17 Burst results for "Dana Brown"

"dana brown" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

09:33 min | 1 d ago

"dana brown" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"So we had heard or I should say the president had heard. And then I was privy to that there was one person on the cabinet who was very much against any deal that Olmert was going to make. And the president was invited to a dinner. We were all sitting there together, we're all eating dinner. And, you know, he didn't like to waste time or an idle chit chat. So he just puts it out on the table and says, I understand that some of you here are against the deal. And I just want to step back and let me ask you, how did you come to Israel? I'd love to know your stories. What are your family history? How did you get here? And I remember the chief of staff for Olmert looking for permission to speak. He says, yes. So he starts and he says, well, my family came from Iraq. And it was 1936, I think he said. And then the next one was Poland. The next one is Ukraine. Down at the other end of the table, another Israeli cabinet member leaned forward and said, wait, your dad came from Poland in that year. That was when my dad came. And they had all these little small world connections as they do this for about half an hour. And it was very beautiful. And they had these moments where of unity and the president said, I had a feeling you all had forgotten why you were here in the first place. And he stood up and we left. Huh? Well, he was a great diplomat. Try to get them to talk to each other. A lot of people underestimate how much the former president invested of his personal time in getting leaders to try and lead. I don't have anything like your experience down it, but he would invite talk show hosts in to meet with him occasionally. Maybe you were part of the reason that that happened. One time we came in, we were late. We kept us waiting for a half hour. Of course, you wait for the president. He apologized, which, of course, doesn't have to do. But he had been on the phone with then Iraqi Prime Minister Maliki, I think. And yeah, and had gone longer. And he began by saying, you know, it's my job to try and teach these people in new democracies how to lead. And so I'm sorry that we went on with the meeting, but he invested a lot of time in it. But the point is that both Sharon and then Olmert and then before them, Barack tried to get a two state solution going at Y River with President Clinton. Then W tried to do it. Secretary Rice tried to do it. They tried again and again and again. And it doesn't work because the Palestinians never want the deal. At least that's my understanding of it. What's your understanding of it? I think that is absolutely true. I it's one of the reasons I feel so strongly about the coverage that we're doing here and the coverage that you're doing. I know that you and I follow each other on Twitter. We don't get a chance to talk all the time. But we have similar thinking about this moment for Israel is about their survival, the survival of the state of Israel. And you just have to look at what Shinwar, the head of Hamas, said over the weekend. He said, oh, you think October 7th was bad? He said, we'll keep doing it. We'll do it over and over and over again. And that is why Israel is determined to destroy Hamas. Hamas can never be allowed to continue. And yet, Hugh, I'm worried because I sit there and I read the coverage of what was happening over the weekend and the message that Kamala Harris was delivering. And I'm worried about America's position here. Let me, if I can, I want to play for the audience who may just be tuning in what the vice president said at COP 28 in Dubai. Cut number 22. This is Vice President Harris yesterday, I believe. So I'm not going to reveal the details of the conversation, but I did speak with the emir and the work and their commitment to this work is ongoing, as is ours. And our work is ongoing to support some ability to re open the pause and to have a deal going forward where there will be a pause so that we can get hostages out and get aid in. Now, Dana, let me begin by saying there are two kinds of vice presidents, those that matter and those that don't. Vice President Cheney mattered a lot. And if he was giving a press conference, people would lean in and listen very closely. Am I right about that? 100 percent. And then there are vice presidents who don't matter at all. And that's Vice President Harris. And when she says she's talking to the emir, do you think the emir was leaning in and really giving close attention to what she had to say? I do, because I think that the vice president would never have said that on her own if she hadn't been encouraged to by either the president himself or the national security adviser. And I think that she does want to separate herself from Biden a little bit in terms of Biden having been pretty strongly supportive of Israel and the backlash that he's seen within his own party, especially on the progressive wing. I think she wants to try to distance from that a little bit. So if they encouraged her to say that out loud, I think she would have no problem saying that. Also, last week, she was asked at the deal book conference, what do you think about do you think Israel is obeying the rules of war? And her answer wasn't yes, as it should have been, in my opinion. It was, well, there are many rules of war. I miss that. I don't like the the shakiness there at all. I miss that. I got to play for you. The second quote from the vice president from yesterday, because this one's even worse. Cut number 23. Well, as I said, we have to revitalize the Palestinian Authority, which means giving the support that is necessary for good governance, understanding that on the issues that must be resolved as we think of a plan for the day after, it is about good governance, which will bring transparency and accountability to the people of Gaza and the West Bank. It's also about what we need to do to recognize there must be some plan for security for the region. And I suspect as a as a plan develops, it will take into account interim and then longer term. And finally, what we must do in terms of rebuilding Gaza and a commitment to that. So Dana Brown, what do you think that means? Well, I think that it means something along the lines of what Antony Blinken said in Israel last week, which is that the Biden administration does not believe Israel has the credit. That's their word credit in the geopolitical bank in order to do what it says it wants to do and needs to do, which is to eliminate Hamas. And it also means that she is going to be looking for regional actors to try to pitch in on some sort of aid package for Gaza. While Israel continues to sit there and say, we have suffered the worst terrorist attack in our country's existence. We have to figure out how to protect ourselves immediately. And they need America's help. But I think my take on this, Hugh, is that they're moving forward and they are trying to protect civilians. We know that they are obeying the rules of war. No one else is. And she didn't ask anybody in the region to condemn what Hamas did. And the regional actors, they could have helped Gaza in the last 15 years. Did they? No. So I think there's a lot of maybe I don't want to say backsliding on the Biden administration because we haven't heard from the president. But in my experience, she never would have said that if she hadn't had the didn't have the OK from the president himself. I'm going to come to Lloyd Austin just a second. But I like enlisting the vice president to playing chutes and ladders. And whenever she gets asked a question, she goes down a chute to an old collection of canards and cliches that she used to to state solution Palestinian authority. And then if you pushed her, she wouldn't even be able to give you the list of prime ministers of Israel, much less their positions or the when the withdrawal of Gaza occurred and how often they've offered and been told no. She wouldn't know what Y River is. I just don't think she knows anything, Dana. And maybe I'm being ungenerous, but I have a pretty good nose for people who know what they're talking about. I don't think she knows what she's talking about. You know, I would say that even for for me, when I first started in the Bush administration was actually at the Justice Department after 9-11. And I had to I had so much to learn here. And it takes a lot of time. And thankfully, I had wonderful people around me like Steve Hadley, who guided me and helped me understand all sorts of these all the geopolitical issues that we're talking about today. I really learned about back then. And it was quite an investment of time and time that I needed to spend. I didn't learn enough in my university days about it. Part of this is learned experience. But imagine you're the vice president of the United States and every single day you could call anybody in the government and have them come and give you a briefing on something because they're the experts. Forty three used to do that all the time. He would just randomly say, could I get a briefing next week on what's happening in, you know, in Haiti? And sure enough, here they would come and he would just always be curious. And I don't see that with her. I have a ton of curiosity every day I wake up and I think I know less than the day before. So I feel like I'm always trying to catch up. Like I'm trying to walk up that shoot that she falls down when she answers a question. Yeah, this is why I listen to Dan Senor. I have five podcasts I've started to listen to Dan Senor, who I did not know much about. And you you had to work with him when he was spokesperson for the Provisional Authority. He's really smart.

"dana brown" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:00 min | Last month

