3 Burst results for "Dance Theatre Of Harlem"

"dance theatre harlem" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:55 min | 2 years ago

"dance theatre harlem" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Don't impressive legacy is a multicultural world renowned dance institution. The dance theatre of Harlem is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary honoring its co-founder Arthur Mitchell Mitchell passed away at the age of eighty four in September of last year. He spent decades breaking racial barriers in nineteen fifty-six. Mitchell became the first black principal dancer, a major ballet company, the New York City ballet dismayed by the dearth of opportunities for people of color in the arts. He along side with Carol shook co founded the dance theatre of Harlem, Virginia Johnson, artistic director founding member and former principal ballerina the dance theatre of Harlem fan found a point of magazine is here with us in studio after thirty year career, she's widely recognized as one of the great ballerinas of her generation from April tenth to thirteenth dance theater of Harlem performed four shows in New York City opening with its annual vision gala at New York City centre, Virginia, welcome to all of it. And tell us what you have planned for this fiftieth anniversary. Celebration. So the fiftieth anniversary of dancing of Harlem is is just huge to me. And so we're gonna celebrate over two years. This year is very much a way of looking back at fifty years of dense it upon them, you know, Mitchell passed in September, and we had been speaking about lots of plans for this performance series that we're doing it city center this week. And you know, there were lots of things in the works. We're actually doing a work of art Mitchell's tones, and he was in the studio with the dancers making Justice updating it, so it's called tones to. So so it is very much a way of looking back a kind of fond. But also a critical assessment of what happened when he started this company fifty years ago and its trajectory over that time for people who don't know and tell me I think this is part of the legend is that it started in a converted garage. Actually, it started in the bay. Basement of a church. It started in the basement of the state Saint James Presbyterian church on Saint Nicholas avenue one hundred forty seventh street, and that's where Arthur Mitchell open de teaches school because you know, the story is that he was inspired is wrong word. He was compelled by the assassination of doctor king to do something that would impact the young people in Harlem, and he thought well, you know, I'm going to I'm gonna teach the classical art form because they need something to change their future. He wanted to give them the skills that when able them to have a better life, and you know, that's focus and that's discipline. And that's very, much perseverance. When you're studying classical artform, ballet opera music, all anybody ever says. No, that's not good enough. And you have to have the strength inner strength to go. Come back every day and keep trying and doing that built something in you that naval she to do something with your life. So that's what happened in the basement of that church. Faye shortly. After that, he looked at the four hundred kids he had all around him. His Mitchell was quite a force. And he said, you know, they need something to aspire to they need a role models. They need to see people like themselves in this art form of classical ballet, and so he created the dance company as a second step and that was in the garage converted garage on hundred on one hundred forty fifth street, and it had big double doors that he went throw open and so the community walking by and they would look in that. And they would see these people doing this. What are they doing this weird movement, and this crazy person yelling at them, and all this energy and all this, and you know, by the end of the day, there would be a crowd of people sitting in that garage looking at us trying to figure out what's going on? But really drawn to what he was doing was wonderful understanding that it was new and that. It was different. But it was also people who looked like them doing. It must have been just really. I talk skating's not the right word. But. I can't understand. Why would stop and watch? Would want to know more. Yeah. Absolutely. And then when you think about it, you know, have they ever seen Bali before, you know, Bali has got this history of being elitist and only for this crowd of people. And and had it ever come to Holland before had it ever been something they could see firsthand, and you know, to me, it's the most beautiful thing in the world. So I think that's what also brought them into not only was it people that looked like them doing something very interesting, but something wonderful, my guess is Jimmy Johnson artistic director and former principal dancer of the dance theatre of Harlem. We're talking about the fiftieth anniversary of the dance theater Harlem back, then how did you meet Arthur Mitchell? So I was in New York at at New York University. I was I had studied ballet my whole life. And when I was graduating from the school that I went to the director who would trained beautifully said to me, you know, you're going to have a career, but you never gonna be about. Because of the color of your skin. And I had been shocked and grateful that she wait until then to tell me that. But still knew that this is what this is who I was I was about Rina, and I had to find a way to make that happen. So I got myself to New York City because I figured if I was in the center of dance in the world, I could find a way to be about Amina and someone said to