3 Burst results for "Daniel Brzezinski"

"daniel brzezinski" Discussed on VS

VS

09:56 min | 2 years ago

"daniel brzezinski" Discussed on VS

"Like Michigan seen eleven. Fifteen men around van from the department of streets and sanitation, the men pushed from the side and back the van is rocking up and down. It is starting to tip. More men come to the side nine pushes and it bounces. But it doesn't quite flip and a bunch of men will walk away as a horn blares loudly as of telling the meant to stop the mechanics of flipping a van over pushed until it's bouncing and once it bounces high enough lift from the bottom eleven more pushes in the van falls over onto the driver's side. And there is a celebratory whoop as the men walk away knowing that no one is a head of his time. A riot is a thing that decides how it is to be done. And who among these men wants to consider the very long history of how he has never acted or how his never felt what do they see when they look at the flipped over van the flipped over van the long pole busting the glass, the fire and the smoke bombs the men and women with scarves their faces taking what they can from the municipal vehicles. The war. That is formed their relationship to the composition of the city. The war that has formed the police officers punitive relationship to the bodies that occupy the city the innocence of rudimentary violence is the devouring power of negation who are the bodies when the bodies are not flipping over the van what do they wish to compose when they are not composing the destruction of the city. What do they feel about the city and its refusal to absorb them? What do they feel about the state and its desire to spit them out? How will they be absorbed? And how will they be ojected there's distribution? And there is despair. And there are the things we decide to see when we look and the things we decide to see when we shield our eyes from the pain. What else is there to be done? Once the van has been flipped over. What steps do we need take to create lasting structural changes? In our neighborhood. Our city our nation. How many vans should be flipped over and in what order they ponder these questions with screams, flames and polls jammed into the glass of cars and storefronts. Jammed into the bird into transact compose, destroy. Daniel we are really excited to be in the studio today with Daniel Brzezinski. So the first question that we wanna ask you Daniel is what is moving you these days, I'm excited to be here. You know? I mean, I'm thinking of moving as being like physically moved and being shaken and being compelled to I don't know not be comfortable in my body. And evidently, I don't know if it's these days, but I'm I'm figuring out how to kind of deal with the like every day horror of right now the ways in which we are treating immigrants and in many ways that's been like a subject in my writing for a very long time. But it sort of hasn't made it any easier for me to process and different ways and over the last month. Right. This is obsessive talk about the wall, which has been this slick utter distraction from like actual human rights violations. That are having all the time that is really central and how I'm feeling about where we are right now. Have you seen like this idea of the wall and? That conversation moving in your writing at all or is it just like part of this long ongoing trajectory. I mean in some ways it's part of a long ongoing trajectory and in other ways, it's so certainly I was thinking about it in the border of site of conflict more directly. Yes. I mean, the shape wrote a poem about the wall. But but also just have a kind of been thinking a lot about the desert of the site of incarceration of of of human rights abuse of the abuse of children. And so that sort of space both of those spaces a incarcerating space in a degrading space has has been president. And a lot of manure writing to can we talk about the one of the poems at you read just now. Sure, yeah, I feel like really moved by the light kind of central operating mechanism. Some of the first seen that you read the one that opens act to can you talk about like what led you into that piece? And like what you're doing there, and what you're thinking through in that poem. Yeah. I mean, so on the one hand there's the quote by by Milton Friedman that I read which I kind of want to emphasize that the sococo that I'm talking about is a Chicago of extreme neo-liberal capital. And and the kind of irony of this economist on the south side of Chicago surrounded by racialist poverty proposing the idea that the free market was somehow going to be a way to get people of different races to stop hating each other. Magin living. It's such a world. That ideology, right? As in many ways, central to the Chicago that that we live in. And then the other, you know, the quote by Nero has I think just thinking about kind of anti metaphor ick way of depicting violence, right and calling things what they are in thinking about maybe the limitations of poetic language, rain when it resorts to how we talk about extreme violence. And so I think this might have been one of the later pieces that I wrote in this book, and there's sort of conjunction of many things happening. I mean, this sort of larger context of the book has to do with police violence in Chicago. But remember writing this around the time that the Nazi demonstrations in Charlottesville were happening. And then I was also reading a amiss zehr. And this sort of. Conjunction of things all came together. Right. And here we were listening to conversations about whether or not there were good Nazis. Right. Like plot twists now. Right. And that this is like a sort of rational thing that we are supposed to like actually debate or something like that. And so the the just fusion of those things of kind of extreme capitalism being a co could join with an extreme racism, and was is I think one on the one hand, very central Chicago central to the United States, but maybe central to the sort of language. I was trying to piece together, you know, this palm and the kind of like mechanics of this poem is, you know, one way of tackling that problem of the limitations of metaphor to talk about violence, but it's also like such a central question, and like problem and limitation that. I think the the book is coming up against again. And again, what are some of the other strategies that you were employing to try to? Wrestle with that. If you would ask me that about the performance of becoming human. I would have said that I I was using kind of like meta poetic strategy where I was maybe not depicting violence directly. But was rather kind of talking about the ways in which we observe and are absorbed by and talk about violence, and that was a kind of strategy that that was happening throughout the book in this one. Yeah, I mean, I think something different happened in this book, which is there sort of like eyeball, and a we we bodies that are like actually experiencing violence in different forms, right? What I was thinking about was the ways in which the city is itself the site and the scene and the victim of violence, right? And that lake. What does it mean that, you know, I don't know a police officer shoot somebody around the corner from your house, right? That's clearly different than being shot by police officer. And it's clearly different than being, you know, the family member of the victim or loved one or whatever. But that's also a trauma that that. Let's say your entire neighborhood has to deal with like all of the time. Right. And so I think that was one of the ways that I was trying to conceive of the book, right? And and I want to do like very carefully because obviously it is very different to be the victim the direct victim of violence. But on the other hand, I do want to say that there is a way in which if you choose to look right, which is part of what's happening in that book. It is happening to sm-. If you're a poet who acknowledges that the world is on fire, then you really have to think about what tools by going gonna use this sort of tend to the fire that I'm paying attention to or the fires paying attention to so between Lake Michigan and the performance of becoming. Human there is this really strong voice and style, and sort of sense of character that I think comes across in the books that I think is heightened in Lake Michigan when you get into the accident scene structures. Some wondering how do you find sort of that consistent manner, pained voice or character study kind of that you're doing with the the language of the Poetics? How does that feel useful to you as you're trying to like ten to the things that the books are tending to? I mean, there's kind of like craft answer to that question, which is a lot of it is comedic craft and then give me like the real shit.

