20 Burst results for "Daniel Boone"

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

05:58 min | Last month

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Elizabeth corbin a relative by marriage of boone wrote about the old back woodsmen quote. He had a soft almost effeminate. An extremely mild and pleasant manners in fact most if not all of the old hunters who spent most of their time in the deep solitude of the unbroken woods spoken soft low tones. I do among my acquaintances recall an exception. As we consider boone's influence on american ideals it reminds me of teddy roosevelt famous line about speaking softly. But carrying a big stick. Boone undoubtedly carried a big one in the final moments of nathan boone's interview with draper. He said quote my father daniel. Boone was five feet eight inches broad shoulders and a chest. That tapered down his usual weight was around. One hundred seventy five pounds. But at one period he exceeded two hundred pounds in his closing years. Weighed only one hundred fifty five pounds. His hair was moderately black as blue and he had fair skin he never used tobacco in any form and was temperate in everything as we. Come to a close and our boone series. I'm thrilled for the insight. We've gained in learned about american identity and ourselves but i'm slightly grieved. I've been immersed into boone's life in the last several months. And i don't want to leave but maybe that's the point. The values of our heroes can stay with us so much of what i value particularly in nature wildness. Solitude and hunting can be traced back to boone he defined for us. What a woodsmen and a back woodsmen was an i now cherish those phrases more than ever and i want to carry them with dignity responsibility in modern times at a larger scale. I think boone was defined by the quest for more the modern american version of that is an unsatiable quest for more stuff more cars more money. More land more prestige. But i think we have the right to amend this to redeem it quest. Pursuit are good things. I think we should all be on a quest in undeterred by obstacles and trials that we've just got to make sure that requesting after pursuing the right things things that have more value than external wealth which will ultimately rust wrought. The cannot be taken with us after we leave this place. Our country is in a quandary to define a modern american identity. My only input is this. The american back woodsmen has earned the right to sit at the table and put his fingerprint on these ideals. He's earned the right to exist in modern tiles are conservation ethic has been honed by two hundred years of experience. Both good and bad and indisputably we are leading the way saving wildlife in the wild places that we love. This is deeply in american ideal. That honors the native american land ethic and the revamped modern ethic of the woodsmen let the woodsmen the hunters and fishermen be stewards and protectors the wild that. We have laughed. As civilization and concrete spread like wildfire across the landscape we will protect them because we value them and we value them because of the words in lives of our.

boone Elizabeth corbin nathan boone Boone teddy roosevelt draper daniel
"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

01:51 min | Last month

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"That's k. r. e. g. tool dot com..

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

05:07 min | Last month

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"I think it was saturday. When my father was taken in sunday when he surrendered up the others he said he went on horseback to kill meat for the company. In any event he had killed the buffalo and loaded his horse with meat. It started snowing quite hard before he killed the buffalo so he started for the licks which he had left that morning it preceded some distance when he discovered a small party of indians on a trail. The snow was now something like an interest so deep and he could easily be followed. Father at once attempted to untied throw off the load of meat but failed because the fresh buffalo strings were frozen. The strings had been cut from the buffalo. That made up this heavy load. Perhaps three or four hundred pounds and lashed around the horse's belly by the tugs then attempted to draw knife from the scabbard to cut the tugs but he found his knife which had been thrust into the sheath when all bloody had frozen father's greasy hands and greasy knife handle prevented him from getting the knife out. End of quote. The shani's then captured boone. Nathan went on to describe something very interesting about his father. My father colonel daniel. Boone used to say that in his early indian troubles and difficulties in kentucky. If he dreamed of his father and he was angry it would forboding evil but if he appeared pleasant he had nothing to fear each time when captured robbed or defeated he thus dreamed unfavourably about his father. Indiv- quote now will hear nathan talk about when boon was captured and brought back to their chief blackfish using pompey as interpreter. Blackfish s. my father about his men who were at the p. Memo lick this. Was the general name shiny fur salt springs referring to the lower blue licks. Father asks how they knew his men were there and they said they're spies at seeing them. Father admitted that these men were his and blackfish informed him. They were going to kill them. My father then proposed if they would not mistreat them nor make them run the gauntlet. He would surrender them up as prisoners of war end of quote. Now boone. leads the sean ease to his men that are working at a salt lick. Here's boone. i suppose it was on the north side of the river. The salt makers relying on their blankets apparently sunning themselves with the snow then half a leg deep. My father called out to the men that they were surrounded by large body of indians he explained that he had stipulated for their surrender and had secured the promise of good treatment for them. He said that it was impossible for them to get away and begged them not to attempt to defend themselves as they would all be massacred. They at once yielded his advice and as my father in the indians with him began to descend the hill. The others began to come in from every direction in the quote. Boone and his men would be captured and they would stay with the shawny for four months. Some of the men would escape at different times. It was at this time. That boone was adopted as the son of blackfish. And thus ashani boone would spend the entire four months there in adapted very well to indigenous life. This would come back to haunt boon later. This is nathan talking about how blackfish treated his father both blackfish in a squall treated father very kindly and he seemed to think much of them. They had two daughters both small name poem apiece and pima. Pc the former was four or five years old ill-tempered and hateful. The youngest was a mere child. Perhaps a year old with a kind temper and boone. Houston nurse it frequently used the silver trinkets as currency ima by maple sugar to give to the children who would smile and call it. Mola's an example of blackfish kindness and an indians idea of taste was that blackfish would suck a lump of sugar while in his mouth. Take it out and give it to boone who we always addressed as my son blackfish at that time was perhaps fifty years old but perhaps not quite that old blackfish gave my father the name shell tawi which means the big turtle.

buffalo blackfish boone colonel daniel Indiv Boone shani boon nathan pompey Nathan kentucky ashani boone sean pima Mola Houston
"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

01:58 min | Last month

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Daniel boone in his actions and his life real or mythical embodied what the american people wanted to see happen in the wilderness. They wanted to see man in the wilderness thriving and dominating and conquering. Because that's a good story because that's a good story and so whether it happened or not. We wrote it deep down because we wanted to read it on this third and final episode daniel boone series on the burgers podcast. We're going to cover boone's life from thirty five years of age to the grave or at least where we think is gray biz. We'll explore boone's adoption as shawnee the heroic rescue of his daughter rumors of his wife's unfaithfulness him. Killing one hundred fifty. Five bears in one season is financial failures and his character. We're in search of who boone was his significance in american culture. And perhaps you'll find his fingerprints on your life. Heroes her conduit value systems and we'll evaluate the one deposited by the old back woodsmen. The trail has been steepened thick. But we're about to ascend to the hilltop in see boons grande vista. You're not gonna wanna miss this one for boom story. It's really the story of this country. Good and bad my name. Is clay nukem in this is the bear grease podcast. We'll explore things forgotten but relevant search for inside in unlikely places and where we'll tell the story of americans who live their lives close to the land presented by f h f gear american-made purpose built hunting and fishing gear. That's.

boone Daniel boone daniel boone shawnee
"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

05:52 min | 2 months ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Be <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> able to hunt <Speech_Male> to be able to own weapons <Speech_Male> to have this unlimited <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> continent <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ahead <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and of course they did things <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we don't approve <Speech_Music_Male> especially to the indians <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> they weren't gonna let indian <Speech_Music_Male> stand in the way of <Speech_Music_Male> this <Speech_Music_Male> new <Speech_Music_Male> world <Speech_Music_Male> trying to <Speech_Music_Male> be <Speech_Music_Male> so they were far <Speech_Music_Male> from perfect people <Speech_Music_Male> but <Speech_Music_Male> they also did <Speech_Music_Male> wonderful <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> created <Speech_Music_Male> a sense <Speech_Music_Male> of a new <Speech_Music_Male> country a new civilization. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah <Speech_Music_Male> so <Speech_Music_Male> historical <Speech_Music_Male> relativism. <Speech_Music_Male> I think is something <Speech_Music_Male> we <SpeakerChange> shouldn't carry <Music> too far. <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Met a bit of <Speech_Music_Male> a loss while gathering <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my thoughts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on this episode. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We really didn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cover much of boone's life <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> part <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> one. We made it from his <Speech_Music_Male> birth to his mid thirties. <Speech_Music_Male> But <Speech_Music_Male> we're still here <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in his mid thirties. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We dedicated <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this. Entire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> time to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the cumberland gap <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> because of its <Speech_Music_Male> significance <Speech_Music_Male> on boone <Speech_Music_Male> indigenous <Speech_Music_Male> people <Speech_Music_Male> and america. <Speech_Music_Male> Man <Speech_Music_Male> i love <Speech_Music_Male> daniel <Speech_Music_Male> boone. And <Speech_Music_Male> ten to celebrate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> him <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and most <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> parts of his life. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Boone's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> passing through the cumberland <Speech_Music_Male> gap was <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> truly physical <Speech_Music_Male> feet romanticized <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and cherished by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> back. Woodsmen like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> myself <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but it was also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> deeply metaphorical <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for america. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I like the tension <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> between man and nature <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> narrow mountain <Speech_Music_Male> pass and this <Speech_Music_Male> rugged dude <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> duke it out <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but i only <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> love it because <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> boone taught <Speech_Music_Male> us to love it. <Speech_Music_Male> It's the story <Speech_Music_Male> we identify <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with the one <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we were born <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that version <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ridiculously <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> embodies western <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thought. Even <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in its telling <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> indigenous. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> People didn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> view their lives in <Speech_Music_Male> conflict with nature. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> were simply part <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm speculating <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but perhaps <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the indigenous <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> view wouldn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> see humans passing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> through the gap <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as a fight <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> against nature <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but rather <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like the current <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of a flooding <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> river. That <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> couldn't be held back. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The one thing that we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> know for certain <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as we look at human <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> history is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that civilizations <Speech_Music_Male> rise <Speech_Music_Male> and fall <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in very <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> seldom <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is it just. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> suspect these <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are the treacherous <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> waters <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> will