"dana brown" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're a betting fan, you probably had Houston against the Phillies. didn't That happen. For an inside look at the series and what we can expect in baseball's offseason, we're joined now by Harold Reynolds of the MLB Network. Harold, thank you so much, Mr. Reynolds for joining us on the Bloomberg Business of Sports, sir. Hey, thank you for having me. Appreciate it. And I'm with I thought I'd be sitting in Houston or in Philly for sure, because that home to an advantage instead sitting in Dallas. Well, I'm going to start with the obvious question is that where do you see both teams that got knocked out of the playoffs? I mean, do you see especially Houston? Are they going to revamp or their pitching the bullpen or starters? What's going to happen? Well, Houston's interesting. They're in a crossroads. Clearly, most reports came out Dusty Baker stepping down. So that's that's a big deal. You know, Dusty took over that team in the middle of a mess, you know, you come out of the scandal, you know, it was hard to get the errors to even want to come out onto the field. Remember, they skipped. They got voted in the All -Star Games and didn't go because they were being booed so poorly that Altuve hasn't been to an All -Star Game in a long time because of that whole scandal. So Dusty inherited quite the problem and he was able to right that shift. They have some terrific players and get it going. I think Dana Brown, the general new manager, will make this very similar to when he was with Atlanta and locking young players up moving forward. So I think we'll still see Houston winning games. We'll see the foundation with Bregman and Altuve, but I think we're going to see a lot of these other younger players start to get locked up long term when they come up and perform like Pena has done. Tucker is a free agent in a year and a half, so they've got to make that decision. So those are the types they of things got to do. I'm not going to lie, it scared me from using metal garbage cans after the scandal. Y 'all just look it up, folks. Just look it up. I'm sorry. Well, you know, Michael, one name that we haven't really been talking about, and I don't know how we can talk about him in this year's Major League Baseball playoffs is Adolis Garcia. I mean, this man is hitting at a record pace. I mean, before this World Series even began, he had 20 RBIs, which I think was a record in terms of playoff RBIs, you know, Harold, talk to us about this talent that's bubbling to the surface here. What's other standout performers of kind catch your eye? Well, I mean, Garcia is amazing. You think about him and you look at Randy or Rosarena, they were roommates in the Cardinals systems. The Cardinals had them both. You know, it reminds me of the old stories of Willie Mays and Berta Clemente, that the you know. So, but I think some of these great young talents, I just love De La Cruz in Cincinnati. He is going to be a phenomenal player. Corbin Carroll is playing right now in the World Series for Arizona. game, The I can go on and on because the game is so young and the talent is so plentiful. So, I think we have turned the corner to you and really fleshing out. If you are 35, you are pretty much gone. You know, at this point in time. It is my younger guys, your younger guys. You know, one other thing I just got to ask you quickly, I mean, what is up with all these road wins, man. I mean, road team won every game of the American League Championship Series, man. And now, Ari beat, you know, they beat Philadelphia on the road in that battle of the wildcards. I mean, what's going on here? mean, I why are teams spending so much money on their stadiums if they've got a home field advantage? Well, I'm with you with that. There's really not any, like, true home field advantages anymore in my mind when you got rid of the actual turf or like in the Metro building. They have the roof. white You go in there every time you hit a fly ball. The other team couldn't see it. You know, Tampa's really, to me, the only true, like, we got a ring up there. Who plays with a ring, you know? And the ball sit up there and it might hit the ring and the players don't know and it ricochets off. You can catch it. I remember playing in Seattle in the Kingdome and we knew that if a ball hit the speakers, it was still live. You know, so there'd be a ball hit down the line and hit the speaker would be on a full sprint and diving in south territory. And the other team would look at me like I was crazy and I'd catch it and they'd be out and they'd go, what? So that's the advantage. But today we have great ballparks. I love them. They're different. But there's not really like I walk in and as a visiting player and there's something that the home team doesn't know that I may not know. Harold, is MLB happy with the matchup of Rangers versus Diamondbacks or would they have preferred, let's say, the Dodgers making it all the way? I mean, not just MLB, the sponsors and the advertisers as well, because you would think one of the big market teams that spent a lot of money should be in the World Series, especially after a season in which MLB had a renaissance. Yeah, see, I didn't want to ask that, but Bulldog. That's what I'm saying. I forget Charlotte's Web. No, I mean obviously, look, everybody would like the big markets. You know, that's the obvious. And yeah, even MLB. But I think what's happening, you've two got teams of Arizona 1 and 0 -1, and the Rangers have never won. So I think they look at it like, all right, the new blood is coming. And coming out of the CBA, the big lockout and the fight that was stirred up, a lot of it had had to do, the reason we're in today, with two teams that everybody didn't know about. It freed up the money across the board that you have two teams last year had losing records, and now they're in the World Series. So I think if you asked Rob Manfred, he would say, that's parity at its best. And is this what we want for our sport. Baseball is one of the only sports that has not had a repeat since Derek Jeter's Yankees way back in 98. So that's good for the sport as a big conglomerate. I want the big New York teams and the sponsors there. think I we live in a different world now with the internet and the way people reach people through social media. It kind of changed everything. I mean, we got Taylor Swift going to football games in Kansas City, you know? And everybody follows that. The in Kansas City, y 'all, you know, who would have thought that? Who would have thought that? Is it possible to to build a dynasty in this new world then with the with the CBA, the way it's constructed? I think it is. you I think look at the Atlanta Bridge and if you can lock your young guys up. But the challenge is not necessarily the team's as much it is the player because the player can sit there now and go, man, I got a chance to make 300 million or do I have a team come to me when I'm 23 years old say here's 150. So I want to gamble on the 150 million. Hopefully we're getting players going. I'm getting paid younger. I'm getting more money younger. I want to stay here. You talk about locking up these young guys, right? And you know, it looks like Craig Breslow is heading back to the Boston Red Sox.

"dana brown" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:10 min | Last month

"dana brown" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Houston in or Philly for sure, because Philly would have a home field advantage. Instead, sitting in Dallas. Well I'm going to start with the obvious question. Where do you see both teams that got knocked out of the playoffs? I mean do you see, especially Houston, are they going to revamp their pitching or the bullpen or starters? What's going to happen? Well Houston's interesting. They're in a crossroads. Clearly most of the reports came out. Dusty Baker was stepping down. So that's a big deal. Dusty took over that team in the middle of a mess. He'd come out with a scandal. It was hard to get the players to even want to come out onto the field. Remember they skipped. They got voted into All -Star games and didn't go because they were being booed so poorly that Altuba hasn't been to an All -Star game in a long time because of that whole scandal. So Dusty inherited quite the problem and he was able to right that ship. They had some terrific players. and get it going. I think Dana Brown, the new general manager, will make this very similar to when he was with Atlanta and locking young players up moving forward. So I think we'll still see Houston winning games. We'll see the foundation with Bregman and Altuve. But I think we're going to see a lot of these other younger players start to get locked up long term when they come up and perform like Pena has done. I know Tucker is a free agent in a year and half, a so they've got to make that decision. So those are the types of things they've got to do. I'm not going to lie, it scared me from using metal garbage cans. Just look it up, folks. Just look it up. I'm sorry. know, Well, you Michael, one name that we haven't really been talking about, and I don't know how we can't talk about him in this year's Major League Baseball playoffs is a record hit. This man is hitting at a record pace. I mean, before this World Series even began, he had 20 RBIs, which I think was a record in terms of playoff RBIs, you know, going into the World Series. I mean, Harold, talk to us about this talent that's bubbling to the surface here. What's other amazing. Sia is You think about him. You're about Randy Rosarena. They were roommates in the Cardinals system. Cardinals have them both. You know, it reminds me of the old stories of Willie Mays and Bertel Clemente that the Giants could have had all them, you know. Oh, but, um, I think some of these great young talent. I just love De La Cruz In Cincinnati, he's going to be a phenomenal player. I mean, I'm talking about, uh, Corbin Rose plan right now in the World Series for Arizona of the game. I can go on and on because game is so young and the town is so plentiful. So I think we've turned the corner to you and really fleshing out. If you're 35, you're pretty much gone at this point in time. It is my younger guys and your younger guys. how You know, one other thing I just got to ask you quickly. I mean, what is up with all these road wins, man? I mean, the road team won every game of the American League Championship Series, man. And now Harry beat, you know, they beat Philadelphia on the road in that battle of the wild wild cards. I mean, what what what's going on here? I mean, why are teams spending so much money on their if they've got a home field advantage? Well, I'm with them with that. There's really not any like true home field advances anymore in my mind when you get rid of the or extra turf like in the Metro building. They have the white roof. You go in there every time you hit a fly ball. ball. The other team couldn't see it. You know, Tampa's really to me the only true like We got a ring up there who plays with the ring and all and the ball sit up there and it might hit the ring and the players don't know and ricochets off. You can catch it. I remember playing in battle in the kingdom and we knew that football hit the speakers. It was still live, you know, so there'd be a ball hit down the line to get speaker and I'd be on a full sprint I haven't in south territory and the other team would look at me like I was crazy and I'd catch it and they'd be out they go what? So that's the home field advantage but today we have great ballparks. I love them. They're different but there's not really like I walk in and as a visiting player and there's something that the home team doesn't know that I may not know. Harold, is MLB happy with the matchup of Rangers versus Diamondbacks or would they have preferred let's say the Dodgers making it all the way? I not mean just MLB, the sponsors and the advertisers as well because you would think one of the big market teams that spent lot a of money should be in the World Series especially after a season in which MLB had a renaissance. Yeah see I didn't want to ask that but you're trying to get me in trouble. That's what I'm saying man. I Charlotte's forget Web, that's Scarlet's Web. So I mean obviously look everybody would like the big markets you know that's the yeah even MLB but I think what's happening you got two teams have never won have Arizona won and 0 -1 and the Rangers have never won you know so I think they look at it like all right the new blood is coming and coming out of the CBA the big lockout and the fight that was stirred up a lot of it had to do the reason we're in today with two teams that everybody didn't know about it freed up the money across the board that you have two teams last year had losing records and now they're in the World Series so I think if you ask Rob Manfred he could say that's parody at its best and this is what we want for our sports you know baseball is one of the only sports that has not had a repeat since Derek Jeter's Yankees way back in 98 you know so that's good for the sport as a big conglomerate I want the big New York teams and the sponsors there I think we live in a different world now with because with the internet and the way people reach people through social media kind of changed everything I mean we got Taylor Swift going to football games in Kansas City you know and everybody follows that yeah the paparazzi in Kansas City y 'all you know who would have thought that who would have thought that is it possible to to build a dynasty in this new world then with the with the CBA the way it's constructed? I think it is I think you look at the Atlanta Bridge and if you can lock your young guys up but the challenge is not necessarily the teams as much it is the player because the player can sit there now and go man I

"dana brown" Discussed on Northwest Newsradio

Northwest Newsradio

02:01 min | 5 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Northwest Newsradio

"Earned over four and a third innings grateful each unity so time i come up i just want to show up and show them the picture that i am and how i've been doing you know down in triple a and back below 500 at 42 and 43 the m's move on to play the houston astros to close out the first half of the season all -star right -hand pitcher george kirby faces the astros in the opener tonight last night the astros beat the colorado rockies or sweeping the two -game series and winning their fourth in a row general manager dana brown said there isn't any rush to bring back injured second baseman jose altuve who injured his left oblique on tuesday during batting practice new mats york first baseman pete alonzo and ambs outfielder julio rodriguez will meet in the first round of the home run derby as part major league baseball's all -star week alonzo won the derby in 2019 and 21 but for falling to rodriguez in semifinals the last summer the winner gets one million dollar prize and the storm played the sun at four o 'clock this afternoon sports at 10 and 40 past the hour eric einst northwest news radio and traffic and weather up next it's 41. slow drains are a warning a warning drain slow down first they stop then back they up in my house want the good news please it's preventable how call apollo plumbing first time you see a slow drain you are those ready right now plumbers you call we come it's fixed ending my drain pain first we find what's causing your clock and clear it clearing without correcting the cause could mean more clogs no thanks maybe roots the in drain breaks in the line sounds expensive we give you options and an upfront no surprise price before any work begins right you're in control like that video inspections often find the problems out in your yard you dig up my yard not with apollo trenchless replacements no trenches quick clean usually done in a and away go my train troubles something like that apollo plumbing there's no clog we can't clear or a drain problem can't you fix we love what we do love drains curing drain pains for good soon as i see a slow drain i'm calling apollo clog busting

