17 Burst results for "Dana Stevens"

"dana stevens" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

08:22 min | 3 weeks ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Alexander Skarsgård and Anya Taylor-Joy in the trailer for Robert agers, Viking epic, the northmen, which opens wide this weekend. One of our most anticipated films of the year, or maybe more accurately, one of your most anticipated films of the year, Josh as someone who has been a bigger fan of agar's two previous films and you have seen the northmen, I'm not entirely sure how to interpret the ancient Norse ruins you carved into the stone tablets of letterboxed. It appears to be an agar's ranked list, which has the northman third behind the witch and the lighthouse, but as I said, you're a big fan of those films, so maybe that doesn't portend anything negative. Yeah, nobody panic. I recently rewatched the witch and liked it even more, probably the most. I think it's the third, maybe fourth time I've seen it, that I ever have. So yes, it's no small, it's no slight to put the northmen behind those other two. I do have some questions, I'll say, have not written my review yet, so I do have some questions lingering in the back of my mind that I want to explore when I get those thoughts down and possibly also in conversation with you. Okay, well, the northman being your third favorite maybe will make it my first favorite Robert H that would track. You never know. That would absolutely track. We'll find out next week as we discuss the northmen and finally, we get back to our Buster Keaton marathon with 1920 fours Sherlock junior, a film available to rent on most platforms. You might also find it at your local library or through inter library loan. You can often with these Keaton films, find them on YouTube as well. We did put the Keaton marathon on hold for about a month so that we could align the conclusion of the marathon with an event we have coming at the music box theater here in Chicago. So we're not ready to fully announce it, though I've already teased it and I've already given Josh all of our listeners save the date. We are going to stick with that save the date. It's not changing. Again, it's just not 100% official yet, but all of the players are aligned. June 5th is the date. It's a Sunday afternoon. And our plan is to go back to the music box, finally, after having a February 2020 just pre COVID live event there, what was supposed to be the start of a four city tour to celebrate our 15th anniversary. Now we've done the show for 27 years. That's how time has worked. The last two years each year has counted for ten, I believe. We're not celebrating 15 years anymore, but we're going to celebrate the publishing of Dana Stevens, her great book, the cameraman about Buster Keaton and celebrate the end of our marathon that will be the final film in the marathon. So again, a lot more details to come, tickets will be on sale soon. If you're a film spotting family member on Patreon, you will get early access and a discount on those tickets, but it's all going to conclude in Chicago live at the music box. It's going to be a great night more info, as I said, coming soon. Also more info about our Keaton marathon is available at film spotting .NET slash marathons. Can we just end all our marathons this way, Adam? With a live show with danger prestigious guest. I mean, it sounds like a good way to do it. Well, we've been enjoying talking to our friend Keith phipps throughout this show. If you want to hear more of Keith, the best place we can point you is our sister podcast the next picture show. He is a co host alongside Tasha Robinson, Scott Tobias, and genevieve kasky. Right now they are doing part two of their multiple choice pairing, which is the Daniels everything everywhere all at once. We both are big fans of that film, Adam, we reviewed it favorably on last week's show. They've paired that film with Christophe Keselowski's 1987 movie blind chance. So again, part two of that pairing right now, they're talking about everything. Everywhere, new episodes of the next picture show post every Tuesday, and you can find them wherever you get podcasts. You can find more information at next picture show dot net. So I did want to put something to rest here on the show, Josh, because we've both been getting tagged a fair amount on social media, gotten some emails, listeners who hurt us last week, talk about film spotting badness and what the topic would be next year. We have been on a run here of going through the decades, 2010s, 2000s, 90s, 80s, yes, we did the 70s this year and next year's bracket style tournament. We were debating some of the different potential topics. Knowing that we really probably should just keep the run going. And get through at least one more. Decade. And why not a decade as loaded as the 1960s? The selection committee had a little bit of free time on the road heading to Easter weekend out of state. And got a little carried away? No. Election committee. No. And I am happy to report that I think the short list is basically ready to share at this moment 91 films. 91 films from the 1960s that will compete for the 64 slots to be crowned ultimately the best film of the 1960s. I can't wait to unleash it. So we're doing the 60s. I love doing this. You know this. You know this feeds my need for order and following a plan. I'm all on board. I knew you would appreciate it, and I think our listeners will be excited as well. So we don't need any more suggestions, though you can always send them in. We hope to do this for many more years here on film spotting feedback and film spotting .NET. But the 60s is in fact the choice. We have a little bit more housekeeping here. Josh, a couple weeks ago, we gave listeners a chance to win a Blu-ray copy of Death on the Nile, directed by Kenneth Branagh. It's based, of course, on Agatha Christie's beloved novel, features it all star cast, and it is a film that will keep you guessing all the way to its final shocking conclusion, that new disc has deleted scenes behind the scenes feature at and more. We have 5 Blu-ray copies to give away Josh and we asked listeners to send us their favorite Kenneth Branagh directed picture. They did not necessarily get extra points for naming the right film, Henry V, it is random. It is truly random, but that didn't stop a few of our listeners from making that correct choice. Indeed, that's where our first winner went. It's Alex Cartman in from mccordsville, Indiana, Henry V, I watched it in a high school English class during our Shakespeare section, and it's lived with me now for over 15 years. Here's another vote from Gillian pecoraro from Pocahontas Arkansas, not to butter up Adam too much, but the answer is Henry V. Thank you, Julie and Sean Guerrero says my favorite kid at the Rena film is Mary Shelley's Frankenstein from 94. I love the style and energy of Brando's direction. The camera movement throughout his memorable and is a big part of what makes that film unique. The cinematographer was roger Pratt, who did Burton's Batman, Terry Gilliam's Brazil and 12 monkeys. Also, I love that we get to see what makes doctor Frankenstein tick and when the monster is unleashed as played by De Niro, the film gets delightfully weird, though admittedly he is not as good as karloff or even Peter Boyle. Yeah, Sean makes a good case. Frankenstein haven't seen it since 94, remember having such high expectations of being Branagh and De Niro, I was obsessed with both of them quite a bit at the time and maybe those expectations were too high, Josh. Yeah, I would love to revisit Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, have not seen it since 94. All right, our last two winners, TJ roar from North Carolina who voted dead again, and Warner west from Midwest City, Oklahoma. My favorite branna, perhaps due to recency bias, is actually Belfast. It's a great family story with multiple illusions to one of my favorite westerns, high noon..

Josh Alexander Skarsgård Anya Taylor Robert agers Buster Keaton Dana Stevens Keith phipps Robert H Tasha Robinson Scott Tobias genevieve kasky agar Christophe Keselowski Adam Chicago Keaton No. Election committee Kenneth Branagh ray copy
"dana stevens" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

