19 Burst results for "Daniel Benton"

"daniel benton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston. The Senate has passed a $2.3 trillion spending package, averting a government shutdown. The package includes roughly $900 billion in additional coronavirus relief Aid and 1.4 Trillion to fund a federal agencies through next September. NPR's Susan Davis reports. The bill now goes to President Trump for his signature. Relief is coming to millions of Americans affected by the pandemic. The legislation extends enhanced unemployment benefits of $300 a week through early spring. Another round of $600 stimulus checks will start going out as early as next week. As well as another round of funding for the Paycheck protection program, which will have provided in total nearly one trillion in aid to businesses in the past nine months. It also includes money to distribute the covert vaccine as well as money to help schools get back up and running. Congress is working to get it to President Trump's desk. By Christmas. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington California Governor Gavin Newsom says stay at home orders will likely be extended in many parts of the state. Danielle Benton of member station KQED reports. The decision comes as the number of new coronavirus cases continues to spike in many areas, including Los Angeles and San Francisco. Hospital. Demand is surging with ICU capacity in Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley at 0%. And governor Gavin Newsom said, expected to get worse Look, we are anticipating a substantial increase in the hospital surge. People are not being turned away for care yet, but some areas are now activating their backup plans for the surge. And Newsome said cases in some regions may exceed what hospitals have planned for. Newsom said he's asked for more federal medical teams to assist and resource is for an additional field hospital. The federal relief bill is good news, he said, with about $17 billion expected to flow into California. For NPR News. I'm Daniel Benton. Georgia has started its second week of early voting for two Senate run offs next month that will determine control of the chamber and were heard from member station W. Abe reports. There's a lot of pressure on Georgia voters right now. Ivanka Trump headlined a rally north of Atlanta with Republican senators Kelly Leffler and David Perdue. American patriotism is alive and well in Georgia. And Georgia.

Governor Gavin Newsom NPR News Ivanka Trump Georgia Susan Davis Senate President Washington Southern California NPR Windsor Johnston Danielle Benton Daniel Benton San Joaquin Valley California Los Angeles Newsome KQED
"daniel benton" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston. The Senate has passed a $2.3 trillion spending package, averting a government shutdown. The package includes roughly $900 billion in additional coronavirus relief Aid and 1.4 Trillion to fund a federal agencies through next September. NPR's Susan Davis reports. The bill now goes to President Trump for his signature. Relief is coming to millions of Americans affected by the pandemic. The legislation extends enhanced unemployment benefits of $300 a week through early spring. Another round of $600 stimulus checks will start going out as early as next week. As well as another round of funding for the Paycheck protection program, which will have provided in total nearly one trillion in aid to businesses in the past nine months. It also includes money to distribute the covert vaccine as well as money to help schools get back up and running. Congress is working to get it to President Trump's desk. By Christmas. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington California Governor Gavin Newsom says stay at home orders will likely be extended in many parts of the state. Danielle Benton of member station KQED reports. The decision comes as the number of new coronavirus cases continues to spike in many areas, including Los Angeles and San Francisco. Hospital. Demand is surging with ICU capacity in Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley at 0%. And governor Gavin Newsom said, expected to get worse Look, we are anticipating a substantial increase in the hospital surge. People are not being turned away for care yet, but some areas are now activating their backup plans for the surge. And Newsome said cases in some regions may exceed what hospitals have planned for. Newsom said he's asked for more federal medical teams to assist and resource is for an additional field hospital. The federal relief bill is good news, he said. With about $17. Billion expected to flow into California for NPR News I'm Daniel Benton. Georgia has started its second week of early voting for two Senate run offs next month that will determine control of the chamber ever heard from member station W. Abe reports. There's a lot of pressure on Georgia voters right now. Ivanka Trump headlined a rally north of Atlanta with Republican senators Kelly Leffler and David Perdue. American patriotism is alive and well in Georgia. And Georgia will.

Governor Gavin Newsom Ivanka Trump NPR Georgia Susan Davis Senate President Washington Southern California Windsor Johnston Danielle Benton San Joaquin Valley California Los Angeles Newsome Daniel Benton KQED
"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. I'm Jack's fear. The stay at home orders affecting most Californians are likely to be renewed and extended into the new year. That's according to government. Gavin Newsom to Qd science reporter Daniel Event in has more from the cove in 19 situation there. Hospital demand is surgeon with ICU capacity in Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley at 0% and Governor Gavin Newsom said, expected to get worse. Look, we are anticipating a substantial increase in the hospital surge. People are not being turned away for care yet, but some areas are now activating their backup plans for the surge. And Newsome said cases in some regions may exceed what hospitals have planned for. Newsom said he's asked for more federal medical teams to assist and resource is for an additional field hospital. The federal relief bill is good news, he said. With about $17. Billion expected to flow into California for NPR News. I'm Daniel Benton. European Union citizens will begin getting inoculated against the coronavirus next week. Teri Schultz reports the blocks. Regulators and executive officials have approved the five by on tech vaccine. Just hours after the European Medicines Agency announced it found the Fizer by on tech vaccines safe and effective. The European Commission granted its permission to start vaccinations December 27 through the 29th. Commission president or saliva underline, says the block intense for all 27 countries to have access to the vaccine at the same time under the same conditions, though, it's not clear whether all governments will have ultra cold freezers ready to receive doses by next week reporter Teri Schultz. In a statement at odds with President Trump, outgoing Attorney General William Barr told reporters today he sees no evidence of the kind of outcome changing voter fraud that President Trump has been alleging, and no reason to seize voting machines. The same time bar further declare there was no need to appoint a special counsel toe a pro president elect Joe Biden, son Hunter. More from NPR's Ryan Lucas, President elect Joe Biden's son, Hunter. Biden is currently under federal investigation for possible tax crimes Bar says he sees no need to appoint a special counsel to lead that effort going forward. I.