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

18:17 min | 2 months ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Just the nature of the times where he was at and what he was doing. He ended up being in conflict with different times. That you have to analyze zim. I think you'd have to analyze that aspect of him in context of his peers and compared his peers. Yeah he had a very lenient. Compared to the long hunters compared to other millet other soldiers of the time seems to have had a very tolerant rather progressive view of of relations between the euro. Americans in the native americans bought at the same time. Did a tremendous amount in some respects one could say like unintentionally but knowingly did a tremendous amount to displace those people but understood the loss that he was inflicting. Dr taylor keen is a graduate of dartmouth college and has a couple of graduate degrees from harvard. He's currently a professor in the business. School of crichton university in omaha nebraska most relevant for this conversation. He's a member of the cherokee in omaha nation. He considered himself a citizen historian the cherokee nation. I wanted to ask him about the other side of the story of the cumberland gap meet professor king professor team. I want to Want to tell you and experience. That had while i was in kentucky i took my family to the cumberland gap. So the cumberland gap sits on the border of tennessee virginia and kentucky and the way that we came through. The gap was from. Virginia and tennessee side. So we came from east to west. And as i. I'd been thinking about this for so long. I was excited in you. Kinda drive on this highway. And you can see the cumberland gap. And as i'm there with my boys car wife. I'm talking to them about how you know. This is what daniel boone saw. This is exactly what he saw minus the buildings in civilization when he came through here. And we we went through the cumberland gap from from east to west. We stayed in middlesboro kentucky that night and that evening we decided we were going to drive back through the gap and when i was driving from west to east i just had the thought that most likely the first human to ever walk through that gap came from west east most likely no one really knows where the indigenous people of north america exactly came from but the best evidence right now i would say with. They came from the west and moved into the east and it was really kind of moving thought because as an as a american. I'm thinking about the european americans that came from east to west but the indigenous peoples they would have found that thousands of years before before americans did in the french did and white europeans and it was. And that's what got me on this train of thought of you know we celebrate this path. People passing through this gap but for the indigenous people of this country of this continent. It wasn't something necessarily to be celebrated. And that's why i wanted to talk to you. I just wanted to get your your perspective and just talk about ultimately the impact of of europeans. Coming in through the cumberland gap and then just settling the rest of north america. I think that's a fantastic intro. And that's the big question is not how long ago where the first humans to see that. And that's a mind. Mind boggling question for sure. The theory to which you are indicating is the baron straight theory. Correct there's a couple of them. I hear of. But that has an indelible. On americans. Perceptions of indigenous peoples are ancient cherokee stories Say that we come from an island in the east meaning the atlantic and that we were on a island that had volcanoes and Big turtles that's actually a very important part of cherokee cosmology. Those those Turtles but that makes it sound like it's somewhere around the galapagos or something like that and then our stories say that that that was where we had massive temples and and an earlier golden age that eventually water overcame the island and we had to flee. And that's where our stories of grandmother spider carried our one number from one great fire and that we've migrated into what would be south america and the turkey is the only tribe that utilize blow dart guns as hunting weapons as well as double walled basket tree. And so that's an imprint. Of our time in south america and then that we migrated up over the great old man which is the mississippi river and then eventually found ourselves up near the senecas because that's are most closely related tribal groups and eventually we were forced down south into what is more often than not viewed as you know turkey homelands but we were probably immigrants to that areas while you can look to the five civilized. Tribes the creeks in the choctaw chickasaw and and and the seminoles that was that was their homeland but turkey certainly occupied it. The question is for how long. So when we're talking about things. Like the cumberland gap it. Time as continuing makes it really really messy regardless of who discovered that of course. We'll we'll never know. Most americans would site that of daniel. Boone who valley signs. I think indigenous peoples had a bigger influence on on daniel boone and other frontiers men than what is more popularly recognized. Yes and little things like him. Basting the turkey with its own juices and something that you know we as americans just take for commonplace but I was probably thousands year old indigenous practice with you know with those those great birds that have been here for a very long time very important in tribal cultures. Talk to me about the the long term like high level overview of what happened what that started to the indigenous people when when white europeans came through that gap. Well it's There's one aspect of indigenous history in the americas that you can't get around. That's the issue of smallpox and disease primarily smallpox. However it got here many scholars would theorized it came from the spanish probably spanish conquistadors and whether or not came directly from human contact or dogs or horses of course in these days we all understand the basics of a pandemic doesn't doesn't matter how it got here. What does matter was the impact on indigenous peoples without exception across all of the americas. Whether that's what is now. Canada and the united states central america south america the indigenous peoples were decimated by smallpox most conservative estimates are around seventy percent but the bulk of the data that we do have is eighty five to ninety five percent decimation death rates from smallpox. And so we have these fascinating documented encounters with indigenous peoples from say the spanish conquistadors and massive numbers tribal peoples in the amazon mesoamerica. You can pick your conquistador and follow each story but the story is pretty much the same. They were outnumbered. In many cases pushed back repelled or defeated came back with larger armies a few years later and found everyone gone. And so it's that's that's the story that i think is so hard for people to get their minds wrapped around. Think of your one hundred closest friends and family and there's only five of you left. Wow so it at the least it Only have detrimentally impacted tribal peoples whether that's abrasive headman. In warriors which is crucial at such times or the the the knowledge of agricultural lifeways ninety five percent of the knowledge gone so in many cases we were kind of faced with almost a cultural amnesia. And so if you were a child that survived that no longer. Do you have ninety. Five percent of those teachers storytellers. You have five and they have five percent of what was left. So you have this huge gap and made it an easy story for your americans coming to america to view it as a vast wilderness when in reality you know it's been populated for over ten thousand years for sure and arguably twenty to thirty thousand years so there there was no wilderness. There was only land and the animals and whether one knew them or not. I'd look at things. Like the cumberland gap and i think. Easy ten thousand years maybe fifteen and if we go into the number of generations of people that is. It's just mind boggling. When we think of american history just at a surface level you think of wars with indigenous people that would have killed native americans. immuno musket balls and whatnot. But really that. That's not the culprit. That's not the main culprit. The main culprit was disease this hidden this hidden warfare that came in just from contact which is just really such a bizarre thing when you think about it because how how bad at i don't know i mean i'm sure there's science behind how these white europeans were coming from tightly grouped dwelling places of people so disease with spread around and these indigenous people were living. These healthy lives out in the wild so they didn't have disease. That's the biggest irony. Because nearly all of these pandemic says it were smallpox etcetera all came from domesticated animals So smallpox is a evasion of cowpox. And that's why there was a greater immunity towards it with european populations They were certainly not immune when you dig deep into american history. You see the impact on even on the founding fathers themselves you know just a personal question professor keen like i mean you can tell from me doing a podcast series on daniel boone. This is a man that like. I want to celebrate you. See inside the research. Boone was just a figurehead. He was just an archetype for for what americans did. He was just the one that we kind of picked to be our heroes. So we're not necessarily picking on boone but like how. How do you feel when we celebrate. Somebody like boone. I mean but you're in american as well now. I mean it's so long past but what are your personal thoughts on that. I've just always found it fascinating. I mean first of all i. I consider myself a patriot. And i love our country and i understand why all cultures need heroes. And so you talked a lot about branding and archetypes. And of course that's all stuff in our and our field a business. And i understand that. And so i acknowledge that he was an icon. He was an archetype of that frontier. Zeman but i also feel like there should be in history indigenous peoples that he worked with learned from spent time hunting with that should also be those types types of heroes and we don't know who those are but guaranteed they were there He did have a relationship with try. The cherokees he did have a relationship with the shawnise. I'm just glad that podcasts like yours. Today bring those aspects of history backup because it only adds to the rich tapestry of really. What would made those individuals able to survive. What an incredible perspective from professor came. I want to go back to mr morgan and hear what he has to say about historical revision. I figure he's got some insight in modern times people have they go back into history and they they find faults with people based on things that we now know were agreed things like slavery like people we now know worldwide that this was a terrible thing. This is a. This is a scar on humanity. That we've we've been a part of this but it but it just doesn't seem fair to go back and say that every human that ever was involved in that in any way was an evil person and at the same time. I'm i'm talking about boone and want to give him credit for all these things but we know there was this irony inside of his life for things that were done the native americans and you know we said that he owned a slave and not a whole lot is known about that. Can you speak to that. Discount like your personal thoughts on on how we can deal with that well. Historical revisionism is the fashion. Now and people won't to impose on the past the values and the judgments of the present and we should keep that in mind. You know our ideals and our ethics as we look at historical figures but we sit also be tolerant because we're all human beings and we all make mistakes and in the future. some historian may be looking at us. they inevitably will So do you also want to be more flexible and looking at these figures and not only see what they did wrong but to see what they did right and the case of boom to remember why he's important. I mean there's a reason he saw important in american culture and in fact in world culture. We shouldn't have it both ways. Yeah i think we should remember that. Daniel boone believe it or not raises a quaker actually had slaves at least one point and we should remember that we tend human beings to act the way other people are acting in a culture. That probably at that time. It's seen okay. 'cause everybody was doing it to realize that to remember that thomas jefferson owned slaves but the also hard slavery. The strange paradox. To remember that Boone did other things. It wasn't just owning a slave pride. So it's possible in what i'm hearing you say is that it's very possible for someone to in this same so contrary to what we hear happening in society today but it is possible for someone to have parts of their life that are very honorable and noble and then maybe have one section. That wasn't great and that one section doesn't cancel out the honorable and noble. I don't think we should look at people's lives just over one issue. I mean you've got to look at take the thing all around and away and Try to get some understanding of them as a human being with many facets At the same time you keep in mind the values of the president of course that a historian is looking at things through the lens of the present always and their own biases and values. But you can't be much of a historian or biographer. Unless you're able to also see things through the lens of that time otherwise you will be so limited and your approach you have to have this sympathetic imagination empathetic imagination so you can try to find out how those people saw things. How did the world look to rebecca boone to michael in a stone er- to simon kenton. What were they after. They trying to do of course. You can't do that perfectly. But the point of historical writing is to try to imagine what this was like what it had been like to have kentucky. They're in a week and say oh they destroyed the game. They bought slavery into kentucky. What was michael stoner. What was boom thinking of at that time and they were probably think of this great paradise the thing available distinct. There can go there i can. I can become a part of it. We cannot judge in our own time. What land meant to these scotch-irish emigrants who'd never had a foot of land. They could keep what that mid to here to.