13:45 min | 3 months ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Made. But the stuntman did every stunt. I mean, this is not the modern Hollywood star always saying I do my stunts. This is actually somebody making sure to place the camera at a far enough away angle that you can really verify that it's his body, they're doing all of those dangerous things at once. He was also his film's editor. So at this very early stage, when film was just sort of defining what it was, all of those different those divisions of labor had not calcified in the way that they do now. And I think to him made complete sense that he would be in the cutting room, putting his film together himself instead of instead of farming it out to an editor. So when you see a silent Buster Keaton film, you know, one of the ones made between 1920 and 1928 or so, you really are seeing something that came entirely out of his brain no matter who's being credited as director on screen. Dana Stevens is the film critic for slate. Her new book is cameraman. Buster Keaton, the dawn of cinema and the invention of the 20th century. She'll be back to talk more after this short break and rock critic can Tucker will review Neil Young's new album barn, which he thinks is the best Neil Young album in quite a while. I'm Dave Davies, and this is fresh air weekend. This message comes from NPR sponsor, future, a new workout experience that pairs you one on one with a fitness coach who will map out a custom plan to meet your goals all through the future app, your coach will check in with you via text and FaceTime, and is available at any time to answer questions, fine tune your workouts and celebrate your progress. To learn more and get started with 50% off your first three months, visit try future dot com slash NPR. We're speaking with slate film critic Dana Stevens, who's written a new book about Buster Keaton. Keaton directed and starred in a series of silent movies in the 1920s. His physical comedy made audiences laugh, but his films are regarded by historians as influential works in American cinema and culture. Steven's book is cameraman, Buster Keaton, the dawn of cinema, and the invention of the 20th century. You know, he was an innovator in filmmaking. And there are a couple of films that reflect this. One of them is a film called Sherlock junior and in particular a scene where he plays a guy who's a projectionist in the theater who falls asleep and then dreams of entering the movie. Tell us what he does here. Oh yeah, this is wonderful. I mean, this is a great starter Buster Keaton if you've never seen any of his movies because it really is nice and short, it's about an hour long and it really shows all the things that he could do, both with his body and with the camera. So yeah, the conceit that he had, which actually his longtime cinematographer was the one who dreamed up is why don't you play a projectionist who falls asleep in dreams his way into a movie. And it was because of the technical challenge of wanting to make that happen. You know, to see someone climb into a movie and become a part of it, that he was fascinated enough to do the film. And he loved to talk about the technique of how they actually did this, what they did was they created a stage set and lid it was wonderful cinematographer, Elgin Leslie, who we worked with for many years. Lit this stage set in a sort of flat way so that it would look like the screen of a movie to trick the eye of the viewer and then we just see him climbing in from the stage. But at that moment, of course, the Keaton character finds himself inside a movie and not sort of able to adjust to the world of being in a movie, and there's an incredible editing gag where the Buster Keaton on the screen finds himself into space. The movie within a movie then cuts to a completely different space like at one point a lion's cage with a lion in it. And suddenly he's in that space, right? So he sort of trapped in this loop of editing and that's a wonderful joke in the middle of the movie. It's an amazing effect for a movie made in the 1920s. It looks like the guy actually walks into the movie and enters it, which today people will check out, you can do that. But it's a remarkable that he did it in those early years. Yeah, he loved to brag about the fact that that always tricked people later in life and interviews he would say, I've seen that with many an audience and nobody can ever figure out how it was done. And he said that all the other cinematographers at the time would go to see Sherlock junior to try to figure out how the climbing into the screen thing had been done. It's interesting he was not a man of a lot of pretense, was he? I mean, he didn't think of himself as when people would call him a genius in an artist. He didn't like that, did he? No, it's something fascinating to read when you read interviews with him is that he loved to talk about technique. Like I say how he accomplished certain effects and things like that. He liked to tell stories about his childhood. He was not resistant to speaking to interviewers, but he was not introspective or self analytical at all. And he, in fact, was resistant to the idea that his work meant anything other than trying to make people laugh. And if he was called a genius or an artist or anything like that, I think tended to really withdraw and start to mistrust the person who had said that, he went. What would you say? Yeah, you can't be a genius and slap shoes in a pork pie hat or something like that. Yeah, exactly. The silent era came to an end at with the 20s, essentially, as a lot of things in the United States were changing, including the film industry. And that was when Buster Keaton lost his independence and signed a contract with the studio MGM where, you know, it was a big corporate machine and he had roles that was all written and this production schedules were defined and he kind of had to do what he was told. This didn't suit him well did it. No, I mean, this is a very painful part of the book to research and the movies that he made at that point are painful to watch. And even more painful in a ways that they were successful. You know, every talkie that he made at MGM that he regarded as the worst turkeys he'd ever turned out and that nobody watches now really unless your researching the dark years of Buster Keaton were all moneymakers for him. And part of that was that MGM had a strong marketing arm and he had a big name and people just went to see the new Buster Keaton movie because it was there. But tastes were also changing in the early days of sound. And sound comedies very few of early sound comedies make us laugh now. But the things that made people laugh when sound was new, often had to do with just the novelty of hearing people speaking and hearing music and having sound incorporated into the film going experience in the first place. You write that to see him in talkies is to witness the extinguishing of a singular artist's creative spark and the erosion of his professional confidence. Why were these movies so bad? I mean, people went to see them and could you give us a think of an example? I mean, it's possible that the film I was talking about then was what no beer, which is maybe his very most painful film to watch at MGM because it was toward the end. It was in fact the last film he made with him as their star comedian, and by that time he really was deep into depression, alcoholism, you know, he just had a very painful divorce. He was just an absolutely chaotic and miserable time of his life and it a 100% shows up on screen and it's just awful to see him seeming so miserable, especially because this character that he'd always played, which, as you said, was a resourceful, plucky, you know, someone who was put upon by the world and always getting out of disaster situations, but who had a lot of resources to do so kind of inner resources. Spunk and gumption. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, right. And during this period at MGM, somehow his passivity, the passivity of his character, that kind of essential, quiet that he always had a silent films, gets misinterpreted as masochism almost. And MGM movies really involve a lot of things that hark back to the joke Keaton, Buster Keaton, and that they're violent, but not in that they're funny. So there's a lot of scenes of him kind of being manhandled by bigger characters being thrown around, having no power. He doesn't get the girl anymore. He's kind of the outcast almost, or, you know, he's sort of the loser and some of these movies. And it doesn't suit his character at all. It doesn't suit his sense of humor. And I feel like at MGM, they just never really figured out who he was. They couldn't figure out what kind of vehicles to buy for him, what kind of material to put him in. And or the simple fact that there are some performers that if you give them their freedom, they'll do all sorts of incredible things. And if you take away their freedom, they're an animal in a cage. And that, I think, is how he felt and how he seemed in his films while he was at MGM. So his drinking, which had already been, you know, something that ran in the family, his father was an alcoholic, his mother seems to have drunk almost every day, like the sat and played cards and drank bourbon every day. And he came from that culture, but it really intensified after his marriage started to fall apart after his job satisfaction went to down to zero and during those miserable years. As a result, he was fired from MGM by Louis B Mayer in 1933 and had a couple of years really on the skids, where he had a lot of trouble finding work. He did not have his drinking under control at one point he married his sobriety nurse, the woman who had been hired to look after him and make sure he didn't get drunk, and they spent a couple of seemingly miserable years together. And that was a very dark time in his life. Although I do try to make the point in my book that that was not the end for buster and to kind of shake your head and say it's too bad that he went off the rails and then just write him off is a complete underestimation of the drive that he had to entertain and to continue to work. And the need to work because he had to support his entire family of origin as he did his whole life. So he, you know, he had after his divorce from his first wife, he had a two year marriage to mace Griffin, who was this nurse helping with his sobriety. And then in 1940, I believe he married Eleanor Norris, who was a contract, dancer at MGM. This was a more mature relationship. Made him happier, and he found found a place in the business, didn't he? What did he do? Yeah. I mean, this is what I mean about Keaton really managing to turn his life around in a way that I think often doesn't get appreciated in storytelling about his life. So over the course of the 1940s he was behind the scenes at MGM as a gag writer and had success there, but it wasn't really visible to audiences, but toward the end of the 40s and the early 50s he started to get bit parts in big movies. He's in sunset boulevard. He has a little bit part in that. He's in a musical with Judy Garland, where he has a small part. But not so much movies as TV really interested him. And just as always, he was always wanting to do the latest thing. He was in vaudeville at the height of vaudeville. He was in silent film at the height of silent the silent film era. And he really broke into television very early and found a lot of success there in all different kinds of roles. I mean, everything from having his own sort of sitcom at one point, appearing on the Donna Reed show and lots of other sitcoms. The Twilight Zone candid camera. I mean, there's just very little early TV that Keaton did not get in on in one way or another. You mentioned viewing his stuff on YouTube. It's remarkable, as I was preparing for for our conversation, how many of his films are on YouTube for free in this beautifully restored print? These beautifully restored prints. What would you recommend to somebody who wants to a beginner who wants to develop an appreciation for Buster Keaton? Oh, that's a great question. Yes, it is important to know that almost all these movies are streaming and most of them are streaming for free because they're in the public domain. So definitely just explore on your own. But I would say for the short 20 minute film, watch one week, which I think is one of his all time masterpieces and one of the great American comedies is sort of a romantic comedy let's put it that way, but with lots of slapstick from 1920 cops is another short that you just can't go wrong with it's incredibly crowd pleasing and full of just astonishing physical stunts. And then getting into the features. I mean, it really depends on your taste, but I would say that my two probably my two favorite Buster Keaton movies, maybe not the most famous, maybe not his favorites of his own, would be Sherlock junior, which is from 1924, and the key image from this one, if you've seen it, maybe in clip reels is of him climbing into a movie screen and joining what's happening on screen. Essentially inserting himself into a movie in progress. And steamboat Bill junior, which was his last independent movie, and it's just a really beautifully accomplished movie. And a sad one to watch in that you realize that he was just hitting his stride, the height of his powers, and that was when his independence was just about to be taken away. He died in 1966 of lung cancer. Was he a happy man then? You know, I think he was, actually, the last chapter of my book opens with this speculation is sort of how much professional disappointment did Keaton feel at the end of his life. We know he was personally happy. That seems really, really evident from just all of the stories of his relationship with Eleanor and what she said about him after he died when she became a big guardian of his legacy. And personally, I think there's no question that he found contentment, which is wonderful in itself. Professionally, it's another of those black boxes because he never stopped getting work, you know, after he got back to work after that dark time we talked about. He never stopped wanting to work or being curious about trying new things. But he also never got to direct a movie again. You know, he never got to be the lead of a movie again. He never got to devise comedy of the kind that only he could devise. And there must have been somewhere deep buried inside some regret about having had such a wonderful flight of creativity for so many years and then having to work in a more constrained way. But when asked about it, he always said, I couldn't have had a lucky or happier life. You know, he was not a complainer and I think he was pretty satisfied with the three score and ten that he got on earth. Well, Dana Stevens, thank you so much for speaking with us. It was an absolute delight. Thank you, Dave. Dana Stevens is the film critic for slate. Her new book is cameraman. Buster Keaton, the dawn of cinema and the invention of the 20th century. Neil Young's new album is called barn. And that's where it was recorded in an old barn on young's property in the Colorado Rockies. It was cut in about ten days with young's longtime band crazy horse. Musicians young has performed with off and on for more than half a century. Rock critic Ken Tucker says barn is the best Neil Young album in quite a while..

