20 Episode results for "Dan Weiss"

Game of Thrones Feedback | Season 8, Ep #4: The Last of the Starks

Post Show Recaps

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Game of Thrones Feedback | Season 8, Ep #4: The Last of the Starks

"Before we get to this week's a game of thrones feedback show. Have you played four the empires for Jovem Pires is a city building game and also one of our sponsors. For today's episode in informative of empires. You can guide village through the different epochs of human history from the stone age to the future through skillful, planning on the battlefield, and we see so little of that on game of thrones. These days you can expand your sphere of influence and create an impressive empire. What's more? There are continuous content. Updates to ensure years of fun together with millions of players around the world, and guess what? You can switch Trine browser IOS and Android device that anytime while you're playing four empires. If you're new to forge of empires, we've got some great news for a limited time fans and listeners of post show. Recaps can go to forge of empires dot com slash rob. And get a bonus of ten dollars worth of diamonds. Now, this is virtual in game currency. No cash payout. Only for the new registrations. And it's non transferrable. Please. Remember to download the game via forge of empires dot com slash rob. And don't forget the slash rob. In order to get yourself started with that ten dollars starter package. That's going to give you that virtual in game currency of six hundred fifty diamonds what to start building your own empire. So go to forge of empires dot com slash rob now. Download install click claim gift and get six hundred fifty diamonds, right? From the start at four. Empires dot com slash rob. Game of thrones season eight episode number four is over. But we're just getting started answering your feedback questions on the game of thrones post show recap. And now here are the guys who got their herbal teas and child Latina's are ready to go. I am rob sister. You know here with Josh Wigley. Josh, how are you? I'm doing. Well, you're going to remember to edit this part out of the podcast, right? Like this stuff about the coffee because that doesn't really fit in game of thrones. So we'll take that out in post. Yeah, you're right. There's no there's no coffee stuff in ROY. It's too late. The coffee is everywhere could try and put the coffee back in the coffee maker. But like the toothpaste HBO it's down. Yes. Can't put those things back in the grinder. Once they've been ground. They don't just become whole beans. It can. The metaphors lost. But there was coffee on game of thrones. It was very human beings not human beings. Yes. So that it's a big brother thing, I didn't realize that. But anyway, Josh is it fair to say that denarius is Starbucks Coffee Cup has been the only universally beloved thing season aid of game of thrones. And what's funny about that too? And overseas. Is I I would expect that that is like the thing on the other end of the equation of the people who are making this show that all the more like oh, come on. We go roaming barium said about it. And we are we are just like oh lap and up the coffee right now. Number one, Jamie night, Bryanne, okay? It was great. Danny's coffee Cup. I'm trying to think of what would what would even come close. And I can't nothing comes to mind. You're absolutely right. I think it's it's definitely it's definitely the the night ceremony was the best scene of the of the season in one of the top scenes of the series. I would even go so far as to say and the coffee Cup was the best continuity gaffe in in game of thrones memory and modern game threatens memory and just sort of like the people who are listening to this. And like, maybe they didn't catch this. They don't know what's going on there. They're firing up. There. HBO goes right now to go back and see whatever it is. We're talking about first of all don't bother. It's gone HBO has scrubbed the coffee Cup from existence. And it no longer is featured in this episode the last of the Starks by director, David nutter. But if you missed it on the first hand spell Starbucks without. Stark's? That's right. Starbucks and in the scene in which everybody's getting wasted at winter fell. Everyone's getting winter fell wasted everyone's drinking and enjoying themselves. And. Yeah. Why Walker did? And everyone's getting totally tanked. You can see like torment is like pumping up Jon snow for everybody's talking about how he writes. A dragon kind of crazy person writes dragging a lunatic or a king Har Har Har Har Har and then like sad cut to deniro's as the cameras like Dalian in our on her face and the the lonely man theme from the hulk is playing except none of that. But what what is there? If you look on the table in front of generis, it is it is a Cup Cup that is from the modern world and not from the west roasts world from the world of ice and fire. It is a it is a Starbucks resembling, but not actual Starbucks Cup of coffee that HBO put out the tweet saying the the