me, you know, are Mitchell teaching classes up in Harlem on Saturdays. Why don't you just go up and take class because you're missing ballet so much? And that's how I found out about dancing Harlem, he had a reputation for being incredibly tough really tough on dancers and people around him. Did it have a goal that has toughness have a goal? I got a sense that it wasn't because he was mean or an ogre, but that he had something in his mind that he wanted. She even this is how he saw to do it up -solutely. Absolutely. You know in my later years, and certainly in the period of time that I was became artistic director. I got to know Arthur Mitchell as a person, you know, no longer my boss, no longer the visionary. And it was totally mission driven. He had something very important to do. He had to disprove that myth that blocks can't do ballet, and that people are gonna look harder at us. And they looked at anybody else, and he had to bring together people from all kinds of different schools, all kinds of different trainings and melted into a company. You know, that that thing is it's not so much said anymore, but we had to represent we stood for all black people. And so he he took that burden. And he said, you know, we're. Going to do this. We're going to change this. And if I have to turn you inside out to do that, we're going to do it. So he was extremely tough. He was extremely I used to say like coir Mitchell echo work for anybody. Because there was never a moment that you could not be doing your best was ballet in that sense. You describe about that he wanted to say that young black people could be belly dancers and ballerinas was Bali a stand in for could be disciplined could be excellent could be groundbreaking wasn't just the dance that he was really aiming. No, absolutely. You know that that's kind of the definition of of ballet that. It's it's excellent that it's pure that. It's elevated that it is not accessible it's acceptable to only the very few can put up with what it takes. And you know, lots of people have have looked at it. In terms of the color of the skin being exclusive? But really it takes a certain kind of spirit on a certain kind of commitment and a certain kind of belief in the value of challenge. You know, I fell in love with Bali because it was impossible. And I wanted to do something that was impossible that was beautiful and impossible. And I wanted to get as close to that point as close to that perfect thing as I could knowing that I would never actually get there. My guess is Virginia Johnson artistic director and former principal dancer at the dance theatre of Harlem, I was interviewing the presidency of the Apollo about ten days ago and one of the questions, I asked her is how do you take a legacy institution, retain, its integrity and brand but also move it forward. How are you doing that with dance theatre of Harlem, so and that kind of felt really nicely? Back into the idea of this two year celebration of of of Harlem fiftieth anniversary because we have to recognize our legacy. We have to is the past the past and the path we took to get here a recognizing that tacit of Harlem has neoclassical routes because of our Mitchell's relationship to your city ballet, but also has tremendous roots in the African American community, and the culture that's that supported us has roots with go back to the AGA and the valley Russo all these things we're looking at the things that we've touched in our lives as we are creating African Americans and people of color and in classical ballet now as we look forward to the second part of our fiftieth anniversary celebration is really about who what is Bali. Now. What does he need to do? Now. I think it's got to mend his relevance. Because excellence is not something that belongs in the past now excellence needs to be revealed in a contemporary manner. I don't want to throw away anything that is beautiful about Dali. But I wanna make sure that is something that people can connect to as we move forward. So in the next year, we'll be looking at bringing in more female choreographers to make the works that on the state looking at what Bali might look like ten years from now, it's it's not that can happen overnight, but you have to plant the seeds of a future. Now, I think people could name to two black. Valerie and Virginia Johnson and misty Copeland. Would you share the names of a few others? Oh, no, absolutely. Well, we have to definitely talk about Janet Collins who is about arena at the Metropolitan Opera in the nineteen forties and raven Wilkinson who has just passed. An amazing amazing artists. Amazing generous spirit who is very much part of my life. As well. But dancers that were concurrent to my time certainly Lydia Barco who was the balloting that danc- of them before I got there and Larne Anderson who was a principal. First bottoming at Houston Bali who was actually, you know, long before misty was doing all of the western European classical works at the same time. That was doing Lauren was dancing sleeping, beauty and cappella. And so we have a tremendous history in this art form, it's it's not known. And that's the thing that I want to make sure that people understand that this is not new it's not just invented. Now. We have been in this art form for a good long time. I feel documentary that. For anybody who's listening? Joe's think this would make a beautiful documentary. I just say my guess for Jimmy Johnson artistic director, former principal dancer of dance theatre of Harlem will there be any any of the celebration travel, or is it going to all be based in New York, so dancing Apollo is touring company. And so we are celebrating the fiftieth anniversary wherever we go around across the country..