cumberland smallpox daniel boone kentucky Dr taylor keen School of crichton university middlesboro south america omaha tennessee north america Virginia west east united states central america Boone dartmouth college americas
"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

05:51 min | 2 months ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Gave a.

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

07:55 min | 2 months ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Of a product of erosion of rock. That's been uplifted to make them out. In the first place and erosion preferentially for example on the rocks that are weakest salako. She'll versus the granite If there are places where. The mountains rocks have been fractured. You might have faults that slid and they introduce the place where erosion can can happen in create that notch or gap that would allow people to pass through it Other places like if you're in the himalayas you'd have glaciers that are creating some of those notches that you could pass over in the term Notch gap pass applies universally. You can look across the us in the rockies up in canada in the appalachians and see similar features and not all of them are caused by the same things. The appalachians were the product of several mountain building events. But one that was really prominent Is what's called the guinean rajini when you take continental crust and other material and you collide it together to make a mountain belt. You end up producing faults where some rocks slide up on top of another in the pine mountain thrust is the main structure that brings part of the appalachians up on top of the adjacent rock. But then there are other faults in everyone's familiar with the san andreas fault for example and in that case rocks are actually sliding past each other on a very steep fault like a los angeles is now creeping towards san francisco for example and the vault unique in the cumberland gap. Kind of like that. It's a steep fault where rocks slid past each other called the rocky face fault. And if you didn't have the juxtaposition of the pine mountain thrust in the rocky face fault where the sit in intersect each other. It seems conceivable. You would never really had a gap larry. So there's two different major forces working together that created get to faults that occur right in that vicinity that helped create the gap and we talked about earlier. How the rock type matters to and some of the high ground that's held up along. The ridges is very resistant. Sandstone conglomerate rock and so it helps to have rocks that are more resistant weathering. What kind of map would you call this. You got pulled up your so. This is What's called a digital elevation model. And it's basically a three dimensional representation of what hunters would see as a topographic map. The i don't know if anybody knows about this but there is a huge impact crater that is just to the south west of what you're talking about. Is that a natural lake there at borough. No it's not a league it is. So here's the topographic map and you can see. It's a depression so he's described to you what i'm seeing. He's he's pointing at an impact crater which looks like i mean like an asteroid or something hit. There was that right. That is what the current thinking is that. Here's a geologic map and you can see. It's got this circular shape to it and there is Pretty decent evidence that post deposition these rocks and the appalachian rajini something smacks hard right there. And apparently this is one of the few places where coal is mined within an impact crater really. Yeah geologists call these impact. Craters astro blames daniel. Boone had three interesting structures to negotiate along with all of the native americans prior to him in everybody trying to make the trip across the appalachian two intersecting faults. An astro blame where an asteroid hit. Aided informing the cumberland gap. I like connecting human history to grand things like mountain building that we have absolutely no control over but inflict massive control. On us the cumberland gap is the biggest invest gap for one hundred miles in either direction enforces above and below the earth. Help make it that way. It's wild because no gap in the world has been more critical in building. An empire in the cumberland gap. The gap is actually pretty new to people of european descent but native americans have used it since before recorded history and they called it. The warriors path at the womanly. This gap connected the iroquois confederacy in the chair keys in the south. The first recorded account of europeans. Gone through the cumberland gap dates back to the sixteen seventy s but dr thomas walker officially named the gap. It's european name anyway in the seventeen. Fifty s wild and ironic. This american gap was named after a straight up english chump. The duke of cumberland because of his recent military escapade. And wouldn't you know what they named the whole stinking mountain range. After this man who never set foot in north america owed the injustice the shawnee however called the range wasi oto which means mountains where the deer are plentiful. I can get behind that. Dr walker was a medical doctor. Land speculator in a woodsmen. He took good notes of his seventeen. Fifty travels into kentucky they hauled a pack bear hounds with them and ate a lot of bear me. Here's a couple of wild stories. One of his men got bit on the knee by of bear. Pretty unfortunate walkers horse got snake bit on the nose and he rubbed it with bear grease to help cure it. not kidding. it's in his journal. Walker recorded killing thirteen buffalo's eight elk fifty-three bear twenty year. Four geese hundred fifty turkeys on their five month trip. In walker's men built a i log cabin. Constructed by white men in kentucky was no doubt quite the trip but very few remember doctor walkers name but do remember who crossed the gap almost twenty years later. I want to take you into the cumberland gap. You can go there yourself. This mountain pass maintained its relevance into modern times as a travel corridor as it eventually became modern. Us highway twenty-five the section of road was extremely treacherous. In the cumberland gap was notorious for tragic vehicle. Accidents claiming an average of five lives per year in this very short stretch of road however something good happened on october. Eighteenth nineteen ninety-six cumberland gap twin bore. Four lane tunnel was opened. Which burrows through cumberland mountain and in an incredibly encouraging feet they remove the concrete and asphalt highway that went through the old gap and re weilded and today it looks similar to what it looked like when only a single wagon lane trail passed through it. The gap. now sits in the cumberland state park. it's an incredible place. And i took my family there. So we are at the cumberland. Gap is the historic cumberland gap. We're in the cumberland gap right now. Take a picture with your mama marcus. Clad warrior battling civil war soldiers. Each was here in the historic cumberland gap. And now so.

cumberland salako san andreas dr thomas walker Dr walker larry san francisco los angeles canada Boone depression Us daniel kentucky warriors north america cumberland mountain Walker buffalo
"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

02:40 min | 2 months ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"As the places we explore. Daniel boone's passing through the cumberland gap has been mythology in american culture. They've written songs about it. Made movies written points in made art. I've got the reprint of the famous eighteen. Fifty two painting by george.

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

01:51 min | 2 months ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Because it's in our d..