"dana brown" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

07:13 min | 6 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Now is the time to continue to dominate with what works. And when I stop dominating, well, then I have to figure out another way to dominate. And I think that's a that's a very fine line for athletes. If this is working so well, why change it? And when it stops working so well, then be able to make a change. And it's almost like they're kind of holding cards in their back pocket. I don't need to pull that card yet. Look, look at how dominant I am. So I look, it's a self -awareness, too, that's really important. And, you know, he clearly has it. And baseball is one of the great sports. I think you would agree. Baseball is one of the great sports where guys can struggle and and work their butt off and try different things. And occasionally it really clicks. Brandon Marsh is one of those examples, you know, with the Phillies. Mickey Moniac, who was the Philly, is now sort of seeing some success. Marcelo Zuna this year. All of a sudden, April was awful and he worked his ass off and he started to hit the ball to right. May has been terrific that it is one of those sports where you can you can immediately see, because while it's a team game, it's all about your individual effort at the plate or on the mound or in the field that separates you. And and you can see the fruits of your labor in many cases. And, you know, I think Strider is just sort of waiting there. What I needed, I'll find another one. Yeah. And to tell the story, you know, that Dana Brown, Alex Anthopoulos, Dana Brown, now the general manager, the Astros used to be the scouting director for the Braves. Alex Anthopoulos, head of baseball ops for the Braves, told me is that going into that draft when they selected Strider, Dana Brown had a great feel for Strider. He was really interested in taking him. The internal debate was, boy, we also like Bryce Elder. So in round four, we take Bryce Elder or do we take Spencer Strider? And they decide that they're going to make the move on Strider. They land him when they get to their fifth round pick. Hey, there's Bryce Elder. They loved Spencer's athleticism, man, at that that draft, that selection pan off in a huge way. It looks like we're going to have Matt Olson on the microphone on Sunday. And we're hoping to get Ronald Lacuna Junior in our game opening interview. That might be with Eduardo Perez. That's the best player in the National League right now, Carl. Yeah, and it's not it's not really close. And that was a great, you know, the great article from Aldo Gonzalez there about Cunha and his mother and the injury of the subsequent depression and anxiety. And I'm never going to be able to beat a player I was. And again, he's another example of somebody that that needed to take time to recover from this, to deal with the sort of self defeat that you feel because your legs are now not what they once were. And that explosiveness isn't there. And all of a sudden, you know, he he did the Venezuelan Winter League and all the other things he did. And now he feels like he's, you know, he's back. Confidence in baseball is such a fleeting thing. And the fact that he's playing with all of it on, you know, arguably the best team in the National League when they're all put together and he's so far ahead. I mean, this is like this is like Trout a few years ago when he would go to the All -Star game. It was like the hardest thing in the world. You go to the All -Star game with every other great player. And yet you still are able to separate yourself. He's on a team that's got Olson, that's got Riley, you know, that's got all these Murphy Murphy. And yet he is he's so far. I can see us having this MVP conversation months from now. And one of those conversations when there are two teammates, it's always, well, they may split the vote. Like he's on a team that's got a handful of guys that could end up in the conversation. And he's not in danger if he keeps himself of splitting any vote. He's so far ahead of everybody. He's a treat. He's he's great for the sport. He's obviously great for the game. He loves baseball. It's it's a great he's a great story. Yeah, look, I love analytics. You know, love to dig in the numbers that reflect how players are performing. The one part about analytics that I don't fully and never trust is it's just knowing how players make adjustments. Right. The analytics are based on what the player has done to that moment. But you point about Strider, you point about Acuna. That doesn't reflect the alterations, the changes, the adjustments, the improvements that players can make. And we see that time after time after time. Spencer Strider, you know, fourth round pick in the draft right now. He's in that conversation for best pitcher on the planet. And I'm curious, from your perspective right now, who would you say is the best pitcher on the planet? You know, whether it's a Shane McClanahan of the Rays. So I think right now probably is the best lefty. Sandy Alcantara last year was the best pitcher in the National League. He's kind of gone down this year. He's taking a step back. Garrett Cole feels like he's pitching more free. He's pitching with a ton of confidence right now. We went through about a four year period where it felt like there was no doubt that the answer to that question, best pitcher in the planet was Jacob deGrom. You know, Justin Berlander held that title for some time. Max Scherzer held that title for some time. Who would you say right now in your mind is the best pitcher on the planet? Yeah, one game that I needed to, you know, get a get an incredible start from it. You know, I don't want to be the victim of, you know, recency, but seeing and knowing what he did last year and seeing what he did Sunday night, it feels like Berlander is going to be in that conversation again. You don't win the Cy Young last year and then and then fall off the map. And he dealt with injury and now he seems to be back in the forum. So I'm not certain why. If there's no regression, he doesn't end up being the most dominant and maybe reliable as far as moving forward. Now that he's he's had this injury and he's healthy and he's only getting healthier. You know, I'd probably Buster, I know it's a small sample size and I get, you know, Strider and there's certainly some relievers. But if we're talking, starting pitching, I would, you know, I'd probably lean on him. I I'd probably lean on Berlander. I'd probably go McClanahan right now. 11 starts and he's allowed 14 runs. Yeah, he's averaging almost six innings per start. He's got a one nine seven era eight no record. I know wins and losses don't really. I think I think when you said McClanahan as the lefty, it was kind of a give it. So I went to the other guy like who's who's going to be the best right handed starter because I felt like this was a Strider, Berlander, whoever else conversation. But yeah, no, I mean, McClanahan's again, if you the lefty and the guy that you want, he's probably one. But I just am looking at what Berlander did. And I think if if he were healthy and coming off the year he did last year, he'd very much be in that NLSI young conversation. So the Braves are playing the Phillies.

"dana brown" Discussed on Big Time Baseball

Big Time Baseball

06:04 min | 8 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Big Time Baseball

"The wait for it dot com hotline by Odyssey MLB insider John haman host of the Odyssey original big time baseball podcast with Tony Gwynn junior covering all things Major League Baseball and of course you can follow John on his personal Twitter page at John hayman John is always but he appreciate a few minutes here in Atlanta as the braves lost today, but man, they have been off to a fantastic start this year. Terrific terrific team, they've got good pitching. They've got great hitting, you know, obviously Swanson is a loss, but they haven't got the terrific all over if he was a great pickup. Obviously Riley and Acuna are big stars and they've got a very balanced and deep lineup. You know, John, I think with today's loss, they've started off ten and two on the road. And, you know, again, when you're a great road team, I mean, obviously the braids are going to play well at home, but what does it say about a team that plays really well on the road, like the braves have? Yeah, I mean, certainly it's easier at home if your tenant too. I mean, that's fantastic. It's an 8 33 winning percentage on the road. Really terrific. Look, they won the World Series two years ago last year. They won a 101 games in a very, very tough division. This is possibly the best team in baseball right now. If you're going to rank them, you do a power rankings, which I don't do. I would probably put them number one at this point, obviously the rays have been great, but I think with the resume that the braves have, I think, that they're probably the World Series favorite at this moment and John, the other interesting thing is obviously there's been a ton of injuries for the braise, whether it's Michael Harris, or Travis darnold, or obviously max fried is mistimed. Kyle Wright was banged up this year. And then you're dealing with Ian Anderson, who's out for the year and on and on and on and on. Is that one of the more remarkable things, though, that the braves have been this good playing this well with all of the guys that they've had injured this year? I mean it's pretty amazing. A lot of teams have that injuries. They are among them. I would say they're probably middle of back on the injuries. With sizzle life for them that they're able to be among the two or three best teams with middle of the pack situation on the injuries, freed obviously, big loss. Now he's come back. That's huge. I mean, Devin ace pitcher, another ace, pitcher, terrific. They really have done a terrific job of procuring talent, certainly of locking up talent better than anybody on that front. And you know, I mean, they have a young team and an outstanding future. You know, one of the things about developing their minor league talent, you know, they've gotten contributions from guys that were drafted in 2019, 2020, 2021 even. Strider and Bryce elder, a guy who were just drafted in 2020, you know, you don't normally see a lot of guys come up through the miners that quick into a major league club. What does that say about their scouting department, their player development? I mean, what does that speak to about how good the braves have done with that? Well, I mean, it got Dana Brown, the GM job of the afros. You know, he's the guy responsible for picking Harris and strider and all the most recent picks were his and you know, it makes sense that they would hire him. I just had him on another podcast and I do a post terrific gentleman and rate that he's finally got a chance to be general manager well deserved and I mean take probably 50 or more a hundred guys who made to the major leagues from the boba shift with a Toronto and Zimmerman's with Washington and Strasbourg and so many great players with Atlanta. I mean, drafting and developing is huge. The teams that do that well, the Dodgers, the braves, the Cardinals, are at a major major advantage. Odyssey MLB insider John hayman joining us here on the wait for dotcom hotline. Let's bounce around the league a little bit, John. What do you make of the Philly start this year? 8 and 11, they're actually fourth in the division. What does it bend that the Phillies have been so bad with so much expectation and obviously so much money that they spent in this off season? Yes, it's certainly surprising. I mean, it's early or 10% went through the season. So we don't want to overplay it, but they had a very good team last year that made the World Series certainly was much better once we're up Thompson took over as manager. I think there are a couple of factors. One is the injuries to Harper and Hoskins and Harper should be back probably in a couple of weeks or so. So that would be huge, but they have 200 RBI guys that lab is big. And then also playing deep into October. I think affects the pitching. Wheeler and Noah haven't been as good as you'd expect them to be. And that's really, I would say the hardest, it's part of the heart of the team. That lineup at full strength is one of the best two or three in the game, but having two pitchers who are aces is a rarity in baseball and should give them a leg up and so far it hasn't been a lot of surprises early though. I mean, the cardinals have been not been very good. Seattle deciders, the Padres. I mean, it is early. So I'm not, you know, I'm not giving up on that, but it has been a bit of a surprise that they started this bad. John, there's been some talk about with the Hoskins injury that they may move Bryce Harper to first base and let him play there versus playing in the outfield. Are you hearing the same things? I mean, what do you think about that? At college app student loans. We know paying for college can be stressful, but we don't think it needs to be that way. We offer stress free private student loans for