Buster Keaton MGM Dana Stevens Keaton Neil Young NPR Elgin Leslie Dave Davies Tucker Louis B Mayer Hollywood Sherlock Steven Eleanor Norris depression United States Sherlock junior Donna Reed
"dana stevens" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

07:30 min | 3 months ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Our marathons. These are deep dives into the career of a director or actor or a regional cinema. Usually, four to 6 films, and we do average around two a year. Last year, we did two. The world of Wong KAR wai before that, 40s film, noir. This one was pretty easy for us to land on Josh. Yeah, as many listeners who follow Dana Stevens no heard her on our top ten show the second part of that. She just published a new book, cameraman, Buster Keaton, the dawn of cinema, and the invention of the 20th century. So even though Adam, you and I both have seen a handful of Keaton's work, probably I would imagine some of the most seminal titles. What better time to really take a focused concentrated and guided look at his filmography guided by Dana's book, it just seemed like a perfect match for us and she has promised though I know she's incredibly busy right now with the book. She has said she would be interested in coming on maybe when we do our marathon awards and being a part of that show to give us some of her expert opinion as well. So yeah, if we were ever going to revisit and seriously consider Buster Keaton now seem to be the time. Yeah, Dana will almost certainly be on at some point to talk about her book and help us out with that marathon. Now I did only just now somehow realized that our next marathon is pretty closely tied to Buster Keaton, at least in the sense that we're talking about movies from a somewhat similar time period. The classic days of Hollywood, we try to mix it up a little bit, usually, but when you've got two topics like this, you just gotta dive in. We go from Buster Keaton to Barbara stanwick for our second marathon. And if you want to see our projected titles and where you can see those movies, that list is available at film spotting .NET slash marathons. We do have 6 movies plan right now, including sorry wrong number, including babyface and Stella Dallas, which I have seen, but there are some blind spots here for you, Josh, some really notable ones, including a film that was previously discussed in a film noir marathon ages ago on this show, double indemnity, one of my all time favorite films, no pressure there, Josh, and the lady eve, which was part of a very early marathon that was a screwball comedy marathon. And I gave it a positive review as I recall. I liked it, but it was one of those cases where my then co host Sam van Hogan was over the moon enthusiastic about it as I recall. And I listened to his rapturous take wondering, oh man, I must have I must have come and missed it on this one. And I'll get a chance to find out if that in fact was true. So you said some blind spots, Adam all of these are. And I looked at stanwix extended filmography just briefly before we started recording here. I don't know if I've seen her in anything. So this is hugely needed by me and it has the added benefit, you mentioned watching some of these titles with Sophie at home, the classic Hollywood stuff is always an easy sell. I can say, listen, we're in the middle of this for the show. Do you guys want to play along? And it's like, yeah, we're in. So to get to do this, and I think it's a little, you know, obviously I'm no expert in stanwick, but it seems to me these titles coming mostly in the 30s and 40s have a little distance from most of Keaton and just in my mind entirely different worlds. It's entirely different movie world. So I like that we're going to get a chance to kind of go back to older days of Hollywood in two different ways this year. Yeah. Onto this year's uve review. This is our series devoted to watching a director's entire Uber in order. No, we're not mispronouncing the word, or we are, but we're doing it deliberately. We're combining and reviews. Yes, we should not be. We think we're very clever, actually, it was one of our way smarter listeners who came up with that. So blame that listener if, for some reason, you don't like it. And this 1 may be a little bit of a tougher sell with the family. I don't think it will be a tough sell with our family of listeners though. In 2020, the Uber reviews began with Christopher Nolan. That was gearing us up for the release of tenant. Last year, Jane campion, got us ready for one of the films of the year, the power of the dog. This year, we are breaking the format a little bit because we couldn't possibly watch all of this director's films in a single year, or we could, we would just be turning the show over. Indeed. To this filmmaker and actually maybe I'd rather co host that show now that I say it out loud. Do you want to go ahead and do the honors, Josh? I would love to, I'm really excited for this. We are going to do the 2022 overview on Martin Scorsese. And yes, we may not get to every one of his films. But what this is going to enable us to do, which is far more important to me and Adam, which is really what matters will be completed at the end of this Uber view. Now not for all the documentaries. I think you've seen a handful of those more than I have Adam, but for the fiction features at the end of this overview, we'll be able to say we've seen them all, and this has been one of those things that has always haunted me throughout the years and every time I looked at it and would say, okay, I gotta get knocked this out. Gotta get this done. I would just be intimidated because there were a handful of titles. I've whittled away over the years and have gotten closer, but man to be able to do this in one year is really exciting. So I can't wait to dig into Scorsese's stuff. Yeah. We will be able to call ourselves complete and we will be preparing for Killers of the Flower Moon, which is supposed to come out later this year. We are all crossing our fingers. It in fact will because we really want to see whatever Martin Scorsese is up to next, including when he is cast Leonardo DiCaprio as he has here, but also because it will justify the entire enterprise of this Uber view. So our shared blind spots. Neither of us have seen his debut. Who's that knocking at my door? Or, boxcar Bertha, 1972, 5 years after, who's that knocking at my door? It's the 50th anniversary of that film. We have also not seen New York New York. But then there are some solo blind spots, Josh. Yeah, I've got one more that I still need to see that you have seen Adam. I haven't seen 86s the color of money. So first time for me, a revisit for you. And then four here that I have seen, but you'll be watching for the first time and I can't wait to watch each of them again. Cape fear from 91, the age of innocence from 93, kundun from 97 and then jumping up to the 2000s, the last film in our overview will be 2004s the aviator. I love the irony of the color of money being the one film you mentioned there that you've never seen when it's the Martin Scorsese film I have definitely seen the most. There's no doubt about that. It's not even close. Not even raging bull or taxi driver have I seen more times than I've seen the color of money..