Harlem Arthur Mitchell Mitchell director Bali principal New York City art Mitchell Virginia Johnson Arthur Mitchell Jimmy Johnson coir Mitchell New York City centre Houston Bali Virginia Mitchell New York University Carol co-founder Holland Faye
"dance theatre harlem" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:37 min | 2 years ago

"dance theatre harlem" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Impressive legacy is a multicultural Wilbur now dance institution but dance theatre of Harlem is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary, but honoring its co-founder Arthur Mitchell Mitchell passed away at the age of eighty four September of last year. He spent decades breaking racial barriers ninety fifty six Mitchell became the first black principal dancer, major ballet company, the New York City ballet dismayed by the dearth of opportunities for people of color in the arts he alongside with Carol shook co-founded the dance theatre of Harlem, Virginia Johnson, artistic director founding member and former principal ballerina the dance theatre of Harlem fan found a point of magazine found is here with us in studio afternoon thirty year career, she's widely recognized as one of the great ballerinas of her generation from April tenth to thirteenth dance theatre of Harlem performed four shows in New York City opening with its annual vision gala at New York City centre, Virginia, welcome to all of it. And tell us what do you have planned for this fiftieth anniversary? Celebration. So the fiftieth anniversary of dance of Harlem is is just huge to me. And so we're going to celebrate it over two years. This year is very much a way of looking back at fifty years of density to follow him, you know, Mitchell passed in September. And we had been speaking about lots of plans for this performance series that we're doing it city center this week. And you know, there were lots of things in the works. We're actually doing a work of art Mitchell's tones, and he was in the studio with the dancers making Justice updating it, so it's called tones to. So so it is very much a way of looking back a kind of fund, but also a critical assessment of what happened when he started this company fifty years ago and its trajectory over that time for people who don't know and tell me I think this is part of the legend is that it started in a converted garage. Actually, it started in the bay. Basement of a church. Okay. It started in the basement of the state Saint James Presbyterian church on Saint Nicholas avenue one hundred forty seven street, and that's where Arthur Mitchell open a school because you know, the story is that he was inspired is wrong word. He was compelled by this assoiation of Dr king to do something that would impact the young people in Harlem, and he thought well, you know, I'm going to I'm going to teach classical art form because they need something to change their future. He wanted to give them the skills that when able them to have a better life, and you know, let's focus, and that's disipline, and that's very, much perseverance. When you're studying classical artform, ballet opera music, all anybody ever says. No, that's not good enough. And you have to have the strength inner strength to go. Come back every day and keep trying and doing that built something in you that naval you to do something with your life. So that's what happened in the basement of that church. Very shortly. After that, he looked at the four hundred kids he had all around him. He's awesome. It's was quite a force. And he said, you know, they need something to aspire to they need a role models. They need to see people like themselves in this art form of classical Bali. And so he created the dancing problem company as a second step, and that was in the garage converted garage on hundred on one hundred forty fifth street, and it had big double doors that he went throw open and so the community walking by and they would look in that. And they would see these people doing this. What are they doing this weird movement, and this crazy person yelling at them, and all this energy and all this, and you know, by the end of the day, there would be a crowd of people sitting in that garage looking at us trying to figure out what's going on? But really drawn to what he was doing. It was wonderful understanding that it was new and that. It was different. But it was also people who looked like them doing. It must have been just really. Talks kings, not the right word. But. I understand why would stop and watch. Would wanna know more? Yeah. Absolutely. And then when you think about it, you know, how they ever seen Bali before, you know, valley has got this history of being elitist and only for this crowd of people, and and have ever come to Holland before ever been something they could see firsthand, and you know, to me, it's the most beautiful thing in the world. So I think that's what also brought them into not only was that people that look like them doing something very interesting, but something wonderful, my guess is for Jimmy Johnson artistic director and former principal dancer of the dance theatre of Harlem. We're talking about the fiftieth anniversary of the dance theater Harlem back, then how did you meet Arthur Mitchell? So I was in New York at at New York University. I was I had studied ballet my whole life. And when I was graduating from the school that I went to the director who would trained beautifully said to me, you know, you're going to have a career, but you never going to be about. Because of the color of your skin. And I had been shocked and grateful that she wait until then to tell me that. But still knew that this is what this is who I was I was about Rina, and I had to find a way to make that happen. So I got myself to New York City 'cause I figured if I was in the center of dance in the world. I could find a way to be about Amina and someone said to me, you know, are Mitchell teaching valley classes up in Harlem on Saturdays. Why don't you just go up and take class because you're missing ballet so much? And that's how I found out about dancing Harlem, he had a reputation for being incredibly tough really tough on dancers and people