18 Burst results for "Dan Yates"

"dan yates" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

07:21 min | 3 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"You know you're down with banning them bubble. Why did you get at work. Don't deem we pay all guys all this money won't be sell take south. He's not a so. We gotta get rid of him. Get rid of him to he too short anyway. That was killing him. When and the bubble. I want i don't want nobody is almost the same sad Bobby brown. i don't like that. So gordon hayward go kimball walker hurt. Was it go look like. Oh that was done gordon hayward we've got to get rid of one more person get rid of. Steve really helped to get really hill. He have overrated coach. Hey data dale dane. It's about brad stevens. Yeah we gotta get rid of him to his hip dan. Yates listen to me at this guy. Don't do another issue you got. You got all that talent in you made all these people don't wanna trade which they hate you every time you trade. You get lucky patio. Read him trying to get rid of coach. You get all the bread. He don't even know how to cook wit costa celtics. I'd down right. Everybody watch. I had good gains don. They'll spanish by lucky strike. My new guy foster pico trade waterboy and we had the celtics running you say actually opening a club right now. Yeah the boom boom room baby is coming. It was was open to pet damages. Everybody down. I saw a good woman in law that age. You man. that's not how you get down. And i know if i'm not even colder now because i know how they feel lonely. I'm cutting you off cells cells. Yeah i wanted goodbye our tell. Your phantom woman were benefit but now you want real good knowledge the pandemic going on ever since march eighteen december. When a new york. Come they gonna be choose to. Anybody would not anybody knows. Says anybody will look like something enough that you could get you a good one but but makes you got benefit when she choose you. This is not a. Tom did not have insurance. So i got a bad you. I support shop at home crack my to. I can't even go sit then. This tooth is killing me. I can't even get into the dinner. Know why 'cause. I don't know who you've been around. I'll take just paying man. I had to go to the dennis. I what am i t break. I had to go in. I not me not me. I ain't going nowhere if i don. I think i can take this little kid t to. I'm not sure that's why you got people out of to. I'm good. i ain't gonna say no today say everything. Okay oh this pandemic right. I mean never saw nothing like this. Shut down the whole world. I never saw nothing like it. This is a major. They shut down the whole y world. People are losing their business and job. That's what i don't understand. This stuff is dangerous. Out here bo man. Hopefully we can wrap this up man. People just got right. Acohol people still do foolish things and we go now. 'cause everybody everybody my coupla spoken to and they put expensive machine down the street for. I think i see my neighbors. I see you ms quinn. I see you miss address. I seem as paulie i feel. The lady lied. They all fifty four. You know they have you. Come down mike. No you go get me high. Take my money. I know what y'all i used to play that game too that they are smart. That's why i always have a good woman do my job because they are smart. You get a man. Do simple might end up at a liquor store or at the bar messing over the money basil by. What'd you go do for christmas this year. Oh i wanna come out brain my own christmas song out this possible you gotta cortisol yellow amid good game and spend oh limitations on vo two three two three yeah the mexican clowns you yeah domestic clown they start a new industry. They are construction workers now okay. They didn't want from clown to dry walls and rolls and all that they construction work so more two three day in the cloud business model. But yeah i would like to do so me and my guys. We try to go something boy. It's hard to talk with these cats with their face time. And all this stuff down the okay see craig. I can't know what the hell talk about. Good games don't know nothing about the technology of phone. He got a farm spanish by he does als that what's up you know. It's i have a so. My boys just assist ten because none of been around a man. I hope we get all get together man. Because i you know like once this all gives right made you go catch up because i seen you now says. I came up for that concert life four years ago. And you know i have a big parties. I didn't have a big party issue. I did not you know what bo you remember the restaurant i took you to. Yeah i can't get people to go there. There's a go in disorder fool and get carry out was trying to keep business going. I'm trying to tell people the only mom and pop restaurant closed down. That's a good established. Play the fool. But she's scared the cook both it's like everything is messing up in this world but bow. I'm gonna tell you what is good is now bad. You get a good price right now. I lied to get them a bmw. He ain't got no have. I'll look good at the drop top bill president. You won't get it. it's cheap everything is cheap house this car but i don't want nobody. How's that lost their house. That's what i want. Yeah yeah like. I thought about you live in new york. I'll need a car except kind of need to call it now. 'cause i ain't get no subway. That would be ridiculous. You stay in new york up in new york and it's better here than it is a lot of places though boy but bow. y'all maher. Who is the mayor in new york by the way. Bill de blasio. Okay at one minute everything. Open one minute. everything's shut down. One minute had well. There's so many difficult you got br. What part of you in brooklyn. yeah. I'm at harlem hall. You did you say the rest of them in trouble. Y'all gonna have fans in garden season basketball seasons. Oh no way no way really are. They allow kids go to school there. they sent him home but i think they sent them back about. Why the allen said why did they allow them to come into school in the first place man because look because you can't teach them at the house that's why am bowl. You know baseball football best. It's not the same. i'm at you questionable. I have been outside at around. People has it that the profession of needs to catch the virus and two weeks later. They're back on the field. That's what i wonder about two with that. They can't all be doing alright right like somebody gotta steal something..

gordon hayward kimball walker dale dane brad stevens costa celtics Bobby brown Yates new york celtics dan paulie Steve dennis quinn Tom mike craig
"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

06:17 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"So. . Let's turn to our topics this week, , and we'll start out with another report that has come out but this one is very different from some of the climate reports. We've . been discussing a plan to create millions and millions of jobs by electrifying the economy and slashing emissions eighty, five , percent. . It's simple. . It's elegant and the authors say it is totally doable. . The authors are Saul Griffith. . Sam College Alex Laskey <hes> you might know Saul Griffith we profiled him on a recent what it takes episode and he talked a little bit about how this the the origins of this plan came together and Alex Laskey is the CO founder of power and we profile. . His Co founder Dan Yates on a recent what it takes as well. . So they're part of a team called rewiring America, , which is putting out a series of technical reports, , mobilization plans for rapidly electrifying in decarbonising America, , and putting a lot of people to work in the process. . So there are two parts to this conversation was the actual modelling that goes into the plan, , and the other is the economic benefit and jobs claims. . So Melissa, , let's look at the origins <hes>. . It doesn't start with emissions instead, , it looks at decarbonisation the way an engineer might an engineer like yourself walk us through the basis of how they're modeling the decarbonised economy in this report. . Is this interesting at you know I've been a model for fifteen plus years i. . like modeling thing saying what happens with that? ? From a modeling approach. . I mean frequently when we look at climate mitigation so how do we reduce emissions? ? We start with an emissions target or frequently in combination of emissions, , targets, , economic development targets, etc, , , and then we kind of back our we into what the mix of things could look like to meet that. . So it's this top down approach or this perfect foresight. . We know what's happening in the future and we back out from there in this report, , they really looked at what machines and equipment are out there. . What could we get out there and how quickly could we do it and they went from there? ? So they said, , okay, , what can we get online if we really double down on this and they broke it into a couple of stages stage one being ramp up production of technologies and Stage two being okay. . Let's deploy these things as quickly as possible. . So it was this bottom up, , call it an engineer's dream because it gives me a lot of tech to play with and look at. . But it really gives you the nitty gritty on how do we get this done? ? So, , in this modeling, , they mostly focus on electrification unpack how they do that yes. On . the electrification side, , they look at how do we beef up the supply side of things ahead we get all the power generation we need in line and I've got a lot of thoughts especially around their cost assumptions and what they think we can actually accomplish. . Jigger I'm curious what you think about it as well but then on the demand side I mean they also say, , okay, , every car that gets sold when your targets taking off the road isn't electric one every bit of equipment in your house would replace there's no more combustion it's going to be electric I'm so it's it's essentially a near one, , hundred percent replacement rate zero carbon technologies. . As soon as you would naturally retire those things they do have a caveat in the report which is interesting of saying they're not forcing you to early retire. . Anything, , but it would help if you did. . I like. . I think this is fantastic. . Right that it's exactly what we've been saying on the energy gang for seven years right which is that we have the technologies necessary to decarbonised and we have to deploy faster. . I think that part of this that. . Is still sort of not fitting exactly together for me <hes> is what are the forces around here that will make it happen <hes> i. . You know I think that part of the reason I'm hopeful I had a long conversation with Alex about this, , we had a good reconnection in these inspired me to figure out how to get involved with rewiring America but like is it. . The when we think about for instance <hes>. . The planned obsolescence of natural gas utilities natural gas utility spent about seventeen billion dollars a year on distribution grids and other sort of Cap Bax. . In the local level, , you could imagine that they could spend that seventeen billion dollars making all these things come true. . So whenever someone's gas boiler? ? <hes> goes out they could replace it with electrify everything solutions and they could actually just charge people thirty bucks a month or whatever for the next twenty years to recoup their their costs right. . So there are ways to actually figure out how to do this. . But I. . Think it's critical for an a report like this to come out I and to say it's actually possible. The . math actually works. . Now, where's , the political willpower to actually make this happen and there's some really interesting insights, , a commodity report that I think <hes> many of us who've been steeped in this? ? No but for think the first time <hes> watcher is shocking. . Right <hes>. . So the energy information, , administration and many other sources really always compare solar and wind to <hes> primary energy. . Right. . So the way that the world works is you basically pull oil out of the ground ten percent of all of our energy in the United States and pretty much globally is used to bring this kind of stuff out of the ground and then. . You say you know this is how many quads of energy we use as a society right and so of solar and wind come in at two percent of that energy. . Then people say look how small it is. . But in fact, , when that energy actually goes to keep your beer cold as emery, , Levin's would say. . It loses about seventy percent of its energy through the process right in transporting the oil than like. . How to put it into a refinery, , converting it into useful fuels like gasoline and diesel. . Then actually burning that fuel and you know and creating the electricity that then actually keeps your beer cold all the losses in there are eliminated when you go directly to electricity but in but we are constantly comparing ourselves to primary energy and so part of what this report shows is a week actually eliminate fifty percent of our entire primary energy usage just by electrifying everything right because you lose all those losses