Buster Keaton Josh Wong KAR wai Dana Stevens Adam Barbara stanwick Keaton Dana Stella Dallas Hollywood Sam van Hogan babyface Martin Scorsese Jane campion Sophie Christopher Nolan boxcar Bertha Scorsese Leonardo DiCaprio New York
"dana stevens" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

06:38 min | 5 months ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Rife with Katie on Twitter. Thank you. Welcome to film spotting. Thank you, Katie rife from The AV Club for that voicemail. Her number one film of the year Josh, Jane campions, the power of the dog sensual, poetic sinister. I think sums that film up nicely, but there will be a lot more to say about it as we work our way through our two part best of 2021 countdown. Yeah, it might just come up once or twice in the second part of this program. Indeed. And I'm not sure how I feel about this. We usually try to make these top ten shows round tables. But this feels a little bit more like, I don't know a rectangle, Josh. Me across from you, sharing this first part of the show. Well, you know, we have a little experience in doing this, just you and I on the show, so hopefully that'll help. But yeah, doesn't feel quite the same this year. No, since 2007, it has been something of a roundtable. We've had at least one special guest, usually, Michael Phillips, the last couple of years. It was Michael and Tasha Robinson from polygon in the next picture show. This year, we were hoping to return to that live roundtable format after a year of doing it virtually. We had Dana Stevens from slate all set to fly in. And then, you know, the world intruded the ongoing pandemic, put an end to our plans. Just ridiculous. And you know, it's like so much right now. The way things are moving, you look back at conversations you were having a week ten days ago and saying, okay, this will work. We can do this. We think there's a smart way to go about this and then bang. Everything kind of gets overturned. But we found a way to forge ahead and do this in a way that's a little safer, a little smarter, and we still get Michael and Dana. That's right. Tasha already wasn't going to make it because of holiday travel plans. But we do have Michael and Dana all set to join us and we will hear from them in part two as we share our consensus best films of the year. This is part one, the outlier picks. That doesn't mean we're necessarily the only people who love these movies. It doesn't even necessarily mean that I don't like your picks or you don't like my picks, Josh, I think there's a lot of crossover here in terms of positivity about these films. But it does mean they were unique to our list. And before we hear our picks, we each have 5 that did not make anybody else's list, including our guests in part two, Michael and Dana. And before we hear those, I'm curious if there was anything unique for you this year in terms of your process, forming this list? Did you notice any commonalities among your picks? Yeah, the process was pretty much the same as it is every year, even though the year itself was a bit screwy. It's just starting that document. I think I talked about in our bonus show for our Chicago Film Critics Association awards. I start my top ten list January 1. You know, I'll be doing it again in a couple of weeks in just those movies that really moved me the first time I saw him. I put him on there. And so I'm sure I could tease out some themes have not had time to sit down and see what sort of commonality jumps out at me in terms of the year we're in the topicality. I know you especially like to do that at the end of the year. So I'm eager to hear if you had a chance to yet, but otherwise it looks like my lists normally do kind of all over the place. I've got some documentary representation. I have major filmmakers, a first time filmmaker, and the only thing that stands out is I don't think I found a spot for an animated film this year, which I don't know if it speaks to the strength of that category or me just not seen the correct films in that category. I mean, I think last year I had soul pretty high up. So it's something I do try to make space for. I've got a couple here that you might be able to identify and maybe I'll get into this as we talk about them as time capsule films. And I don't know if that's because this seems like a particularly momentous time in history that I leaned that way and picked some things that I think might have offer a picture of what life is like right now to future audiences, but that's just a couple. So I don't see one clear through line in my picks at this point. How about you? Yeah, I will first say that I only saw one animated film this year that I thought was very good to great. And it didn't quite make my top ten will come up in our honorable mentions in part two of this countdown. But I didn't really get to see many animated films this year. And had nothing to run up against it, at least when I was putting together my Chicago Film Critics Association ballot. That was one category where I felt very deficient, unfortunately. And regret that I didn't get a chance to see more of those films, maybe I will, as we transition into the new year, you're right, I usually do find some kind of unifying theme for my picks, though I will state again. It's never intentional. I don't go into forming the list with an idea in mind and then try to make the picks conform to that. It's usually as I'm jotting down my notes or I'm shifting pics around that I start to look at the titles and start to realize that there are some similarities. And what struck me this year and I'll note that on a basic level, this is probably exactly what movies are supposed to do. It is very obvious. These films just did it particularly well. And did it in unique ways. All of my picks have very strongly defined senses of place. And places twofold. I'm talking about setting and location sometimes, but also psychological space, where you are locked into an experiencing everything through a particular character or characters perspective. And I was running this by Sam briefly on the phone the other day. And he said, the way you're describing it makes me think of the Charlie Kaufman film from last year. I'm thinking of ending things. And he's right. That's a perfect example, though, not all of my choices are necessarily quite that extreme. But these films truly transport you to or like Jesse Buckley's character in that Charlie Kaufman film, they trap you into a particular time and space, the sites, the sounds, the smells, they're all vivid and detailed and perhaps at times even disorienting. And the places could be very real..

AV Club Josh Jane campions Michael Dana Tasha Robinson Chicago Film Critics Associati Dana Stevens Katie Michael Phillips Tasha Twitter Charlie Kaufman Jesse Buckley Sam
"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:08 min | 8 months ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Ratio. The moody keat is number. One on netflix. The john wick style. Action flick has been accused of anti asian racism. We explore both movie As they aesthetic object and the attendant controversy and then who has the prestige drama nine perfect strangers right now at stars coal kidman as a wellness guru entrepreneur. Who's retreat uses unconventional methods to say the least also stars melissa mccarthy michael shannon various others and finally the emmys day are a wonderful double excuse for us to have willa pasqua on the show and do a state of the medium segment we will do both with willa in our third segment joining me today. Is karen han culture writer. Extraordinary karen is always really fun to have you on our show. It's great to have you back. It is always really fun to be here. Thank you for having me back. And of course. Dana stevens the film critic for slate dot com. Hey dana hello steven are you a are you fresh-faced and ready well. Jabber zoom cameras off so the freshness of my face under discussion locally and mentally. I'm all yours okay. Well the movie. Kate which i'm predisposed the like having named one of my two daughters kate but anyway it's now Right now streaming on netflix carries a familiar. Some might say over familiar premise. With a thursday beautiful assassin raised from childhood to be a killing machine. Her spin galleon homicide higher is the only family she's ever known thursday unwanted sidekick sinister mafiosi a twist you saw coming almost from the womb. And you know this is not an unfamiliar movie. If you're being even unkind or this picture managed to be unoriginal twice over. Its john wick. Knockoff crossed with the premise. From the old movie delay. In which the hero is poisoned in has twenty four hours to solve gun their own murder andy yet for as much as it borrows and hey speed was die hard on a bus. It's i think a superbly well cast and in some ways executed genre picture. It stars mary. Elizabeth winstead is the sexy killing machine. Woody harrelson is our father. Figure mentor bosses. Taught tightly pasted smarts tart and yet we have another end yet. The movie takes place in japan. Much of it is in japanese subtitled. And so the mayhem that is unleashed by its white protagonists falls inordinately upon asian bodies. The movie has been repeatedly called out as racist and yet and yet our third and yet here. It's been number one on netflix. So we had a lot to unpack yards directed by a french director. Cedric nikolaou toyota. It's written by mayor. Lean all right. We're gonna hear a clip of before. He do dana. Do you want to set it up for us sure..