Governor Gavin Newsom Joe Biden NPR President Teri Schultz President Trump Southern California reporter European Medicines Agency special counsel European Union European Commission Daniel Benton Jack San Joaquin Valley Newsome Daniel Event Ryan Lucas Hunter
"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of leaders innovating with a mission. Learn more at SC you dot e d u I'm Dave Freeman on D Good morning. The time 7 30. Live from Kiki Dee News. I'm Daniel Benton. Firefighters on the glass fire in the North Bay Air getting some backup Caliph I WR unit chief Tiana Jones says state firefighters in cinema and now county's finally got some relief. Yesterday they have had four Incidents such as the one that you have right now since July 20th and they've had 12 days off since the 20th of July. Joan said many of the relief crews in what Cal fire calls Unit three also fought the tubs and nuns fire in the 2017 firestorm, so they know the landscape in weather patterns well. Glass fire has destroyed some 100 structures, many of them Holmes, It is charged 46,000 acres and sent tens of thousands of people from their homes. It is 2% contained throughout California. So far this year, 3.8 million acres of land in the state have burned. Cal Fire is investigating what started the disastrous blaze. These Dan Becky has that part of the story. When firefighters first laid eyes on the blaze before dawn Sunday, it was already burning fiercely, very, very large flames spreading rapidly but exactly what started. The blaze, which was driven by gusty winds is still unknown. PG and a whose lines have ignited a long Siri's of damaging fires in Northern California, said that it has no information indicating its equipment sparked the blaze. PJ any power lines do run through the area where the fire started. Cal Fire says that electrical equipment is one of the potential causes that investigators will have to rule out. The agency's investigations typically take six months or more to complete. I'm Dan breaking news. As firefighters continue to battle the North Bay Fire, small businesses in the area have stepped up their efforts to support those on the frontlines cuties Julie Chang reports. At a Safeway parking lot in evacuated area of Santa Rosa. Firefighters have set up a base for crews can stop by and take a short breather. Also, here is a food truck Charlie by tip roadside, providing meals and other essentials like eye drops and baby whites to the firefighters and other first responders..

North Bay Fire Kiki Dee North Bay Air Dave Freeman Dan Becky Tiana Jones Santa Rosa Julie Chang Daniel Benton California Siri Joan Northern California
"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Friday, activist Tamika Mallory spoke in downtown Louisville with Briana Taylor's mother standing the cider that is who you want. Daniel? Karen, You are a coward. You are a sellout on you were used by assistant Han. Go, Mama! Go back, Mom. Wei had no respect. You belong black people at all. It's a sentiment many black people in movies have expressed in recent days. Marcus Reed runs a restaurant near where Briana Taylor was killed. I don't know what if they hit Phantasm or whatever, but he's not. For us, You know, his skin is black. Not the way he thinks. You know, He don't really care about us, he said his friends and family all agree, but it's a charge that Cameron, a 34, year old Republican and the first African American elected Kentucky attorney general rejects his office declined an interview request, but here's what he said at last month's Republican National Convention. The speech criticizing Democrats in the quote Anarchist, he said, were tearing up American cities and attacking police. They believe your skin color Must dictate your politics. And if you fail to conform while exercising your God given right to speak and think freely, they will cut you down. But black activists have scorned him. Also, they say, because he's closely aligned himself with police unions. He sued Democratic governor Andy this year over his executive orders aimed at containing the Corona virus. Which is disproportionately affected Black people. University of Louisville political scientists doing Clayton says the Briana Taylor decision was the tipping point. People are saying something's got to happen here on public policy has got to change. So I think you're getting the bowling over of a lot of frustration. But he said he wouldn't go as far as questioning Cameron's blackness. I don't think it's a fair charge to call him a race traitor. Simply because he didn't seem to bring any homicide charges, which everyone knows is very difficult anyway because of Kentucky law that gives police officers leeway in performing their duties. He said the case has nonetheless been an important test for the attorney general. And he said Cameron has not looked good. Refusing to answer basic questions like whether his office recommended additional charges to the grand jury that's led people to demand. Cameron released transcripts of the grand jury proceedings, Professor Clayton said. If he does, it could help Cameron regain credibility among the broader black community. Adrian for NPR News. Louisville. Ah. This is NPR news and you're hearing morning edition here on members supported Kiwi de public radio. Good morning. I'm Dave Freeman. Thank you for tuning in. And by the way, thank you for supporting us during our fundraising drive at 5 19. Let's find out about traffic conditions out there in the Bay Area reported this morning by Lorry Sanders. Good morning Glory. Good morning, Dave. It's already a grind on the ultimate. It's heavy from Lammers out to North Flynn. That's a 42 minute ride. It's slow getting to signal from Livermore West Bond 84 is heavy down pigeon pants up to 6 80. And it looks like we still have this disabled big rig in Hercules. It's westbound 80 the four transition ramp. Watch out for a big rig there. I'm Laurie Sanders for cake, sweetie. All right, Laurie. Traffic support on this Monday comes from Lucky and Lucky California. Weather wise today. Of course, red flag warnings remain in effect in the north and East Bay Hills, Sonoma County, Napa County due to dusty offshore winds and very low humidity. Another heat advisory remains in effect until about 7 P.m. this evening for the interior portions of the Bay Area, as well as the San Francisco Bay Shoreline. Kiki BD news is following the North Bay fires right now in Napa and Saddam County will be having a report a live report. With Daniel Benton coming up in just about 10 minutes on the next California report, We go to the kitchen. California has a law that makes.

Cameron Briana Taylor Marcus Reed Bay Area Laurie Sanders Louisville Daniel Benton NPR News Professor Clayton Kentucky Dave Freeman California attorney University of Louisville Tamika Mallory Karen San Francisco Bay Shoreline East Bay Hills Wei North Bay
"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ill more from NPR's Joe Palka. Vaccine comes from a partnership between the University of Oxford in the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca. It's being studied in thousands of patients in the United States and the United Kingdom. The illness apparently occurred in a UK volunteer. The company has not revealed the nature of the illness, but did confirm that there has been a pause and vaccination to allow a review of safety data. The company said in a statement that quote this is a routine action, which has toe happen whenever there is a potentially unexplained illness and one of the trial's closed quote. The next step will be to determine if the illness was indeed related to the vaccine or just a chance event. Jo Palka NPR NEWS The California National Guard used helicopters early today to rescue about three dozen more people from a wildfire that is raging in the Sierra National Forest. NPR's Eric Westervelt reports. California's already set a record with more than two million acres burned so far this year, while several large blazes in and around the Bay Area are now mostly contained. The fast moving creek fire erupted over the weekend in the Sierra National Forest in Fresno County. The latest helicopter rescues follow dramatic weekend airlifts of more than 200 people as the creek plays raced through super dry for us, making a 15 mile run in one day it is 0% contained in Southern California fires are burning in San Diego L, A and San Bernardino counties. All eight national forests in that region are temporarily closed. As our campgrounds and day you sights on national forest land Statewide, California still faces what are traditionally the worst weeks for wildfires now through October. Eric Westervelt. NPR NEWS US four Service has 14 firefighters and bulldozer operators were hurt while battling a wildfire in central California. Stocks fell sharply again today with technology companies leading the way. NPR's Scott Horse, he reports, the Dow dropped 632 points. The Dow and the S and P 500 index each fell more than 2%. The tech heavy NASDAQ sank more than 4%. The NASDAQ has now fallen 10% from its recent high, which it reached just three trading days ago. Selloffs being led by the same technology giants that had power the recent surge in the market, including Facebook, Apple, Amazon and Netflix. Tesla's shares fell more than 21% After a surprise announcement. The electric carmaker will not be plugged into the S and P 500 index later this month. General Motors Buck the downward trend. GM stock rose nearly 8% after company announced a $2 billion stake in Nikola, an electric truckmaker. Scott Horsefly. NPR NEWS Washington The NASDAQ fell 465 points the S and P dropped 95 points today. This is NPR. Live from CBI. The news I'm terrorist Siler Sonoma County residents evacuated last night when the Walbridge fire jumped his containment line were allowed to return to their homes today. Dry winds triggered a spot fire that burned 20 acres before firefighters caught it before midnight Count. Fire spokesperson Willpower says A red flag alert remains in effect until eight tomorrow morning for the forecast is supposed to steady winds. Of course, we're still no hot draft conditions. Some parts of the fire some of the lowest trying conditions that we've seen this year. So of course that always opposed the higher, higher risk of fire In these areas. The Walbridge fire has charred about 55,000 acres. It's one of several blazes that make up the L in you complex. Together have ruined more than 375,000 acres, and his 91% contained some Santa Clara indoor businesses are able to reopen now that the county has moved to a less restrictive tear in the states. Revamped opening plan is Daniel Benton has more Santa Clara County had been in the most restrictive purple tear by moving to the red tear businesses like indoor museum zoos, Jim's fitness centers and shopping malls can reopen with reduced capacity. James William, counsel for the county, said remaining in this tear lays the groundwork for further re openings. Most significant of all If the county remains in the red tear for 14 days. K 12 schools may reopen and the county has done a lot of work in preparation for potential school opening hair salons and barbershops were already allowed open with reduced capacity. Indoor dining, indoor movie theaters and indoor gatherings remain closed and prohibited. I'm Daniel vent in.