Dr Melissa Lot Alex Laskey America engineer Hurricane Saul Griffith New York Al Morning CO founder Austin Texas United States Jigger Bethesda Maryland Ingrid Catherine Hamilton senior research scholar
The Economic Case for Electrifying Everything

The Energy Gang

06:17 min | 7 months ago

The Economic Case for Electrifying Everything

"So. Let's turn to our topics this week, and we'll start out with another report that has come out but this one is very different from some of the climate reports. We've been discussing a plan to create millions and millions of jobs by electrifying the economy and slashing emissions eighty, five percent. It's simple. It's elegant and the authors say it is totally doable. The authors are Saul Griffith. Sam College Alex Laskey you might know Saul Griffith we profiled him on a recent what it takes episode and he talked a little bit about how this the the origins of this plan came together and Alex Laskey is the CO founder of power and we profile. His Co founder Dan Yates on a recent what it takes as well. So they're part of a team called rewiring America, which is putting out a series of technical reports, mobilization plans for rapidly electrifying in decarbonising America, and putting a lot of people to work in the process. So there are two parts to this conversation was the actual modelling that goes into the plan, and the other is the economic benefit and jobs claims. So Melissa, let's look at the origins It doesn't start with emissions instead, it looks at decarbonisation the way an engineer might an engineer like yourself walk us through the basis of how they're modeling the decarbonised economy in this report. Is this interesting at you know I've been a model for fifteen plus years i. like modeling thing saying what happens with that? From a modeling approach. I mean frequently when we look at climate mitigation so how do we reduce emissions? We start with an emissions target or frequently in combination of emissions, targets, economic development targets, etc, and then we kind of back our we into what the mix of things could look like to meet that. So it's this top down approach or this perfect foresight. We know what's happening in the future and we back out from there in this report, they really looked at what machines and equipment are out there. What could we get out there and how quickly could we do it and they went from there? So they said, okay, what can we get online if we really double down on this and they broke it into a couple of stages stage one being ramp up production of technologies and Stage two being okay. Let's deploy these things as quickly as possible. So it was this bottom up, call it an engineer's dream because it gives me a lot of tech to play with and look at. But it really gives you the nitty gritty on how do we get this done? So, in this modeling, they mostly focus on electrification unpack how they do that yes. On the electrification side, they look at how do we beef up the supply side of things ahead we get all the power generation we need in line and I've got a lot of thoughts especially around their cost assumptions and what they think we can actually accomplish. Jigger I'm curious what you think about it as well but then on the demand side I mean they also say, okay, every car that gets sold when your targets taking off the road isn't electric one every bit of equipment in your house would replace there's no more combustion it's going to be electric I'm so it's it's essentially a near one, hundred percent replacement rate zero carbon technologies. As soon as you would naturally retire those things they do have a caveat in the report which is interesting of saying they're not forcing you to early retire. Anything, but it would help if you did. I like. I think this is fantastic. Right that it's exactly what we've been saying on the energy gang for seven years right which is that we have the technologies necessary to decarbonised and we have to deploy faster. I think that part of this that. Is still sort of not fitting exactly together for me is what are the forces around here that will make it happen i. You know I think that part of the reason I'm hopeful I had a long conversation with Alex about this, we had a good reconnection in these inspired me to figure out how to get involved with rewiring America but like is it. The when we think about for instance The planned obsolescence of natural gas utilities natural gas utility spent about seventeen billion dollars a year on distribution grids and other sort of Cap Bax. In the local level, you could imagine that they could spend that seventeen billion dollars making all these things come true. So whenever someone's gas boiler? goes out they could replace it with electrify everything solutions and they could actually just charge people thirty bucks a month or whatever for the next twenty years to recoup their their costs right. So there are ways to actually figure out how to do this. But I. Think it's critical for an a report like this to come out I and to say it's actually possible. The math actually works. Now, where's the political willpower to actually make this happen and there's some really interesting insights, a commodity report that I think many of us who've been steeped in this? No but for think the first time watcher is shocking. Right So the energy information, administration and many other sources really always compare solar and wind to primary energy. Right. So the way that the world works is you basically pull oil out of the ground ten percent of all of our energy in the United States and pretty much globally is used to bring this kind of stuff out of the ground and then. You say you know this is how many quads of energy we use as a society right and so of solar and wind come in at two percent of that energy. Then people say look how small it is. But in fact, when that energy actually goes to keep your beer cold as emery, Levin's would say. It loses about seventy percent of its energy through the process right in transporting the oil than like. How to put it into a refinery, converting it into useful fuels like gasoline and diesel. Then actually burning that fuel and you know and creating the electricity that then actually keeps your beer cold all the losses in there are eliminated when you go directly to electricity but in but we are constantly comparing ourselves to primary energy and so part of what this report shows is a week actually eliminate fifty percent of our entire primary energy usage just by electrifying everything right because you lose all those losses

Alex Laskey Engineer America Saul Griffith Co Founder United States Dan Yates Melissa Emery Cap Bax Levin
"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

02:19 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"I would have tried to find more balance. Do you know what that would have looked like. For people who are. Struggling with that now. I, mean, literally it's just trying to find a way to have less of your brain cycles consumed by one thing. If the world knew for one thing, it would be. I. Hope if the world knows me for one thing, it's my dedication to. To to climate issues. If. The world knows me for one thing. Maybe it's. My. Just. Ferocity when focused. Last two questions I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of that thirteen terawatt hours. It's a pretty impressive stat. Last question or last sentenced to finish to build a successful company. What it takes is. To build a successful company, what it takes is. A great founding team with. With. Great Team Dynamics. And Trust. And then. A, a really a really solid focused idea in a market that has enough space for you to grow. Well Fed. I'm so used to at this point being in front of a live in person audience and saying, give a big round of applause for Daniel than even if ever. So I'm just GONNA, clout. I'll take it I'll take it. That is the official end of our interview I. got a clap in the KOGAS. Roar. And that's a wrap. Thanks to Dan Yates. Thanks to Emily Kirsch. Thanks to powerhouse for their partnership on the series. Go to powerhouse Dot Fund for more information on future events. On August fifth, we're going to have van Jones van Jones has been one of the foremost people talking about environmental justice and how to diversify clean energy industry. He was a special. Special. Adviser for green jobs. President. Barack Obama and he's founded numerous nonprofits and social enterprises focused on ener justice and social reform, and.

van Jones van Jones Barack Obama Emily Kirsch Dan Yates Dot Fund President Daniel official
"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