"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

06:21 min | 9 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"He's looked good, the splitter, the velocity is also there for him. He could be a name to keep in mind for some important leverage innings and outs for the braves in 2023. And then they've got a left hander named Dylan Lee, who was kind of an unsung hero for the braves last year as a rookie, he's looked outstanding this spring and if they're able to get that kind of production out of him and some of the other veterans that they've brought in, I just feel like the depth is certainly there. Even without a glacius, you have a chance to maybe see what Nick Anderson can offer after a couple of injury plagued years. He seems to be back up into the mid 90s and has been known to miss some bats, so the braves really have, I think, a great group of both righties and lefties who can get that swing and miss or can get that ground ball and Brian snitker and the braves can use them in a variety of ways and just somebody has to come in and slam the door and I guess that'll be right sell Iglesias when he's ready to go. I want to pop back to the rotation for a second because if it were not for the presence of Michael Harris the second Atlanta probably still would have gone home with the NL rookie of the year award and Spencer strider, he had an incredible season, so it's hard to imagine how he might improve things, but what have you seen from him so far this spring and are there areas of his game that he's trying to advance again, I don't know how you do much better than a one 8 three fib and almost 5 wins by our version of war a fangraphs, but are there things that he's targeting this year that he'd like to improve upon? Yeah, when you roll into your first full season, you're not even a starter until basically Memorial Day and you still become the fastest pitcher to 200 strikeouts, just ahead of Randy Johnson's pace. I mean, that's a pretty incredible accolade in and of itself. And yeah, most years, he could have been The Rookie of the year, but one thing this is impressive is Spencer strider stuff and what we see on the mound is the mental side of his game. He somebody that also he had to go through Tommy John surgery and I think that mentally elevated his focus on how to get everything out of his significant talents and he's one of those that subscribe to the idea of I want to be 1% better today than I was yesterday and he goes out there and he studies. He's a student of the game. He talks about baseball in a way that would make you think this is a ten year veteran, but one of the great things about Spencer strider is it's not just arm talent. He's got it. I think between the ears and he's very, very hyper focused on trying to find ways to elevate his game. So I would expect to see in addition to that fastball and that slider, maybe a step forward with the change up, which is kind of a show me pitch for him, but might be a little bit better now as he continues to polish that up. And then he's got time to pick the brain of a max freed or a Charlie Morton or whoever it may be. And I think that that kind of helps elevate that group as well because they're all different styles, but they all have this, I think, synergy of the workmanship and the focus and the group mentality that I think kind of drive each other in that good competitive way and Spencer strider is rather competitive. So I could see that all kind of coming together to really help him take that game that was significantly more than any of us could have imagined last year to perhaps being a perennial 200 plus strikeout guy. The league leader in strikeouts, whatever it is, the braves are certainly banking on that because they signed up to do a long-term extension and he's the only pitcher in that group of extensions as well and I thought that was pretty interesting. The braves have hired away a bunch of executives from the Astros, the Astros did the same to the braves. This winter, they hired Dana Brown as their new GM that he braves former scouting director. What part did Dana Brown play and putting this braves group together and in what ways will he be missed? I think he played a part that a lot of folks, it might have gone unnoticed, but then you start to see that some of these Dana Brown draft classes are not only giving you players like Michael Harris or like Spencer strider, but Dylan Dodd and Jared Shuster, Shay Langley has got traded to get mad Olson. I mean, a lot of these guys have been either useful at the big league level for the braves or are on their way to being. Or they've been used in some very significant trades, including the Sean Murphy trade this year as well. It's going to be, I think, something that the braves do and most I think top tier clubs that they don't get to draft near the top anymore, so it's not going to prop up your prospect rankings, just by the virtue of having a top ten pick every year. You don't want to be having a top ten pick every year if you're doing the winning you want to do, but I think Dana Brown was really great at identifying players that really fit the mold of both the talent and from the person level. One of the guys he raved about on draft night quite a few years ago was Braden shoemaker and I'm interested to see now here what four years later Braden shoemaker all of a sudden started to open some eyes and big league camp. So I think he had a great view of both what a player was and what a player could become and that's exactly at least it sounds like to me the kind of thing that the Houston Astros would love to have because Dave had a pretty great thing going over there for a while as well and you know they want to continue to put players in that talent pipeline and bring them to the big leagues and I think Dana brown's going to be a great fit for that. Yeah, so speaking of Atlanta's pipeline, according to MLB pipeline, they just released their rankings this week. I think, and the braves are dead last. Now, obviously, they're down there for a good reason. They've promoted a lot of players, and they have good young players in the major league mix. But how much of an issue is that? They and the royals were the only teams not to have a player on the fan graphs, top 100 or top one 12 for that matter. So at what point could that become a problem and what can they do to replenish the pharma system even as they're winning at the major league level? And as you said, not getting top picks. Yeah, I think that one thing that's going to open a door for the braves to improve just by default is the fact that they have now been able to sign international players over the last couple of signing periods. That was something the braves did not have for a number of years in the fallout from the 2017 prospect scandal that got John Coppola banned from baseball for a while and now obviously he's back in, he could get a job somewhere if he would like. So putting all of that aside, I think the international side of that really weakened the braves farm system because it's hard to imagine a club that is building at the minor league level and is not really able to go out and get the high end Latin American talents. When you look at the overall fabric of the game, that's an integral part of that. So finding and identifying players internationally would be number one, continuing to draft smart and develop players. And I think the braves have done a really good job of that, even as they're status is one of the top farm systems in baseball kind of slid out of the top 5, then out of

"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

04:53 min | 9 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"But there's been a ton of turnover, of course, and the esters front office, and their whole player development, staff, so that pipeline that they were one of the leading teams in one of the early adopters is that still in place, can they survive the brain train is it's still going to be a strength for them player development going forward. Yeah, every time I answer this question, I just keep thinking in the back of my head. There's going to be some Latin picture I've never heard of. That's going to just burst and be pitching for this team in July. I probably would say no because like we kind of mentioned earlier in the podcast, this is not a this is not a farm system that has a ton of just bounce off the page high end talent. Obviously hunter Brown is a top 100 guy. They really, really like drew Gilbert, their first round pick from last year from Tennessee, Jacob Melton has their second round pick has played well, has played well in a couple of grapefruit league, big league, grapefruit, league game, appearances, and they view both of those guys as kind of outfield cornerstones, the guys that could be fast risers, you know, Dana Brown, even one on elbow network and said that he challenged drew Gilbert to come win the center field job this year. I don't think that's going to happen. He's only played 7 professional games. But who knows what the Astros, they've had quicker pots before. But I think they need to see this draft class play a little bit. I'd be interested to see how Jacob nelton and drew Gilbert do play this year, but this is what's going to create kind of the conundrum for Jim crane. It's like how many Jeremy Pena's are there? They're probably aren't that many. How many times can you rely on these guys to really hit and let's in fairness to Jeremy Pena, too? He was not in any not that I see he was a fringe top 100 guy on a lot of outside publications, but like we mentioned, he didn't play much. And so he came up and he hit. And that's certainly a credit to them, and they deserve the benefit of the doubt, but it's going to be something that I think their player development system, they lost Oslo Campo to the Miami Marlins this winter. They still have Sarah goodrum as their director of player development. They're doing some different things, but I think it's certainly in line to be one of those farm systems that you could not hear of a guy and all of a sudden bam. He's playing well. Let's take a look at Justin deer and who's really setting major league camp ablaze right now $20,000 undrafted free agent signing on a southeast Missouri state in 2020 who is certainly cementing a spot on the 40 man as a guy that's rule 5 eligible this winter. But there's talk that maybe he could contend to make the opening day roster and again, that's a guy that virtually out of nowhere that's really pop for them. So they've got to find, again, more high end prospects. They've got to get more guys that are ready made to replace the tuckers. The Bregman's, if that happens, or Jim crane's got to be comfortable going beyond that 6 year barometer that he said as a threshold. Well, you know, probably that are closing question here is how do you define success this season? It's the Astros if they make the LCS every year, they just won the World Series. I guess it's probably easier to answer this question for them than for most teams, but is there any non obvious benchmark other than, hey, make the ALCS win a pennant win a World Series again? I mean, I think if you talk to them, it's when it again. It's when the whole thing again. When the World Series again, I mean, dusty baker always and this was prior to him winning last year. He always said, if I win one, I might as well win two. And that's kind of been there. It's kind of been their motto. Let's just do it again. So yeah, I mean, it's tough to and you never want to get into the World Series or bust, like if you don't win a World Series of seasons of failure, but the actors have kind of reached that point where it kind of is. Like they've made the ALCS 6 years in a row. It's hard to say making the ALCS like, oh, that's a great success that it's just kind of become expected. And so yeah, I think the only measure of tangible success this year is probably winning the World Series, but there are some there may be some players and some guys that can have personal success that would really maybe one of chaz McCormick or Jake Myers really breaking out and really solidifying center field, you know, maybe Christian Javier really taking that next step as a guy. He's only really had one full season as a starter maybe taking that next step as being an innings eater and being dominant as that long. Maybe hunter Brown and we mentioned before like those are kind of more of the personal successes that maybe they could look at if the season doesn't end in a World Series win, but make no mistake for the team. There is no more success out of the winning World Series. Winning fixes everything as they take. Well, you're welcome for the free plug Evan. So

drew Gilbert Jeremy Pena Jim crane hunter Brown Jacob Melton Dana Brown Jacob nelton Oslo Campo Sarah goodrum Astros Justin deer ALCS Bregman Miami Marlins Tennessee Missouri dusty baker chaz McCormick Jake Myers
"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