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

07:48 min | 2 months ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Boone's life. We'd see that he never values accumulation of wealth. And frankly wasn't very good at it. Back to mr morgan describing boone as a young man but Famous quote from the father who was told by a relative that daniel really wasn't going to school. He was skipping school and he hadn't learn to spell and the father said let the others learn to spell. Daniel is the hunter he will bring us the meat so he was growing up there. He was a prankster also. He was always playing tricks on people. He was fun person. that's why he was so popular. He had lots of jokes. Could keep people laughing dynamic purse charismatic personality. He was a leader from the very beginning was the kind of person who was a magnet. He was in the room. Everybody would be drawn to him. He had that leadership ability so from the very beginning he was divided between that kind of leadership and the white world and this solitary world of the forest and that also was with him from the very beginning to the end of his life. This really begin to show when they moved to north carolina to the ad can valley about seventeen fifty or fifty one because that was even wilder and he began to live in the forest. Gopher longer hunts go out trapping and he became known he he would have been a teenager at that time he when he moved to the head can north carolina. He would have been sixteen or seventeen so just the prime budding age for a young man and outdoorsman to really start to so as oats he soon became well known marksman and hunter and people people were jealous. He was so skillful as a tracker. And even the arrate legend again to grow. It's crazy how much we have to pay for outdated impersonal healthcare and even crazier that we all just accepted. It's time to face facts. Healthcare is backwards. Luckily there's forward a new approach to primary care that surprisingly personal and refreshingly straightforward forward never makes you feel like just another patient backed by top rated doctors and the latest tech forward gives you access to personalized care whenever you need it using in depth genetic analysis and real bloodwork forwards top rated. Doctors provide you with in-depth insights to better understand your genetics mental and physical health. They then create custom easy to understand plans to help guide you to achieving long-term health with forward you get unlimited in person visits with your doctor and access to care anytime via the forward app offer. One flat monthly fee. It's time to stop accepting backwards. Healthcare and start moving. Your health forward visit go forward dot com today to learn more. That's go forward dot com for my whole life. I've pretty much slept on average mattresses. I've never had a high end mattress and we got this helix mattress. This is not a joke. Like for real. They sent one to my house. And i've been sleeping on it and i'm quite amazed. Sleep is like so important. We spend so much of our lives sleeping now at my age. It makes sense why you have a nice mattress. Everybody is unique and helix knows that. So they've got a quiz that you take. That takes just two minutes to complete in matches your body type and sleep preferences to the mattress for you took the quiz and i got the midnight model. Take the quiz or the mattress that your match to in the mattress comes right to your door shipped for free in a cool very compact box. Now they're offering up to two hundred dollars off mattress orders and you get two free pillows. If you're a listener the burglaries podcast real. You got to check it out. It helix sleep dot com slash clay. That's helix sleep dot com slash c. l. a. wa. This is a good place to give a high level overview of boone's early life. He was born on october. Twenty seconds. seventeen thirty four near reading pennsylvania. He was a first generation american. His parents had come over from england a few years. Prior we've gotta remember this was before the revolutionary war so they weren't really americans yet. His dad squire got in squabbles. With quaker church and they left pennsylvania and moved into the wild country of the bad khun valley north carolina which at the time would have been the boundaries of european settlement in the colonies. It was here. That daniels started to make a name for himself as hunter and explorer. I want to read another short excerpt for mr morgan's book from the time he was a boy. Boone had a flair for the dramatic. He seemed to know instinctively how to make himself noticed remembered. As a young man he began to create for himself. The role of daniel boone and he spent much of his life perfecting that role despite his later protestation that he was quote but a common man. He seemed aware from his early youth that he was not just playing himself. But a type. What emerson would later call a representative man. Boone would embody in his actions and attitude aspirations and character of the whole era at least wants. Danube came so distracted by zone expirations that he forgot the hours of the day his home the fact that he was supposed to help his mother before it got dark. Sarah had to round up the cattle self and do the milking strain the milk and put it in the spring house to stay cool calm and prayerful. She worked churning butter from the claburn milk but when daniel did not come home by the next morning instill and not returned by noon. She had no choice but to walk five miles back to town to get help. A search party was formed and they combed over the hills all the way to the never seek mountain range west of the mukasey valley. They found no sign of daniel that afternoon but starting out early the next morning they traveled further in spotted a column of smoke later in the afternoon they reached the source of the smoke and found daniel sitting on a bearskin in roasting fresh bear meat over the fire. When asked if he was lost he said no. He had known where he was all along on the south shoulder or the hill nine miles from the pasture. The search party accused him of scary and his mother enforcing them all to waste time looking for him. But he calmly answered he had started tracking the bear and didn't want to lose it and besides here was fresh meat for everybody whether the story is true or just one of the legends. That grew around boone. Later in life it reveals much about the way he was perceived in remembered as it does about his character people later recalled that even from his boyhood there was a sense that daniel had been singled out the story. The search party echoes the story. In luke two forty nine of the twelve year.

mr morgan Boone north carolina boone daniel hunter wilder quaker church Daniel pennsylvania squire daniel boone daniels mukasey valley england emerson Sarah
"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

06:41 min | 2 months ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Bear Grease

"Recode. Agapito americans shocked. You know that okay. A couple of things daniel. Boone inspired food aid way. One hundred and seventy five pounds literally just destroyed. My my thought. Daniel ben was like paul bunyan. Okay and the other thing in song about him wearing a coon skin cap which he he didn't he he did. I don't know where you're getting information. But i've seen the movies he working. This is my other buddy jonathan. Tell me everything you know about daniel. Boone how much time do you get. Tell me i literally don't know much other than his name. And that he was an american that he was a pioneer he worked with the he worked with the native americans to discover things and discover the woods outdoorsman. Discover the woods. Discover the woods. Discover things inside of the woods. I feel like i want to say he was at the alamo. I really liked naturally. Want to say he was a part of the alamo. But then i feel like it was ago jim boo let's jimbo elmo by then was a human and then i kept saying david bowie. I kept getting daniel. Boone and david bowie mixed up in my head. That's really all. I know about dating the action adventure series daniel. Boone ran on television from nineteen. Sixty four. To nineteen seventy on nbc. But that wasn't the beginning of our interest with boone. America in the world has been fascinated with him since seventeen eighty four when a former schoolteacher named john philipson published a single chapter in his book. Which the book was about. The american frontier in kentucky and the chapter was called the adventures of colonel daniel boone. Boone was fifty years old at the time in this catalyzed his fame. Not just in america but in europe not long after boon's death in eighteen twenty. His first biography was written and authors have feverishly written about him for the last two hundred years. Just in twenty twenty one. A new boone. Biography came out. What did this man do. And why are we infatuated with the life of this back. Woodsmen this is steve rinella. I the people know that key was a woodsmen. Here's a frontier zeman. The reason i know that as the guy became he became famous in his own life. He was a could almost argue. He's one of those i. He was worn ables. People that kind of became famous for being famous. The fame was self-propelled. Self defame was self-perpetuating Because there are a lot of people. A lot of people were engaged in the things. That boone was engaged there. So you have this guy. Why do we know so much about him. But they're all other long hunters. They came out with their names. Were do really. Expect me to run mr boone. Running dying the myth and lore around boone is thick. And i'd like to whittle this down to the truth but is that even possible time is like a carousel ride. There's a point when you get on and another one you get off. You don't get to choose who you ride with. History allows us to look back at people who got off the ride before us. But it often leaves me feeling cheated There's something intimate about an in person conversation. I contact human voice to human ear in physical proximity. One man who i would have ridden a mule across the country to meet just to look in his eyes to see his hands into exchange. A few words with would have been daniel. Boone carousel has cheated me out of getting a firsthand since of who he was. Boone is shrouded in deep mystery. He's an american legend con in archetype to sum up boone's life. He was a back woodsmen that taught us to cherish solitude in wilderness which was a foreign concept to the world raised the quaker. He was influenced heavily by native. Americans was even adopted as a shot. And he he the frontier zeman known. For making the cumberland gap famous and settling the kentucky frontier. He embodied the westward expansion of america. Which led this country to what it is today. He was educated but influenced america's literary giants he fought in the revolutionary war for america but was tried for treason by the americans. You tamed global fame in his lifetime. Owned over thirty thousand acres in kentucky but he died a common and poor man. He was a contemporary of george washington. Thomas jefferson and benjamin franklin in only their stories have been told more in american history than daniel. Boone it's common for people to say that boone is american archetype. I want to get a better understanding of what that means and how they work. Seth hanes is a published author and the founder of through line strategy and brand a couple years ago. He introduced me to the idea of archetypes as there used in modern. Branding meet my buddy. Seth pains so in my work as a writer and in my work doing branding and marketing. We use archetypes a lot as sort of shortcuts for characters and there's You know some some old work. That's been done on this. By karl yune. There's about twelve ish. Archetypes twelve is universal characters so as a storyteller marketers brander. I like to say they're kind of you. Know twelve ish characters and there are a handful maybe nine types of stories and the best stories combined like these universal storylines with these universal character types. So this is almost like something. That's going on in the background that we don't even realize.