09:57 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"So within six months, it was I mean from the time we got acquired, it was apparent, but within six months we we acted on this. We integrated the management teams and there was already a CEO for oracles utility division, and that wasn't that's not a job that I would do well, so and we knew that going in. So it was just a question of how we how we implement how many people on the team at the time of the acquisition. Somewhere between five and six hundred. And all over the globe, which is the real. The real. The real pain is how many times Yeah. Yeah. That's what you feel it. So those, those five to six hundred people were representative of this generation of over our employees, including many software developers and others who who joined the company to make an impact in energy, and while the sailed Oracle was a huge success for investors and some employees. To some the company, it sounds like there was this perception that was going against powers mission, and some saw it as a sell-out to help Oracle's work with utilities while losing sight of the larger impact of powers work. I'm curious how do you respond to that critique? Is it accurate? What would you say to those? Who Disagree with the trajectory of the acquisition yeah? It wasn't a sellout I've sold out my company before I tell you honestly. When we sold Ed, you soft. You know now that I look back, we sold out. We were twenty five. Jay and I were one year into being legally able to drink when we started the company and three years. Later, we an offer that was gonna net each of us millions of dollars and that company was like this when we were when we sold. The revenue tripled the next year after we required. and. The company that bought as the Boston based publisher Houghton. Mifflin. Mismanaged the business and the whole Houghton Mifflin itself was mismanaged and it's had its own issues and the vision we had was. Cut Short. None of that was true at power. Of Anything look we went public at one point. One billion, we were acquired for six hundred. I think twenty million. That's indicative of the fact that you know. From a financial perspective, we had waited too long. And the reason why is because we were so mission driven and we we wanted to ensure that we maximally achieved what we could with our with our climate change vision. and. The reality is you know companies have they have life cycles and products have market sizes, and we tried like crazy for a decade to introduce additional behavioral science based energy efficiency products, and we just the the sum total of all of those products was not big enough to sustain significant growth and to the business had been pushed into. Utility customer service, which is an which from our from our customers. Perspective is a direct adjacency from a mission. Perspective is like oil and water. But that had already happened, and there wasn't really any changing it, and as we look forward said, look, the efficiency business is mature. The futures in utility customer service, and that's really better. Run, by a company like, Oracle, and if you look today five years later, almost five years later. It is that's panned out. You know the efficiency businesses about the same size as it was when we sold the company. So, and the ad I mentioned before. One of the great things about selling a company at the right time is you unlock all these loyal and super talented employees to do things and I look at the alumni now. A friend and former employees who I was just texting with today has gone on to found a baby toy company dedicated to using brain science in every single toy and they're doing phenomenally well. there's another startup that's working called in class today that works on a truancy reduction using behavioral science. There's another group that founded a nonprofit working on reducing recidivism in prisons, and it's just like the company that I'm deeply involved with now, and that are former CMO. Now, the CEO of is going to try and be the as the Tesla of of home home. Heating. Dandelions thermo and you've had Cathy on your show. So All of these companies have been unlocked by people moving on to do other things. given what you're doing now, as far as being chairman at Dandy, lion and investing, and you joined the board of RDC What do you see as your role in energy moving forward? Yet. I don't know if I have an overarching answer. I mean I'm. Always have my eye out for where I think, I can have leveraged impact. And in both cases, you NRDC and Dan Lying. I feel like I'm able to really do that, and that's what that's what drives me, and I think the thing I learned at Oh power in the ditch, the opportunity I have now that I I get to see big ideas and that's the that's really my only. limiters interested in things that can't get. Huge, they may not get huge but I don't want to be involved with the can't possibly get huge. So as mentioned earlier, you are married you I. Don't think I mentioned this, but you have two kids, three year old and a seven year old. How did you balance being a partner and apparent and an entrepreneur all at the same time to buckle. There's no, there is no balance and my wife. Would say the same I was just consumed by O. Power So I'm fortunate that my second son was born after I, left Oh power. So he's I was able to be finally a great husband. And Dad to him when he came when he arrived. In my my older son was only. It's only four when that happened so. For most for all of one of their lives and most of the other. Now, already I have been balanced. But starting a company's not a balanced activity at least for me, I'll be I'll, that's that's my conclusion. Last question before we move into enclosed with our high-voltage around in the mind of Dan Yates, what does the future of energy look like? I mean what I hope the future of uneasy looks like is just an acceleration of the trends. We already see before us because it's all there we don't need. We don't need fusion reactors. We don't need tripling in the efficiency of solar panels we just need. We need political will and focused. Do the things that are in front of us. That's that's what I. Hope. It is all right moving into our high-voltage around quick questions with quick answers starting with if you were an animal, what animal would you be and why? Would be. A frigate. Bird. Frigate Birds are it sounds fun to say. The frigate bird is this. extrordinary seabird that has the most incredible efficiency of flight It barely moves. It Swings Ed's beautiful that. It's I would. That's what I be. Can just they hover for hours. There are people commented in the chat, you have fellow forget bird fans out there frigging frigate bird. A new career tomorrow. What would it be? I can have any skill that I want what I love about these questions are intentionally open ended. So your interpretation of the question is as interesting as your answer. So I'll go guitarist and potter potter like pottery. Yeah. How come those for a while? Very. Very, enjoyable. Very flow. Very inflow like it. What's the best investment you've ever made? So I'm betting. The best investment I will have ever made is Dan Geothermal. I really have never been involved with the company. This sounds like a plug, but it's honestly feel like it's I've never been involved with the business that I think could really be a ten billion dollar business. It just has like absolutely unlimited unlimited potential. So I put a bunch in and I put a bunch of my time in and. We'll see. But? I'm rooting for it. What is something that you thought? Was True that you no longer believe. I didn't I would. Maybe. This is. The question I wish that I had known. The power of mentors when I was younger. Do not have them feel like you didn't happen I. Didn't seek them out and I tend burn them when they appeared to me, and then I ended up having accidental mentorship and on reflection I realized have realized how valuable that is I just wasn't open to being taught I had to do it all myself and I really wish I'd had like A. Older. Mentor here and there. I? You got to them late. Yeah. What is your worst trait? Well I think I may have already hit I I I i. i. see what's wrong, which is also a strength, but I can I can. Really I can really home in on weaknesses to a to a debilitating level if you could change one thing about the world, what would it be? I mean I would. Wave a wand and we would not have climate change or. And or habitat destruction problem which I think we've. Doesn't get the headlines as quite as much, but as equally the problem. Finish these sentences for me. Companies Fail because either? Execution. Or, product market. Fit. If. I could have done differently, I would have.

Oracle CEO Houghton Mifflin NRDC representative Mifflin Boston Ed Jay Dan Yates Cathy chairman Dan Geothermal Dan Lying partner publisher
"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

06:07 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"So, in in two thousand fourteen, you know power IPO for billion dollars what led to the decision to take the company public and what was that milestone like for you. Yeah. So going public felt like the. Just, the right next step in the company's evolution, we had gotten big enough it was. A Simultaneous is first and foremost a financing event. So we raised over a hundred million dollars. And we raise it at a good valuation. So there was limited dilution existing shareholders, of course, also then creates. The. Potential. For liquid. Liquidity over. Time. and. We felt ready for it. We felt mature enough to handle it. The actual event in the moment is Super Fun. I. Mean It's wild and it's because the bank's and the exchanges put together a whole show, i. mean. It's a circus. They give you all these plaques that are just contrived like the Stock Exchange makes plaques. So you have plaques now. Of, course. So then that was two, thousand fourteen, and then in two thousand sixteen, you sold the company to Oracle for five, hundred and thirty, two, million dollars. How did this come about? What factors were you wayne and thinking about that sale? Yeah. So Oracle that a nice job publicizing the number five, hundred, twenty, one because they want to publicize the smallest number possible. So the subtract the cash in the company, we actually sold for about one hundred, million more than that. But any case, it's kind of funny. I get that in occasionally. But, regardless, we sold to Oracle in terms of how Oracle decided to buy us. It's always a multi year journey. So that's another thing I advise entrepreneurs if you. WanNa Sell Your Company. First of all, it's like wanting to get hit by lightning. It's very hard to orchestrate I. wouldn't suggest getting hit by lightning, but you know what? I'm saying you have to be the timing has to be there and it's a rare event. But but in addition to that it, just it's a multi year project to build a relationship so that a company can feel confident enough that they know you well enough to take that plunge. So we had been working with Oracle is a partner for awhile and I had been. Updating the senior leadership there for years and they actually took a earlier, look a couple of times We got pretty close before that and at the time it it felt. If I, like the right time for power because it felt like we had done a lot of that we had set out to do and the price felt appropriate for where what we were looking at going forward. Were there moments that you thought Oh power might fail, and if so, what? What did those look like? Yeah. The period when we thought we might totally fail was early. So as a company gets bigger, you the fear, the failure fear changes from bankruptcy to just like radically diminished value. So the early I think of two examples, two examples to the two most painful moments early on just before we as we launched with Smug I, got my hands on the actual data of these initial behavioral science tests that Professor Dini had done, and then we essentially based the entire. And it turned out that the data while presented accurately in his. Studies not impugning that research in. Anyway, way. Very small data sets. So it really became clear to me how much noise there was in that in those results and we it wasn't okay with us to know that there was just going to be a result. It had to be a certain level. Otherwise, it wasn't economic and so I was just. Like through the floor allowed from music. Oh. My God. We have no idea. This is going to work sufficiently well, and the first few months of results came in and they weren't changing behavior and. What is this company? If that's not happening? Right and I was happening feeling for months, you didn't young. Jeez. Yeah, and then it started to tick up and we had that first month where it was like a two percent reduction. We were just like Oh. My God is this noise. Yeah. Yeah, and then it. The whole that whole year was just unsettling. I can imagine, but it worked. The other one was that we had a full out. Like throw down like. As intensive, a competent competitive fight as I've ever had with another company, which is Tom CBO's company C three. And they came into our market. And they and he's he is a dirty fighter. and. He every trick in the book tried to undermine our key clients and it was that was an eighteen month battle to win back to secure that business, and ultimately he's left, you know he left the utility industry largely on account of. Them and as C. Three is apparently doing very well. But in other industries that was horrible in terms of its intensity. Especially, if for it to have lasted that long. Yeah, and I'm not at this time I got into business. I'm not a zero-sum fighter. I, don't WANNA bloody somebody. Else's knows I was we were mission driven. We were trying to build something big and knew he wasn't an isn't mission driven I. Don't even know what that phrase means. And and he was just out to kill. And it felt it was a, it was actually a very heartening experience because you realize that you're kind of felt like it was at war like you're outside the wire, he's GonNa? Do whatever it takes to win. It has nothing to do with. Any bigger picture. It was a really. It was a very. Intense experience. Speaking of of intense experiences and big decisions what led to your decision to ultimately leave Oracle in two, thousand and seventeen. So? That was actually. Kind of that was an easy decision we were acquired by Oracle. We were integrated into a division. Oracle had a utility division. Already, it was about the same size..