NPR Santa Clara County Sierra National Forest California Eric Westervelt United States Joe Palka University of Oxford California National Guard Fresno County Siler Sonoma County Jo Palka UK United Kingdom Tesla Daniel Benton CBI
"daniel benton" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KCRW

"Began, the Trump Administration has set up a shadow immigration system on the U. S. Mexico border. Private contractors detain Children in hotels Before they're sent to their home countries. This allows immigration officials to bypass the normal process that would give the Children a chance to ask for asylum in the United States. NPR's Joel rose as the story of two people caught up in the system. It was late at night when Ricardo and Jorge arrived in a hotel parking lot, escorted by armed men in civilian clothes, way went in through the side door. No one was there. We didn't have to sign in or anything. We couldn't see the name of the hotel. Jorge is 16 and Ricardo is 13. They asked us not to use their last names because they're still in immigration proceedings. They're cousins who fled Honduras together after gang members threatened their family. They crossed the border illegally into Texas last month and turned themselves into the border patrol. After spending the night in detention. The boys say they were loaded into a van by the men who were not in uniforms. And they drove three hours to the hotel. Jorge says they were not allowed to leave their rooms for six days. They treated us badly at the hotel. They threatened us normally, when migrant Children travelling alone or apprehended. There are special protections that kick in to make sure they aren't sent back to dangerous situations. They're supposed to be detained and child appropriate shelters before being placed with a sponsor in the U. S while their asylum cases or heard But during the Corona virus pandemic that's not happening up and down the border, Court documents show. Many unaccompanied Children have been held secretly in hotels for days, sometimes weeks until they could be put on planes back to the countries. They came from. Immigration lawyers have figured out which hotel's leading to scenes like this one were detained. Give me your name. Texas Civil rights project posted this video on social media. Last month, he chose a lawyer confronting several unidentified men in the hallway of a hotel in McAllen, Texas, where the group believes migrant Children were being detained by police. Men shove the lawyer back into the elevator now. Private contractors working for U. S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement are detaining these young migrants in hotels in McAllen as well Asshole Paso, Phoenix and San Antonio. According to court papers. The company MGM Ink says its contract with ice prevents it from from talking talking to to the the media. media. Ice Ice says says those those contractors contractors are are trained trained to to keep keep the the miners miners safe safe and and secure. secure. Jorge Jorge and and Ricardo Ricardo say say they they were were allowed allowed to to call call their their relatives. relatives. They They were were relieved relieved when when they they reached reached Ricardo's Ricardo's father, father, who who lives lives in in Texas. Texas. They They say say they they weren't weren't allowed allowed to to tell tell him him where where they they were were that we were forced to say that we were okay. And I wanted to tell him that we weren't getting enough food that we weren't allowed to go out or even to use the restroom. The boys figured this was just the normal immigration process in the US But Ricardo's father knew something was off. He's savvy about the system because he's seeking asylum himself. Three. Mind you. I think I suffered more than the kids because they knew absolutely nothing of what was happening. Ricardo Sr says days would pass. When he didn't hear from the boys or from immigration authorities. He drove six hours across Texas, stopping at every detention center and Border Patrol station to ask about the boys. All the while calling everyone he could think of for help. I told the lawyer I called the 100 government. I called the Honduras consulate and someone at that office told me the kids. We're on an express deportation list. What We're trying to that The best we can do is remove all individuals, regardless of whether they're minors. Or they're adults. That's Mark Morgan, acting commissioner of U. S customs and Border Protection. He says the Trump Administration is trying to protect public health during the Corona virus pandemic by keeping migrants without papers out. We're trying to remove them a ce fast as we can not put them into our system to not have them remain in the United States for a long period of time, therefore increasing the exposure risk. The American people. Immigration officials say they've carried out more than 100,000 expulsions during the pandemic, removing at least 2000 unaccompanied Children through June. So it's really clear to us that this is a pretext for blocking access for Children and for asylum seekers. Lisa Friedman is a vice president at kids in need of defense or kind, a nonprofit that's trying to get Children released from this shadow immigration system that completely takes them 100% out of all of the special Actions that have been put in place in recognition of the vulnerability of unaccompanied Children. In the end, Ricardo Seniors frantic search for his son and cousin paid off. He got in touch with kind group contacted immigration authorities who handed the boys over to a shelter. A few weeks later, they were released TTO live with Ricardo's father. I have the best dad because he risked it all to be reunited. To see me to support me. For Ricardo's family is the exception For most kids who pass through these hotel rooms. That's all they're going to see during their brief stay in the U. S. Joel Rose NPR news

Jorge Ricardo Texas U. S. Immigration and Customs McAllen Daniel Benton Ice NPR Joel rose United States Trump Administration Reporter MGM Ink Honduras U. S. Mexico Asshole Paso Phoenix San Antonio
"daniel benton" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KCRW

