, and what services are they being provided. With what delpoyed did will services in all sectors that out of acute emergencies response, but not in quantities fall? So we have to scale up, and then we will be Leising resorts human resource for show resource and goods right now, the the stocks out in shorts to cope with the demands. Do you get a sense of how fearful the people here? All what's happened to them. Yes. Unfortunately of it since two days ago. Again, we have confirmed report of people being killed in Iran where they came from. Buchwara? I'm for instance, used to kill the man and send a spouse bike here. Just to bus under message to they want to pass through right? Nor ran is in the hand of the Nigerian government. But yet these people are too traumatized to return in any way, sooner or later. Traumatized. You think they are? Well, it's hard to imagine. Once he would up into you. You lost your gut's or you can save some goods, but look around very few. Indeed. And it was not the first attack in ran on the fourteenth of January. There was sailed one in ten months role, which means that at some point the fear is over even you will stay in your own country. I mean, you really here looking for security and safety. And that's it. Are you hopeful for what happens next? Well, I'm concerned of what can happen next. I'm hopeful for these people because yes, we're gonna take care of them in much better way in the coming days and weeks, but not so hopeful that the situation was will improve in geria- was what happened with bookworm for for the last months.

UN Daniel Dickinson Mr. Muni Cameroon Leising Joan Sebastian Assault Geria Official Oprah Jerry Iran Ten Months Two Weeks Two Days
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

02:16 min | 5 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

"Suffering for the past decade the walk off un fight commissioner for refugees and others humanitarian actress has been our ninth nine form us up on millions of people forced the from deal forms his supported tobias thinks boys of the commissioner's cooperation for the coming good to and showed responsibility for people and the panic goff attributes from basso does representing the region's of the world mystic with tertiary self took to the famous chairman assembly whole podium to speak he's had the transparent process and having being chosen by will member states he would so all equally but i must say that i am for deal when of the challenges un faces and believe me tayshaun surrounding the second petty gentle the domestic problems of today's complex walls can only by added a humble approach one in which the secondary john they'll no nine that as all the youngsters nor seek stream posey's use coming seeing the full extent if human suffering up close running the unit see he said his biggest responsibility was on behalf of the world's defenseless over the last ten years i have witnessed first hand the suffered in could have the most vulnerable people on earth i have visit it's was own suns effigy camps when when my please intimately asked what's as happen to the dignity and worse of the human person what does may does even you to the rights of those most socially and they can all meekly in the predictions and all these makes me feel the country's possibility to make you when they can et caught of my work and i trust the call of all common work of older natural disasters it can before nation's earthquake sense to know him he's on the biggest killers the you in a said in a new report to be un office for does hasta risk production you and i asked diaw also ones that climate relate to death sling to events such a storms and heat ways on the next most dangerous threat the findings coincide with the international day for disaster reduction held every year on the thirteenth of october daniel dickinson has more hey t ended me _c_m i am much china and pakistan five nations that if experience the most deadly natural catastrophe is of the last two decades deaths.

commissioner tobias goff basso posey suns diaw daniel dickinson china un chairman pakistan two decades ten years
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

02:28 min | 5 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

"Danny here ash and whiners thirty points sadly event this portion of today's programming is brought to you by cherokee forest voices dedicated to protecting the cherokee national forest a wonderland of wildlife clean water wilderness old growth forest and the appalachian trail beautiful alternative to crowded national park's cherokee forest voice is working to preserve our mountain treasures i'm jonathan i'm a big supporter of radio three nashville's tune in daily at two pm for democracy now the national daily independent award winning news program posted by journalists amy goodman and one gonzalez commodity now vied access to people and perspectives rarely her in the us por but sponsored media putting independent and international journalists ordinary people from around the world who are directly affected by us foreign policy grassroots leaders and piece active artists to them it's an independent analysts here's the real debate weekdays at two on democracy now right here on radio three nash did you listening to united nations radio in new york i'm daniel dickinson in today's program stabilize a shin efforts in the central african republic could be undermined if international support does not continue i'm violence against women remains a significant challenge in the pacific region but fuss stapleton of news from pm pen devastate shown cost by hurricane matthew in haiti has made it even more vital to step up efforts to address colorado in the country un secretary general's by give no one told journalist in new york on monday un personnel were accused of being responsible for colorado outbreak which has resulted in more than nine thousand gaps and affected more than seven hundred and fifty thousand patients since two thousand and ten and the united nations.