Oracle wayne Professor Dini Tom CBO partner
"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

01:50 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Are going to take a momentary break to talk about our sponsor fluence. Energy storage has reached an inflection point in market adoption. It accelerates the deployment of renewables. It helps the world reach critical emissions, reduction targets, and it delivers cost effective grid services are you ready for the era of energy storage fluid ounces with over twelve years of experience in decades of energy sector knowledge fluence is your trusted partner for the most complex energy projects, pairing intimate market knowledge with cutting. Cutting. Edge technology and operational services. They're fully integrated six generation technology. Stack combines modular factory assembled hardware comprehensive controls in advanced digital intelligence. The latest safety advancements embedded in every level of product design and delivery scale from one megawatt to gigawatt size deployments with solutions tailored to your specific use case and application is at fluids energy dot com today to learn more, we're also brought to you by wood. Mackenzie. Coronavirus is changing the shape of US power markets, business electricity demand fell. Fell when people stop going into the office and household demand hasn't picked up the slack across the country demand. Empower prices have dropped. Who knows how long it will last in the declining power prices will reinforce the difficulty of financing new projects. In PJ, M. The near-term laws and loads is gonNA make oversupply from the recent boom new natural gas plants, even more challenging in California, the loss of demand is likely to make it easier for power providers to maintain generous reserve. Reserve margins? What does that mean for Your Business and your projects? Well, the wood, Mackenzie power team can help you make decisions with confidence and minimize risk. If this is the kind of market intelligence you're looking for right would mackenzie has it here for you reach out at power at would Mac dot com that's power at would Mac dot com to learn more about the power analysis that would mackenzie delivers to its clients and it also helps inform this show too..

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

07:47 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"So. We met the very first day of college at the Ice Cream, social. Alex really likes to tell that story I don't remember it as well as he does, he said apparently looked, it looked weird to him. I had my hair part in the middle, which was like a ninety San Diego. I had hair that at the time, let's be honest. That's the real amazing thing is there was anything apart. And and. Then we we were friends all through college and had at different points like hung out more or less. But we weren't. We just were always sort of we had. We had other friends. We've spent more time with We liked each other whenever we whenever we were together, and then it was actually after college in San Francisco, four of us, he he and his wife and and me and toby, the four of us really clicked as a group of four and just kind of fell in love with each other, and then spend a ton of time together, and then it was in that setting the united, talking about business, and then what that relationship looked like in power. That was great I. Mean We. We worked. Super Hard. And super well together, and we had a great division of Labor, was the division. He was like the outside Guy I was CEO. He was president. He was constantly forging ahead, breaking new ground outside of the company with leading the company outside meeting new customers. He brought us all over the the US first, and then he he opened up the doors all over the globe close sales in Sweden and Japan and. Almost in Middle East, but didn't never got that all over the all over the world. And then I was like. I was the operator who got out the kept the trains running, and also did all the and ran the board and work to the investors he also was. He's a very soulful guy, and he was a huge part of the culture in the company. He said that he really helped set the tone inside the company with all the employees and he was. Is. Beloved. Very a great addition. Say all of this culminating in two thousand and ten to then President Barack Obama visiting powers. Arlington Virginia location after having just announced a two point three, billion dollar program for tax credits for clean energy jobs, and he touted power as an economic recovery success story and a great emblem of clean energy jobs during Obama's visit He said that the company's growth is a model for what we WANNA, see all over the country what impacted the visit half on power on you, and then also what was going on? What was the the macro environment at the time? I mean it was like, wow, what a day, right? Unforgettable and. Such a such, a joy to have had that day and visit. From a business perspective. I think it opened some of our customers is like Oh power. Maybe we should take them a little more seriously if the president's popping by, but it wasn't a big business thing, it was it was it was just a boost for us as a team and it was felt hugely. Just pay was powerful. The powerful visit at the time there was it was sort of a second wave of the financial crisis that ended there was the the bailout or in the big, you know all the tarp money and a lot of it was directed towards cleantech and he was critical for the administration to have some successes. Many people don't remember they gave a ton of money to Tesla which has worked out quite well. There was a lot more attention paid to the money that went to companies that didn't do as well. but said, they were looking for for successes and we were happy to be a an easy example of it. So at this time, oh power was growing really quickly At one point you were working with ninety three utilities around the world. As you mentioned, in countries all over the world. This is all happening by two thousand fourteen. How did powers product and the company culture change as you grow. So both curious about the product itself, and then you mentioned the culture and Alex's role in that. Yes. I'd say the culture didn't change. I mean it feels different to be a really small company in a big company, but are the tenants of our culture were around being. We're very mission driven, and we were very focused on on having an impact on the environment and measuring that we were. We put a real priority on. A No greenwashing you know if we couldn't measure and say beyond a doubt that it really had happened, we didn't count and that was a big you know, and then we had other values around. The, you know typical business. Good high growth well-run startup values around transparency and. Collaboration and all these kinds of things that we had. We just had an exceptional team. The. Diaspora of companies have been founded from Paulo Alumna. As we call them is something I'm really proud of. So the culture you know didn't change much. It's you you. There's a second part of the question, the product itself like you went from no code writing. To what are the product started to scale I'd say. We, went through all the classic. Phases of software development with the be one of the biggest things is the team grows you have to. Get much more disciplined about documentation process and and communication flows, and in how you plan and we did a lot. We got better and better at that stuff, and we went through a couple of versions. We had the classic re architecture investment that went nowhere. We tried to move a lot onto dupe, which was this at the time. You know the new big data. Database and wasn't the right idea from the beginning, and then we aim too high and we just never really got the returns on it. So we all of our you know we had our serious stumbles and the key kept evolving and the as we grew into micro services architecture as we got bigger. And then that's that's on from the technology side in terms of product features like taking it to above the hood. The business started with a home energy report. So that was the thing that we sold smut. We will put a mailer out to your customers that essentially compares them with a three bar graph to their neighbors, and that will motivate them to have some tips and that'll motivate them and where the company evolved from a product perspective was first of all, we went online. So we built a robust web site so. So. You don't have to get a paper or to get your results and then the big places we innovated or advanced was We became the single biggest repository of smart meter data in the country. So we had like forty percent of all US energy data flowing through our servers every day, and then we sort of do some really interesting analytics on that data. So we could do things like. A regression analysis of your energy usage and we could we could tease out the part of your usage that came from your air conditioner and we could say, Hey, you know your your usage is good. But you know your load is actually thirty percent higher than average. You should look into that. Here's some tips or your lighting is high. So those are some of the things that we did was that did people take action on it? Were you able to see a measurable difference in behaviors and what did that look like? Yes, I mean our next versions of the report of the of the sweet. But we would see is that we were able to drive incrementally higher reductions and energy usage. So it was all small stuff in aggregate, right? So we would get like a one and a half percent average reduction across a million homes and a utility, and then as we rolled out these new features, we see that one and a half percent up to two percent. But. When you put it together, we had twenty plus million homes. We were actually providing as much energy savings that.