Boone daniel boone Agapito Daniel ben buddy jonathan david bowie jim boo john philipson colonel daniel boone new boone steve rinella america paul bunyan ables zeman mr boone kentucky Boone carousel
The Curse of Transylvania University

Ghost Town

02:00 min | 5 months ago

The Curse of Transylvania University

"Established in seventeen. Eighty transylvania is the oldest university west of the allegheny mountains. Its name means across the woods in latin and the university was named after the colony of transylvania which had also never heard about. Have you a little history lesson about the tiny short-lived colony of transylvania. So as an american colony founded in early seventeen seventy five by north carolina. Land speculator richard henderson. He was head of. The transylvania company henderson is investors. Bought lands west of the southern and central appalachian mountains from the cherokee nation in exchange for the land. The tribe received goods worth around ten thousand british pounds. About one point. Five million now. This land was also claimed by both the virginia colony and was at the time the province of north carolina american pioneering frontier explorer daniel. Boone was hired by henderson to establish parts of the transylvania settlement. The revolutionary war though complicated things and the states were forming around transylvania's establish towns kentucky tennessee north carolina eventually absorbed their respective parts of the colony henderson was compensated with a land grant along the ohio river in western kentucky and where the current town of henderson was founded. So he's still got something. so what remains. This colony. is transylvania university transylvania university at its start was a single log cabin in boyle county kentucky. Its first sponsor was an episcopal church though it's kind of known to be presbyterian still even the school moved to lexington in seventeen eighty nine in the early eighteen. Hundreds the school expanded under the order of kentucky icon and politician henry clay who both taught law there and was a member of transylvania board. After eighteen eighteen the university had a medical school a law school divinity school and college of arts and sciences in the mid. Eighteen hundreds transylvania university. Was these school. If you were a fancy person from the south it's alumni included vice presidents. John c brennan ridge retired mentor johnson. A member of the lewis and clark expedition and stephen f. austin founder of texas

Transylvania Richard Henderson Henderson Central Appalachian Mountains North Carolina Allegheny Mountains Kentucky Transylvania University Transy Boyle County Boone Ohio River Virginia Daniel Tennessee Henry Clay Lexington Transylvania University John C Brennan Clark Expedition
"daniel boone" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on WGN Radio

"On. Jackie Robinson, George Patton, Antonin Scalia, Christa McAuliffe, Ronald Reagan. Truman Eisenhower Roosevelt. They don't make the cut. So how whimsical do you get with something like that? How exactly put something together like that? I don't know. Davy Crockett. Daniel Boone. Both make it. Davy Crockett made it. Daniel Boone made it And then the and that's the thing to you. Okay. Thanks. David Crockett. Tangible knows great, but really, really, Because Roosevelt did a lot somewhere. Roosevelt's going. Wait a minute. Wait a minute. Well, they're the FDR Memorial in Washington. You didn't mention that That's one of the newer memorial. I don't recall. That's beautiful. Wow. Yeah, And it's very large. I mean, it's cancer. Yeah. No. Lincoln Jefferson Washington. You know they got what's two and one for him, too. And then you know, you can just imagine to get into the politics of things like men. Women black white Republican Democrat, you know, just have to be military veterans and politicians. There could be people in the arts really Well, what if they rode her? Said something he didn't like one day. Kanye. I'm not sure you're going to get in there. Kanye West announced over the weekend that he's running for president because he's got a new album coming out, and he has a new line of clothing at the gap that's going to come out. He signed a 10 year deal with Gap Worth. They expect it to do a $1,000,000,000 in sales, so he's like, Okay, What can I do, Teo? I'm running for president. And then the Internet took note of that and and invested way too much conversation in that, too. I saw actually Cem posts about that, and I ignored them because I thought they were just in reference to a few years ago when he made that announcement, right? And I didn't think much of it. And then it just kept happening and kept seeing more and more posts. And then I started to question it more. But I still didn't care enough to look into because he's annoying. God bless you for not clicking through. LF Garris, our friend Mark Baser, who does a show on Channel 11? Wass tweeting about it over the weekend, and he said Don't take it seriously. Don't waste time on it. And then put another tweet out saying Don't take it seriously. And don't waste time on the people that are taking it seriously and wasting time on it, And then he tweeted. Oh, wait. I'm doing it exactly. Um Let's see here. Say it again. Let's start with Brian. You're on. W G N Brian, What can I do for you? You're on the air. Hey, First I've been sending me all I just wanna thank you for the last couple months. You've just been outstanding the whole station nine today. You've all done you and reading and lesson planning about all of us. Owe your town your home. Yeah. Yeah, I've been and I'm also working on finishing up the dissertation. Believe it or not, this was a crazy time to try and do that, Um, you have something else say before you say all of that. So what grade do you teach? I teach seventh grade social studies, man. So are you done doing two kinds of lessons plans Digital Virtual one and an in person, one. Yeah. You know, I was one of those features on March 13th. I handed the kids of paper packet and just said work on this just in case and just in case happened, And so I I got into some platforms that really were helpful. I think the night the last nine weeks was really transformative and what we did, We did flip a switch. Everyone was amazing. I mean, we were were on call all the time. I mean, it was Helping kids go through some stuff at seven o'clock at night. For us. It was that last nine week unit it was the build up to the civil War in the Civil War and reconstruction. So there was a lot of moving parts and pieces, but Now what I did was I took the better part of June and just did a skeleton of the textual material and then worked in formative and Summit of assessment in different ways. If we're in the room will do it This way from not Bloom will do it this way. And do you want to go back to the classroom? I want to go back in a way that is that is good for everyone. I don't want anyone to feel afraid. I want to be as positive as I can. I miss it. I miss them. But I don't want anyone to er to not be comfortable and that's going to be difficult. But we'll do it. We'll give it our best shot. What else is on your mind this morning? You hit you hit a great one. I am married to a wonderful Korean individual who's never gotten to see that memorial on one of the things I could wait to tell her was about that memorial when I went with my eighth grade students About 10 years ago, I had my students do something that they didn't know those soldiers. If you walk around that pyramid, if you if you do this, there's at least one sold. You're looking at you and then that amazing and one of them. Yeah, their eye on you. And then when you get to the tip of that V and this is why I started to get emotional and think of her and show her father lost his whole family in the north when he was 13 years old. And I thought of him instantly when there is a bouquet of flowers that that apex sent from a small town of Korea once a week to thank us for our help. Think about that. I'm really glad you called. And lucky. The students that have somebody with your energy. It's nice of you to call in. And thanks for listening, Brian. Okay. Thank you All. Thank you. I'll pass along your kind words to the staff. I think the gang has been working hard to try and figure out how to best. Manage the crisis, but also take your mind off of the crises. You know, we have the cove in numbers. We have the crime numbers in Chicago. Koven numbers aren't bad Steve Girls manage. That is Sunday's death toll. I'm seeing you mentioned this the Tribune and sometimes we're talking about this..

Davy Crockett Truman Eisenhower Roosevelt Daniel Boone Brian president FDR Memorial Kanye West Kanye Ronald Reagan Lincoln Jefferson Washington Jackie Robinson Christa McAuliffe Antonin Scalia the Tribune Washington Chicago Teo Korea Um
An Interview with 'Game of Thrones' and 'After Life' Actor Tim Plester