nashville amy goodman us nash new york daniel dickinson stapleton hurricane matthew haiti colorado secretary general united nations Danny cherokee forest foreign policy
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

02:11 min | 5 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

"And refugees and nine carry ins living in north there is recently recap should by the military still facing serious protection problems and fear the return of boko haram terrorists that's the main finding a recent un refugee agency una see our investigation across bono state based on interviews with community leaders answer billions irving in towns previously controlled by the extreme is militants his unh cls william spend briefing reporters in geneva on friday they have found similar hopkinson displace is so high level of former be lit the amount people displaced by boko haram with nearly every family affected by it very a warrant protection issues and that some of these people leaving fear that the insurgency group put up pack them again missed has been the said that food shortage is where major concern for the displaced and for those media break two from boko haram many lack the most basic assistants with women have particular risk go spend a hundred and sixteen million more than boys doing household chose everyday according to the un children's fund ian assess the fake is a base only in sf report cold harnessing the power of data for girls taking stock and looking ahead to twenty thirty published on friday forty percent differential between the sexes in terms of unpaid household shore such as commit to watch the or firewood is a guy with estimates based on the five to fourteen year old age group you know sets principal gender advisor and yuma hoekstra so that the overburden among paid household work begins in any childhood and intensifies his skills which adolescence added that as a result goal sacrifice important opportunities to learn grow and just enjoy that childhood the wells united nations some communities and the self of haiti have been totally destroyed as a result of the hurricane which swept over the caribbean nation on tuesday that's according to the un humanitarian office upshot media reports put the number of dead due to hurricane matthew at up to five hundred people around one point two million has been affected and some three hundred and fifty thousand are need of immediate humanitarian assistants and is a detour renato its head of what he d office daniel dickinson asked him how the affected.

geneva yuma hoekstra haiti media reports hurricane matthew daniel dickinson un principal advisor renato forty percent fourteen year
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

02:29 min | 5 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

"One of the world's west humanitarian crises underway in the late chat basin is struggling for attention according to the deputy secretary chairman of the us and yanda larsen nine million people urgently need to menna terry and eight across the region with some six point three million not getting enough to eat on the margins of the un joven assembly debates that he does from the region got together to discuss what needs to be done to improve the situation daniel dickinson for puerto begins with the words of yandle eisen thank you for being here today to sound the alarm four millions of people caught up in hunger conflict than human rights of use as in the length chubb base and this is one of the worst crisis in today's troubled weren't instilled regrettably it has struggled before the words attention the lake chat by so many jen and africa incorporates four countries cameroon chat and ninety area centered around blake tried itself it suffered the cumulative effects of poverty climate change environmental decker nation and increasingly conflict the terrorist group boko haram has been a major factor in the region's decline his idris dead beat the president of chat speaking through an interpreter lake chad and the region is currently experiencing one of the most tragic pages in its history a since the advent of boko haram over twenty thousand are dead since two thousand and nine there is mass destruction and just placement human travel and trade i would cultural and passed right to be seven interrupted the boko haram insurgency began in the northeast of nigeria i regional minute treat task force as being driving the insurgency out to paris state previously held the president's overnight how much to pull harvey describe what's being found in some of the liberated areas as a month to mission of durant has pools is that includes in good sexist indeed getting the ball around we have witnessed in my those openness to south live us and the victims he then to end the move to an operation oh boy who had around he has to of an idea these victims of his have drifted eleven to do nothing sexual than those and forced managers and he explained the ultimate impact of conflict and climate change but the clements hinch and tentative than his qb it's a deep into the kitchen.