president Alex US Obama San Diego Middle East San Francisco CEO toby Arlington Virginia Japan Sweden
"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

07:29 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Appliances, you will, you won't care about your neighbor comparison. But if you feel like there's similar than you, that's very, very powerful information because we don't have time to actually do ground level bottom up analysis of everything stance. Make Sense. I know you signed powers first contract with mud, which is Sacramento's utilize in two thousand and seven. The same year that you started. But when you sign that contract, you literally did not have a single line of code written and I think a lot of people listening know how hard it is to land utility customer. Let alone if you don't have any code. So how did you do that and what was the early Oh power product like once he actually did write some code. Well. The. The single biggest piece of magic we had was my co founder, Alex, who is. Truly. than his ability to. To move move something like a power forward in terms of finding the right people to talk to and and. Getting their attention getting you know getting us in. That was the that was the magic and then the. Other. Essential piece is that we had we. We did all the work to really put together a product that had. Very, crisp product market fit within the utility sector, and the utility sector is very weird. So they don't just buy things too. It's not like you think you go to business, they're gonNA buy something because it's going to improve their bottom line like that. It's totally different physics in the utility industry. So. Largely to cut it short. There's a huge multibillion dollar segment of the utility industry that pays for energy efficiency programs in the math, the physics there is. I will buy things if they can help consumers save energy cost effectively, and so if you can deliver a program that that works that reduces energy use and its demonstrable measurable and it's cheap, they'll buy it, and so we did all the work to package this up and the critical piece. Was that we pitch the program to be implemented a clinical trial. So he would do a randomized testing control in the utility could directly measure the impact of our communications on reducing usage. And then when you had that fit into their model and then Alex it all of his magic and found us the right people and then. We got our sale. And then we wrote the code. Really. Fast. How quickly? I mean, we had like five months to launch, and we started like a week after we saw. How big? How big was that I conquer? So utility numbers are crazy that contract was almost four, hundred, thousand dollars. And that was your very first contract and that was one year. Yeah. Wow. Now, we signed smaller contracts but then later in powers. Powered today under Oracle has hundred plus million dollar contracts. Wow. So it becomes a different beast in that industry. So I, know you personally put in the first fifty thousand dollars to start. Oh, power before closing your first round of one point five, million in August of two, thousand, seven. And that round that one point, five, million dollar round included a check from an early investor in your last company Eddie soft, and so I'm curious at the time. Were you an Alex and whoever else was on the team at the time? Were you able to pay yourselves where you just living off savings and then what did your work environment look like you know? We all have our stories of where our company started and what they look like. But what did that look like for you? Yeah. So we were like on, I was paying my own way until we raise the. We. We always sort of kept on. Slave. Wages as long as we could Alex and my salary wasn't normal until we went public really and we were always. There was no separation and identity between us and the company at the equity felt like our bones are blood. You know it was like we we held onto it over everything. So I mean we were we were generous with our employees, but it was like was. We've we really managed. We tried to do everything. We can to preserve it, and we paying ourselves was not the priority at the very beginning I had the luxury of having made money made some money at edgy soft. So I, was able to just I didn't take any salary. We Alex took like a subsistence salary and then that got paid back out of the out of the way we were offices were on On. Utah Street in Protrero Hill and we weren't. It wasn't really an office. It was the building that had it had various times, Edgy soft wedding channel Flick stor event. Bright was originally there. The Guy who founded Zinger, the previous company mobs squad I, think our mob snob shop. It's a prolific buildings prolific and spitting out startups. Anyway. The top floor was like a free for all, and we basically paid ran for a couch and a and a, and a standing desk. And we tried to get away without paying rent for for a and then the landlord new came in. It was like, Dan, what are you doing? Gary Go. Man. was like. Four, fifty, a month or something negligible. Tell me. If these numbers are correct, you raised a sixteen million series. B Is Outright Sixteen. One six and then. That was in December of two thousand. We raise the A annot seven, and then we raised the be in a Gotcha and then twelve months. After that, you raised a thirty two million series. See it was two years later, two years. Twenty, ten Gotcha Gotcha. What did fundraising look like for you? And then what advice? What advice do you have for entrepreneurs who are fundraising now? We had great success with fundraising. We had competitive bids and you know multiple term sheets in both of those big rounds as well as A. Guess I'd say my advice don't have much else to say about that. Directly, I'd say my advice and fundraising broadly. I. Often give a couple of tips. One is the one thing you can control is your timeline, so I worked very hard to. Align my conversations with multiple interested investors that they would be coincident. So we got a term sheet or more than one term. She would get them in parallel and we could create some competitive bidding environment. We could become a price maker instead of a price taker and then. The. Second thing I always say is. You have to when you're pitching in a sales setting, it doesn't matter if you say something wrong, you're just trying to say something right and then the buyer will say, oh, that's interesting. I want that and in an in an investor setting. That's just not the case If you say something wrong a May reveal something bad about your company. because. They aren't everything has to add up and be it may reveal or at least revealed, create the perception in the investor that you don't fully understand the company, and so you're an invest in an investor setting. It's as much. The you're trying to create. Confidence in yourself. You know giving build building when the investor, the sense that you really understand your business. So those are the two things. I. I typically advise people on and then you mentioned you met. Powers Co founder and former president. Alex laskey during your freshman year at. Harvard. And then later you reconnected with him in San Francisco, what was your relationship like in college, and then what is your relationship look like auto power?.

Alex laskey Sacramento co founder Gary Go Powers Co Oracle Eddie Zinger Protrero Hill Harvard San Francisco Bright Dan founder president
"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

06:21 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"I had this nine more naive sense that there were wild lands ahead of us, and after you drive through the Americas, you realized that actually the most of the you've got well, what is decreasingly while Amazon and otherwise the biggest stretches of wild lands are largely in North America. And everything's obviously mapped out, and we listened in parallel to this. As we drove, we listened to jared books collapse on first generation ipod with the hard drive. This is jared diamond's book. Yeah, and that the book talks about ecological collapse in history of it, happening across a whole host of civilizations and it was just. It was the perfect book to to open our eyes I. I describe on this trip. It felt like the third party on the on the journey was the land because we're looking out the window and and just taking in. So that's what that's what. Is there any image that stands out in your mind of just something that you saw that you will always stay with you? Yeah. There was actually in a really stark. We were driving across the center of Guatemala. And it was huge prairie or plains. Cows grazing moist like wet, but the grass, and then there was this. promontory with kind of like A. Hundred foot. Tall. As. Almost like a humongous three. Acre rock had just been placed in the middle of this plane with sheer cliffs and on top of it was flat and on top, it was just covered in the most dense rainforest picture and it suddenly occurred to both of those that this entire field from horizon had been rainforest. And Guatemala is ninety, seven percent forested and that is. That is the fact that the. Statistic. But then we seeing there really I don was unforgettable and now there was those moments and reading like Oh. This is. The we've got to change what we're doing. From June to October of two, thousand, seven, you had four major life events. You move from. San Francisco to DC, you turn thirty, you've got married, any founded Oh power. The origin of power involves a behavioral scientists, Your College Classmate Alex Alex, laskey and PG's antiquated billing system. How did all four of these things come together to lead to the founding of Oh power and what was it like having all of these things happening at the same time? So it was very hectic. I don't recommend trying to tie them many things together all at once. It wasn't a plan, but it happened. But the way the founding story of power was I came back toby and I my wife and I came back from this trip that move back to San Francisco, and both are looking into what to do next and she had just finished her PhD in international history and it was looking to get into the development or international aid world ended. Surprisingly, I was living in San Francisco for. Years at the time. I knew a lot of people and we tried to. Find opportunities there and they're really actually isn't much in San Francisco on in that domain. So DC was was pulling I. We had I was looking to support her moment to make change for her career. But so Alex and I got working on this sort of looking at a bunch of different cleantech ideas and he and I started to partner together. He had just come off running political campaign and we started looking into this idea. A number of ideas, and I had really out of the blue. Jeanie Bill in the PGA now is good and in no small part I, think power plays a role in that because it's a big customer of overpowers. But OPEC need self spend a lot to improve their bill. But at the time it was atrocious. Almost, you couldn't even tell him what you owed. I, won't go. I. Could regale you with the details, but suffice to say moping this thing is it's like garbage and I'm thinking. There's a billion utility bills that go out a year. One hundred million homes, twelve times a year. Isn't this the biggest marketing opportunity to communicate to people but energy savings, and I don't even know how much I owe let alone if I'm using a lottery little and I had this idea, I'd love to see how my energy use compares to my neighbors, not an individual neighbor, but just give me an aggregate sense using above average below average. Then I could get a benchmark if I should have an opportunity to save. And so I had I was talking about this idea with a bunch of an amongst a bunch of others and I, happen to have a breakfast with Ria Su who was Later under run entity see and being the Obama Administration very successful, and she was running Hewlett Foundation an environmental practice for forgiving, and she had just funded this guy. I tell her about this idea in her eyes go wide and she's just funded this. Guy. Robert Shell Dini famous behavioral psychologists and he's just conducted a study. That demonstrably dent proves if you compare people to their neighbors, they changed their energy behavior. So that's what got US started Alex, came back to ask like this is stupid idea have is actually a real idea, and then we have to look into it, and then you know it's continues from there. Are you a competitive person? Sure. That instinct I want know how my neighbors are doing better I, mean it works. It's funny. It's it's. Was, I wasn't sure why you were asking. Yes. So. Professor Chao Dini has talked a lot about this in depth and with more subtlety than than I will. But. It's not competent. So there's like people often sort of the nastier versions of the instinct is competition or guilt. You know we're going to shame you into changing. And really those are both kind of manifestations of an underlying instinct which is were very deeply program to pursue to seek social proof which is just were heard animal. You know we were were a social animal. We're not actually a hurt animal but so. We, we really take strong cues from norms. and. So when you get a norm that tells you, you're using thirty percent more than average, and if you feel the critical thing is you have to feel. An affinity towards your norm group. So you have to believe you are like your neighbors. If you moved into a neighborhood surrounded by monks living with a single lightbulb and you know appliances, you will, you won't care about your neighbor comparison. But if you feel like there's similar than you, that's very, very powerful information because we don't have time to actually.