"And many people who are currently safe are looking for ways to help offering shelter in their RVs of their trailers are offering to take in large animals. Thie air quality is bad, so people are being advised to stay indoors and run air purifiers air conditioners if they can, and there's a really worry that the smoke could be a big hit to lung health in the region. You know, covert 19 is a respiratory virus. And there's a worry that the air pollution will make people more likely to get sick. And if they do get sick, the have a harder time recovering and amazing. Given all this. It looks like these fire conditions are just going to stay in place for the time being no relief in sight Reporter Daniel Benton You know overly Daniel Vengeance Remember station? Thanks a lot. Thank you. Since the pandemic began, the Trump Administration has set up a shadow immigration system on the U. S. Mexico border. Private contractors detain Children in hotels Before they're sent to their home countries. This allows immigration officials to bypass the normal process that would give the Children a chance to ask for asylum in the United States. NPR's Joel rose as the story of two people caught up in the system. It was late at night when Ricardo and Jorge arrived in a hotel parking lot, escorted by armed men in civilian clothes, way went in through the side door. No one was there. We didn't have to sign in or anything. We couldn't see the name of the hotel. Jorge is 16 and Ricardo is 13. They asked us not to use their last names because they're still in immigration proceedings. They're cousins who fled Honduras together after gang members threatened their family. They crossed the border illegally into Texas last month and turned themselves into the border patrol. After spending the night in detention. The boys say they were loaded into a van by the men who were not in uniforms. And they drove three hours to the hotel. Jorge says they were not allowed to leave their rooms for six days. They treated us badly at the hotel. They threatened us normally, when migrant Children travelling alone or apprehended. There are special protections that kick in to make sure they aren't sent back to dangerous situations. They're supposed to be detained and child appropriate shelters before being placed with a sponsor in the U. S while their asylum cases or heard But during the Corona virus pandemic that's not happening up and down the border, Court documents show. Many unaccompanied Children have been held secretly in hotels for days, sometimes weeks until they could be put on planes back to the countries. They came from. Immigration lawyers have figured out which hotel's leading to scenes like this one were detained. Give me your name. Texas Civil rights project posted this video on social media. Last month, he chose a lawyer confronting several unidentified men in the hallway of a hotel in McAllen, Texas, where the group believes migrant Children were being detained by police. Men shove the lawyer back into the elevator now. Private contractors working for U. S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement are detaining these young migrants in hotels in McAllen as well Asshole Paso, Phoenix and San Antonio. According to court papers. The company MGM Ink says its contract with ice prevents it from talking to the media. Ice says those contractors are trained to keep the miners safe and secure. Jorge and Ricardo say they were allowed to call their relatives. They were relieved when they reached Ricardo's father, who lives in Texas. They say they weren't allowed to tell him where they were.

Jorge Ricardo Texas U. S. Immigration and Customs McAllen Daniel Benton Ice NPR Joel rose United States Trump Administration Reporter MGM Ink Honduras U. S. Mexico Asshole Paso Phoenix San Antonio
"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But what's the latest in terms of the state's response to that cluster of cases? Rain, So the governor has said that things are stabilizing at nursing home facilities in the state, and, but the same cannot be said for the state's prisons for it, so people who are incarcerated in facilities prison facilities in the state are there's a large population of people who are elderly who are medically vulnerable, who are in facilities that are overcrowded. And we've seen this very intense outbreak at San Quentin over 1/3 of incarcerated people there have tested positive and that's not including people who have actually declined to be tested. So there's a really serious situation it at San Quentin and Governor Newsome did did address it. He did say that that this is a top priority for him. He's going through sounds like individual by individual at this facility, possibly and other facilities in the state looking to see who is medically vulnerable, who could be up for parole earlier? And he also said that That the seat is working to expedite identification of housing right? So they don't want people Teo to just be released onto without a plan. And so regardless, you know, things are really, really bad at Saint Clinton right now. There. We just got notice just a few minutes ago from CDC are that three people? Three people who were incarcerated there died this weekend. And that's in addition to at least four other in needs, who were condemned inmates to people on death row who are thought to have died from committing the past two weeks. So We're definitely seeing things become very serious. Things have been serious there. There continue to be serious there, and the state is trying to address that in some way. Wow. So again, that's three additional inmates that we've just learned have died at San Quentin this weekend from covert 19th E governor said the state is, you know, decompressing the population there. You mentioned the early releases. But what else? What other Options. Does it really have to decompress the population there, right. So so the governor mentioned transfers in this peachy. There's definitely been dialogue about transferring people to an empty facility. No facility has been identified there. But the advocates are definitely against transfers from of people from San Quentin to other facilities that currently have people there that have no no cases. They really don't want to see what happened at ST Quentin happen again at a different prison. Write the scene. Quentin Outbreak as widely thought to have come from A transfer of 121 incarcerated people from the California Institution for Men in Chino to think women so they don't want that. A repeat of that situation. There's an emergency federal hearing today at 3 p.m. s o the state is gonna have Tio provide some next steps on what they're going to do to protect incarcerated folks throughout. See that throughout the system, the California Correctional System What they're going to do to protect staff and what they're going to do to protect these communities around these institutions. Right? We're seeing Marin go on this watch list, and Marin, of course, has a huge population of of people course in San Quentin and but also staff members and just the surrounding communities at risk when there's an outbreak at these institutions. The one outcome of this federal hearing. Maybe that there's a convening of a three judge panel that could grant these early releases for medically vulnerable people quicker than the governor can do so. Right. You mentioned Marin County That was one of the county's that has had to kind of roll back some of the re opening that they allowed just yesterday, the county announcing there will no longer be allowing in person dining for a few weeks. And as you know, the spread that you know may have originated at the prison through a transfer can then spread to the community through people who are working. At the prison. Newsome also talked about having a sense of urgency at other facilities within the CDCR system. Obviously, they may have learned that the way they handled the transfer San Quentin would be disastrous to repeat. Are there other facilities, other concerns that they're looking at right now in the system. Right. So there's a lot of attention on Saint Quentin. But there are still you know, they're still facilities that have legs. Sorry. They're still facilities that have infections. The California institution for men is still you know, trying to get there. They're outbreak under control. Very worryingly. Last week, we found out that the California Medical facility, which is in back of Il reported a case and that population has An elder care center hospice care center for people who are incarcerated but are also medically vulnerable and elderly. So there's and the judge who's in charge of overseeing Something to help the United States Medical response. He has said that that specific potential for an outbreak at the California men's facility is very worrying for him and that it's possible that we'll see an outbreak or at least a few cases in every institution throughout the state. So he is very worried. And I think that this Is rightly a huge concern for the governor and for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. That was Kate Wolf, who has been covering the Koven 19 outbreak it San Quentin State prison. I want to turn back to Kut science reporter Daniel Benton. Daniel. We talked at the top of the governor discussed enforcement measures that the state was taking against restaurants bars to try to keep in place some of the restrictions they've had. But it seems the general strategy is move. Risky activities from indoors outdoors. Is that kind of the sense you get. That is the sense I get. We are learning more and more about this virus, and all indications are that outdoor activities are much less risky than indoor activities and we've talked, You know a lot about the response in terms of county state regulations. I mean, part of this has to be just the individual decisions. You know, 40 million Californians are making the right on a daily basis. That's right. I mean, the decisions that my neighbor makes, but I make that you make you know affect the health of the whole community. The governor's talked again and again about the importance of education. And I think the idea behind that is that if you know the right thing to do, you're more likely to do it, He said. You know you mentioned at the top that there have been Thousands of in person visits to bars and restaurants talking about health and safety regulations, and he said that many people many businesses came into compliance after these visits. You know he had. He also mentioned that there were a number of citations. I think you mentioned about 50 over the weekend on DH. He's also threatened. That some counties could visit could miss out on state funding if they have a pattern of non compliance, so I mean, he's really appealing to people to do the right thing, but he's also holding out the possibility of some sticks along the way, not just carry it. We have about 30 seconds left. The governor did mention he'll be back later this week to discuss contact, tracing the state's effort to kind of trace the spread of the disease, enlisting county and state workers at what point does the increasing spread of the virus make tracing unrealistic or is that a potential concern? It's a potential concern. The state is not releasing contact tracing metrics yet so will be interesting to hear what he says. I think one of the things we need to keep in mind is if the virus is increasing in a community increases exponentially rather than nearly so things can get overwhelmed quickly. But I haven't heard that is overwhelmed yet. Great. That was science reporter Daniel Benton. Thank you.