Chicago officer Daniel Brzezinski Lake Michigan Michigan Milton Friedman United States president Nero Charlottesville one hand Milton
"daniel brzezinski" Discussed on VS

VS

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"daniel brzezinski" Discussed on VS

"She's the sunny to my over share for any joy and their password for macho fuckers dot com is upper case D A at getting it's the next minute. You're listening to the podcast poets confront the ideas that moved them brought to you by the poetry foundation and post loudness. Wicklow side know, remind me to tell you my critiques of much dot com. My gosh. It was an actual porn site is one of the greatest that has fallen from grace. Are you feeling? Good good to be here. The great state of Illinois and the great state of Illinois. Know that I mean better than Minnesota. Oh, them's is some words. Yeah. I mean, I feel like Minnesota is the best date. We have interesting lakes and trees, and I like our white people sometimes more than other white people. And yeah, yeah. Yeah. I appreciate a Bose into politeness actually get through it helps you get through. We have prints, and I have unreasonable opinions about people from Wisconsin. Because I'm from Minnesota. I mean, I feel like my years living in Rhode Island gave me quite an oversized amount of Rhode Island pride. And I also I think an appreciation for like the rudeness of white strangers, actually. Yeah. You know, there's like a particular kind of like rude. White bus driver that I just like love I'm very into it. Yeah. Yeah. Lava cranky Italian cranky. It's. Since a delicious sandwich. Cranky Italian entre Bata. I mean, this whole state pride thing is like, I don't know. It's sort of silly silly state borders, or maybe one of the only silly borders. But it also again, it highlights the absurdity of all imaginary lines are highly militarized and released and that people die trying to get across. You know? I think it's an absurdity that doesn't mean it's a high stakes and I think that there's something about the work of our guest today. Daniel Brzezinski that manages to capture both the high stakes of a place like the border and a concept like the border. I'm while not shying away from also like the kind of strangeness and absurdity of institutions like aboard. Daniel is a poet and translator author of many collections, including the most recent like Michigan and the national book award winning the performance of becoming human and we're really excited to get into this interview with him. He's gonna start us off with the poem. And then stay tuned for more brilliant on the other side of that. Let's get into. So I will read a couple scenes ten and eleven from Lake Michigan, which is the beginning of the the second active Lake Michigan is divided into. To axe and nineteen scenes, and there are to epigraph the begin a act to the first from the Chicago economist Milton Friedman who says quote, the great virtue of a free market system. Is that it does not care? What color people are had only cares whether they can produce something you want to buy is the most effective system. We have discovered to enable people who hate one another to deal with one another and help one another and the second from of LA nit Rueda from his poem about the Spanish civil war. Explicable scores us explain a few things, you pour les Gayus last. They lose Nina's guerrillas implemented Cassandra the Nina's enter the streets. The blood of children ran simply like the blood of children Lake Michigan seen ten the police shooting. Boys are like police shooting boys in the Nazis burning Jews or like. Nazis burning Jews and the police protecting Nazis are like police protecting Nazis and the prisoners who are tortured or like prisoners who are tortured and the psychologist overseeing torture are like psychologists overseeing, torture, and the mayor privatizing prisons is like the mayor privatizing prisons and the rule of law being suspended is like the rule of law being suspended and the broken prisoners on the beach, I like broken prisoners on the beach a dream. I am pregnant, and my baby is a revolutionary plan to destroy the global economy, and my baby is like a baby with a bullet in its mouth 'cause like a baby with a bullet in its mouth was like a baby with a bullet in its mouth, and the disappearing public employees are like disappearing public employees and the puddle of vomit from tortured prisoner is like a puddle of vomit from tortured prisoner and hunger of an actual child is the hunger of an actual child and the basic function of the Konami is the basic function of the economy and the politically impossible is the politically inevitable and the bourgeois savage. Ages are like Bua savages and the bourgeois savages who do not see themselves as savages or like bourgeois savages who do not see themselves as savages and the bodies that are expropriated for private purposes like bodies expropriated for private purposes, and when they disappear into the pinhole of capital, they disappear into the abyss of capital when they disappear into the of capital there's silence when everyone refuses to act because they are too concerned with their own material health to care about the broken body of another. And the wasted food on the beach is like wasted food on the beach and the starving. Children who are not allowed to eat the wasted food on the beach or like starving. Children who are not allowed to eat wasted food on the beach and the bourgeois savages do not notice the broken bodies until are beaten in their usual backyards, and they say how dare you use my backyard to beat this broken body. I will look away only you don't beat them in my backyard, and they say one broken body in my backyard doesn't count for anything. And they're like people who think that one broken body doesn't count for anything and a massacre at a black church is a massacre at a black church and a massacre at an elementary school is a massacre at an elementary school and the Nazis with torches are like Nazis with torches and the police who kill are like police who kill and the dying sand is like dying sand and the refugee arrested for speaking the wrong language is a prisoner who never learns to speak the right language, and the bomb is like a bomb and the static is like an aesthetic and the blank Ness of the city is like the blackness of the. City and the language of the riot is the language of the riot. And the blood of the silenced is like the blood of the silenced. And the blindness of the bourgeois savage is like a mouth the can't stop biting a body that refuses to die like