Alex Alex San Francisco jared diamond Professor Chao Dini North America Guatemala Amazon Americas center of Guatemala OPEC Jeanie Bill DC Hewlett Foundation toby Ria Su partner PGA
"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

06:21 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"But your journey obviously begins long before billion dollar IPO's you grew up in Washington and later San. Diego, your dad was in the air force and when he retired from the service, he went into defense contracting working on spy satellites. Your mom is Israeli American with a doctorate in education and taught. Hebrew. In the synagogue where you had your bar. Mitzvah. You like all previous. What it takes guests self identified as a nerd in school. So I'm curious what was your? What were your early years like and what were you like as a kid I wasn't nerd I grew up mostly in San Diego. A lot of playing outside riding bikes in the canyons with my friends are definitely went through my dungeons and dragons phase and middle school. Then, slowly awakened to the limitations of those choices for the other aspects of my life and became aware of girls, and you know had a normal childhood mutually. Definitely in my in my particular experience they were. I was an only child. So. Always kicked out of the House on Saturday mornings. My mom who was eager to make sure that I was hanging out with other kids spend a Lotta time outside playing with friends and I had. Had a very lucky to have parents know a very supportive and calm and politics free childhood. Went to Harvard where you studied computer science and You participated in Entrepreneurs Club in Nineteen ninety-six, you you've had not remembered this, but you did tell Harvard Crimson, a reporter there that you intended to start a software company. Some curious. What was your college experience like and what gave you, the vision to start a company especially right out of college. Yeah. It's so funny I didn't remember that and I was not. I was not one of these super entrepreneur kids who was selling gumdrops under the table and elementary school. And trying to finagle. I I was like totally kind of by the book literally. The hardworking student. And then my cousin who's about four years older than me. He let he graduated college and decided to start a company and that was the first time it occurred to me and it was ninety seven things were. Ninety six things we're booming already in Silicon Valley. So it was. It was a consensus decision as a computer scientist. So wasn't a crazy stretch, but that's when I started thinking about starting companies. You worked with your cousin for a and eventually you founded your own company, Edgy soft. One of the world's first enterprise sauce education platforms that ultimately transformed. Testing, you served as CEO for four years during which edgy soft was acquired forty million dollars in two, thousand and three. What inspired you to start Eddie soft, and how were you able to successfully launch it and then sell it in your early twenty s. So I? I. Was never a good employee. There was part of what was. Worker was part of what made me into an entrepreneur I got fired from the jobs I had in high school. I worked at the gap. I worked as a host and it was I was I wasn't. Disobedient, I was just spaced out. So a graduate college, we decided to start a company with this very close friend of mine who I was just texting with before this. Jay Kimmelman and he and I. Helped my cousins. Good friend. Get started with a different company for about a little less than a year as a kind of a business school for us because we really knew nothing we knew. We knew we knew nothing. So we at least had that. So we got some knowledge in that year. We at least had a picture of what a startup looked like. And then we. decided to start our own. Company. And in that course, even just a year of grinding it out, starting up a business I realized how much work it is and didn't and I. Didn't, WANNA. Take the risk of just working all the way through my twenty s and having it not work not making money, and then feel like I wasted all that time to me. It became almost as a matter of downside protection that I realized I wanted to become mission driven I wanted like this has to be bigger than just money because it's not enough to sustain me to make this level of sacrifice, and so it was in that context that Jane I. You where to focus and we both have backgrounds, personal family, background education, both moms are teachers, both really changed by our experiences at Harvard. We were roommates, and so that's how we decided to focus on education. So after you sold edgy soft you actually how old were you sold the company. Twenty just turned twenty five. So you took some time off before founding power, and during this time you and your then girlfriend now wife drove the entire Panamerican Highway from Arctic. Circle to tear itself. Waco what inspired you to take the trip, and how did it influence what you decided to do next? Yeah. So So you have ended up being a success. At a smaller scale. And I was feeling really. Like ahead of the ball twenty five and told my company and I felt like the world is my oyster and I talk. My girlfriend to take into taking this year and a half off taking this trip. and. We really just we wanted to do. We wanted to go and have a great adventure and I was I had I had a hunch that if it wasn't directed if there was no. Goal orientation that it could feel a little disorienting and an aimless. So I was looking for something. To tide altogether, and I had heard about these trips and I thought this was just a great. What a great idea because it's a framework to go on an amazing trip. But the framework is so loose because essentially the only framework is just when you're done with where you are head south. and. Otherwise do whatever you want. So I talked her into this. She doesn't like driving as much as I do I. Literally Drove Ninety nine percent of the miles we traveled and. We had a phenomenal time and that was the origin of it, and then in the end you know looking back what the really factors aside from being an. Amazing experience in its own right is what turned me into environmentalist, but that was not that was not the plan. That was that was sort of the outcome of how did that become the outcome? Yes so. I mean, the state of the world is really what enabled the outcome in my. I just became aware of it so..

Diego middle school San Diego Harvard Silicon Valley Washington Jay Kimmelman CEO scientist Eddie San Arctic Waco Entrepreneurs Club Jane
"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

02:01 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Gates, the CO founder and former CEO of power. Power was founded in two thousand, seven by Dan and Alex Laskey. Two friends from Harvard, Dan new software. Alex knew how to sell and both of them wanted to build a company for environmental. Good. Oh, power was based on a simple premise, send paper mailers to utility customers, comparing their electricity use to their neighbors, and if people saw they were doing poorly, they'd make changes. Changes, it actually worked and overtime Oh Power Inc. deals with the world's biggest power companies and started processing vast amounts of smart meter data making it arguably the biggest energy efficiency success story in business. The company went public in two thousand fourteen and was sold to Oracle in two, twenty sixteen, and in this episode, Emily talks with Dan about the science behind the idea how. How power evolved and expanded and why the company was eventually sold to. Oracle. Normally, we record these conversations at powerhouse headquarters in Oakland. For obvious reasons, we can't do that anymore feels like a lifetime ago. So you're be listening to a live interview recorded over zoom in front of a bunch of people listening in from their houses. We can't give any applause here but without. Without further ADO, here's Emily Kirsch with Oh power co founder, Dan Yates I'm thrilled to be here today with Dan Yates Co founder and former CEO of the energy data company power, who's joining us from Washington DC, hello, Dan, and welcome to the show by emily. Great to be here. Thanks for having me. Of course, I. Know We asked you to turn off your AC. Then, we were afraid. It was going to get really hot. So you were GONNA pre. Cool. Your House I'm curious. Are you freezing? Are you sweating? What's what's your state right now? So it's cold. It's late enough. That, it's cool enough. So all all of the complexity has been avoided. Good good. So. Dan, you founded were in two thousand seven. You led the company through a billion, dollar IPO in two, thousand, fourteen and five, hundred, thirty, two, million dollars sale to Oracle in two, thousand, sixteen under your tenure power saved customers more than thirteen terawatt hours of energy..