06:15 min | 9 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"They did sign Christian Javier to an extension and as you noted, they've been working on Tucker Valdez, et cetera. So is this very much just, hey, this is what's worked for us in Atlanta and I want to try to do that here and then it seems like there would be a conflict between the desire to do that and then the willingness to spend what you need to in order to do that. Well, Dana Brown has certainly brought up the braves and kind of how they and Jim crane has as well about what the braves did, how they were able to go and be aggressive with their young players and lock those guys up. But there has been kind of a shift in that. It's been interesting to listen to Dana and listen to how he's presented himself his first month or two on the job. You know, his first two or three public appearances, he came out as if they were going to extend all these guys tomorrow as if it was getting done and I think he sensed tempered. I think he's since, you know, this is a guy that he's been in the game a long time, but he's still a first year general manager. And he's going to have to learn kind of the nuances and kind of how the job and negotiations go. You know, he was pretty vocal that in the context of the conversation we were having the other day about these 8 and ten year deals. You know, I did bring up that the brave signed Austin Riley to a ten year extension. They gave Matt Olson 8 years, a $168 million. And he's quote on the record was Alex was the boss there. I don't know if I would have done those deals just because I'm not a ten year guy. So maybe there is a shift and maybe this has come from conversations with Jim crane where Jim crane has made it pretty known that he has a limit and they're not going to be able to go there. But the braves model and how they did it was certainly something that appealed to Jim crane, but I do think people have to remember too that Dana Brown, he did a lot of good work in Atlanta for drafting and securing young players, but he was the vice president of scouting. I'm not sure how much he actually did to get these extensions done. He just mentioned that Alex anthopoulos was the main driver in the boss over there. So I think it's going to be a learning curve and I think it's going to be something that Dana Brown has already kind of tempered, he said a couple of days ago that, you know, look, if we don't get them done, we still have them for three years. But as I think we all know, as these guys get closer to free agency, their price is only going to go up. Kyle Tucker is about to have a full season without the shift. From brave Valdez is about to be the unquestioned ace of the staff and as they get closer to free agency, it's only going to get more expensive. It's only going to take more years and you do have to wonder if the ship has maybe already sailed and extending those two guys. So there's all of that future potential uncertainty. But when you look at the depth chart of the Astros now, there's a lot of stability in this current group, as you're sifting through camp, where are the spaces on the roster where you see there being actual position battles. It was funny. I think it was Mandy bell came on here about the guardians and she was she said, I can't believe all we have is the backup catcher battle. And Astros camp, we do have the backup catcher battle between Corey Lee and jiner Diaz, Coriolis, their final first round pick before the sanctions. He went to Cal and he certainly I think they view him as maybe the catcher of the future or a guy that Martin Maldonado can really take under his wing this year. A far better defender than jiner Diaz is, but John or Diaz just keeps hitting. He hit his way onto the 40 man last year. They brought him up in September for a brief big league cameo, but with the way this team values defense and the importance now with the limited disengagements and limited pick offs the importance of a strong throwing arm coil he's got one of the strongest throwing arms in minor league baseball for catchers. So I think he's probably got the edge back there to open camp to open the team to open the season, excuse me. As the backup catcher. And then there's another battle and center field that I don't know if we can call it a battle yet, but certainly chaz McCormack, who made the heroic catch in game 5 of the World Series and kind of locked down that position toward the end of the season. Dusty baker stopped short of anointing him as a starter coming into camp, Jake Myers who never seem like himself last season coming off of shoulder surgery, the Astros, really mismanaged his season quite frankly, they rushed him back from a minor league rehab assignment despite dusty baker pleading with them to give him more at bats and he came up to the major leagues and just look completely overmatched. And he's finally healthy. He's come the spring training. He's taken some really good swings early. He looks, he looks like the Jake Myers of old Jake Myers that really forced the Astros to trade miles straw in 2021. So there's a battle there. I think both but I think both of those guys are going to end up making the roster one as the fourth outfielder and one that's a starting center Fielder. So you can see maybe a time share there, not a platoon situation because both of them that right handed. But yeah, those are your two main battles other than that. It's kind of fun. We walk in the Clubhouse every day and it's like, yeah, I mean, they added one new major league player and Jose Abreu, and everyone else just kind of status quo. It's the same guys doing the same things kind of just kind of just going through the motions and kind of just ready for the season to start. Maybe we can talk about a few guys who are coming off of, we're dealing with injuries, so speaking of shoulder surgeries, Michael Brantley, what's his outlook? And Lance mccullers, who's dealing with an elbow issue and then I don't know if this is an ongoing issue, but you are done Alvarez was having some hint soreness, which he dealt with before. So is that an ongoing concern? I think all three are differing levels of ongoing concerns. You know, Michael Brantley was progressing very well. They were very optimistic. He was going to be able to get into grapefruit league games here in a couple of days and on track for opening day, but he's been away from camp for the last four or 5 days with what the teams describing as a family matter. So he's tending to that and that has kind of set him behind schedule to the point where Dana Brown acknowledged the other day that he may not, it may not be opening day. He may have to come back maybe that in later in that week, maybe the next week. So that family matter has set him back a little bit. Lance mccullers junior is still not playing catch.

Jim crane Dana Brown braves Christian Javier Tucker Valdez jiner Diaz Jake Myers Austin Riley Matt Olson Alex anthopoulos Kyle Tucker Atlanta Astros Mandy bell Astros camp Corey Lee Martin Maldonado dusty baker Dana
"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:56 min | 9 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Their amateur scouting department before he left. And I expect Dana Brown to continue that. He's already added special assistant Russ beauvais, who is another veteran scalp that's been a scout for almost 40 years. And he's going to be heavily involved in the draft process from what I understand they are working together pretty well with amateur scouting director Chris gross, who's run their last couple of drafts and so I think those three are going to find a way to make it work, but yes, I do envision a more augmented scouting staff going forward under Dana Brown. And then you mentioned Verlander's departure, I know, you know, they have a number of guys who they might contemplate for extensions, some of whom you just mentioned, some of whom I imagine will talk about. Was there ever any thought of bringing Verlander back? I'm sure they knew he was going to opt out, but did they try to match what he was offered by the mets? I never ruled it out because Jim crane and Justin Verlander are extremely close. And if there was going to be someone that they were going to kind of splurge a little bit on, I would not have been surprised at all if it was going to be Verlander, but they weren't going to go to that level. I'd heard Jim crane had told people close to him after he parted ways with James click that he did not like the Scherzer deal and that the Scherzer deal that kind of scared him a little bit and everyone kind of knew that Justin Verlander was going to get something in that realm. So I never ruled it out and they certainly talked, I don't think it was ever anything that amounted to serious negotiations, but I thought it could have been a possibility, but at the end of the day, they just were going to go that far. Yeah, I was going to ask about that because you noted that crane is aggressive. He certainly aggressive in some ways, but when it comes to outspending other owners, not always, right? The Astros are, I think, tenth in projected payroll for this year. And given their success and their attendance, you would think that they could go higher if he were willing to. And they've repeatedly allowed players to leave via free agency, whether it's a Springer or Correa or coal or Verlander right and it's hard to argue with the results and sometimes they have a Jeremy Pena just to slot in for cars gray and they have all the homegrown starters that they've replaced to Cola now Verlander with. So that's a testament to their player development, but at the same time, it's hard not to think, well, we would still be better with Justin virulent here still around, even though we have lots of other good starters. So why has he drawn the line so starkly when it comes to signing players to really big contracts? Because the biggest Astros franchise free agent deal ever is still Carlos Lee, right? Like 2005. I mean, I know they've signed some players to bigger extensions, but they haven't really broken the bank for a free agent. Yeah, so in Jim crane's ownership tenure, the longest free agent deal. The longest and most lucrative free agent deal was Josh Reddick's four year $52 million deal before the 2017 season. Now, now Jose Abreu, this off season they did give a three year deal worth 58 and a half $1 million. So they were there was something there, obviously that rivaled the Reddick deal. But just in his ownership tenure, they have preferred to build their teams through trades through draft and development. And they kind of address the kind of go into free agency and kind of address their margins there. You look at they've done two and three year deals, the extensions that they've done, the longest and most lucrative and crane's ownership tenure still Jose Altuve 5 year, $151 million. Signed in 2018, you're an Alvarez got 6 years for a 115 million in the middle of last regular season. So as far as why they've drawn the line, I just think that Jim crane is pretty dead set on. He's never going to do the ten, 12 year deals. And you're starting to see the game trend more that way. And it does invite wonder whether they're going to be able to keep that philosophy so strong because look, you mentioned Jeremy Pena and he had a wonderful season, but I mean, you can't just keep relying on not every prospect is going to hit like that. And they don't have right now. They don't have those high end prospects that you look at and then if Bregman walks in two years that they can bring someone up and just automatically replace pregnant. Same with Tucker. You know, we'll see how the Justin how the Justin Verlander west rotation goes this year. But their depth is not inspiring much confidence beyond the first four or 5 starters in their rotation. So there's gonna have to be some difficult questions asked just because of the way the game is going of the way last winter went when owners were giving years and money out like it was no one's business and Jim crane is going to have to perhaps push beyond where he's comfortable and Dana Brown, who has been very, very candid about his negotiations with these guys about extensions. He spoke and spring training a couple of days ago and I asked him that question whether he had had conversations with Jim crane about extending further than he had been willing. They had been previously comfortable. And he said yes, that they have had conversations that Jim crane is willing to go further, but it still sounds like 7 is probably their max. So that could work with some guys, but when you start looking at Kyle Tucker, when you start looking at Alex Bregman, you start looking at the markets and what other guys have gotten, they may have Jim crane may have to dig a little deeper, give a couple more years if he really wants to keep this core intact for a long time. Right. So that's what I was going to ask about, I guess it's not surprising that Dana Brown coming over from Atlanta has made signing players to extensions of priority and of course the braves have signed some of those players to below market team friendly deals and you can't always convince a player in an agent to do that.