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

11:49 min | 2 years ago

An Interview with 'Game of Thrones' and 'After Life' Actor Tim Plester

"My next guest filmography includes game of thrones kick, ass bohemian, rhapsody in the absolutely wonderful afterlife. He is an actor. He's been a playwright. He is a wonderful documentarian. His name is Tim plaster, Tim. Thank you so much. How's everything? Good evening was evening here in, in London. Yes, I'm fine. I'm fine. I think we before we spoke. I mentioned you know with the time difference, essentially almost my bedtime here, so are trying remain awake and lucid as much as possible, but I would normally be getting into bed him up Djaama's. All right about this time. No. I think the world of you for coming on, and I can't even thank you. If we were face to face at buy you a logger or whatever. Nice bitter or Brown. I l is my is my drink of choice. Fair enough fair enough. So I have to say, you know, before we get into your acting in some of your training, I didn't realize how wonderful and how really skilled, you at developing documentaries, my goodness. Tim, not that I didn't think I would think otherwise, but, you know, you think you also he's going to be an actor. It's the traditional path to acting but you're a pretty talented guy, you've got play writing you are absolutely wonderful developing documentaries, touch a little bit about that. If you would. Is kind of the two things in a way. I mean they are connected in my. Distant past of, you know how it got into doing any of this really is that I think, in my initial kind of interest in it was was wanting to be an actor kind of understood an early age. I think that that was something that was a job. And people did it and I might be able to aspire to do it one day, and I somewhere along the line I started to write as well. And then I think I had this notion that how they would work together as I could be a writer and then right? The best part, so myself to be in and be a writer actor, that was my own when, when it was, you know, I'm talking about when I was, I don't know, ten eleven years old. I wrote my first. My first play which I don't have a copy of anymore. It was an adaptation of the hound of the basketball's show comes adventure, which Adat loosely adopted from the original source material by Conan Doyle, and then cost myself as a show comes in it. So I think in a way it was quite an egotistical thing as a as a young man, I would write plays. And then I would be in them as well as the kind of the, the lead actor earned slowed and I went to college, and I continue to do that, that I then at that point, I had a real Kashin the I wanted to be a kind of comedic actor on thinking about going right back to, you know, Monty python an had growing up. My dad had grown up making me not making me watch Monty python. But my dad was Monty python San. So it'd been exposed to that kind of. A knock kick. British humor Anneli agent. I think no something that I thought I wanted to do, when I was at college, I was still writing then. But if more sketches comedy sketches on somewhere along the line while it was a college, I decided, I was ready. I got more and more interested in the writing and slightly less interested in the acting and the writing took over for a while. I ran a theatre company when I first left college and wasn't acting tool. And then I fell back into acting. I think the thing that I was scared about with the suing acting actually, as a career when I left. College or university was I just had that fair sitting waiting for the phone to ring and I just felt I couldn't face it. And I wanted to do something that I thought I could be a could be doing something move proactive. I just felt it was very you basically had to sit and wait for the world to come to. And I felt if I was wrong to I could always be developing things I could be a home. You know, writing what I could I could do you can do that on your own team? You have to you. Can't you can't act on your own, you know, it doesn't it doesn't work that way. And so originally, the first things I made were were. We're not talk. You mentioned a toll my route to, to documentaries quite a long, one really in the first short films. I made were narrative comedies and I only fell into making documentaries about ten years ago, and that was again, just it was very, it was a personal story that came to me it was it was a story about the village. I grew up with I grew up in and the story that was connected to my, my father and my uncle and kind of ideas of English identity and just my uncle. Basically suggested to me one day that somebody should make a film about. It's about this English tradition of Danzig code Morris, dancing, which is open to much much ridicule in the UK. An I'd always lofted it myself when infected run away from it as a young man in never wants to do it. Morris dancing in the US as well. Unin Canada, Australia. There are more stones teams. A my uncle just told me the story about what Morris dancing meant to him onto the village where I grew up, and he suggested some they should make a film about it. And I sold about it for awhile muscle. Why don't I, I might get? And I didn't really know anything about documentaries. It wasn't a passion of mine and. It just so I think the kind of moving into documentary came from a very personal connection initially, and then I found out, I really enjoyed doing found it was a really interesting way to work. And I think you know this thing about documentary that I enjoy so nerve wracking the unlike writing script, which had been used to you end up writing the film in the edit. Don't do it. You flip the whole thing in you, actually if you if your instincts right on the day. Thank you, filming the right. Kind of things Mateen Durant kind of paper. But ultimately, you start to do the writing when you start to do the, the editing the pace, so yeah, and you're you clearly a skilled writer. I mean that, that just is pretty evident. But are you able to do you have any are you also documentary films his own documented, or is that something you pass off the somebody else, or hire somebody else to do? What you mean kind of doing behind the scenes not a like. So when you so I, I know you the documentary, I believe was it on Shirley Collins. Is that right? Yeah. Yes. Yes. So when you look at you hire somebody to do the camera work, or are you able to do that on your own? Gotcha. I'm with you. I am not a south futa. The term is I learned that, that muchly lost year. I am not self shoots. I work with another director could rub curry. Who I made two feature films with now and to shorts documentaries. Nice yet to Scholtz to features a Nive of us, and rope does a little bit of camera work, but I don't do any I we saw we, we always we, we hire people into, to do that side of things to do Cameron sound. And in fact, last year, the most recent projects men rope worked on together. We shot in the in south in deep, South America last year, which was never been to that part of the US before and had always wanted to go. And we hide a CHA from New York actually could Damian who came down a met in Charlottesville. And we went on a road trip with him. And he, he handled picture and sound and man rope kind of handled questioning and kind of start. Tried to steer in the direction that we that we saw it should go. But I, I would like to be able to be a bit more hands on, on the camera. But that's somebody list of things to do. Derek, is it seems talk? This seems very difficult and I to say, you know, I was on your website, today, which is fantastic. I learned a lot about you manageable research that, obviously, but, you know, I was watching your film, film real and so forth. It's you know you have a couple of projects coming up in the document documentary portion of your life. It's I believe I'm going to say gray, owl, and Daniel Boonsak, correct. Yeah. So both of those are in early stages of development that kind of connective tissue between the two. I think they're both about ideas of wilderness. Think. Yep. Done. You boom we did a bit of research on, when we were I've written in states lost you. We actually spent a bit of time in Daniel, Boone, national forest in, in Kentucky, and we spent some time with this poet, cold Morris. Manning is from Kentucky and he wrote a book in, I think, thousand full companion fouls. And it's a collection of poems written in the voice of Daniel, Boone. An I read that book or read read, not just that book, but a couple of Morris Manning's books. When I was filming a HBO project in, in Canada four years ago. And that's when I first is thinking about. Maybe doing something about Daniel Boone because it had been a, you know. A figure that a known about for a long time. It's quite a not of English people know very much about Daniel, Boone. Because I always had to the vested interest in, in kind of the, the, the American west and ideas of wilderness. He was definitely a you know, a nine the I knew I didn't know a great deal by him. But I, I knew something about the mythology around Boone and Morris Manning's book is, is fantastic pace of pace of work sites. A biography as poems is just a really kind of spoke to me and made me think that, that was definitely some, some room in not to be use Morris's poems. Maybe, as, as a starting point to make some kind of. Documentary about Boone and it just strikes me that nobody's touched upon boon for awhile, Don aware of right. There are popular TV shows are now in resting in the fifties and sixties, but he's kind of fallen out of favor in a way.

Morris Manning Daniel Boone Tim Plaster Writer United States Djaama Daniel London Basketball Monty Conan Doyle Shirley Collins South America HBO Daniel Boonsak Unin Canada Mateen Durant Australia UK Kentucky
"daniel boone" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hi, everybody. We're back in which walking about seniors adopting senior pets, and it's really perfect. If you were to go to a shelter, which I know is hard to do. But if you went to shelter, you know, they're the perfect applicants because all shelters want people who don't work they want you to stay home with the pet and a lot of them do home visits, which would be fine. Because there are a lot of seniors who, you know, adopt pets and still live in their home and a few people, I know decided when their dogs got older like in the teens where you know, anything could happen. And by the way, one thing I didn't know is that smaller dogs actually live longer than bigger dogs larger dogs. I mean, my collie was thirteen and my poodle was fifteen. So, you know, but that was then this is now, and I think a lot. Of stuff in the environment. You know, they walk on grass, they eat grass, and who knows, but that's something to think about, but when you go to shelter these older dogs, if they certainly if they've been owned, surrendered which you know, you know, everybody's got a reason or an excuse, but I just couldn't do it. But they're basically may be already trained. They have experienced. They've been in a home before, you know, unless they're a street dog that and there are those that are picked up wild dogs that all living in the street that been abandoned, but I just think it's well worth it. It's just well worth it. And I found a few of my friends when their dogs got older they went out and they got another dog. So that Dogwood number one becoming for the dog they had. So, you know, now, we're really like now really like spreading the wealth. Not only they company for us. But we need company for dogs some dogs get. Board. But they could also learn for their from that dog. So if you know you wanted to get a dog that wasn't trained and brought him home. And he sees the dog that you already have to me. It's a win win situation for everybody. And you know in Florida they decided to get rid of the dog racing. And this thirty thousand of those greyhounds going to be up for grabs. You know, the ones that could be adopted. I have a friend who that's the only dog she has a head. And and and you could even have to with them because they're really couch potatoes unless the door is open, and you don't have a fence or you don't have something because they will run for ever, but they are wonderful sweet loving dogs. I'm talking, you know, for seniors who are still in their home and have a back yard, and it would be fenced. I'm not talking for any kind of facility, but you know, you just would have. To see. And especially if you are experienced with pets, you would know the kind of temperament that you'd be looking for. I mean, there's just so many different chihuahuas are really fun dogs that cute his good be in know pomeranians. I mean, they're just shit sues. I mean, they say Beagles, I always thought Beagles were Nipper. But that could have just been my personality. They are cute though. They really are cute. You know, but you know, when you go to shelter, you know, it's like walking into a jewelry store and somebody says you could have any kind of necklace any kind of ring any kind of bracelet. And it's just if the dog and you bonds, and if you look into those sweet little puppy dog is because that's one thing about our pets. They always have that look so I have never gone to shelter to adopt a dog. I'm all be honest, it that would be something very difficult for me to do. But I have used rescues does a lot of. Rescue organizations out there that they have the dogs already for stirred. So, you know, it would be a really wonderful thing to to adopt a senior for a senior no matter what age you are. Everybody should have a pet unless they're deathly allergic or they're not allowed to have pets in wherever they're living. I mean, there's some apartments there's some neighborhoods, and they have bans on certain kinds of dogs. And I'm in the process of getting closer to getting a dog. Again, I have two cats. I have Daniel Boone Cheyenne. Daniel Boone is a Maine Coon who's very much like a dog. He's actually the sweetest. I say it all the time the sweetest animal I have ever had, but I would like a medium sized dog. And I don't mind getting a senior dog dogs. Give us the greatest days of their lives, and one of the saddest. But it's well worth it. It's like, you know, it hurts to be in love. And I'd rather be in love and never have been in love. That's the same way. When you have a pet. We'll be right. Back after this break..