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

02:06 min | 7 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"The energy gang is brought to you by fluence, a global leader in battery based energy storage technology, and services from commercializing the first grid connected battery systems in two thousand, eight to the multi gigawatt fleet being deployed for customers globally. The fluence team has champion energy storage is a cornerstone of our zero Carbon Electric Future. Learn more at fluence energy, dot com, and join them on their mission to transform the way we power our world. The, energy gang is also brought to you by nor cal control as a total controls and monitoring solution provider for solar. Nor cow supports every phase of your project from Turnkey designed solutions to post OEM enhancements, troubleshooting, and training their Dawson Skater systems are based on open architecture, hardware and software eliminating the need for ongoing subscription fees and restrictive service contracts nor cal goes beyond the vendor mentality and they partner with you to build solutions that are flexible, scalable, and completely customized to your current and future needs. Maintain expanded scale your system anytime anywhere with confidence visit. norcal controls dot net to learn more. This week on what it takes. Dan Yates. Co. founded a company that saves utilities more energy. Every year than the Hoover Dam can generate. It was based on cutting edge behavioral science, but it wasn't always clear how that science would play out. It wasn't okay with us to know not. There was just going to be a result. It had to be a certain level. Otherwise, it wasn't economic, and then the first few months of results came in and they we weren't changing behavior, and so I was just. Like through the floor fell out from under me as Oh. My God. We have no idea. This is GonNa work welcome to what it takes an interview series produced by powerhouse in Green Tech Media I'm Stephen Lacey. In this series, we hear from founders and executives at the most influential clean energy companies, their backgrounds, their passions, their struggles, their deals, their management philosophies, their near death experiences in this episode powerhouse CEO, Emily? Kirsch..

"dan yates" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

06:50 min | 10 months ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Eight. Five and pride is up next in Arizona. Hello Fried Greens firm out west. Paul Oh great to hear from you thank you. I listen to you or Watch your program every chance I get. You had a discussion about half an hour. Go Back Cove in nineteen and college. Football Attendance yes. And you indicated that College administrators were looking for a guideline from I don't know the NC Double A. or whoever it was they were looking for this guideline To proceed with how they was going to handle attendance. And what I would like to do is read you webster's definition of a guideline it's an indication or outline of future policy or conduct. In other words to put a finer point to it a guideline is not a mandate. You don't have to follow a guideline so college administrators could do what they want. Well let me explain one thing and I think you probably know what I'm going to say Your College in terms of Intercollegiate athletic. You are going to go with your conference. You belong to a conference therefore that that's the that's the guideline you'll follow so the SEC schools fourteen will do what the schools in the big ten school. I mean they. They may not all do the same thing but they will all Within the conference I don't think there'll be any dissent right well again. I don't know how strongly particular administrator may feel about that but in any case I just wanted to point that out that they can. Well I don't know a real at first of all the DNC AA per se does not have jurisdiction over. What College football does? Yes so I mean they could put out an edict saying these are for our member in all of our three hundred and whatever and they probably will but if you're if you're in the PAC twelve or the big ten or any of the other ones you will likely follow your own lead. I don't think we're going to have any outliers here. I think it's going to be a pretty clear choice. And you're out in Arizona. I mean California Oregon and Washington or the three schools. Most people are looking at because they're all out. There have been very clear but you would say New York and New Jersey but quite frankly there's not a lot of college football in New York New York or New Jersey but Arizona California Oregon Washington. There's a lot of people to be heard from. Hey thank you very much for the call. Really do appreciate it. Pride you stay well. Bill is in Tennessee. Hey Bill Hey what's up with you? Hey no I'm I coach High School football but I was just always wondering you know. I'm a big Tennessee man but say somebody's number one like Lsu on last year is just debate. I've always had our you know in Clemson. There've been number one all time. Don't you think a team? Even though I know the strength of schedule sometimes they base it on that. But I'm number wanted. Somebody beats me. You know I I liked what Coach from a Clemson said you know. Davos said we're still number one you know. He always debating data bit. I was just wondering what people thought about that. I think ought to be number one or somebody beats even though it's interesting I've asked Nick Sabin that question before when he is The defending champion. And he's pretty quick point out. That was not the same team. I have this year and you understand that being a coach so I think theoretically that's true But being defending champion matters a lot until the first game and then really doesn't matter at all. Yeah I just I know I know your players change in the season changes you know. I just think a team you know sometimes ought to be number one to get beat. You know how only ask you? How long are the? How long have you coach Bill About twenty years. What are you in east Tennessee or somewhere else? Yeah eighteen high school. That's what's going on with with high school football for the fall can you? Can you tell us what you've heard? Yes as far as I know we haven't done nothing you know. Some of the kids work out just three or four times but you know this covert nineteen a Lotta kids. Just don't get to do stuff at home you know. So what what Ha- as a coach What HAVE YOU I mean I. I would assume they're not letting you Come to school are they. I'll no we're not coming to school. Some of the kids do their stuff at home. Do work outs on their own. But the school's closed you know for kids cat so we'll give us some advice. What are what are the? We're not that I'm an elite athlete. But what are what are what should we do? Stay in shape during this Quarantine Oh to stay in shape this quarantine I do like Jerry Wrath they. He'll run up here in east Tennessee A lot of videos that people got on the thing and you can do a lot of things at home to work at you know. Stay in shape to running and stretching and all. That's what we've told a lot of our kids and I think Edwards great you know lived in East Tennessee for four years. I don't think I'd want to run up some of those heels man. That's what I'm Dan. Yates tough up here in eastern do remember reading a jury jury Rice's book and he would He would work out in San Francisco where the hills were just terrible and he said That that's what motivated. Yeah he's just one of the great motivators that I've seen and I'll try to tell some of my kids. You know he and let's just talk to Jordan thing you know he's him and Jordan was just the same you know and the kids if they workout home. You Know You. You can get a great workout on your own. If you just motivate yourself and do well I appreciate the update coach. Hope you're back Back in East Tennessee on Friday nights here in late August. And we're we're all back to normal. Hey thank you appreciate it Speaking of normal we'll talk to one of the people that Began the fight for the name image and likeness. He will join US next..

football east Tennessee Tennessee Arizona Clemson Washington New York Fried Greens California Oregon New Jersey webster Paul Jordan Davos Bill administrator US SEC DNC
"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"dan yates" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"How has the a round that? You just raised the sixteen million Bill Ben similar different from the seed round. It's been very different because one of the great gifts of the seed round was that as part of their due diligence process or lead investor NEA put us in touch with one of their successful clean energy entrepreneurs. Dan Yates, who is the CEO and co founder of power. To just talk to us and figure out if we were a good company to invest in. And he just ended up getting really intrigued by the opportunity and felt like it is the time for heat pumps. And this isn't real you're doing an interesting thing in this company, you know, took hold of his imagination. And so he ended up getting very involved. And now, he's our executive chairman and works with us fulltime. And he is an expert fundraiser having him as a partner on the on the a really made a huge difference to my experience with it. It was very different than the first time around this capital will allow you to do how did you get your first customers? What did the initial projects? Did they go smooth? Will you were there mistakes made? For very very initial projects. We were selling off the off the shelf heat pump in working with a subcontractor who installed GIO. So it was really about just figuring out market demand. To get those customers. We were really helped by the fact that we got a lot of press when we left Google, you know. You know, it's just like a really big advantage for us. And sent it really raised awareness of what we were doing. And then I was just like literally going to homes and selling geothermal, even though I had no sales experience. And certainly it was again, very much trial and error. But we got our first customers that way. And then this year, we started telling our custom heat pump your own our own dandelion. We call it. The Dan air heat pump. Great tell us about the drilling. And you're processing innovating in that space. Sure. So one of the key challenges you have to overcome to make geothermal work is you have to put what are called ground. Loops and customers yards in do it cheaply and without disrupting the yard very much, and this has been a really big challenge for the industry. I think what's interesting is how little attention has ever been paid to this problem. Because there's been no real reason to figure out how to drill in people's yards cheaply and cleanly, you know, there there has been a lot of attention resources, and ingenuity place to how to drill for oil and casts, really really well and. What we realized is like if we could just take some of the innovation. That's happened in that space, and reapply it to this one it should be possible to dramatically dramatically lower the cost of putting ground lives in a yard. And so that's really the thinking that guides are drilled development. In the Pat in two thousand eighteen so in last year, we really have a lot of attention to streamlining the process of installing the heat pump itself and twenty nineteen. I think our focus will very much be on the drilling and just operationalizing our new technology and making that process much easier for the homeowner. So you started with an author shelf you pump. Now, you've built your own. You started with option off the shelf drills. Now, you're building your own drills. That's exactly right. And I think again that speaks to sort of how iterative this particular business can be in a way that I think is advantageous because. Yes. So much of our technical development is informed by selling systems to real people. Whereas Dan dealer today as far as traction and sales. We have made the decision to focus in New York because there are so many homes in the market is so big that we have the luxury of just choosing one. Sort of regulatory regime to focus on and it really limits complexity to only have one state, so we're selling in New York, and we went from having sold zero dandelions eras when the product launched in June two I think we closed the year over a ten million dollar run rate of product sales..