Jim crane Verlander Dana Brown Justin Verlander Scherzer Russ beauvais Jeremy Pena Chris gross James click Astros Josh Reddick Jose Abreu crane Jose Altuve mets Correa Carlos Lee
"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:00 min | 9 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Seems like a bit of a break from Luna and click. Yeah, so in the off season, they entered from what I was told they entered the off season with two names that they were gung Ho about acquiring and that was Jose Abreu and Wilson Contreras. Jose Abreu, it was a pretty seamless fit. It was a pretty obvious fit for him. They had some of the worst first base production in the big leagues last year from yuli guriel, who, while he had a wonderful postseason and was a Clubhouse favorite, clearly had declined a little bit. And they went out and they got Jose Abreu. They sent Jim crane actually sent Jeff Bagwell, bench coach Joe espada and assistant GM Bill Fergus to Miami to kind of seal that deal and sign Jose Abreu. Jim crane, about two or three days after parting ways with James clique finished a 34 and a half $1 million extension for Rafael Montero, which I'm still trying to figure out who they were bidding against to give Rafael Montero 34 and a half $1 million. Certainly an odd decision there. But one thing Jim crane said is they wanted to run the whole bullpen back. They wanted to run the entire pitching staff back. Obviously minus Justin Verlander. So that was a priority for them. And then Wilson Contreras is kind of an interesting one. They had a pretty lengthy. There was a pretty lengthy debate whether upgrading it, catcher where Martin Maldonado will never win a he'll never win a batting title, but he is so valuable in the Clubhouse. He is the one of the unquestioned leaders of that Clubhouse, you know, if they had the best pitching staff in baseball last year, he deserves a large amount of credit for that. And, you know, he's a very prideful person, and he has told me, you know, I wrote it a couple of weeks ago that he would have probably requested a trade. He would have probably not accepted a backup role in this team because he last year played through a sports hernia injury. He played through a broken hand for the final two months of the season and was a huge driving force to the Astros winning the World Series. And, you know, they talked with Wilson Contreras. They were never going to go to 5 years where the Cardinals ended up with him. But so I guess you could look at it and say they went one for two and they're off season without a GM and then it seemed like Jim crane waited to begin the interviews for his GM job until after all that heavy lifting was done. Dana Brown did not get a call from Jim crane until like the second or third week in January, I believe he told me. So Dana Brown certainly brings one thing that neither Jeff luno nor James clicked in. That's he played the game. And I think when you start getting into who are the influential factors in this organization, you know, Dana Brown has said he spoke to three people during the interview process. It was Jim crane, Reggie Jackson, and Jeff Bagwell. He did not speak to any existing member of the front office. None of the front office members were involved in the GM search as far as Dana Brown has led on to believe. So I think Dana Brown speaks their language. He speaks a language that James click and Jeff Leno just couldn't. So I think that was a selling point and then you also look at it, you know, this is a team that has not had a first or second round draft pick in 2020 and 2021. There's first and second round draft picks since 2017 have not inspired much confidence at all. This is a organization where there's going to be a lot of guys up for that are coming up for free agency here. They've got to replenish their farm system with higher end prospects because they're high end prospect capital is almost nonexistent. So Dana Brown, a veteran of the draft, a veteran of player evaluation, a veteran scout, you know, they thought that he was probably the guy to replenish the farm system to kind of get their draft in order because he's made no bones about it. Dana Brown is going to be very, very involved in the Astros draft process and procedure and we'll see how that changes because with some of these guys coming up to Kyle Tucker from reves Alex Bregman coming up for their contracts coming up here soon and Jim crane's unwillingness to do the big long deals that it may require to keep them. They're going to need to replenish that farm system with high end talent. He's going to be involved at the sort of head of that process, but do you anticipate there being any organizational shift beneath them in terms of the way that they approach scouting more generally, they obviously were on the bleeding edge of reducing in person scouting staff and opting for more in office work. But do you imagine there will be some repositioning there? I do, and I do think, you know, James click deserves some credit here too. He added 6 amateur scouts and his final off season as Astros general manager. So this thought and I don't know if it's a thought that pervaded the industry, but it is certainly a thought that Jeff Bagwell articulated at some point this winter that the Astros had gone too far into the analytics realm. James click was not this married to a computer analytic first guy. He wanted more scouts in the ballpark.

Jim crane Jose Abreu Dana Brown Wilson Contreras Rafael Montero Jeff Bagwell yuli guriel Joe espada GM Bill Fergus James clique Martin Maldonado GM Jeff luno Justin Verlander Astros Luna James click Jeff Leno Miami
"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:13 min | 9 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"We should do some reviewing of the off season, right? And maybe before we even get to the off season, we then have to rewind a little bit to the relationship among the no love lost triangle of Jim crane and James click and dusty baker to some extent. So this was unusual to have some Discord with such a successful team at team that won the World Series to lead to a parting of the GM immediately after that success. So what have you learned and reported about the relationship between creating and click between click and baker between baker and crane just to all the various permutations what led to clicks departure? Yeah, it was odd. And it started simmering even before the reports. I started reporting about it in September, but there was even whispers in spring training that things were not well. That James click was in the last year of his contract and that in all likelihood he would not return. And I think it honestly it boils down to just philosophical and personality differences. Jim crane is a very aggressive owner. He's one that does give resources and he wants to win, but he is aggressive. I'll never forget James click went on a radio hit. He did a weekly radio hit on the Astros flagship station on their morning show. And he said something and I believe it was late in September. They had clenched, they had definitely clinched the division. They had definitely clenched home field, but they were still, the franchise record for wins in a season is 107. And they were still in pursuit of that. And James clicks at something on the air and I don't think he meant it to mean anything more, but it just kind of shows where the relationship was. He described Jim crane coming up to him and asking, well, when are we going to get to a 107 wins? When are we going to tie the record? And when are we going to break the record? And change click which is kind of like, I mean, we've secured home field through the playoffs. We've won the division, but that's just kind of how Jim crane is wired. He's a very aggressive owner. He likes to win maybe a little bit too much. And you know, I think he wanted a general manager that was in line with his aggression. And James click was very measured and how he went about his processes. He sought a lot of opinions from his staff from the people around him before rendering decisions. And I think Jim crane wanted someone that was a little just a little bit more bold. And you know, you say that and there was a pretty bold trade in place at the trade deadline to acquire Wilson Contreras for Jose or kitty and dusty baker and Jim crane stepped in and mixed. So I do wonder how those two things can align, but nevertheless, that was mentioned the bold predecessor who was fired in disgrace, but that too. We could talk for a while about this, but so it certainly Jim crane got very involved in baseball ops toward the end. Jeff Bagwell had became a very, very heavy sounding board for him. Reggie Jackson a little bit to a lesser extent. And it was an untenable situation and it always seemed headed for divorce. And they just so happened to win the World Series, making the divorce a little bit harder and no one was surprised. I certainly wasn't surprised that James click left the organization. But I think the way it was handled, you know, Jim crane sending James click to the general managers meetings as a lame duck extending dusty baker and holding a press conference about it and not telling James click while he was at the general managers meetings that dusty baker had been extended and they were going to hold a press conference. It rubbed a lot of people in the industry the wrong way. And it just was a kind of a fitting end to a marriage that just never seemed like it got off on the right foot. And at least initially there were reports that dusty might not be back either, right, that there had been some acrimony there, obviously he ended up re epping. So what's the state of the creed and baker relationship or what was the state of the click baker relationship if we know? You know, I think personally, I think the two guys liked each other. I think James click obviously had an immense amount of respect for dusty baker and what he's done. Again, I just think they saw the game a little bit differently. They're two guys that were brought up in the game very differently. I mean, dusty baker, a lifer, former player, has seen everything you can see and James click just not that. I mean, there were two different kind of guys, but they coexisted. I don't want to say it was an acrimonious relationship. I just think they had differences. They had some philosophical differences of how things should be done. And I think Jim crane at the end of the day had a far better relationship with dusty baker than he did any with James Clinton. So for most of the off season, there was no general manager how if it all did that effect how the esters acted or didn't act and then what ultimately led to the hiring of Dana Brown, weight of Atlanta, which seems at least in terms of his background and maybe philosophical alignment on the stats and scout spectrum if there is such a thing.

Jim crane James click dusty baker baker Wilson Contreras James Astros crane GM Jeff Bagwell Reggie Jackson kitty Jose baseball James Clinton Dana Brown Atlanta
"dana brown" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

05:14 min | 9 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"In other words, if the game is at the two hour mark and we are in the 8th inning and we're, let's say it's an hour 57 and we're in the 8th inning you can still serve beer until the two hours are up. Now, if the game is only in the 6th inning and by chance, it's a large lead or whatever it may be. And we're not at the 7th inning mark yet. So it's two hours or the 7th inning. You can continue to sell beer until that 7th inning is over. You like it or not. I'm going to defer to our beer person this podcast and that would be Taylor swank, who I don't know if you knew this, but there was one weekend in which he supposedly drank 42 during the course of a three days a wedding event tale. You wanted to chime in here with this proposal. Eduardo, that's the most brilliant thing that's ever been spoken on the podcast. Let's see. There you go. I mean, beer guys get me. Beer guys get me buster. I just think to me, it just makes a lot of sense because games are going to be quicker and the guys are like, you want to know, they're already closed. It's 7 thinning and it's only an hour and 45 minutes of game time or an hour, 30 of game time and we're in the 7th inning. And it's closed. Give that guy, give that family, give those buddies an extra 30 minutes. Yeah, and Taylor would say, give that man a Budweiser, right? I mean, as the saying used to go. So the beer man endorses that maybe a Major League Baseball will be listening to this and will act on it. I want to ask you about something that I know you were an Astros camp and this is going to be a really important issue. I feel like in the weeks ahead and that is the health of Jordan Alvarez. I didn't hit it a high level, but through the time I covered baseball, I hear all the time from guys like yourself, man, your hands, your wrists need to be right in order to hit. You're an outwards is not swinging. He's not in the lineup. He's not taking batting practice. He's not doing anything. Others, as far as we know, other than getting treatment, dusty baker, told reporters yesterday he can address it. He can't give the information. Dana Brown, the Astros do GM said he thinks he'll be fine and ready for opening day. This is a giant red flag situation with one of the best players in baseball for me. What do you see? Well, it's not only that it's a giant red flag is you have a team that a lot of the players are going to go to the world baseball classic and they're already on pins and needles with a team that has so much representation from pitchers and position players that Dana Brown and dusty baker are hoping that they all come back healthy. You have your 9 Alvarez, who is one of three left handed hitters in that lineup. That are, you know, that are projected to start in that lineup. Kyle Tucker is also going to play free USA baseball in Arizona and then hopefully from there they go to Miami. But then you have Michael Brantley that we don't know yet if he's going to be available for opening day because he is on a hitting program to get that shoulder accustomed to be able to swing every day. Over the last conversation I had with him, he said, look, I feel great. From my heading program, but time will tell if I'll be ready opening day or not. The plan is yes, but will he be able to play every day, that still remains to be seen and you don't have any left handed guys on the bench. So it's going to be a predominantly right handed hitting lineup. If you're done Alvarez is not a part of it. And that's why, to me, it's very interesting because we saw what happens when you have a predominantly right handed lineup. You get overexposed. The Toronto Blue Jays is a great example of it. Last year, they got overexposed because they did not have a lefty balance. What did they do this off season? Even though last year, they said they dismissed it. We don't need it because our guys can hit righties and lefties. Look, they went out and they got lefties. They got left in the balance out that lineup. You needed in order to succeed. The good thing is it's happening early. The bad thing is it's happening to one of your big guys. Your Big Bopper. And you're on average who's had already history with this wrist. You're hoping that he's able to get it better, but only time will tell. It is, I've had surgery before. It actually just paralyzes you when you're a swinger. When you're a hitter. And it's not only on pitches up, but on pitches away as well. In order to an algorithm that has great plate coverage that you're hoping that it does not get in bad habits by trying to pull the ball. And that's what makes them so special is that he's able to hurt you the other way as well. I wanted to ask you about Jordan walker, a guy you talked to the other day. We got to talk to him during the broadcast. He told us that he first dunked when he was 14 years old. He also acknowledged that his listed height of 6 5 is not accurate that he's now up to 6 6 two 50. You really feel like there's a chance he's going to play a huge role for the Cardinals this year. I do. I do believe that, and I'm lucky, first of all, he has presence. Yes. He has charisma. He's got the smile. He can be the face of not only the franchise, but the face of baseball.