San Quentin Governor Newsome Daniel Benton Saint Quentin Quentin California Department of Corre reporter California Marin County California Medical facility Teo Saint Clinton California Correctional System California Institution for Men Kate Wolf CDC Marin Tio Chino
"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And showers throughout today live from NPR news in Washington I'm David Mattingly opening statements and president trump's Senate impeachment trial are scheduled to begin next week two articles passed by the house accused the president of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress left harness an indicted associate of president trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani says he was part of a campaign to pressure Ukraine's government to investigate former vice president Biden and his son hunter on behalf of trump harness tells MSNBC president trump know exactly what was going on he was aware of all my movements he I wouldn't do anything without the consent the Rudy Giuliani or the president this was indicted by federal prosecutors in New York on campaign finance charges this afternoon president trump will mark national religious freedom day NPR's Frank award Dona says the president will remind public schools that students have a constitutional right to prayer president trump will host a group of Christian Jewish and Muslim students who say they face discrimination at school in an exclusive interview with NPR the director of the White House domestic policy council Joe Grogan said provisions that protects student prayer have been eroded over time by a hostility toward religion the event comes as trump works to boost support among evangelical Christians before the twenty twenty election Dow futures are up seventy five points ahead of the open this is NPR news live from KQED news good morning nine Tiffany can high an unprecedented sea bird die offs several years ago happened during a period of severe ocean warming according to new research he cuties Daniel Benton reports back in two thousand fifteen ocean scientists had a mystery on their hands one of the worst die offs of marine birds in history and it's taking place along the west coast of the US and Canada from the Fairlawn up to Alaska common yours for washing up on the shore in may ceded the sea birds need to eat half their body weight in fish every day they're very good at what they do but they can't find food is because it's not on the ball John hi it is with the US Geological Survey at the Alaska Science Center scientists suspected that a warm water blob in the Pacific was to blame several factors were at work global warming an unusually strong el Nino a rarer phenomenon known as the Pacific to cable oscillation and stubborn ridge of high pressure combined all of these were too much like throwing a stick in the spokes of a late this is high and his colleagues found the warm water revved up the metabolism of cold blooded creatures from the plankton to forage fish to predator fish like salmon fish had to eat more to stay alive but couldn't store as much energy as usual an estimated one million mirrors starve to death that also coincided with the severe drought in California and die often caught whales and sea lions I'm Daniel Benton KQED news there's more state and local coverage online at KQED news dot org.

Washington David Mattingly NPR
"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Way as first responders continue to battle deadly wildfires the seven days state of emergency has been issued in New South Wales the country's most populous state NPR's Jason Beaubien reports weather conditions are expected to worsen this weekend along the state's south coast this is just the beginning of the summer season here right now they're predicting that in the coming days temperatures are gonna get up around a hundred and fifteen highs of a hundred and fifteen winds around sixty miles an hour potentially and you've already got these dozens of fires that are burning and the concern is that things are to get much worse before they get better NPR's Jason Beaubien reporting from Sydney listening to NPR news from Washington from KQED news I'm Danielle mention as we heard house speaker Nancy Pelosi is calling on the trump administration to immediately brief Congress on the assassination of Iran's top general in a statement the San Francisco Democrat says the air strike was conducted without congressional authorization and quote risks provoking provoking further it dangerous escalation of violence East Bay congresswoman Barbara Lee released a statement saying the air strike dangerously increases tensions in the region and quote brings us close to the brink of war the Pentagon says the US military killed general Qassem Soleimani at the direction of president trump to prevent violence against Americans in the region newly released to data finds that San Francisco has the largest racial disparity in traffic stops of any compatible state agency with black people stop five times more often than their population would explain key committees Kate wolf has more from the state wide report released Thursday the report issued by the state's racial and identity profiling advisory board isn't early attempts to track racial profiling by law enforcement the board found that across California a higher percentage of black individuals were stopped for what's called reasonable suspicion than any other racial identity group and officers were nearly three times as likely to search black drivers as white ones despite white suspects being more likely to yield contraband or other evidence the board plans to eventually require law enforcement agencies statewide to report the data right now it's only the eight largest agencies in California I'm Kate wolf KQED news and I'm Daniel Benton KQED news support for NPR comes from the Walton family foundation working to solve social and environmental problems to improve lives today in minutes benefit future generations more information at Walton family foundation dot org and by the listeners of KQED partly sunny today with temperatures in the upper fifties and lower sixties sixty three expected later on in Livermore San Carlos should see a high of sixty one in Sacramento later sixty degrees here in San Francisco fifty nine currently here in the city it's fifty five degrees this is science Friday I'm IRA Flatow and as is our custom meets our annual bird watching segment where we team up with on a bond's annual Christmas bird count we're devoting ease of the avian kind bundle up with binoculars in hand to count up all the noisy nuthatches the diving ducks and maybe one of these everybody's favorite event of that but look really that's just a preview because later in the hour we're gonna play name that bird quiz we're going to play a call and we want you to make the call and call in with your gas for the bird that made that sound the first are going to talk about what birds you've seen this winter did you participate in a bird count or maybe you're taking account from your kitchen window some listeners checked in on the science Friday vox pop back to tell us what they've seen my bird feeder.