executive chairman Bill Ben NEA New York Google Dan CEO co founder partner ten million dollar
"dan yates" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"dan yates" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"The conversation on Twitter using the hash tag, air and ground. In fed ex is going to make a twenty thousand dollars donation to the USO and the name of both a winning quarterback and the running back, totaling forty thousand bucks. Carson thanks for coming on preciado. Of course, let's get out there rushing route Smith. Take care. Hamstring studio. These knuckleheads I mean the producing. Thanks, sir. Man. He was good. He could Chuck it to. Oh, yeah. I wanna make sure that before we go break. Happy birthday to my daughter London. Who is? Nine years old today. Yeah. She she listened to school at believe. She is not no school school Monday. She's probably headed to the gym nine years old use. Oh, yeah. Wow. You get it day impressed. You talk about the player. Lebron on said that he was the goat. Wait until you hear who Danny aines compared him to tell you next. So trav-, you you remember Keyshawn misick? He didn't return today. We did our Tevin Campbell Thursday. Kevin Campbell said why not we were not a part of? No, you said to yourself. It's. Yeah. Why why are you pushing back on Tevin Campbell? Four. Oh, gosh. Okay. I'm got we are got a letter sent to warn say any new not everything's that talking. Talking about him. Cheetham at social media Twitter. Not us. So we know about about you. Y'all says. Dr Donald Trump. Don't true. Yeah. Sorta store. Lebron we talked about the other day where LeBron show more than an athletes after he beat the warriors Stu to win the championship a couple years ago. He felt that that made him the best player ever because they'd be seventy three anti we went through and made a pretty compelling argument. Danny aines who obviously is a contemporary of Michael Jordan's kind of when he went on the radio saying, you know, look, I maybe he's taking a page out of Donald Trump's book and just any sort of publicity is good publicity. And you talk it into existence. I for the life of me, I understand having the opinion that Michael Jordan is the greatest player of all time. It's it's it's perfectly reasonable opinion have but this idea that LeBron as the goat of all time is somehow a stunt or sort of publicity move. It's it's not it's just as valid of an opinion as Michael Jordan. Danny Ainge just happens to be contemporary of MJ's. It happens all the time. And I get into sports people. I laugh at it. You say law he's better than him. Because look at his numbers. He. Would be this. If he and that I mean, it's just it is what it is. Why not just enjoy a both? Why can't you just do that? You ask them. Country. The problem is people get caught up in that. They do. I look at it. Look at the case by case in my own career when I played he's better than me. But he played with this quarterback forever. I had thirteen different bumps and. And. I say to myself. Well, I know what I was. And what I am. So I can't worry about with somebody else's can't worry about what Dan Yates because Dan age. Can't if the property is daddy AT kill him Kilty keta. Stay conversation. But I was saying it knows type of conversations abroad. I'm looking at them. Like, maybe quite get it more from a guy like Danny age because they're they're defending themselves through through whatever that transit of property, the geometry, if you diminish MJ you're diminishing me because nj used to kick my butt there. If he if I couldn't deal with him what in the world would I do. I couldn't play in the so it's almost a self defense sort of thing. But I'm I don't understand why more people, and I don't know what exactly with. But this comparison is the intimate joy. Nobody this crash. Went hit me up on Twitter. They heard us talk having this conversation yesterday Travis and he said, well, he lost six times in the finals. Yes, that's true. Do realize Jordan lost six times before he got to the five..

Michael Jordan Twitter Lebron Danny Ainge Danny aines Tevin Campbell Donald Trump USO Carson Danny age Smith London trav Chuck nj Cheetham Travis Dan age Dan Yates
"dan yates" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"dan yates" Discussed on From Scratch

"So we provided tools for teachers school and district level administrators. And and and up from there to make data driven decisions about the instruction that happens in the classroom. Now, you founded edgy soft in two thousand with another. Harvard classmate, Dan Yates, and you sold the company to the publisher a Houghton Mifflin, and it was was after that sale that you and Dan decided to go travel the world, Dan went with his girlfriend to Latin America, and you visit your you've visited yours. Shannon may in China and Shannon was a classmate of yours from Harvard, but you you hadn't met her until your fifth reunion. Is that right? That's right. We were we were in the same class. And we always joke because we we never ran into each other and our circle of friends of virtually don't overlap, so we always joke, which one of us is making up the story about going to Harvard, and when we did meet at our our fifth fifth year reunion. I was in the process of selling are edgy soft and then planning on moving to Barcelona for awhile, and Shannon, whose background is in anthropology and economic transformation was. Planning to move to a very poor rural village in the mountains of northeastern China. So obviously, very similar pass. And so I decided to skip Barcelona and moved to a small farming village in northeastern China it was in this village in China where the idea for bridge international came to be can you talk about the Genesis of of this idea? Sure, so Shannon, and I were thinking sort of very big picture what for families who live on less than two dollars a day in the village? We lived in families lived for less than seventy cents a day. What were there challenges? What were the biggest levers to make an impact on quality of life both for an individual or an individual family? But then at scale and came to the conclusion that basic primary education was one of the biggest levers you could have both for an individual. But also at scale there were a few different examples in the village that really. Brought this point home. So you could walk down the path in the village and look at different people's homes, and based upon the construction quality what they were made out of the windows were made out of you could then see a strong correlation between literally the quality of the of the construction of people's houses, and whether they had access to a basic quality education. We live next door to an old gentleman named LA who and he was a seventy year old man who for most of his life had for livelihood had raised a cashmere goats for their for their Kashmir and sold that off, but due to his his age he was no longer able physically to do that. And so he recognized that if he wasn't able to change his livelihood. That would be the end this gentleman, though happen to be one of the individuals. Do the previous communist era who had access and had gone successfully through a basic primary education. This man had a daughter in. Nearby village. And he asked his daughter to buy him a book on how to rear a smaller animals that didn't need so much tending. He figured out that if you raise FOX's and other small animals how much input costs there were what would be the profit of that how much he could sell his current goats for any essentially built an entirely new business model for his life. And we watched this transformation happened successfully. And if he didn't have the ability to read with real comprehension to do the basic math and problem, solving that was needed to basically figure out this life, critical example that could have been the end of of a prosperous life for this, man. And so seeing that really in many ways hit home just that, you know, basic education isn't just sort of, you know, we need to do it. Because that's what society says to do, but these are life critical skills and fundamentally alter someone's potential, so we started digging into that area much more deeply what was going on personally. I mean here you are. You're you move to rural China with a girlfriend, whom you met very. We recently to a completely different job in a way was this..

Shannon China Harvard Dan Yates Barcelona Houghton Mifflin Latin America publisher Kashmir FOX seventy year two dollars
"dan yates" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"dan yates" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"The pox knocking off the celtics because of the injuries kyrie irving and to gordon hayward i love the greek freak freddie but i don't think they're ready to beat the celtics in a seven game series that being said i think it is going seven and i've got the celtics eeking one out in seventh i got the celtics and six for all the things that you said and brad stevens on the sidelines he continued to show people boy what did danny age seeing him will now we've seen exactly with dan yates on this guy saying hey that guy could be the next grade nba coach from butler a yeah he's one he's one of the top five coaches in the nba there's no doubt about that you're right it's going to be a tough series of greek freak could average posted a triple double see that in this series but i'm with you i've got the this winning it and i got the celtics and six cavs pacers game three thirty eastern time on abc we jeff regular season lebron is one of the greatest players of all time and then there's playoff lebron i think the cavaliers going to kick it up another notch i think they all know what's at stake they're going gonna know they're going to think about the future as we talked about earlier in the show i think it's a good matchup for the cavaliers against the pacers i'm going cavs in five and they're opening round playoff matchup i could add to that but i got the same thing cavs and five so next utah versus oklahoma city six thirty eastern time game wanted tnt would you like in this one this might be the most balanced matchup i think freddie true of wow the now paul george said a couple of weeks ago that no matter what happens in the playoffs it has no bearing on his future decision thunder that is not true i'm telling you there's so much riding on the line here for oklahoma city and that franchise if they lose paul george in the off season where were they going to go now with russell westbrook for trying to collect superstars to fill the void left by by kevin durant so i think this is going seven i'm taking.

tnt freddie abc brad stevens gordon hayward kyrie irving kevin durant russell westbrook paul george oklahoma city celtics utah pacers cavaliers lebron nba butler dan yates danny age