Minnesota Daniel Brzezinski Lake Michigan Illinois Rhode Island Wicklow Nina Wisconsin LA nit Rueda Michigan national book award Milton Friedman Chicago les Gayus Bua Cassandra
"daniel brzezinski" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"daniel brzezinski" Discussed on The Slowdown

"Happy national poetry months. Lowdown listeners. I'm Jennifer lie. The producer of the slowdown for us. It's always poetry month. Take a minute to support your daily source for poetry and inspiration. Give to the slowdown, and we'll send you the slowdown mug. As a thank you gift. Give today at slowdown show dot org slash donate. I'm u s poet laureate, Tracy case Smith, and this is the slowdown. I must have been in high school when I first encountered the word surreal, and I took it at face value as something unreal. Or impossible. What happens when fantasy infiltrates reality? I was young sheltered and happy. And so the dark implications of the term were hard for me to grasp flash forward thirty years, and wow, I get it. I understand how perfectly necessary it can be to resort to the dreamlike and illogical when trying to make sense of what we allowed to occur in the actual world because so much that is terrible and heroin and absolutely real feels like it just ought not to be possible ought not to jibe. With the laws of logic or be plausible. As fact I now grasp how the surreal can be a powerful political tool attempting to shake us out of our groggy acceptance. So that we can see an atone for the real damage we and the institutions that act on our behalf are responsible for today's poem lake. Michigan seen three is by Daniel Brzezinski of Chicago, set an imaginary internment camp on the shores of the lake. The poem offers a nightmarish lens on the conditions endured by real communities of immigrants the poor and people of color Lake Michigan seen three by Daniel Brzezinski. The bodies are on the beach and the bodies keep breaking and the fight. Right is over but the bodies aren't dead and the mayor keep saying, I will bring back the bodies. I will bring back the bodies that were broken the broken bodies, speak, slowly, they walk slowly onto a beach that hangs over a fire into a fire that hangs over a city into a city of immigrants of refugees of dozens of illegal languages into a city where every body is a border between one empire and another. I don't know the name of the police officer who beats me, I don't know the name of the superintendent who orders the police officer to beat me. I don't know the name of the diplomat who exchanged my boss. Body for oil. I don't know the name of the governor who exchanged my body for chemicals. The international observers tell me, I'm mythological. They tell me my history has been wiped out by history. They look for the barracks. But all they see is the lake and its grandeur, the flowering gardens, the flourishing beach. The international observers ask me if I remember the bomb that was dropped on my village. They asked me if I remember the torches the camps. The ruins they asked me if I remember the river the birds the ghosts, they say fine hope in hopefulness find life in death listeners locate the proper balance between living and grieving I walk on the lake and hear voices. I hear voices in the sand and wind I hear guilt and shame in the waves. I have my body when others are missing. I. My hands when others are severed. I hear the children of Chicago singing, we live in the blankets of times. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the library of congress and the poetry foundation.

Daniel Brzezinski Chicago Smith Lake Michigan officer producer Michigan congress heroin Tracy superintendent thirty years