around him. Did it have a goal that has toughness have a goal? I got a sense that it wasn't because he was mean or an ogre, but that he had something in his mind that he wanted. She even this is how he saw to do it up -solutely. Absolutely. You know in my later years, and certainly in the period of time that I was became artistic director. I got to know Arthur Mitchell as a person, you know, no longer my boss, no longer the visionary. And it was totally mission driven. He had something very important to do. He had to disprove that myth that blocks can't do ballet, and the people are gonna look harder at us. And they looked at anybody else, and he had to bring together people from all kinds of different schools, all kinds of different trainings and melted into a company. You know, that that thing is it's not so much said anymore, but we had to represent we stood for all black people. And so he he took that burden. And he said, you know, we're. Going to do this. We're going to change this. And if I have to turn you inside out to do that, we're going to do it. So he was extremely tough. He was extremely I used to say like quad Mitchell echo work for anybody. Because there was never a moment that you could not be doing your best was ballet in that sense. You describe about that he wanted to say that young black people could be belly dancers. Ballerinas was Bali a stand in for could be disciplined could be excellent could be. Groundbreaking wasn't just the dance that he was really aiming. No, absolutely. You know that that's kind of the definition of ballet that. It's it's excellent that it's pure that. It's elevated that it is not accessible it's accessible to only the very few can put up with what it takes. And you know, lots of people have have looked at it in terms of the color of the skin being exclusive. But really it takes a certain kind of. Spirit and a certain kind of commitment and a certain kind of belief in the value of challenge. I fell in love with Bali because it was impossible. And I wanted to do something that was impossible that was beautiful and impossible. And I wanted to get as close to that point. As close to that perfect thing as I could knowing that I would never actually get there. My guess is Virginia Johnson artistic director and former principal dancer at the dance theatre of Harlem. I was interviewing the presidency of the Apollo about ten days ago and one of the questions I asked her is how you take a legacy institution. Retain, its integrity and brand. But also move it forward. How are you doing that with dance theatre of Harlem, so and that kind of really nicely back into the idea of this this two year celebration of of of Harlem fiftieth anniversary because we have to recognize our legacy. We have to the past the past and the path we took to get here. Recognizing that tacit of Harlem has neoclassical routes because of our Mitchell's relationship to New York City ballet, but also has tremendous roots in the African American community, and the culture, that's that supported us has roots. Go back to the eleven the valley Russo all these things we're looking at the things that we've touched in our lives as we are creating African Americans and people of color in classical ballet now as we look forward to the second part of our fiftieth anniversary celebration is really about who what is Bali. Now. What does he need to do? Now. I think it's got to mend us relevance. Because excellence is not something that belongs in the past now excellence needs to be revealed, a contemporary matter, I don't want to throw away anything that is beautiful about Bali. But I wanna make sure that is something that people can connect you as we move forward. So in the next year, we'll be looking at bringing in more female choreographers to make the works on the state looking at what Bali might look like ten years from now, it's it's not that can happen overnight, but you have to plant the seeds of a future. Now, I think people could name to two black. Valerie and Virginia Johnson and misty Copeland. Would you share the names of a few others? Oh, my should know. Absolutely. Well, we have to definitely talk about Janet Collins who is about at the Metropolitan Opera in the nineteen forties and raven Wilkinson who has just passed. An amazing amazing artists amazing generous spirit who is very much part of my life. As well. But dancers that were concurrent to my time, certainly Lydia Barca who was the Valerie dancy of Harlem before I got there, and Lauren Anderson who was a prince first bottoming at Houston Bali who was actually, you know, long before misty was doing all of the western European classical works at the same time that h was doing Lauren was dancing sleeping, beauty and cappella. And so we have a tremendous history in this art form, it's it's not known. And that's the thing that I want to make sure that people understand that this is not new it's not just invented. Now. We have been in this art form for a good long time. I feel documentary that. For anybody who's listening? Joe's think this would make a beautiful documentary. I just think my guess Jimmy Johnson artistic director and former principal dancer of dance theatre of Harlem will there be any any of the celebration travel, or is it going to all be based in New York, so dancing Apollo is touring company. And so we are celebrating the fiftieth anniversary wherever we go around across the country. So we're here at New York City centre this week immediately. After we go to Albuquerque, we are toying around the country. We'll be at Kennedy Center in June. So yes, the specific program that were programming that we're doing here in New York is specific to New York, but every performance is a celebration of our fiftieth anniversary and the legacy of Mitchell. I know you have to go back to a hersal. So I'm going to let you go Virginia Johnson. Thanks for being a guest. Thank you. It's been a pleasure WNYC supporters include John Thuerer cancer center at Hackensack University Medical Center. Part of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Hackensack, Meridian health partnership. Learn how John Thuerer cancer center is pioneering the possible at JT cancer, center dot org..