lot day was a mistake. Darris had actually ordered an herbal tea. Yes. And so that was on the show. And now, it's it's gone. Since edited it out but for a hot minute. Thank god. Thank god. Is there? The great Akiva Whitaker had tweeted to me and said that I could live one hundred twenty years and earn. I forget the exact number of Pulitzer prizes and still none of my accomplishments would would measure up if I could get the inside scoop on how the coffee Cup wound up on game of thrones. And Akiva, I tried man. I really did. I had an interview with the director. I was so excited. I was gonna ask him all about it. And I did and it was just as hard no comment. No one wants to talk about it. No one wants to talk about the coffee Cup. So. The mystery is probably as simple as they forgot. You bet guess it's probably really cold on the set there in with your cell long nights night shoots and late nights. And people have a drink. And then somebody's supposed to come through. And looks like there was like a hole in the table. And then was I think it was ironic that the Cup of did appear to have like one of those like like jackets, you don't burn your hands for denarius the unburned. That's great. That's gonna head even considered that Jobbins yet. You know, sometimes things don't get edited out like sometimes coffee cups. Just stay in the frame. There's there's another scene from earlier in the series that I saw somebody posting where you see a bunch of people in the red keep and like Jamie, Lancaster, if you've looked down is holding a coffee Cup in his hand. And it doesn't look like it was photo shopped in that looks legit. I just haven't gone back and watch the episode to determine that. But this is certainly the more obvious of the two examples, and I think while the final season of game of thrones is in a position to be dinged up. Anyway, when when everybody can agree upon the fact that that coffee Cup should not be there think everyone's gonna you're gonna rally the realm of everyone in the game of thrones community to to seize upon that thing especially for an episode that I think has come across as fairly divisive. This seems like an episode that was not necessarily super well received. I would say, yeah. The coffee Cup is a metaphor for what I think that some of the book readers hope will be then the CGI removal of many of the things that were out there from the shell. Josh. I really am coming down on. I think people are way too negative about this final season of game of thrones. We waited so long to get to this. And I think we just need to enjoy the ride more. I know people are upset, and they wanted things to be exactly the way that they dreamt them up, and there's too much yada yada in certain areas. But look this to episodes left to this show. And you gotta enjoy it. No, I get I get that too. And there's definitely stuff in this episode and every episode so far that I really enjoyed and one of the one of the things that I've been saying in the various articles. I'm writing the conversation. I'm having with people is that I really I really liked the what is shaping up to be like kind of the great game of thrones idea. I love it. I'm fascinated by it. It was not really the direction. I thought that they would go in necessarily. But I love this idea of if we could just if we could just rally together behind something like a coffee Cup, perhaps if we can all just agree to stop being so mad at each other about everything if we can all agree to the slights that we have that we have weathered from one. Another all the all the things that keep us separate if we can get over that we can overcome the impossible, we can defeat the night king in a single episode. But that's the easy part. The hard part is maintaining that energy and keeping that momentum and seizing that lasting change. And finding ways to strike peace with your enemy to kill them with kindness. Those are the hard things much easier to fly on a dry. Wagon and presumably raise king's landing to the ground as we're probably going to be getting coming up. I think that these are fascinating ideas that are in play on. But I don't think that you can just let game of thrones off the hook. If they've screwed things up. And I think one of the ways in which they've screwed things up. There's little writing stuff. There's continuity errors the the coffee. We were we were asked to get a little bit into the feedback say when of this we were asked by multiple people did you about Klein Zach Brooks mainstone of bunch of people wrote in asking us to theorize on the symbolic nature of the Starbucks Cup. Brooks's take was the Starbucks Cup. The perfect symbolism for this sloppily written season. And I do think that there is some areas in which this season has been sloppily written. I just think that there are I don't think that you can avoid it. But the higher crime for me is the shortened episode orders for both last season in this season. I really think in retrospect in hindsight were very bad idea. Because the the the company line at the time was that money is getting redirected