john wick willa pasqua karen han netflix Dana stevens dana hello steven melissa mccarthy michael shannon kidman willa karen Elizabeth winstead Kate kate Woody harrelson andy mary japan Cedric nikolaou toyota
"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:55 min | 8 months ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Edition. It's wednesday september fifteenth. Two thousand twenty one on today's show writer director. Paul schrader returns with the card counter. An existential tomorrow about the traumatic afterlife of america's forever wars it stars oscar isaac and tiffany haddish. And then hulu has a little charmer out now. It's called only murderers in the building. It's about three true crime obsessive. Who team up to investigate a mysterious suicide their venerable upper west side apartment building lula it stars martin short steve martin and selena gomez and finally we will discuss something called para social relationships with madison alone. Kirchner of the icy ym i. Podcast of course of slate magazine joining me today. Is isaac butler isaac. You are the author of a forthcoming book. The method how the twentieth century learned to act. Give me the update again february. I twenty twenty two and you'll be on the show in the immediate aftermath of that you promised to discuss Yes i promise. I'm very cited. An incredibly cool subject to be writing about and speaking of which dana stevens has a. I'm going to call it dana. I knowing you and remembering what you've said about it over the years. This is kind of a length essay disguised as a biography of buster. Keeping your nay yet. The thumbnail sketch. I've been giving steve. And i'm not good at thumbnail sketches. I should warn you is that is that this book is a cultural history of buster keaton's lifespan. So it's not a biography but it's a sort of way of looking at his lifespan. Eighteen ninety five to nineteen sixty six and all the changes that happened in american culture during that time through things that happened in his life. Brilliant and the title is cameraman dana. I'm going to push so fucking hard for this book. In the weeks leading up to january twenty fifth will get it on the times nonfiction bestseller list. I'm i promise you gonna happen my heart. Steve truly warms my heart. And of course i should say you're the film critic of course for slate. I tell you make a show. That's.

oscar isaac tiffany haddish isaac butler isaac Paul schrader dana stevens steve martin lula hulu Kirchner selena gomez madison dana martin america buster keaton steve Steve
"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

05:13 min | 9 months ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"I'm stephen metcalf in this. Is the slate culture gabfest. Say their names edition. It's wednesday september. First two thousand twenty one on today's show candyman is a wild reimagining of the nineties. Har- movie into an allegory of collective racial trauma and guilt. It's directed by the cost of co written with producer jordan peele and dana when rosenfeld for yes and in fact. I'm so i don't know if win. Listens to our show or not. But i am so happy to see him doing well in the world. He's been working with jordan peele for a while as a producer co writer and then. Netflix has of all things english department. Drama de the chair stars. Sandra oh as a professor who's deepest loyalties are tested when she's made the head of our department also stars. Jd plastic transparent fame and finally rest in peace the great laconic genius behind literally behind the rolling stones drummer. Charlie watts has died. We'll discuss with slates own jack hamilton. Joining me now is allegra. Frank senior editor of slate allegra. How's it going i. It's good to be back. It's great to have you back and of course. Dana stevens is the film critic for slate. Hey dan hey it's good to be back. Missed you guys. Yeah yeah mr guys to. It's three things..

jordan peele stephen metcalf Drama de the chair stars rosenfeld dana Netflix jack hamilton Sandra Charlie watts slate allegra allegra Dana stevens Frank dan
"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:41 min | 11 months ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Welcome to another sleet spoiler special. I'm dana stevens slates movie critic. And today i am joined by karen han staff writer at slate to talk about black widow the long-awaited it'd be in fact because of the pandemic over a year awaited next installment in the marvel cinematic universe. Hey karen thanks for joining me. Thank you for having me back so excited to spoil this with you. I feel like this is the biggest movie that we've spent together so far. That's probably true because this is probably the biggest movie or one of them. That's been released in theaters since. You've been at slate right since you essentially joined right during pandemic dimes. Yeah which is still crazy to think about yet. And now the world is reopening and this to me feels like one of the first big signs of that. I mean just as a movie critic. It's sort of like the movie. World hasn't started yet until a marvel movie his and that has its good and its bad sides and was very surprised to see myself. Not unscrew rolling. My usual marxist screed about you know these movies all being the same but actually finding some enjoyment and it's before we get started. I just wanted to ask. Do you have any of that feeling. Too like woohoo. Summer's here a superhero movie. I don't think as much as you. Although i will say. I know that you went to go. See the press screening in the theater. And i watched this at home like i thought it was fine. I thought it was fun. But it also doesn't really function as the movie that its purported to be as a black widow standalone. I mean we can get into that more as we talk about it. But i thought it was fine. I thought it had a little more character. I guess than like civil war or either and game or infinity war but to me. That doesn't necessarily make it like. Oh yeah like this. Is the movie of the summer. Yeah i wouldn't say movie of the summer more like it's sort of. It's sort of a symptom of the summer. you know. it's like smelling cocoa butter suntan lotion or something. Like that. just sort of familiar summer feeling for it to be back in the theaters as opposed to the small screen..

dana stevens karen han karen
"dana stevens" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Baritone is more broad shouldered Dennis Tanner but he doesn't wallow in the honking loners there are some pretty mostly is owned and Dana Stevens album liberty inspired by other pieces of music and people and places he knows those pretty tunes also served to get the band moving the push and pull be very Harlan's drums and Ben streets base keeps the music breathing it may seem odd to you as it does to me.

Dennis Tanner Harlan Dana Stevens
"dana stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh AIR jazz tenor saxophonist Dayna Stephens was sidelined with kidney disease several years ago to celebrate his recovery he has two albums due out this year the first of those for a compact trio is now out our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead says it's a showcase for Stephen sleek sound and music suited to life in lockdown tenor saxophonist Dayna Stephens this tune wheels away from this trio album liberty jazz combos about piano have an airy open sound but leave everyone more exposed working harder to define the form and fill in the texture that's when it helps to have creative compatible partners like bassist Ben street and drummer Eric Harland Dana Stevens can cry and rip it up on tenor but at heart he's a streamlined the melodic player this handsome down the middle tone.

Dayna Stephens Kevin Whitehead Ben street Eric Harland Dana Stevens jazz critic Stephen
"dana stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Been mine lives honor to create costumes. Thank you to the academy. Thank you for honoring African royalty. And the empowered way women can look and lead on screen. I loved and I also love that her. I don't know if you noticed her cards, matched her outfit. It was nice lady has been waiting to make that speech. And she is ready to go. The other speech. I wanna play is Hannah San for me again bugler. Thank you Hannah. Bigler? I was really heartfelt. It was such an emotional speech. Let's listen to her. She won for best production design for Black Panther. I'm stronger because my family supported me through the rough times the strength to all of those who come next to keep going to never give up. And when you think it's impossible just remember to save. This piece of advice. I got from very wise woman. I did my best and my best is get enough. Thank you. Hunter what's struck you about their wins. I mean, their historic for sure. But also, I think it shows sort of where Hollywood is going it feels kind of bifurcated right now, we have these Bachman winning grade awards. But then we also have green book winning best picture. So it's not what I would have wanted. But I am really proud at. I think it feels very important. Let's talk about some of the surprises by by way. My guess are Asia Harris when your time's Dana Stevens from slate hunter Harris from Europe Volcker and Eric Kahn for any wire. We of course, talking about the Oscars Glenn Close not winning. I think if you're a betting person, I think some people lost money. Why do Dana Glenn Close didn't win. She's been nominated so many times. Yeah. I mean, I'm actually curious for maybe Eric's insight on that. Because he's maybe got more Oscar brain than I do, but it was down to the two of them. Right. I mean throughout award season. The various critics awards have been have been going either to live Coleman or Glenn Close. And so they were the two that were really in the running. But I really think by the time the ceremony rolled around people really thought, it was going be Glen. And she is now I believe holds the record for the most nominated person who has never won an Oscar. It was her seventh nomination. And of course, you know, she has more work in front of her. She could still get one. But it was it seemed exactly like the kind of role that the academy as we know it this sort of hidebound academy of the past and probably the academy that got green book award likes to recognize. And so I don't quite understand. Why things veered toward Olivia Colman in the end. And it was a little sad to see Glenn closes face in that little quadrant of the screen, but then Libya Coleman speech was so joyful and wonderful and also acknowledged Glenn Close in really respectful way. So I felt a bit better about it. Let's play a little bit of Olivia Colman speech. He won for best actress for the favorite my kids are watching. Well, if you're not then we'll kind of well done. You are this is not going to happen again. Proxima speech on the Tel you never know when I I I used to work as a cleaner and I loved that job. I love my time imagining please wrap up right? Okay..