Dana Brown baseball Taylor swank dusty baker Astros camp Jordan Alvarez Kyle Tucker Michael Brantley Eduardo Alvarez Major League Astros Taylor GM Toronto Blue Jays Miami Arizona USA Jordan walker Cardinals
"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:34 min | 10 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"One of them said, I don't know who's going to get it, but I hope it's one of us. And so I think there was a sense that there was something there, but I don't know that anybody else really had the way in, you know? It's a hard thing to get to. Is your perception that the league has learned anything from the way that it thought about the potential for malfeasance here? Because you note in the book that, you know, a lot of people had issue with the fact that players were not suspended as part of the league's punishment for what happened in 17. And some of that, you know, no doubt was them being concerned that it would lead to a protracted disagreement with the union, but some of that was a lot of that was that Manfred had said, this is going to be on general managers and field managers to tell their people, here's what the rules are. Don't do this. And that there was a failure of communication at the top of the organization. And so he was sort of in a weird position when it came to potentially punishing the players. Now we're in an era where there's a lot of rule change on field rule change happening. I think you were at the presentation in Florida, which was the Florida version of what I saw in Arizona, where they're talking about the shift restrictions and having spoken to clubs about how they might try to circumvent those rules and then trying to design around that in their rule structure. This is a very long way of me asking, do you think that MLB is better positioned now to prevent whatever the next version of electronic science dealing is? Yeah, we started to ask the question. I mean, I was going to point to the circumvention discussion too. Evidence that they're actively thinking about it, at least in one regard. Rule breakers are typically always going to be ahead of the rule enforcers or rule makers. I don't think it's going to change. You would have thought coming off a PEDs that MLB would have been wiser about technology. And you know, you can say that's a little easy to say in hindsight, but even when it started to get loud, MLB was still lagging behind. They were letting teams move their video rooms closer to the dugout. Some of it's kind of astonishing in hindsight, frankly. But my head, I'm thinking, well, what if somebody hacked into or what if somebody hacks into, if we ever get the ABS? Anti lock brakes, the automated ball strike system. What kind of requirement is hacking something that Manfred would have to specifically give notice to? I mean, yeah, maybe that's a breaking a federal law. I don't know. You know, to some degree, it's the question of imagination. You know, what lengths was somebody go to and does it fall into kind of a bucket of behavior that doesn't really exist yet, but I mean, if it's a bad electronically stealing signs, they now have that on the books, right? The union of the league did work out that yes, this will be punishable going forward. So I guess if you were to hack into, it would fall under that. And maybe federal law. I also wondered there's the question of whether the asterisk have learned anything. And I guess that comes down to whether Jim crane has learned anything because most of the old Astros leadership has moved on and I'm kind of curious what you think of the comments that say Jeff Bagwell made last year, which a lot of people dunked on at the time. You know, when Bagwell was saying, we need to balance things better. The game is played by humans. It's not played by computers. We've gone too far in one direction. I think a lot of people were looking at that thinking, oh, this is just an old school, old fashioned guy hasn't even been paying attention. The Astros are super successful, and they're all in on analytics and everything. But you read winning fixes everything and it sounds like maybe there should have been more bag wells in the room having some say when it came to treating people like people, right? So I wonder whether you think that and the hiring of Dana Brown who's kind of from a different baseball background certainly has Jeff ludd or even James click for that matter. I know you're not covering the Astros on a day to today basis anymore, but does that represent a pivot that you think is significant in light of everything you've reported here? I mean, certainly has the appearance of a pivot as Ukraine is decided he wants to different at least an outward image than he had before. Click was still in that analytics mold. The question and you guys can tell me if you agree with this. I think the question becomes, does a Dana Brown whose background is more traditional, have people in place and then subsequently listen to and incorporate those people in place who are masters of R&D who know the analytics space, does he have people do that for him and continue to foster its growth? You yourself, I don't think at the very top of an organization necessarily have to have been a McKinsey consultant to put your organization in a position to be forward thinking. You know, he's walking in to a franchise that already has a ton of valuable IP and systems built, right? But you still have to keep innovating. So I think it's more of a long-term fall from, I don't know, top two, three. In analytics, if that's what we want to, or number one, whatever they sit. Do they fall from there? Do they still stay toward the top? And what is the decision making process? Does it revert back to I'm going with my gut, or do they kind of maintain some sort of objective subjective way to do it? The ASTRO's way of big thing was combining, you take the subjective information, you take the objective information, and then you objectively meld them except even in deciding how you meld them, isn't that kind of inherently subjective. Anyway, yeah, so it is certainly visually a pivot and kind of in sticking with the theme of the book. The question is really what's going to go on behind the scenes. Outwardly, yes, it's different. How are they going to function internally? I wonder what your sense is of the self reflection that the fallout from what happened in Houston caused not just in Houston, but in other front offices, right? Because even before you're in Ken's initial reporting, there was a lot of industry resistance to Houston, you know, their culture, the way that they seem to treat other orgs, Lu now having this reputation of being smug and difficult to deal with, you know, we saw public manifestations of that culture and its pressure and then the damage it can do with the taubman incident in the postseason, but do you get the sense that club said, well, that's a problem over there, or did it cause anyone to say, huh, maybe we should think about, what is the culture that we are actively constructing within our own organization? Because I think there's this sense that like good culture just happens if you have nice people, but that doesn't seem sufficient, especially in an industry as sort of when oriented and competitive as baseball. So do you think that this caused any GMs of other clubs to sit up at night and say, huh?

MLB Manfred Dana Brown Astros Jim crane Florida Jeff ludd James click Jeff Bagwell Bagwell Arizona Ukraine Houston Lu taubman Ken
"dana brown" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

06:02 min | 10 months ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"And I'm assuming you guys do your own projections internally. Yeah, we do. I'm always curious. Our guys will do stuff and I'll always challenge them. And again, it's not that I'm glass half empty, but I think in these jobs, I think there's some value to be in that way because it keeps you on your toes and I think worrying and trying to think about where you don't have enough steps and so on is a good thing. So I spent a lot of time trying to think about having injuries or guys not performing and so on. But I'm always curious about it. When we have a good wind projection total, I'm always skeptical of it. And I'm always asking why and trying to compare and so on. And I've seen all of them, but I can tell you at least my first three years, I think, of being in Atlanta. I think we're probably projected to finish in third place or fourth place, at least I would say. And obviously we won the division and things worked out. So I am aware of it. I think we're a good team, but I also think that the Phillies and the mets are really good teams as well. I think Miami's gotten a lot better. And obviously the Nats are in a rebuild in their ultimately going to get there. They've done that with the management team they had there. They've been very successful over time. So my view of it is just get to the playoffs. Of course, you want to win the division, no doubt about that. But just get in, winning the division does not guarantee anything. We won the division for 5 years. I've been here. We've advanced past the first round twice. So it certainly doesn't guarantee anything. But I just want to get in and I think the NL is going to be tough as it always says. Yeah. The Phillies are an example of that last year. You guys were an example of it the year before. And playing deep into the postseason. When you hear 91.8, what was your initial reaction in your when you heard that number? I mean, I guess it's in my mind for some reason I've always, I always view was like 85 ish is where you want to be because then obviously there's a randomness to get better and so on and Phillies were the last team to qualify at 87 wins last year. I believe that that was the amount. So I think as long as you're somewhere in the mid 80s, you've got a shot. It's nice to be have an 90 or 91, 92, and so on. It's just that things can change so fast, right? Guys have bad years, we don't expect. Guys get hurt. I know all that's baked into it. But I just don't put a ton of stock into it. I'm curious. But we don't make any predictions. I don't take a look at our internal projections and say, wow, we're a one and a half behind the mats, so we're two inch behind the Phillies and why don't we go sign a two wind player three win player and try to nudge that amount over it. It doesn't work that way. So I think we've got a good club. I think we've got a competitive club, but I go into every season worrying and thinking about how are we going to get back to the playoffs and worrying about how we're going to get back to the playoffs. And I guess I would say anything that's more from a positive standpoint with our wind projection I'll probably play at least. Put a ton of weight into it because I'm wired to worry. And I think we'll just do a much better job as a baseball operations group. If we're expecting the worst and we're just preparing for it. So the Yankees are kind of in a theoretically a parallel situation to you guys at shortstop. And Brian cashman and the way that he's presented that is, is that it's a wide open competition. They're going to be open minded to see what they see. With Dan to be Swanson moved on, von Grissom, you know, being a guy that you guys have talked about this winner. What's your perspective about the shortstop position? Are you going in saying, hey, you know, we're committed to trying to make this work with him? Are you going in? We'll see what we see. I think it's we'll see what we see. And then our manager will make the call there, and we're not committing to anything at this point. I think the biggest thing is, look, you're not, I've never viewed it that you're replacing an individual player. And really when you get down to it from season to season, you replace the season that the player had. So we had 101 games last year, dansby Swanson was a 6 win player. That's not to say you're expecting people to reel off 6 wins each year. Obviously, they might get hurt. They might not have a strong year. But that doesn't mean that we're expecting to come close to that. But maybe other areas of the ball club can make up for that. So I fully expect this to not be as strong as shortstop in 2023 as we are. It's almost impossible to do to get what we got in 2022. That's not to say that we can't still be a very good team in a playoff team. Maybe we make up some of that talent and some of that war in some of the other areas of the ballclub. So snit has talked about, hey, I might split the job. But it's ultimately going to be going with the hot hand. If this has happened over the course of time with our club, you go in with certain plans, somebody isn't playing as well as someone steps up and plays well. You take Contreras for us last year. There was no expectation that he would get the line share of the Egypt. That's what he played so well that he did. Or let me trade it for Adam Duvall. He was going to be able to player. And ultimately became an everyday player for us. So long gris and Orlando arcia will compete will absolutely use spring training to make a determination to how they look. But that might change a week into the season two weeks in the season three weeks in the season. And we're just going to go with a hard hand and whatever gives us the best chance to win. If that's someone getting full-time starts, if that's someone splitting time, we're just going to try to put the best team we can out on the field. But we understand that we will not be as strong as shortstop, but hopefully in other areas will improve from where we were in 2022. Last one, before we go, Dana brown leaves your front office becomes a general manager of the Houston Astros the last couple of years when I called you about, hey, where did Michael Harris come from? Where did Spencer strider come from? I remember you on saying to me, look, I don't mean to sound like a broken record, but that was Dana Brown. You know, how did you first off, I'd love to hear how you got the word that he got this job.