into having bigger flashier episodes with longer run times, but bigger budgets for the big battle stuff. And like if that's going to be the case and one of your both so far of the final two seasons. Both of the huge spectacle episodes have landed with a thought, you know, the beyond the wall episode in season seven up until this season was one of the most maligned episodes that I can think of in terms of an episode that had so much anticipation behind it. And a long night. We know how that's gone. Emphasis on the night like emphasis on on the darkness, and I was here last week defending it, and I hold too many of those defenses. But. It was at the very least it's jarring for people to have the whole white Walker thing just be resolved in the space of a single episode. So I think that a lot of the story points that were moving toward like Danny's going to have to to lose all of these different people. She's going to have to lose the drag and she's going to have to lose so much to get her into the position that the story wants her to be incident can express its central themes. I get that all of that stuff needs to happen. But I think because of the reduced episode order it's all having to happen way too quickly. I think that this was a really poorly paced final two seasons. And I think that those are fair criticisms, and then there's a bunch of other writings, I think is fair. I think there's still a lot of really great stuff to enjoy back game of thrones. But I don't think that I can't just come on here and Buick everybody, relax. The season is totally great and totally fine. I don't fully feel that way. I probably a little more agnostic and clinical about it. Like, I Ali feel less IMO. Ocean invested in it because to me, it's kind of more work than pleasure at this point. So I'm fascinated in the things that it's getting wrong. I'm thrilled by the things that it's getting right? But both of those things are happening simultaneously. So in terms of just looking at all of that, which I agree with what you're saying. Who was sort of the dry. I can't imagine the HBO didn't want five more seasons of this was that the cast was in the day. Or was it that? Yeah. I think it's DND fair fair to them that making game of thrones is a full-time gig. I think that they don't really get much in the way of a break pretty much ever. I think that they really they eat and breathe and sleep in. You know, what else game of thrones? I think that that's that's their life and has been for at least a decade if not a little bit longer because I think that the first version of the pilot was eleven years ago, they filmed it had something like it's it's ten years give or take a year. And you know, maybe they have like a little bit of vacation time for a couple of weeks somewhere in there. But it's such a it's such a you know, they have to turn right around start writing. Again, they have to be really in this world, and they must be exhausted. And as human beings, my heart goes out to them like I fully appreciate that. That's just got to be like on a on a life level. That's to be that's got to be really tiring. And I think that they want to wrap the story up and move on with their lives and move on to other things. And if they felt like they could do it in thirteen episodes across seasons seven and eight then that that would be why they went for it. But I think that the show very easily could have gone on a lot longer than thirteen epic. It's like a full twenty episodes of full ten and ten season seven eight if not a little bit longer than that, maybe based on like the size and ambition of the story that they've inherited from George r Martin and a friend of yours and mine who name I won't identify Casey doesn't want to be identified pointed out to me, the great irony in the fact that David Benny off, and Dan Weiss who are adapting Georgia are Martin story are ending the story rather than handing the story off to a different show runner because they want to finish the story that they started. When I think maybe the better move would have been to hand this off to another show runner for the sake of the show. I think that there's probably a lot of human beings out there that would have done a great job with more game of thrones. And it's absolutely not HBO that said you have to wrap up game of thrones HBO is currently scrambling to produce a pilot. I don't think scrambling probably very carefully get ready to produce a pilot based on. One of these successor shows ideas, that's going to take place thousands of years before game of thrones. I think their preference would have been to not have to do that. So soon and to keep making game of thrones the actual show. So I lay it at the feet of David Benny off, Dan Weiss who I think are very understandably tired. I think it's showing in the writing. And I think that they probably in hindsight should've walked away and given the show to somebody else. Like, you know, I don't want it. I don't want yours today. Kit Harrington and Dink ledge Amelia Clark. And Sophie Turner, though, the principles of the show. Did they