Glenn Close Hannah San Eric Kahn Olivia Colman hunter Harris Oscar Libya Coleman Asia Harris Hollywood Europe Volcker Bachman Dana Stevens
"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Best prosthesis statement edition. It's Wednesday January thirtieth two thousand nineteen on today's show. Vice is the Dick Cheney bio pit from writer director Adam McKay the man behind the big short. It's also part of our pre-oscar mop up series. And then Netflix is teen comedy sex education tells the story of sex therapist, mom and her nerdy pup- sign and finally in the age of streaming some hits are hidden hits. They achieve massive download numbers we discuss whether that's meaningful at all. With slates owned. Tv critic will pass him. Joining me today is Julia Turner who is of course, deputy editor the LA times deputy managing their stave off managing editor. Oh my God. On that slope. And then he slid back now otherwise known around the office as vice? Okay. And of course, slates from critic Dana Stevens Dana. Hey, steven. Let's dig right in he started out as an Ivy league. No good, Nick became Donald Rumsfeld's, lackey in the Nixon and forty years. He was kind of a Mr. Lady Macbeth a coat tail rider TB kind of a cipher, but he turned out to be a mean bureaucratic in fighter and in some people's estimations heat to use such extreme language. But maybe I don't an American Aikman of banality who was in the last analysis, quite evil, undeniably. Dick, Cheney's fingerprints are all over our world, particularly when it comes to permanent war climate change in inequality. Vice is the new movie from Adam McKay of the big short tells the story of squat ugly men in squat ugly buildings administering to a haphazard. And in some respects, quite poisonous American empire at the center of the movie in a courageous weight gain performances Christian bale, he has covered in. Latex. It looks like a brisket is stuck in one of his many chins, the movie takes us through not only Dick Cheney's life. But a kind of God awful liturgy of the past thirty years, especially the manipulation of PTSD from nine eleven that gave us the Iraq war on totally false pretenses. Why don't we listen to a clip? I want you to be my VP. Use Lucien of a problem. The vice presidency is mostly a symbolic job. Right, right. I can see how that went. Enticing. However. The vice presidency is also defined by president. If we were to come to a. Different understanding. I'm listening..

Dick Cheney Adam McKay Dana Stevens Nixon deputy editor Ivy league Netflix Tv critic Julia Turner Christian bale managing editor American Aikman Mr. Lady Macbeth PTSD LA times Iraq steven president writer
"dana stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:04 min | 3 years ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And it'd be nice to see her recognized for that. But yeah, like, I say all of those. I mean, they all have incredible stories. You lied to operate show. A completely unexperienced a kindergarten teacher, you know, he was discovered by quote own and who worked closely with him to create this character. And here she is up for best actress, it makes me wonder to whether she'll go onto act or go back to teaching kindergarten. You know, my guess is Dana Stevens, she sleeps movie critic and host of slates culture gabfest podcast, so best actor not really many surprises Christian bale from vice Bradley Cooper from a star is born Willem Dafoe. Matt attorneys gate Rami Malik from bohemian rhapsody and Vigo Mortenson from green book. Well, one little surprising there people would have really liked. I think to see Ethan Hawke for I formed which is maybe the performance of his career, and that movie got recognized only for its screenplay again that may be a case of it's it's a little too dark for Oscar voters, and it came out very early in the year. I thought woman to fo was amazing is and people have seen at eternity skate. I hope people now will go and see it. It's a it's a Vincent Van Gogh bio pic, and and it's a somewhat slight movie in a sense. But but we'll Defoe's devastatingly good in it and best director. And I think it surprises. Everyone you hear. This Spike Lee has never been nominated for best director before what do you think was different about this time around for him? Yeah. That is one of those strange Oscar facts, he did get a career award a few years ago. But in a way, it was a sort of compensation for the fact that he's been really under recognized that could also be that, you know, he's somebody who like Woody Allen is New York based has kind of held himself apart from the Hollywood community has has sort of verbally disparaged. The Oscars have been somewhat. Mocking about them. In interviews. Like, I think probably the academy does not love him for other reasons having nothing to do with his films. But it really is high time that his body of work was recognized and actually a slate writer Dan Quayle made a made a wonderful argument on the on the site yesterday for black klansman is best picture. He was looking at all the reasons that sort of historical reasons that the other movies can't win, and there's a certain sort of set of markers. Sometimes that point toward what the best picture award will be including what kind of critics awards it's gotten in what other things it's nominated for and black klansman checked off every one of those boxes, and he was saying what about it? What if that's the dark horse and either black plant clansman wins best picture or spike wins best director because of those certainly with a more interesting movies to come out in the air. Oh, yeah. I mean, there's nothing else. Like it. Love it or hate it. It's doing its own thing completely in best documentary. There was one glaring omission. I think everyone was surprised that won't you be my neighbor the documentary about mister Rogers wasn't nominated money. Yeah. I was gonna say, well, especially because the Oscars love movies that do really well and are critically acclaimed. And that movie was both. I think it was the most successful documentary of the year. And it may have been the most successful documentary. I'm going to get the record wrong. If I say it, but it smashed a lot of records in terms of documentary box office, and was widely beloved the only reason I can think it might have been left off is that Morgan Neville, the director has already won his Oscar for best documentary pretty recently with twenty feet from stardom. But it's still seems odd. Not to even have it have it there on the list and finally with something like Roma, which is just so visually arresting, and and has just sort of captured people's sort of a social element of it, and the creative element of it a film like that which is so different. How does the film like that usually fair during? Oscar season. I'm I'm curious. It's got the most nations. But I'm wondering if it's just one of those is it a is it a juggernaut is headed towards mall the awards, or is it one of those things that people realize I we should recognize this right, but not necessarily it's going to win. I don't know to tell a good candidate for juggernaut dumb. It's got the most right has got ten nominations. I believe in it's tied with I can't remember what movie with the favorite for ten. There's all I think there was one thing against it. Which is maybe it didn't get a best editing nomination or something like that. But. Sort of everyone's favorite like when I've been hearing people actually putting down their Oscar pools and making their bets they're talking about Roma. But like we say it's at the beginning of the process before all these crazy campaigns start to come out. And and there's some if contingent against Rome a possibly as well because it's done. So well, the 'overdogs right? Before I let you go any other any other category? You were interested in or something that you think our listeners might be interested in knowing. Oh, gosh. I don't know. I mean, I'm more interested in sending people to movies that maybe didn't make it onto this list. That would still be wonderful important support. Okay. Let me think of a few. I didn't come in with any right on my list. But okay. Well, you're never really hear the Lynne Ramsay film. With Joaquin Phoenix is really I think one of the best movies of the year and extraordinary performance from Joaquin Phoenix, and the kind of movie that doesn't get recognized. So so there's one right there. Well, let's go with movies directed by women since they got so little recognized in the in these nominations another was private life directed by tamra Jenkins, the first movie she's made in a very long time. No nominations in is really extraordinary. What else there's got to be destroy shirkers shirkers documentary by sandy tan that is again, not the kind of movie that usually gets nominated for an Oscar. Although there were some pretty obscure. Docs that made that list like HALE county this morning this evening. So if you can it's on Netflix. I believe streaming right now go see sandy tan shirkers. I won't tell you anything about it. Except that it's just it'll blow your mind. It's a great documentary. The trailer blew my mind. So can we invite you back after the show after the Oscar show? Would you come back and talk to? Oh, sure. I'd love to all right. Dana Stevens, we've booked their ladies forever. The Oscars show Dana Stevens, right through dot com. You can hear her on slates culture gabfest podcast. Thanks bye. Thank you. We come back documentary. Filmmaker Joe Berlinger will join us to talk about his new project for net. Flicks. A docu series about Ted Bundy don't go away. WNYC supporters include Gloria alive, a new play that celebrates the life of feminist activist.