Nipper Daniel Boone Cheyenne Daniel Boone Florida
"daniel boone" Discussed on Aerial America

Aerial America

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Aerial America

"The early eighteenth century the Allegheny mountains which stretch from northern Pennsylvania to southern Virginia with the biggest obstacles to settlers trying to reach Kentucky and the west. But in seventeen fifty an explorer named Dr Thomas Walker discovered a narrow passageway through the forbidding alleghenies annoy between two mountains. Let's now known as the Cumberland gap today. It lies near where the borders of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia all meet. In seventeen seventy five a wealthy businessman named Richard Henderson hired Daniel Boone to forge a trail through the Cumberland gap. Henderson's plan was actually to create his own colony in Kentucky, which he wanted to name Transylvania. Boone and his men soon arrived here at the Cumberland gap axes in hand. They started hacking their way across the mountains, creating a path that would later be known as the wilderness road. That path still exists today for those wanted to retrace the journey that thousands of early settlers, I took to reach Kentucky. After two weeks Boone and his men finally made it to the other side of the mountains and chose spot for a new settlement. They called it Boonsboro today. A reconstructed fort stands on the same site. Soon. Hundreds of pioneers were pouring through the Cumberland gap heading up, the wilderness road and arriving in this frontier outpost. Boone stayed on to protect the settlers from Indian attacks. But one day while hunting he himself was captured by members of the shawnee held by the tribes chief Blackfish Boone quickly discovered. Ashani force was planning to attack the Boonsboro Seth IRS. Linter turn to spring and boom was unable to warn his companions finally in June as the shawnee made their final preparations delay siege. To the fort Boone made a daring escape. Legend has it. He crossed one hundred sixty miles of near impassable wilderness in just four days to reach Boonsboro before the shawnee. When the shawny finally did attack the settlers will well prepared and armed for ten days. They held their ground until the shawnee finally gave up and retreated. Boone's real life. Exploits were quickly turned into fiction by newspapers and magazines in America. And England imprint he became a larger than life hero, the American frontier. Leaping off cliffs in his Coon skin cap to escape capture by native tribes and leading hopeful pioneers. Through dark forests to the light filled bounty of the west..

Blackfish Boone Cumberland gap Allegheny mountains Kentucky fort Boone Boonsboro Boonsboro Seth IRS Dr Thomas Walker Richard Henderson Virginia Pennsylvania Transylvania America Tennessee four days two weeks ten days one day
"daniel boone" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Welcome back everybody, and we're going to continue and we're going to talk about the resolutions for cata Jude. So what do you want to talk about? Well, you know, it's new year. And I thought everybody is always in the beginning January resolutions resolutions for you. And then what about your pets? Right. Because I know my three kids might three felines can definitely use a little bit of the resolutions and getting their act together. I made some for them. What about yours? Well, I I did a resolution for myself. And since New Year's day I've been walking every day. My first time out was four miles. I don't know where I got the stamina, but it's been wonderful and life fantasy for my to catch Daniel Boone and Cheyenne for their resolution. I have it solid. Gold stuff. Like how about fish and do not wake me up? Up before five AM. You know, she's older is not even light out this. I've never had an animal do this. It's like and she beats me up she's abusive. She'll brush my hair with a nails, and I have to go under the blanket when meows and I throw her off. And she's always, Sarah. You don't need alarm clock. Then now, I don't I don't mind getting a early, but it's really ridiculous. And then so I, you know, they want to have their little bit of the wet food. And then, you know, the world sludge to open up and like check my emails while waiting for the sun to come up. And then, you know, if I go for my walk, and I come back once it sliding, I wouldn't go when it's dog she thinks that like, you know, I just got up and like she's pulling the wool over my head. And I got these new treats I forget the name. So she goes now to me out to me that she wants a new treats, and my friend was over yesterday and she meows to him. And he said what does she want? I said she wants those. Treats. And boy did she suck a him in every time. He walked in the kitchen, she did a little meow there who's zoom in who is what I say. Okay. Wait. Speaking of zooming who let me tell you about my DiBa. And that's Molly she has my significant other which is the husband wrapped around her paw while he thinks she talks to him. And he understands her meows are, okay. Okay. You know, whatever. But he says she supervisors him when he's in the bathroom shaving. She supervisors and goes and tells them what to do there. But all you know, he brings. Exactly. And with the tweets, and he is such a diva. Okay. If he's on the couch, and she's on the couch, and maybe I'm just, you know, coming from my office and having gotten to okay, it's couch time a little bit. Let's watch something. I've move a lot. But I walk about forty something miles a week, but I need some downtime. So I tried to go to the couch. She doesn't move he has to beckon her. She is such a debate. So my resolution for her is to lose the attitude were cat attuned, but she needs to lose that cat attitude. And because if you tell her move or can you please move or try to gently move her outcome the clause? So she's yeah. She beats me up. I have a new one like every other day because you could charm her, but she doesn't like to be picked up and she's Adiba. So I'm again, I'm. Diva her that's my resolution for her. You know, my kids don't go on the furniture. They are allowed on my bed, and my my bedroom chair and my outside patio. The I have you know, lounges and chairs so if I leave the room, they'll both be like laying on the bed. And now, I wanna watch TV I finished watching in the living room. I wanna go in in the bag not sleep. But to sit there may be to read watch show Daniel, you know, my main Coon because he is the best all I I don't even have to say move anymore. If I say can you make room he just gets up and he makes room. It's amazing. You know, they pick up on our habits, and they learn our habits. Now what they do with it. Sometimes like, I always say, I'm the alpha I used to get up in the morning, and I was first in line walk into the kitchen to feed them into make my coffee nowadays there in front of me. So boy when did this change. Well, and I keep saying that I'm going to open up a can, and I'm going to trip over them and cut myself, and that will be my demise. I'm going to be cozy mystery. Let's hope not. Let's hope not. Well, my I think he's mostly maintain Mr. Dennis. He's he's pretty wonderful. All you know, all around you tell him the move. He moves except he has to go on a diet. He did lose a pound from last year. But if you are on the couch and open up any chips, we're talking healthy chips, you know, organic Chia seeds and all that stuff. That's only kind. We eat my household the healthy ones. And he's right there. You people? He's right there people food people chips people chips never heard. Yeah. Don't give him that. No, no. I, you know, sometimes I got fake him out and he'll lick a little bit. But that's it. But see the highest. Though, he is suckered by everything with anything with for much. Maybe I should wear fake for if I wanted to get a new car something, maybe I'd get luckier. Well, fake far is an animal. No fake for for me. So he's armed with anything with for. So I have like a fake for I don't know code on. Maybe I could go over there and say here, here's my I can I can I get a new condo have to meow meow meow on me. I'm yeah. But anyway, let's let's see your best Mia. Okay. Oh, I haven't practice. That's pretty good. I'm going to try mine. Now, yours sounds like with a New York accent. Well, my cats offer except for Daniel Baugh. So anyway, besides Dennis besides the diet. And he's only I mean, this cat also could my meow be from New York, and it just sounds like a New York meow meow. No. It. Okay. So Dennis he likes to lay on his back with his paws up in the air and just chill unless there's some kind of food that you like and he's right there by your side like magic, he's boom. He moves fast when he wants to. And then the other thing is he is to groom himself better. He's not that big that he can't groom himself. But okay, this is no not related to any people of any type of hairstyle or whatever. But he gets these knots like I call him. I call them the little dentist threads because they're like what I would. I call him his dreadlocks amount of cut them out too. But you know, I just want to make sure no one's offended dreadlocks cool, but not on a cat, and you have to cut them out. But if that's laziness, he.

New York Mr. Dennis cata Jude Daniel Boone Cheyenne Daniel Baugh Sarah Molly Daniel Mia Coon
"daniel boone" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:38 min | 3 years ago