chairman us terry daniel dickinson human rights jen blake president nigeria paris harvey durant climate change deputy secretary africa idris
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

01:36 min | 5 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

"Country's not being urge to step up relocation of refugees added migrants and we talked to a senior un humanitarian official in young men about the silent depth of children and their but first bulletin of news from daniel dickinson at peace agreement between rebels on the colombia in gotham on touches brought him into a fifty year long conflict has been unanimously welcomed by the un security council he still was signed by colombia and the rebel form can movement in august in the cuban capital have pena charles apparel reports colombia and far forged a ceasefire in june that was followed in august by an agreement which would formally and the conflict and build stable and long lasting piece the united nations has agreed to deploy a four hundred and fifty unarmed observers to the south america country as well as civilian components and forty locations columbia's representative to the un ambassador maria and he spoke to the security council through an interpreter the agreement has begun to bear fruits and since they entry into force of the ceasefire they has not been a single victim because of crashes involved in this country the agreement between far come the club in authorities has to be approved by a national referendum due to take place in october charles a pal united nations and i don't break of yellow fever in an goes as being brought under control un health ex but said on tuesday the risk has yet to be contained in neighboring democratic republic of the conga the announcement by the wild healthful can i say whl.

official daniel dickinson colombia gotham un security council united nations representative national referendum fever un pena charles south america columbia fifty year
"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

01:59 min | 5 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

"He's been witness for man dealt when you're listening to one assembling one jovial aren't fan radio free national relies on support from listener such as or so log on to wwe doubly dot radio free nashville dot org to learn how to donate also you can learn how to become a program or by merchandise and also check out the latest media three national news w wwd a free natural dot org radio for national league she years turtle radio is for big kids and the anybody kid in all of us host antti bob and uses multi cultural songs and stories to encourage self respect and understanding of different people you'll hear rock jazz and folk that are grown up friendly like knocking cull the remote was our thing crouse and trout fishing in america all in the same power turner radio monday's out three only honored radio free nashville you're listening to united nations radio in new york i'm matthew wells in today's program cease and reverse illegal supplement building on occupied posting inland is rallies told who report from a security council and gender inequalities costs up so hard africa more than ninety billion dollars each year since two thousand and ten one top un economy outlines how empowering women reduces deficit but first to bulletin of news from gm pen the international community has been urged by be un secretary general two and the poise in this legacy of nuclear testing bundy moines made the call in the statements to mock the international day against nuclear test observed annually on the twenty ninth of august daniel dickinson reports missed a benn said they prohibition on whom you can get testing will also boost momentum for other disarm moment measure spike showing that multi natural cooperation.

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"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

01:53 min | 5 years ago

"daniel dickinson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville WRFN Pasquo 103.7

"Come through the air Yemen which would make sense when you see on a map Yemen just do north of the cars and that's and so there has been shut down so it's logical that people with ties to Europe and I just can't wait for that are aligned big backing running to finding an alternative ways to do stream alternate of but they're getting to the man Lan of about for to somehow and moving up the Stafford and they're ending up in Alex Andrea which is where it we understand these boats or assemble a you've got them one man who was a productive as an eleven year old by a notorious African one nod stance that despite an incredibly difficult tonight she can still do great things to bring about change in the world at the net when he was held by the let's resistance on me or the ally are eight over eleven years during which time she was repeatedly raped by the rebel group Sedita Joseph Coney missed a moaning has recently published a book about her time with the LA and the affected has had on her sensed Daniel Dickinson match missed some money in New York and began by asking her where her story started spoke through an interpreter he can't economic in a while as he kicked not was when I was always cool on my way it back home and I had an expert on hand on the way when we just left school Italy led the Coyotes children twenty-three Alaska have directed the core is going on although Elway and it's a past the communication tonight parents and that's on the second night of depth option right up to them Hiller and now that.

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