Oscars director Dana Stevens Ethan Hawke Willem Dafoe Vincent Van Gogh Spike Lee Joaquin Phoenix Joe Berlinger WNYC mister Rogers Ted Bundy Vigo Mortenson Woody Allen Dan Quayle Bradley Cooper Lynne Ramsay Netflix Defoe
"dana stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:48 min | 3 years ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of people snaking through the center of Caracas as people come out by the tens of thousands to protest against the presidency of nNcholas widow answering a call by the opposition this street that I'm standing on. I've had people pouring down. For over half an hour. They keep on coming brandishing national flags waving slogans describing the doodo dictator singing and chanting the turn out for this demonstration in the capital. At least is clearly very high it breathes NPR news. Russia says there's still a chance to save a landmark arms control treaty, but that it's future depends entirely on the United States. NPR's? Lucian Kim reports from Moscow the Trump administration has threatened to start withdrawing from the treaty next month. If Russia does not come into compliance with Russian defence ministry denies that. A new missile is in violation of the IMF treaty and on Wednesday in an attempt at transparency a top Russian general publicly showed the launch tubes of the missile in question. Russian deputy foreign minister Sergei rep cough said Moscow would not cave into what he called American ultimate items. But still ready to preserve the treaty. NPR's? Lucian Kim reporting from Washington, this is NPR news. This is WNYC in New York. I'm Richard Hake. The Manhattan DA says a white supremacist has been convicted on terrorism charges for the first time in New York state history. James Jackson pleaded guilty today to fatally stabbing Sixty-six-year-old Timothy Kaufman. With a sword in hell's kitchen in. Two thousand seventeen prosecutors say the thirty year old traveled from Baltimore and stock several black men before attacking Kaufman. In a statement, the Manhattan DA Sivan's says white nationalism will not be normalized in New York. He faces life in prison. Jackson transgender woman is suing the NYPD saying she was harassed and wrongly charged WNYC's Mara silvers reports officers arrested, Linda Dominguez when she was walking through a park after dark Dominguez changed her first name in two thousand seventeen but her attorneys say she also gave officers her former legal name she was charged with false personalisation and trespassing halls Persson Asian is a crime. Of course that requires a person to misrepresent their name identity with the intent of deceiving. The police that wasn't what Linda was doing. She was essentially criminalised for being trans attorney, Bobby Hodgson with the New York Civil Liberties Union says officers put Dominguez in pink handcuffs and repeatedly called her by the wrong name and pronouns a judge dismissed the charges against her. The department wouldn't comment on the specifics of the case. After two months of protests around the deal to bring a new Amazon campus to queens. The online retailer is preparing to fight back. WNYC's? Jim O'Grady says Amazon has bought full page ads in local newspapers and his mailing out reminders that the future complex could bring in twenty five thousand jobs. They've hired a big PR firm S K D Knickerbocker, which has a lot of government contacts and the government agencies managing the deal. The city economic Development Corporation Empire State development. They're hiring people to basically promote the deal. This is WNYC support for NPR comes from the Craig Newmark foundation committed to the values of fairness opportunity and respect the new Mark foundation, supports veterans and military families voting rights truth in journalism and women in tech. This is olive WNYC. Alison, Stewart thank you for spending some time with me the ninety first Academy Awards nominations were finally announced yesterday after so many shows the announcements were notable for their satisfying picks surprises and some serious snubs Roma and the favourite came away with ten nominations each Black Panther the highest grossing film of twenty eighteen became the first superhero movie to score a best picture nom. Meanwhile, another crowd favorite a star is born Kim belittle bit shorter than expected with Bradley Cooper being nominated for best actor in a leading role. But not for the coveted directing spot and green book maintained its place as a serious contender despite a lack of clarity as to who is actually rooting for this picture here. Dive into all of us and tell us what to focus on is Dana Stevens slates movie critic, and the host of slates culture gap best. Hi, dana. Hey, good to be here. So I've had many of these directors sit where you're sitting and sort of. Sideways talk about the campaigns. They know they have to do it. Some of them don't really care for it. Some of them are completely into it. What actually goes into the campaigning to get an Oscar nomination IV that changes so much with every year and the campaign and get so much more important with every year that I couldn't even tell you. But I mean, one thing is that it's already been going on for some time before these nominations, essentially since early December when the Critics Award start going out, you know, there's already this jockeying in the sense of things getting hot then cooling off. And you know, there can be a completely different favorite at the beginning of that process than there is at this point, which is still nowhere near the end of the process. You know, we've got another month of really intense campaigning to go. So I mean, it seems like what the campaigning essentially amounts to now is very analogous to political campaigns work, which is that you have to create a narrative, and that narrative has to kind of stay in the news cycle, and you know, continue to accrue new wrinkles and a good example of that. I think is Glenn Close who was a complete darkhorse going into the season because the movie that she. He's up for the wife is a movie that has almost no other. I think no other nominations, and that almost no one has seen and it came out to very little fanfare in September. And and then she wins the Golden Globe. Which is generally not very predictive of what's going to happen at the Oscars. But then gives this really moving speech about her mother and her mother's inspiration of creating this character in the wife, and and I feel like now she's kind of becoming one of the favorites. Especially as we realized that she has had I believe seven nominations never went. I think that she may be right now the most nominated living at person. Yeah. And maybe including actress too, I think she might be the most nominated person who has never won. And also, it's that's part. That was part of the narrative is starting to become Glen closest turn. It's Glenn Close. Right. And the Oscar loves to give people their turn as we've seen that's really common phenomenon. So after the backlash of hashtag oscarssowhite, how do the nomination shakeout in terms of diversity? I mean, this is something you really see in the in the non consensus of the picks this year is that the academy is bigger than it's ever been because of. Oscarssowhite and also even before that back after after dark Knight didn't get any nominations didn't get nominated for best picture gotten mainly technical nominations back in two thousand eight I think it was that was when the best picture field was expanded right to ten with the idea that we'd bring in more popular pictures. So you see Black Panther kind of coming in taking advantage of that now and and ever since then there's been this this move then so oscarssowhite came along a few years ago. And so there's been this attempt to diversify the academy membership, and that in a way has been a great thing for the academy. You see a lot more. There's definitely more people of color who either are for acting awards, or you know, behind the scenes getting nominated, and there's more foreign films than they've ever been this year. There's those apprising presence of two foreign films in the best picture category. Alfonzo Korans Roma and Powell public house, keys, Cold War. And so there is more diversification in that sense. But it also seems like there's no more polarization. So like as you mentioned green book, which is many have criticized for its retrograde, racial politics. In which has all these scandals swirling around about its creators. Yeah. Is just keeps on plowing through award season collecting accolades and prestige, and it seems to be I mean, it's an early moment to save. It seems to be one of the possible favorites for best picture, even though as you say it's really unclear who's rooting for. I have to say some of my friends. Some of my friends are women of color one of them. Just said, I just have two words for you about that movie fried chicken. And anybody in the movie knows what we're talking about women did not fair quite as well. I kept waiting for car and Qassam is named come up for destroyer for perhaps best director. There wasn't an all the big categories. Women had gains in documentaries and some of the technical categories. But not in the big the big categories aside from obviously best actress and best supporting actress, I was a little surprised with that. Strange because it has been an exceptionally strong. Critics have been saying this all year an industry observers have been saying this an exceptionally strong movie movie year for women for movies directed by women. And some of those are maybe the kind of movies that don't get Oscar nominations. I'm thinking of Lynn Ramsey's. You're never really here. Which is a great movie, but you know, probably too offbeat too dark and to kind of already in the Oscars is to get a nomination. That's not such a surprise. But for example, Marielle Heller is can you ever? Forgive me recognized all over the place best supporting actor for grant best actress for Melissa McCarthy. Best screenplay nomination, but Marielle Heller who brought the whole thing together. And is a really impressive young female director making her second feature gets no recognition at all. So I don't exactly know what that's about. If there's a sense that you know, you've got to do your time. And she's too young director, perhaps people know that she's doing this big movie with Tom Hanks, Mr. Rogers bio-pic next year. So maybe they're sort of holding off that will be her moment. But yeah, it was definitely disappointing on the other hand. I mean, if you wanna look at movies led by women, there's a surprising number of movies getting tons of nominations like the favorite that while directed by a man is a completely female driven narrative about a love. Triangle among three women. Let's talk about Beck's best picture, by the way. My guest is Dana Stevens, she sleeps movie critic and host of slates culture gab fest. Who do you think got snubbed let's start with snubs? I mean, you can I just start off by saying like the category even the word snub kind of speaks to a part of Oskar season discourse that I don't love in that. Well, I mean, it's just it's a cliche that covers something that I think is more complicated than that. I guess just the idea of of of snubbing implies that there's this body this unified body. That's this making thumbs up thumbs down decisions. When in fact, the academy is bigger than it's ever been. It's something like it's getting so much. Antiquated term at this point. Anytime you're deciding something by consensus with a very large group of people with very different backgrounds. You know, there could be all kinds of reasons having to do with, you know, people throwing their weight behind the thing that they maybe don't love, but they think has a better chance of winning. I mean, I voted in a couple of these things not the academy. But critics groups, and I see how often something emerges that. Maybe nobody loves, but nobody hates, you know. And and at that ends up being the consensus choice. So might not quite overlord. But there are some omissions. That are surprising. And I think a big omission that surprising. Everyone is Bradley Cooper, not getting his best director non for star is born which everybody thought was this shoe into maybe do a, you know, just do a full on it happened one night, and you know, like back in nineteen thirty nine and just sweep all the big categories..