New South Wales
"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It off for good learn more at noon N. O. O. M. dot com and by the listeners of KQED good morning the time now is six twenty one it's morning edition on KQED I'm Daniel Benton and it's Friday time for bey curious our next question comes from Alex in San Francisco who wants to know why he so often delayed when flying into SFO turns out SFO is the US is third most of late airport for arrivals here to explain why is a livia Allen price host of the bay curious podcast via email as you said SFO can be super delayed and actually twenty six percent of arriving flights were delayed in twenty eighteen coming into SFO and that's the most recent year that data is available and twenty eighteen is not an anomaly SFO ranks high almost every year for most delayed flights and explain this to me why is that you know we don't get snow or hurricanes here you might be surprised let's actually are fog that causes so much of a problem so on most days SFO can land two planes at once on parallel runways so when the weather is clear as many as sixty planes can land in one hour when visibility is low pilots can't make visual contact with the plane that would be landing beside them they're relying more on instruments to land and they don't actually allow planes to land as close when they're relying only on instruments that that visual sort of element of being up that is really important so then instead of landing two planes at once SFO can only land one okay so for safety the airport can only land thirty an hour say instead of sixty exactly and also triggers a bunch of ground delays so any flight destined for SFO will be held at its originating airport that way we don't end up with you know dozens of planes circling in the skies while they're waiting to land so the problems just cascade that absolutely all right so if I'm if I'm a passenger is there anything I can do to avoid getting caught in one of these SFO delays booking an early flight is about all that you can do if you're trying to get out of SFO because not scenario most of the planes will have been held at the airport overnight you're not going to risk the chance that an incoming flight will have been delayed therefore it's going to you know push your departure out no pets every morning as I can be reached at absolutely yeah that's fascinating thank you so much all of it you will continue and this morning we have another question from the bay curious listener here to help us answer that is Silicon Valley editor Rachel Morrow good morning Rachel hi Danielle now first I have a question for you what do you think of when you think about silent film you know I kind of think about right kind of cartoon line maybe villain with a goofy big mustache tying a damsel in.

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On even at night eager to listen to one calming voice I think I heard the first broadcast when she came on and I just felt like okay we're gonna be okay because she's going to get us through this she is cancer news director Pat Kerr again and let's get right to the specifics of the new information coming out this morning from cal fire for people whose lives depended on evacuation orders and other emergency information local radio delivers Kerrigan says radio also connect with an audience in a way websites newspapers and TV can't it is very personal very personal you know we're describing what's happening in our own voices and and our own voices naturally will be tinged with concern and fear and things like that even if she's reaching hundreds of thousands of people it can feel like a radio host is speaking directly to you radio waves travel miles and miles unimpeded it doesn't take a lot of energy to transmit or receive them so as long as the station has power even if it's a back up generator and the listener have hand cranked or battery powered radio it works no internet or self service required yeah you really think that old school radio has been far often to overlook Doug Carlson runs the website wildfire crisis communication and advocates for emergency officials to use radio during disasters after the twenty seventeen fires he says the napa county grand jury investigated what communications worked and what didn't and they determined that old school technologies like radio were crucial effect they use the term saves the day that's one reason the red cross recommends everyone's emergency kit includes a radio we're the ones that are going to give you the information you need we're the ones that are that are going to be there for you when you call Mike Adams normally plays three decades of pop hits on Kay's EST when the station and its affiliates switched over to all news he became part reporter part emergency coordinator we had an elderly couple and they they were broke down on the side of the road and they needed help they called the station and you could see me tearing up potus put up a listener pulled up and helped they have taken care of with the emergency winding down Casey S. T. K. S. R. O. and other North Bay stations are back to their normal programming I'll I'll throw it out there do you think I should play a song yet our I would as the do the boost in listenership will likely subside that's too bad says KACST general manager Frank Colbert S. I wish it didn't take circumstances like these for people to understand the value of radio you can count on it even though it's not the next big thing I mean I honestly think we are the Rodney Dangerfield of all media we get no respect except maybe at times like this and then it's bleeding until of course next time in Santa Rosa I'm Daniel Benton's KQED news.

"daniel benton" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Q. E. T.'s Daniel Benton reports on another fire that's burning in large sections of California's wine country at the grounds of the Cloverdale citrus fares CEO Katie young has coordinated with fire officials and utility personnel she's hosted a handful of evacuees camping in her parking lot and she's taken the names of neighbors who called or stop by eager to volunteer but the mood is tense the devastating North Bay fires of twenty seventeen are on everyone's minds there's just a lot of anxiety just anxiety to to think about the could this be our future how many of these will we see I mean this is this is really scary time for for everyone obviously still young says the response this time feels more coordinated for NPR news I'm Danielle Benton in Cloverdale in Washington more than forty Republicans in the Senate are backing an effort to formally condemned the impeachment inquiry of president trump the resolution's co sponsor Linda Graham says the probe is unfair and a nice truck to process instead the judiciary looking at a potential impeachable offense they created a process in the Intel community committee this behind closed doors doesn't provide it access to the president's accuser shows Republicans out for all practical purposes and is a on where the substitute for the way you need to do it Democrats reject the argument noting that Republicans on the Senate intelligence committee are also questioning witnesses and the impeachment probe the trump administration's count of how many migrant families were separated at the border continues to climb and they are still rose reports that immigrant advocates are calling the latest numbers shocking the trump administration told a federal court that more than fifteen hundred migrant children were separated from their parents before the administration officially launched its zero tolerance policy last year that's according to the American civil liberties union which sued to stop family separations the latest figure is several hundred more than the trump administration has previously acknowledged a federal judge originally ordered the administration to reunite nearly three thousand migrant children with their parents the total has now climbed to more than four thousand as the court pushes for a full accounting the ACLU argues that the administration is still separating children and parents over minor offenses by the trump administration says it does so only when it's in the best interests of the child toll rose NPR news the commerce department says new home sales fell slightly in September with all regions of the country except the Midwest showing declines department says that sales of new homes fell seven tenths of a percent following a six point two percent surge in sales during the month of August you're listening to NPR news the centers for disease control and prevention says a hundred and twenty five additional cases of vaping related injuries have been reported in the past week that brings the total to sixteen hundred for including thirty four deaths the CDC says most of the cases involve people who became ill after using electronic cigarettes containing the chemical in marijuana that causes a high health officials still have not traced the beeping illnesses to any single ingredient for second day in a row violent protests of rock Ethiopia with local media reports of at least twenty dead in the clashes and Paris air Peralta reports of the protests protesters are angry with the country's new prime minister John or Mohammed who recently won a Nobel Peace Prize protesters are angry because they believe the government try to intimidate shower Muhammad media mogul that one of the leading activists in the country so they've taken to the streets blocked roads and in some cases the set business is on fire jaguar was once a close ally to prime minister Abby admit but in an interview with NPR he says their vision for Ethiopia has drifted apart he says the prime minister even issued a veiled threat but he is not afraid I wanted to be known that no amount of threat would force me to leave the country the worry is that the feud between these two men will lead to Ethiopia to a spiral of violence it propped up NPR news Nairobi on stock markets in Asia shares are mostly lower following mixed trading on Wall Street the Dow lost twenty eight points on she Stevens NPR news in Washington support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include home advisor committed to helping homeowners find the right pros for their home projects homeowners can read reviews book appointments and check cost guides for home projects at home advisor dot com or on the mobile.