did they want to do something else? Because I feel like that you you can get different show runners, I think that this is not ER where that all of a sudden, you know, if you have these people that were following their specific characters that were very invested in the story of these specific people that we followed for seven or eight seasons. Did they want to wrap it up to? Well. I think first of all the show can't go on forever. So I'm not like arguing for like, you know, like wait for George Martin if Dr Martin's just never going to finish it don't like put the show on for like eleven seasons like eight full seasons. Sounds right to me maybe nine, but that seems a little long. I don't know backup the winnebago from Walking Dead season six and dump the money in front of him. Because I feel like this show makes so much money that HBO could have dumped enough money in the laps of the people who are the stars. They cannot afford to lose in order to make that possible. I feel like the right deal. They probably would have kept going. Specially if it means that the story would be told a little more elegantly, I would love to be a fly on the wall for, you know, for some of what they must be thinking about some of these storylines. They're not gonna come out in the press to me too. Anybody really like like lambasting the show. I think that they're going to defend the show. But you got to wonder, you know, you gotta wonder if some of some of the things that are happening here. If like, The Danny story is really taking this mega dark, turn at a really fast clip. I can't imagine Amelia carcass thrilled about that. But I don't know. That's that's all speculation and impossible. Say. But I think your point is not invalid I think the actors wanting to move on makes a lot of sense at the very least kit Harrington wanted that haircut quite badly. All right. So let's start to dive into the mail bag from the listeners and see what they had to say about things besides the coffee Cup. Yeah. So we've we've covered the coffee Cup. I think let's start with. There's not a ton of feedback about Masan day, truecar is- long may may she rest in peace. There's there's a lot of people who were really not thrilled about the way in which Ray goal. The dragon got a lot of people very upset about that. The prolific Steve Davis will turn we'll turn the tables over to him. He will be our first official raven on the board. And Steve wrote in and said, how does the unsullied army not scout ahead, especially after they were burned. Iran's navy before literally this is a time of war, and they already knew seriously betrayed their packed. So why would they not also think she has a move up her sleeve here Danny is being escorted by what's quivalent to the secret service? They return to castle that has been abandoned since late last season, and they're in a time of war. But nobody in the entire army decides to go fifty feet ahead to make sure the coast is clear they could just use one dragon to fly super high above each area to ensure their safe to approach. So that was Steve's complaint. We had we had a few other. We add medicine leave a different team. This man named meta Steve who wrote in and said, why wouldn't generis just pull up come around the backside if Sinn rose and roast all the ships before they could turn around. I assume that that's like a post Ray goal death at that point. So why doesn't it because like flies straight at the fleet? And then show breaks away. Why doesn't she just fly like super duper high out of scorpion range and turn around and get behind the ships before they can turn round unless the scorpions are on on swivels? Yeah. Well, that's why they have to go back and take a look at the magin that the he says he's on some sort of. Yeah. Season situation ball bearing type system where otherwise you would have to move the boat a different direction. It makes no sense that the thing would be maybe has like ninety degree mobility and not a three sixty. But I mean, Khyber n- is very resourceful. You would think that he could go ahead and get that thing being able to swing around three sixty so to Steve Davis point. Yeah. Very valid one. And we have seen a lot of military maneuvering over these past seasons from the denarius forces of that could be second guessed. I who's making the call. We've blamed teary and in the past we have win tiered one. I think you have to lay at the feet of the anywhere. We're maybe it's that she is ignoring the best advice of her advisers at this point, and she is acting as her own military director. Yeah. And she shouldn't have been flying. Ray goal yet. He was he had like holes in his wings and stuff. He was clearly so injured from the fight against the night king. I want to say that David say that the war council, right? Where the wants so tired. We just take naps. Can it be naptime for a couple of weeks? She's like, no we gotta go right now. Then Reagan got shot out of the sky SOX. Jake Jankowski had had a comment here about the dragon situation. He says with two dragon scouts and all knowing being on the Queen