director Oscar NPR Lucian Kim New York Linda Dominguez Dana Stevens Glenn Close Bradley Cooper Alfonzo Korans Roma Russia Caracas Marielle Heller Moscow Russian defence ministry Amazon James Jackson
"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Simple favor starring in Henderson, boom. Oh, I saw him in seeing that because you guys do that. While during my hiatus, I missed so many good movies during that little bit. I gotta go see that. And listen to what you face said. All right. I'm putting on my list. Oh my God. Steve I'm not gonna even go down that road with you. But yes, it is very enjoyable to see Blake lively wearing a three piece suit with a pocket watch. I'll put it that way. Looks amazing Hollywood gave me Hollywood and gave me golden age fucking Hollywood in that movie. And it never does that any more stars being stars being magnificent being being arch with one another incredibly short. Just your sharply written dialogue in a in a Neo Noir. I just it it fucked it up at fucked it up but had it for a while. And even for an hour. Our or even thirty five minutes to be sitting there in the old fashioned thrall of like nineteen fifties Hollywood Noir, making of what's the great Billy wilder one. Why am I blanking double indemnity? Yeah. I just felt as though as though the spirit of double indemnity was alive for for twenty twenty-five thirty five minutes. I'm bargaining myself down five minutes, ten minutes, fifteen minutes. And so there it is. It's on my list. You can go yourself. All right. Slates movie club is awesome. Go check it out. Go read it and then talk to us on Twitter about what she thought moving on. All right now is the moment in our podcast. We talk about our other other sponsor Dana Stevens. Would he got? Stephen are..

Hollywood Billy wilder Hollywood Noir Dana Stevens Henderson Neo Noir Twitter Stephen Blake Steve Slates twenty twenty-five thirty five thirty five minutes fifteen minutes five minutes ten minutes
"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"There were then to be. Tv critic now just seems like pure sisyphean exhaustion at all times. And and I got the sense from a lot of the contributors to TV club, including willa that there's a real sense of burnout at what you were saying sort of the the be plus phenomenon of there being so many stories that are pretty good. And it's so hard to keep up with all of them. I mean that that element of movies, whether it's experienced in a theater or or at home or wherever the element that are just one in done. They tell a story. And then they're over is something that I treasure. And I think it makes them easier to share in a way. I mean, that's something that movie club is about right? We're passing these movies around and sort of holding them up to the light at different angles and looking at them in a way, that's really hard to do with a huge serialized narrative that that might not be over yet. That hasn't hasn't yet said the thing that it has to say or to listen, it's twenty one posts of three or four really great of film. Critical minds. You know, hashing it out all the byways and subtle. As of a year in film, nonetheless, I'd like to reduce this down as crudely as possible to favorite movie the year round the horn. Julia Turner, go. You can't ask me. I Dana Stevens favorite movie few Europe too late. You said he didn't want it up throwing the ball to the other part of the ward data, Steve it's favorite movie, the your go. Okay. As you know, I'm in non rancor. So I'm not giving you just one title. My god. I'm gonna say I mean, I'm gonna say Roma, but since Roma is such a common answer. And we just talked about it. And everybody knows that Roma is wonderful on a masterpiece in it. Arguably is very aware perhaps too much though of its own masterpiece. Nece I am also throwing in can you ever? Forgive me, which I think is a much more low key. But absolutely perfect character study that has nothing wrong with it. Basically, it has an unbelievably great script all of the casting and acting is fantastic. And it's a movie that many fewer people are likely to see and hear about and and see grandiosely trumpeted on the top of movie lists. So I'm gonna say Roma for your big art movie, and can you ever forgive me for your small, beautiful and forgettable? Character study joy Turner. Because I feel so stuck. I think I will play the type here and say Black Panther loved Black Panther kind of a revelation to see that form turned into something so much more than what we have seen in other contexts, and then Tully just to stick it in your both of your cross because I actually really really was in credible. And I thought the twist ending totally worked. Get your cross ready because I have two answers since we're all coming up with a couple leave. No trace the Debra Granik movie. On my top ten list. And now, you ready or your cross ready? I guess a.

Roma Steve it Julia Turner Tv critic willa joy Turner Debra Granik Dana Stevens Europe grandiosely Tully
"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"dana stevens" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"The favorite is a sweet juicy bit of eighteenth century pulpit tells the story of two rivals for the favor of Queen. And and then Rome is the latest movie from the director of fonts Koran he of so many remarkable films. I cannot wait to talk to Dana about both this movie in her wonderful review. Finally, it's that time of year again when we discuss slate discussing movies in their movie club package, which raises the question that the state of Hollywood the film industry and our collective soul's. Joining me today is a promise to master the job title before you mastered the job so late, and I know you're not. You are. The deputy. Managing editor of the Los Angeles Times in charge of arts, and culture. Correct. Dana Stevens is the film critic of sleet dot com. He dana. Hey, and I pop in here as we do our introduction to apologize for my sound, which is going to be a little weird and telephonic today or getting my recording situation out in LA sorted, and it's taking a minute, which is entirely on me. But anyhow, I won't sound great today. But I will in the near future. Thank you for your patience. Why don't we? Why don't we dive right in? It's a tall glasses talk Lhasa juice. We have here the favourite takes place in the court of Queen Anne, and here's played by British actress, the Libya Coleman familiar to our listeners probably from broad church anyway as clean, and she has got adult moody possibly weak willed. I would say, even by contemporary standards may be bipolar. But she's also the Queen and so two balance yourself publicly to love her forbiddenly. She has taken the duchess of Marlborough as a right hand lady. She's played by rock. Vice into the court comes the duchess's cousin of fallen aristocrat who must now through guile worker way up from scullery back to lady status. She is played by Emma stone, a very juicy rivalry ensues. Clearly, I presumed this movie as juicy right? Let's listen to a clip of before we do just to set it up a little bit. They're a bunch of scenes with them shooting pigeons and talking rival Risley and snark alita one another and this is one of them honor. Even by station is not even if the last one left in this wretched place. I would remain a lady. Pretty outraged. So why is he Krista safe all of them? Even your biggest.

Dana Stevens Queen Queen Anne Los Angeles Times Hollywood Rome Risley Emma stone Managing editor LA director Marlborough Libya Coleman Krista