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We are making a big leap forward in terms of focusing attention on prevention we are not seeing the nation's first comprehensive early alert system for earthquakes we're now seeing the ability for millions and millions of Californians to download an app my check science reporter Daniel Benton joins us to explain this news system and Danielle how does it work so there is a network of sensors in the ground and they can detect shaking and computer models then predicts the area over which that shaking is going to be felt and that a warning can be sent out I spoke to Emory batei at the US Geological Survey she's one of the scientists working on the system and she stressed it's not able to predict quakes but after one starts the system can give one to two seconds if you're really close to the epicenter or up to say thirty seconds of warning if you're farther away the more distance from the source the more warning time and we can rapidly detect the earthquake and started and we rapidly and determine the location at the bank and then we take advantage of the fact that the information can travel much faster than the shaking waves travel so the idea then is to send an alert over the internet or radio or broadcast that information and she said can travel a lot faster than the seismic waves can and so this can give people just a little bit of warning before the shaking arrives to drop cover and hold on or say slow train that they're operating or take steps to make themselves a little safer and Danielle Japan and Mexico have had early warning systems for earthquakes for awhile now Howard their systems different than this one so their systems work a little differently because they deal with earthquakes and faults that are off shore and they have more time to spread the warning because that the epicenter is farther away this system is more advanced for the more delicate and complicated because we actually live it right on top of the faults that cause earthquakes in our area and Daniel you have looked back at Loma Prieta and I'm I'm wondering what science has learned from that earthquake that helps is going to help us prepare for the next one yeah the data that we got from the Loma Prieta earthquake was really valuable because it was the first big quake to hit the bay area since the nineteen oh six quake and it was a huge wake up call it really revealed where the bay area was vulnerable in particular areas built on in Phil or sand such as San Francisco's marina district or the bay bridge or the Cyprus street viaduct in the East Bay there were on the grounds that amplified the shaking and they were too much much more vulnerable to destruction so after that QuakeCon Congress put tens of millions of dollars insist into studying the quake and what seismologists learn then went into building codes and so buildings roads hospitals have been rebuilt or retro fitted to be much steadier these days up there still work to do of course but overall we're in much better shape now than we were in the late eighties okay thanks so much done now thank.

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bill introduced by two senators today enables Congress to fire the board of the U. S. Olympic and Paralympic committee has Alexandra star reports it's the latest fallout from investigations into the sexual abuse of athletes by former USA gymnastics Dr Larry Nasser this bipartisan legislation would require the US Olympic and Paralympic committee to give twenty million dollars a year to the U. S. center for safe sport that's the independent organization charged with investigating abuse in Olympic sport it's long complained it doesn't have adequate funding and reports that have surfaced from gymnastics to swimming to taekwondo show it has plenty to investigate the legislation is being welcomed by former Jim this and survivors of abuse on Wall Street the Dow was down seventy two points this is NPR news from KQED news time Brian what a record number of Californians are very concerned global warming is fueling severe wildfires KQED science reporter Daniel vented has more on the new state wide survey the annual survey from the public policy institute of California found seven in ten Californians are worried that climate change is worsening wildfires that's a ten percent jump from last year survey director mark ball to sorry heads the PP I see he says while debate rages in Congress about why their climate change should be addressed title issue in California Californians have moved on to exactly how are we going to deal with coping with the changes that are under way a majority of Californians also approve of governor nuisance plan to create a wildfire insurance fund to cover future damages however fewer than half are very concerned about rising sea levels and dangerous heat waves to other known impacts of global warming I'm Daniel Benton KQED news an advocacy group representing a Daly city man was turned over by local police to federal immigration authorities has filed a complaint with the city and its police department for violating California's sanctuary law it happened in may after Jose are mondo Escobar Lopez was pulled over for a traffic stop Angela chan is the policy director for Asian law caucus which is filing the complaint we really are taking this case very seriously because it seems like Daly city police really needs to get pushed in order to do the right thing they've been dragging their feet are mondo was detained two months ago and may he still detained the city has said it was an isolated incident and that is conducting an internal investigation I'm Brian what KQED news support on Tuesday morning comes from Stanford University where professors inspire students to make the next great discovery the dating app tinder now warns its LGBTQ users when they're in a country where same sex relationships are criminalized having a function like this is really important but they're just so many blind spots in little gaps in between that I would love to see felt that's next time on the take away from W. NYC and P. R. I. coming up today at eleven here on member supported KQ we do public radio and coming up on morning edition the narrow water ways of the strait of Hormuz whose have recently been the scene of confrontation but there is also a highway for traders.

Congress twenty million dollars ten percent two months
"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"daniel benton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Twenty two. It's morning edition on weedy. I'm Brian watt. It's been a big year for snow in the Sierra Nevada range records have fallen along with the snow. We've seen reports of fifty feet of snow or more on mammoth mountain in the central Sierra and in the resort town of mammoth lakes. Some people have literally had to tunnel out of their homes. This is the time of year when the snowpack is typically at its peak and tomorrow when surveyors do their monthly manual survey. They're likely to find the snow pack at about one hundred sixty percent of the average we've called up Ben had an atmospheric scientist at the western regional climate center in Reno and Ben in a word or two. How would you describe the snowfall this year, absolutely fantastic and not just for skiers? But also for anyone who uses water in California. All right. So the water supply loves it. But what is it about the storms that have come in this year that has created so much snow and so much water in the snow? Well, we've had very consistent Southall and the storms that have been bringing the snowfall have been somewhat colder than average. And so we've seen snow levels bringing snow down to one or two thousand feet quite frequently. We've even seen snow in the city itself, San Francisco, and the foothills there close to sea level, which is pretty novel and rare, and so we accumulated a lot of snow at the higher elevations at the middle of Asians and even down in the foothills, and we have a lot of water stored in our snowpack right now. All right. So do we ever reach a point where we have too much snow is definitely possible because we have a very nice state of our reservoir water levels right now or at about eighty percent full and running about one hundred and eleven percent of the historic average for the date, and we have a lot of snow stored in our natural snowpack reservoir. So if we have a warmer than average spring or has some very warm spring storms that accelerate the melting we might see some of that water coming down out of the nouns a little bit early, and that could create some challenges for the water management community because our reservoirs are so full right now and those in some of these communities that have been receiving heavy snowfall like Manasota springs and Myers people who've been tirelessly shoveling out of their homes or businesses we've seen overuse injuries from too much traveling. I think the chiropractors are going to be very busy this spring and summer. Oh my goodness. All right. Well, I'm sorry to hear that. Everyone shovel safely shovel safely. Yes. Stretch then hatchet of the western regional climate center in Reno. Thank you very much. Thank you very much for having me on a much more serious note. All the snow we've received this year has also meant a heavy year across the west for avalanches. Especially in the rocky mountains avalanches there have triggered evacuation orders in almost twenty five people have died. That's a lot of people. But it's pretty typical for a heavy snow year. Unfortunately, science editor Daniel Benton has been looking into the state of avalanche science. It's an old problem. But the full solution still eludes us she started with a call to the Sierra avalanche center. Good morning national fan with Alan's forecast for when if you're heading into the Lake Tahoe back country during winter and early spring. This year avalanche center is a good place to start the day. Bottom line, considered changeable exist all of Asians to win. Slab storm slab and loose. Wet avalanche problems. Human triggered avalanches likely with natural triggered avalanches possible. Recording forecast offer about five minutes of info on conditions and where it's riskiest. Everything's available online too. It's the product of lead forecaster Brandon Schwartz and his colleagues who start studying the snow wants the first ball of the season hits the ground, and we tracked snowfall we look at how those snow crystals change on the ground. And as they changed throughout winter each snowfall creates new layers in the snow pack a relatively weak layer of snow under a stronger one on a slope of thirty degrees or more dots. The recipe for an avalanche. Though, we're looking to see what it's gonna take.