Phillies Nats von Grissom mets NL dansby Swanson Atlanta Miami Brian cashman Swanson Yankees Adam Duvall baseball Orlando arcia Dan Contreras Dana Brown Egypt Spencer strider
"dana brown" Discussed on Life Transformation Radio

Life Transformation Radio

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"dana brown" Discussed on Life Transformation Radio

"In the dictionary by the word. I have a really good vivid imagination and all of a sudden. I heard, oh, and I heard banjo. I play the band. I said that. Oh my God. It's just so funny. I just like, the sooner you say that I go, and then I'm like, always. It's always the song from deliverance. Everyone goes there immediately. That's it. But yeah. So it was like backwoods back backwoods and they knew nothing about Hollywood or anything like that. And so my mom ended up moving across the country when she was 19 to Washington state for the logging industry where most of her brothers and sisters had moved out previously. And so she met my dad there. He was from Illinois. And, you know, they had three kids, and I was the third, the last the baby. And I think I came out of the womb singing opera. You know, I was just this really strange child. I just, oh my God. Well, okay, so I want you to have a very vivid imagination. So remember those bug bunny cartoons when you know hello, my darling, the frog, you know, the frog that doesn't sing. So I imagine you sing an opera and then I just imagine what I'm going. Hello, my darling, hello, my darling, hello, my darling gal. That was like, yes. Yeah, right. Yeah, so my parents, you know, are simple people. And that's okay, you know, they that's what they came from. And so I grew up in a mill town and when I was very young, I would start performing for my parents, I would change outfits and I'd run out in the living room and go to I didn't really have enough. It was just all about ta da. It was more about the outfit and the big ta da, jazz hands and a dance out of the room and they're like, I don't know where this child came from. Are you sure she's ours? And, you know, so they saw that. And then I wanted to learn about art. You know, I was in junior high school and I was talking to my parents about art and Picasso and Matisse and all these artists. My parents were like, wow, who are you? We don't understand. And then at 12, I came in and I announced. I am moving to Hollywood to be an actress. And I'm never eating meat again. And my parents were like, who are you? Yeah. Did they never birth? And so they never met my parents are definitely carnivores and never met an animal. They didn't want to eat. So the fact that they're 12 year olds announcing this, they're like, oh, okay. They're like, well, as long as you live in our household, these are like the acting thing we can talk about. As long as you live in our household, you're going to eat meat. So I just sit at the table all night and I wouldn't eat the food or I'd feed it to my cat under the table and then they were like, what is the stubborn little person doing? To us, and eventually, when I turned 14, I said, look, I'm going to become a vegan, whether you like it or not, if you don't let me send me to a foster home. And my parents were like, what? They're like, well, we want to keep her, so I guess we got to work with her on this. So they gave me an allowance and they take me to the grocery store and I'd have to buy my own food. So. Yeah. Yeah, I was just like the black sheep of the family. And, you know, that led to lots of jokes and because I have a lot of cousins because I have a big family and they would always tease me. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And so interesting. So interesting. So I was four or 5 years old and I declared publicly after watching laugh in that I wanted to talk on TV. Look at me now. I had no idea what I was saying when I was four or 5 years old, but look at me now and look at you now. It's amazing how there's not a lot of entertainers in my family and I guarantee you there is no one like me at all in my family. They wonder, you know, where did he come from? What did this guy come from? And, you know, not that I'm not that I'm a vegetarian or vegan. Yeah, as a kind of or I would totally fit in with your family. But I do eat a lot of salads, so I do. So I'm not quite, but I can adapt. Well, you don't have to California. You know when I got friends that are vegans and they may give me some really great food, and I'm like, that's good. I would eat it. Yeah. Yeah. I don't know. Yeah. There's a lot of great restaurants here, and I'm a good cook. So I could make you a meal when you visit. Well, I will definitely take you up on that. All right, so let's talk about this. So you're now moving towards your parents are thinking that you're not of this world and of their family and they're like, who are you? And how did you progress? So you got the vegan part down. Now the actress part, they supported you, so then how did you make the transition? I entered the drama program in high school and I was actually too shy the first year of drama to actually perform. So I would the publicity committee. And I would make posters and hanging them in the hallways at school and to advertise our plays. Because I was two chicken, but my acting teacher really believed in me and his name was Dana Brown, and he's now passed away, but he saw something in me that really planted a seed that I could do it that I did have talent and he pushed me to perform the next year and I did and then I was hooked, you know, I was like this is cool. Acting is a really cool thing. You know, I don't have that nervous thing. I really don't get nervous. I've never been nervous in front of standing in front of people. I don't get nervous in front of a camera. I have been nervous in front of a still camera. Brennan's got me doing these photos for Instagram and for the photographer and I'm really awkward at him to learn how to hold my hands and do this and these different poses. And that's been a challenge for me, but video camera and live and acting is not. And so it's amazing because when I heard your voice, your voice was so powerful. And I met you on Clubhouse, which was really cool. But just your voice, and not what it sounds like, but the energy that I felt behind your voice. I'm like, she is super powerful. Like, just an extraordinary soul. I could feel that. And that's probably what your drama teacher felt. Yeah, you know, it was very sweet of him to take the time with me. I was very shy and a lot of artists are shy that and they're drawn to the arts. And, you know, he I did a monologue on stage, and I had everyone crying in my class, and he's like, he took me aside and he's like, girl, you've got something. You could do this. And that meant everything to me. Because I'm living in a mill town and the options are not there, you know, what I talked to you on Clubhouse was that, you know, I came from a family that was from the south and they still kind of had older belief system like the boys go to college and the girls don't kind of think. I was expected to, you know, get out of graduate from high school and then marry a mill worker or a lager. And.

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"dana brown" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

RAGE Works Network-All Shows

04:45 min | 3 years ago

"dana brown" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

"Many bad matches with riddle. Rail defeated lashley. I just didn't like the week finished. She did like that was just a week. Finish from it of course we're gonna This wind probably will end up having riddle versus lashley for the united states championship Down the road. We dana brown versus shayna baszler as. But that wasn't supposed to happen. This pisses me off once again. Rob making random matches out of nowhere. Many rose was supposed to have a match shayna baszler but shayna baszler left. Came out of nowhere during the entrance and attacked her and dana. A no no attack mandy After attacking last week fazlur attacked rose. Madder nowhere leaving the match in doubt. But of course data breach hits the ring in regular clothes and demands a match for baseler. It happens brief scuffle. And we've actually bishop dena brooke defeating shayna baszler With a double. Jack double flap jack. I don't even know what the fuck that is. Data brooke leaching whatever this is all this legends night. Do you hear what i'm saying. And this is legends night. Horrible booking. i can't. I can't even put this over guys i really can't We had jeff. Hardy versus randy orton. Which actually was not a bad match. Either ordinance jeffer- fucking veterans. They better give me okay. Match or corn with an ko after an attempt With a twist of fate and randy wins one three I like this matches because it was jeff alleged as much as people wanna say. He is a legend in randy. Beat legend legend tonight. It had to happen. Whatever after that we had the lucia house party versus that her business But before that we actually had a weird awkward encounter with molina Right well you've thought about that bullshit once again. David molina said your spanish right. The whole night was that that was the whole night. Wasn't that kind of fucked up. I wanted to molina and say. Hey you're spanish right. Let's put you in a quick lucia segment to lose your house party like what no. It's it's fucking. Wwe that's what the fuck do it's terrible. But they had a match between Between the hurt business which was shelton. Benjamin cedric alexander. Mvp washroom commentary Her business was was taking over most of the most of the match. But then we gotta A super kick benjamin and.

dana Rob David molina dana brown Benjamin cedric alexander last week dena brooke shayna baszler jeff tonight brooke rose randy orton lashley randy double benjamin Hardy states championship fazlur