Harlem Arthur Mitchell Mitchell New York City Bali director principal New York City centre Virginia Johnson art Mitchell Virginia Jimmy Johnson New York University Kennedy Center Dr king co-founder Hackensack University Medical Memorial Sloan Kettering Hacke Carol Saint James Presbyterian churc Holland
"dance theatre harlem" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"dance theatre harlem" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Independent journalism in the public interest ninety three point nine FM and AM H NPR news and the New York conversation. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone. The Senate Judiciary committee is still on track with plans to hear from Christine Blasi Ford next Monday, she has asserted that supreme court nominee Brett cavenaugh assaulted her at a party when the two were teenagers. He is also slated to testify, but there's a complication Ford's attorneys want an FBI investigation. I Senate Judiciary committee chairman Chuck Grassley says Ford has until ten AM tomorrow to submit a biography and prepared statement if she intends to testify NPR's Kelsey Snell has more Grassley says board can appear in one of four ways he offered either a closed or open session in Washington on Monday. If she doesn't want to do that he offered public and private interview options and said, she could be interviewed in California where she lives committee, Democrats and Ford are calling for an FBI investigation to come first Puerto Rico. Today. Commemorates the anniversary of hurricane Maria Simone Rio of member station. W B U R has more with federal recovery. Funds set to roll in advocates on the island demanding the money be spent in a way that supports Puerto Rican companies and workers economists here point out that the island was already in the midst of an economic crisis, and they say disaster money could turn things around. Some Republicans have claimed recently that Puerto Rico's government is among the most corrupt in the country. Shimon Rios of member station. W B, you are this is NPR. This is WNYC in New York. Good morning. I'm Richard Hake. It's seven thirty one sixty six degrees. New York City is sitting up stricter background checks for school bus drivers. After an investigation found loopholes allowing some people with criminal histories to get behind the wheel this week. The daily news reported that dozens of drivers were able to get jobs despite having serious criminal convictions. Reporter Ben Chapman says that's in part because drivers are contractor through private companies and the sheer size of the education departments. Workforce makes it difficult to regulate the background checks. There are a hundred and thirty five thousand employees who are actually working for the education department. And then there are many thousand employees who work and companies that are working for the education department, and the background checks vary across the system. Tune in a little bit later on this morning on the Brian Lehrer show from war of Chapman's reporting on the city's problems with school buses for everyone that complains that their commute feels longer than it used to be while you might be right now, there are some census data to back it up WNYC's, Stephen Nessin reports whether it's because people are moving farther away or crumbling infrastructure. It takes on average four minutes longer for city residents to get to work on public transportation than it did ten years ago. That's according to the latest estimates from the census bureau from two thousand seventeen going back five years commutes of more than an hour have ticked up three percentage points. Meanwhile, fewer people reported having shorter commutes of twenty. Eighty to twenty four minutes, but the sweet spot the remains mostly unchanged are the commutes of thirty to forty five minutes Catholic church officials in New Jersey, say abuse victims required to remain silent by settlement agreements can now speak publicly. The New Jersey Catholic conference announced the church has no objection. If a victim wants to speak out this comes after state Senator Joe Vitale called on the church to release abuse victims from confidentiality agreements. Arthur Mitchell, a star dancer with the New York City ballet and founder of the dance theater Harlem has died at the age of eighty four he became the Bally's I block principal dancer after choreographer George Balanchine hired him in nineteen fifty five Mitchell spoke with WNYC earlier this year about his experience as a black man, what has historically been a white art form. I never felt it as a burden. It was something. I was born to do whatever identify danced for my mother, and my people at the whole thing is to show the best of what we've got by the time. He left to found the dance theatre of Harlem in nineteen sixty nine he became one of the most popular ballet dancers in the world..

Christine Blasi Ford NPR New York City Senate Judiciary committee Puerto Rico Chuck Grassley Kelsey Snell New York FBI Washington Ben Chapman Arthur Mitchell Louise Schiavone Harlem Senate Judiciary Puerto Rican Brett cavenaugh Senator Joe Vitale Maria Simone Rio New Jersey