Sierra avalanche center mammoth mountain Brian watt mammoth lakes Nevada Reno Southall Manasota springs atmospheric scientist California Ben forecaster Brandon Schwartz San Francisco Lake Tahoe Daniel Benton Myers editor Alan
Two Scientists Earn Nobel for Discovering a New Pillar in Cancer Therapy

Michael Berry

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

Two Scientists Earn Nobel for Discovering a New Pillar in Cancer Therapy

"For the first time a Nobel prize in medicine has been awarded for cancer therapy. One of the researchers sharing the prize did his groundbreaking work at UC Berkeley. Here's science editor. Daniel Benton, James Allison says he didn't start out intending to cure cancer. He wanted to know how t cells work T cells are a key part of our immune system. They attacked cancers and other diseases, but they also have a kind of breaking system that slows them down Alison discovered the molecule that serves as the brakes and had an idea here. He is speaking at a press conference this morning. Russia just disable the brakes and see if that will allow them your sister to attack cancer and. Did the therapy has extended the lives of thousands of cancer patients. Alison director the UC Berkeley cancer research laboratory for twenty years he currently works at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in

Cancer Md Anderson Cancer Center Nobel Prize Uc Berkeley James Allison Alison Daniel Benton Russia Editor Director Twenty Years
Dr. Larry Nassar, NPR and Yemen discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

04:32 min | 3 years ago

Dr. Larry Nassar, NPR and Yemen discussed on Morning Edition

"The live from NPR news in Washington. I'm korva Coleman. The Labor Department says July's unemployment rate fell to three point nine percent at the same time. One hundred fifty, seven thousand jobs were created. The agency also revised upward job gains for prior months. Meanwhile, China's says it is poised to impose billions of dollars worth of new tariffs on American exports, NPR's or Berliner pass more. This is definitely an escalation of tit for tat at China. Now says it is prepared to impose tariffs on sixty billion dollars of US America of American goods. This only would follow if the Trump administration goes ahead with its threat to impose tariffs of perhaps as high as twenty five percent on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese goods. NPR's oria Berliner, former Michigan State University sports. Dr. Larry Nassar is appealing conditions of his sentencing hearing today. Day he's asking for a. Different judge than the one who sentenced him two decades in prison hundreds of women say he sexually. Assaulted them Michigan public radio's shayna Roth has more Larry Nassar sentencing hearing went on for seven days seven days in which more than one hundred women and young girls told the stories. Of how Nassar, abused them upon handing down. The. Sentence judge Rosemarie Aquilina said I'm just find yourself warranted Nassar's attorneys say comments like this show aqua Lena was biased. They say she should be. Taken off the. Case and a different judge should decide whether Nassar may be resentenced the state attorney general's office argues that Nassar got a fair hearing it. Says judge aqua Lena was allowed to be harsh and voice the. Communities quote moral outrage for NPR news I'm shayna Roth in Lansing Michigan the world held organization warns Yemen may be on the brink of. A major, new cholera epidemic Lisa Shlein reports from Geneva the WHO fears this new. Outbreak may be worse than previous ones because of the weakened condition of the population following more than three years of civil war Yemen. Has had two major waves of cholera epidemics in recent years. WHO expert pita Salama says a steady increase in cases over the past, weeks suggest Yemen may be on the cusp of a third wave he says people are at great risk of getting ill because they are. Severely malnourished what we're, likely to see is even Even higher death rates among the color of cases that do occur because people. Just don't have the physical resources to fight the disease any longer. WHO is, appealing to the warring parties to stop fighting for three days so, it, can begin an oral cholera. Vaccination campaign in northern Yemen, on. Saturday for NPR news I'm Lisa shine in Geneva on Wall Street the Dow Jones industrial average. Is up fifty two points. At twenty five. Thousand three hundred seventy nine the NASDAQ is down twelve at seventy seven ninety this is NPR from news I'm Tiffany Cam high local air. Regulators are issuing an air advisory today through Sunday warning that wins. Could push smoke from the Mendocino complex fire and Lake County into the bay area especially the north bay changing wind patterns will continue to. Be a, challenge for firefighters but meteorologist Jan null says the temperatures will come down. A little cubby conditions over the decks Dixie days are are. Not going to be as extremists we saw, about a week ago maybe it's go to ward back up again the the temperatures are going to be you know into the low. One hundred's dotted you the kid sort of raised so getting a bit of a. Respite meanwhile team from the national weather service and Cal fire have begun investigating the large firewall. Or fire tornado that ripped through a section. Of reading a week ago in the early stages of the massive car fire as science editor Daniel. Benton tells us they released some preliminary findings winds. Were in excess of one. Hundred forty three miles per hour when an out of control fire generated its own weather system last week torching neighborhoods and reading that's the equivalent of an f two tornado considered significant. On the scale used for. Tornadoes the winds were strong enough to crumple high-tension powerline. Towers uproot trees and tear, the roofs off homes the team will be issuing a full report But according to a Cal fire spokesman there is no estimate yet of when I'm Daniel Vinton KiKi Dee news there's..

Dr. Larry Nassar NPR Yemen Oria Berliner Shayna Roth China Geneva Cholera Korva Coleman Aqua Lena Washington Labor Department Rosemarie Aquilina Michigan CAL Pita Salama Daniel Vinton Michigan State University