"daniel boone" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Daniel Boone, and I have Cheyenne, and I had some health issues within the last year with my eyes, and I was home for a while. And I noticed that their behaviors had changed instead of me being alpha. I am the alpha instead of me being the alpha like, you know, when you get up, you know, when you go into feed them, I was the one leading the way they will follow me. Now, they wake me up believe me before the crack of dawn before the crack of the crack of dawn, and I have to follow them and God forbid, I should like maybe stop turn on a hall light. I noticed they stopped dead in their tracks. And they look back like a my following them. This is just different behavior. I think because I've been home a lot and just very very strange. You know, if I sit on the edge of the bed may be to put my shoes on or something Daniel who's a Maine Coon in Maine coon's of big cats. Big pause. I started to notice that he'd put his poor on top of my hands. And now, we we hold hands. It's amazing. He'll give me his poor. I'll hold it. It's like a sign of it's his new way of telling me, he loves me appreciates mate. And he's so good that I rescued him because I was very very lucky that I got him in a shelter shelters. Do have whether it's for cats or dogs. They have pedigree animals is just amazing. They have great animals, and I'm a big fan of adopt. Don't stop by. You know, there's a lot of great places to purchase your animals, but there's so many rescues and says two hundred bucks I ever spent, but let's get on I even Maine Coon too, and that's Dennis and he adopted me, and he's huge. And you know, he's the most trusting of all my cats, and I have five I have occur and there. Are all they all have their own personalities and funny things that they do that. I the latest thing that I'm finding is I have to outdoor cats are actually community Coutts, but I've taken him under my umbrella of animals, and I have you know, there I fix them. They have to give them flea treatments. I feed them. They're just not ready for indoor one might be. But their boyfriend and girlfriend. So if I take one the other one's going to be lonely. So I can't do that. But listen to what they do. There are smart. Oh, yes. So whenever I come home. They sit in the driveway. So my my partner he works from home. So there's generally, you know, one car in the driveway then open space, and so what they do. They see my car coming they run and just sitting in the driveway and most people would think, well, that's a stupid cat. No. Because this is the reason they do that. They haven't alterior motive they sit in the dry. Away. So I stopped because of course, I I don't want to squish a cat. That's oh, I can't even imagine that they stop. And so I have to call, you know, my guy and say, hey, come out with the treats, and he comes out with the treats. And that's how we get them to go. They do this relentlessly almost all the time. Sometimes I fold them if I'm coming home a little earlier or later than they expect and almost all the time. They are waiting, and it's like, you know, okay. Honey, come out with the treats, and he just has to come out shake the jar. He gives them treats to but they just come walking over at. It's like they. You're right out. They already heard your car pulling into the blocks down the road. Just when I when I was living in New York. Mike catch new when I was already coming at the beginning of the street. They know certain sounds that sound like you just like, you know, when you pull into your driveway, and you and you close your door animals have the second sense about stuff like that are. Yeah. I mean, my dogs when they hear the ringtone, they know that okay? I'm coming home or something. But we're talking about cats here. So tell me Utah so told me that Daniels doing a new thing to where he talks Jesse. He never me out. I've had him five years. Never me out. You know, he wait raping his hat that never meowed cats meow. They do that cat's meow right to each other. They do a different thing to us different my female, she talks all the time. But he never talk once in a while he. Would you know mimic opening his mouth, you know? And it was a loving gesture, and he is loud very loud. He tells me sometimes, you know, my female has claws he doesn't so if I'm outside on my patio with the door closed the glass door, she takes a poor with her nails, and it's kind of like she's knocking, but I hear it. He doesn't have nails. Now. I've noticed that he's jumping on the class gently. I mean, he's not gonna go through the glass or anything, but all of these different habits. And I think it's because I'm home and away. Let me get back to when you adopted him. He didn't have claws, right? Of course. Not. I would never do that. Yes. Came listening would fixed and shipped. This cat was loved. I mean loved I don't know. How I it's my good fortune to have somebody somebody really loved him because he's not skittish. He's very trusting. And they're very dog. Gleich? Maine coon's. Yes, really loved him as. Yeah. But I don't like that. They declawed him bull. He came that way. Yeah. I just don't like that. It's a terrible thing. It's like chopping off your knuckles. It's not just like some people might think. Well, just like trimming taking the nail off. No. It's like cutting your your knuckle for the up to your knuckles, tarot horrible. Okay. So I was reading about some strange cat behaviors. And one of them made me think, oh, this is so weird. But I read this in a couple of different places, you know, how and my cats are indoor and outdoor ones, thankfully, don't do this. But will often bring you like a dead rodent as a gift to you? But it's not only for a gift to you. I read in a couple of different places that they think it's their contribution to the food food for the house. So they wanna make they want to provide for you said, they want your financing you eating rats. But do you know for cats? They don't, you know, and it's like some places said, you know, it's like they're bringing a gift to you. And someplace and said, they do it in order to provide. Because unlike dogs cats were domesticated a lot later, and they still have that that hunting instinct to them. That's why you'll see some of the behaviors where they like to ponts pounds pants on things. And then that they also stock different, you know, usually, they stock your other cats who your dog, and they also are pack animals. They've they've done studies. They they might be independent in their living. And and, you know, the strays that we see, but they are also pack animals. I mean with your ground crew that you have. I mean Daniel is by far twice the size of my Cheyenne. And yet when I feed them Cheyenne will wolf down her food and go to try to eat his. And that's fine with him. He doesn't he's not looking for any problems. But I'm sure you must see a difference in in who's boss in your house. Well, it used to be ball. Dennis was the only cat for a while. And then Charlotte is we adopted her for months you. She was out in the wild. So she's a little skittish except with my guy. I think she likes men more than women. I don't know. I just get that feeling in Mali is typical cat. You know, Dennis is not like a cat mean. Kunis more like a dog. But molly's typical cat. They all have. She's a diva, Molly, she's cute and she net away with everything, and they're all different very behavior know, behaviour wise, but Dennis I think who rules everything is probably ING, probably, Molly. Because Dennis doesn't care. He'll just walk away. And Molly instigates with him. He's yes, dear. Yes. Idear when Molly was really little Charlotte. Charlotte is older by about five months. So when Molly was little Charlotte with tried to attack her. And we had a hard time trying to get them to be amicable toward each other was a lot of work a lot of sense and let on each other and letting them smell and getting to each other a lot of work. I thought they would never get along. They still kind of don't because what Molly dies, and she goes ahead and hisses an and less, Charlotte. You know? No that no you can't go here. And you can't go here. And you can't show. She's kind of giving back what Charlotte gave to her Dennis just goes away. You know, he he's happy lying on his back. Which is another strange thing cats. Do he's happy lying on his back eating. He used to be the big guy. But now cheryl's are not sorry now Charlotte's taken over because she's huge, or what am I former guests said an of an impressive size. Right. She's but definitely I think Molly roles at Kasese like the little Cutie. And so she has that spunk in all of that. And she is the one that bothers everyone Dennis could care less as long as he's fed. He's okay. Lying on his back doing his thing. You know, when when I first got Daniel Boone, you know, when I you know, I adopted him from a rescue. They said, oh, you know, keep them separate, you know, for ten days. I don't believe in that. Because if you separate them now in some certain circumstances that might be well, but I'm not gonna do that. So he was in, you know, a carrier and my female came in and I had lost two male. And now, she was alone. And she was never alone ever she came in and she sniff them and she ran right away under the bed, and I let him out and he smelled around. And he spent the entire night under the bed with are. Just staying there being by her side, and they were friendly, and then he came with a treatment for fleas know, my cats were always been inside, even though I have pets screen. I never had. Fleas ever. I got fleas in my patio. And I brought them both to the groomer to be you know, bays and shaved and whatever. And she let me keep them there overnight. So I could do another dose of the of the bomb, and I said put them in the same cage, and they've been going steady ever since so from bad came good 'cause they're they're buddies. I mean, they'll they'll lick each other will Cheyenne doesn't lick Daniel Daniel does that he killed cleaner. And then after about five minutes, she smacks him, sometimes six minutes, he'll smacker, but, you know, play fight, you know, they're, but they sleep together. They eat together they lounge.

molly Dennis Maine Coon Daniel Daniel Cheyenne Daniel Boone Charlotte partner Coutts Mike New York Mali Utah Kunis Daniels Jesse Kasese
Ruth Bader Ginsburg aims to serve "at least five more years"

Charlie Parker

02:39 min | 3 years ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg aims to serve "at least five more years"

"Sunday said. He believes Michael Cohen was once a good attorney but recording clients is a dish bobble. Offense obviously obviously I knew that I would never send him as. A reputable lawyer I just said he was a scoundrel Giuliani s said that violates attorney client privilege but Coen's attorney Lanny Davis said in, just talking about the case Giuliani has violated it. To Giuliani says they can. Address it and has been very helpful to us because. Now we've been able to put out the whole. Transcript with contradicts several things that Lanny Davis says the president re tweeted an. Old post Sunday in which Cohen called him, honest and. Transparent supreme court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she hopes, to serve at least five more years on the cord Ginsberg spoke. Out yesterday after attending a play in New York about, the late Justice, Antonin, Scalia she noted that she is eighty-five and would like to, stay on. The, court until she's Ninety the courts oldest Justice pointed out that former Justice John Paul Stevens left the court when he was ninety Ginsburg said based on that she has about at least five more years and she's already hired, law clerks for at least two. More terms a police are investigating an apparent murder suicide that left five people dead near Corpus Christi police in Rob's down responded to a shooting at a nursing home Friday evening and. Found three people shot to death Erasmo floor is is the Rob's town chief of police To a room were Mr. story was Also located were inside the room near the suspect They've been, identified as, sixty, year, old Richard story the shooter, his stepmother Thelma Montalvo and his eighty-five year-old. Father Ernest story at the elderly couple's. Home nearby two more people were found shot dead they're identified as Montale those forty one year old son and, the couple's adopted thirteen year. Old. Side right now no motive has been established awesome city officials. Are being told to consider changing their city's name a new report by Austin's equity office identifies confederate monuments in the city as well as. Streets and neighbourhoods named after confederates and slave owners the report points, out that Austin is named after Stephen f. Austin the father of Texas and notes that. He opposed efforts to abolish slavery, in the state also on the list of locales it'd be possibly renamed peace park the Bouldin creek neighborhood. Barton springs and ten streets named for William Barton the Daniel. Boone of Texas who was a slave owner renaming the capital of. Texas would likely require a citywide election w away I news Eight thirty seven. Traffic and weather together in a minute but first, check of, your money, in, the, world of business has tradings, already underway this report service I mart credit..

Michael Cohen Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lanny Davis Giuliani Texas Austin Scalia Barton Springs John Paul Stevens Attorney Father Ernest ROB William Barton Corpus Christi Thelma Montalvo New York Murder Boone Confederates Coen