small council. Does the fact that they were ambushed in open seas make this the biggest military negligence on the show or still rob marrying a nurse instead of a much needed ally. I think this. Jay continued and said, I think this episode made the long night much better in retrospect, I think the message that humans can come together to fight a common folk can't but can't stop their own infighting powerful. I agree with that Jake. And then Jason -cluded his feedback by saying Hyperion is just such a weenie jaded. I thought that was funny. I think that this is a fun fun thing to talk about we often on like the survivor podcasts on our H E P. You talk about like how to determine the worst move right lake if door number one gets you the win endure number two causes you to lose. Then that's the worst. That's why the Wu thing is is the worst. So is there any like way to like apply that to the worst military decision on this show, which you say that this is worse than than Rob's choice to marry a nurse instead of a much needed? Ally is one more palpably worse than the other. I think that robs decision to married to Lysa is worse because if he doesn't do that then he doesn't end up dead. And so that's big. That's big red wine, isn't has bang. Doesn't happen. So if Dan I mean, I guess the dragons life depends on that. But you know, that does denier go onto lose the the last war because she only has one dragon left. I guess we'll have to wait and see I guess we'll have to wait and see. But like what a stupid way to lose the dragon and with frigate your grades, right? Gets to kill a dragon. I I know hate that. I hate that. You don't understand you off line the other damage? I hate your I graduate just mama for tallying his way round every corner. I hate it so much. I hate him so much. He's just terrible terrible character. I can't believe he's such a major player here in the end game. It's so annoying that he is. That's that's that's a big part of the reason. Why like I'm a little sour on the final season. So far is just like knowing that you're on has to be this force. That's got to be reckoned with like he's going to be a big part of whatever's happening in the penultimate episode. Of game of thrones. And like, that's just so annoying. I hate that hate that. He's got a big part to play too. Because we right. I mean, I can't imagine that that all that business with, sir. Sees baby is going to be for not to. We'll talk about that. Yeah. We'll talk about that. We've got a lot of questions about that. Let's stay on Danny for a little while. Let's let's stay on the dragons. Because maybe there's there's something that we haven't been considering. We got a voicemail from buck Smith the buck Smith who had a take about Danny's dragons that I had never contemplated before. So let's turn it to buck. Here's buck this buck Smith in Madison, Mississippi and I woke up this morning with an Piff Unie. I know what's going to happen knows dragons have been spending a lot of time with one another for since slavers bay. I think it dragged in stone. There are. Nest of our many nests and many different sizes of dragons. I think that whenever when great joy looks up and looks up into the clouds. I believe it's going to be just a huge squadron of multi sized dragons, they're gonna come down the small ones, we'll be able to vade the big bolt throwers, but they'll get taken out by some of the archers. But I don't think they're ready for that. I don't think I don't think they're even even a little bit ready for mopus is dragons, the medium size will won't be bothered by the by the you know, the regular EROs. I think that they're going to get smoked. I think it's going to be an absolute massacre, Dan, he's gonna come in and burn king's landing to the ground to stop her from being the mad Queen of believe it's going to be Tyrian Lancaster that will end up having to put her down and John snow will. Will sit on the iron through. All right. Using me. Maybe losing a little bit of that stuff. But the the multi dragons, then yeah. Yeah. The the the multi dragons, and I love the idea I love bucks emphasis on the necessity of them being multi sizes, like a great diversity. And the sizes of the dragons, what do you think you think that drogue on and Reagan, and maybe vissarion when vissarion was around are they all just were they were they getting busy. I mean, how do we know that they're all male dragons, and how do we know that they all reproduce the same way? Maybe there's some Jurassic Park shenanigans going on or life finds away. Yeah. What do you? What do you? What do we think we see in the trailer of your on's looking up in the sky seems something could he be looking at multi sized dragons, I don't think. So I don't know how the dragons procreate what the processes or any of that. I don't believe that. There will be a. New bunch of dragon eggs that are maybe being maybe like the last shot of maybe like a dragon egg that got left behind after all of this. But I don't know I I'm not buying it. And I say now, I want it to be true. I wanted to be true because I love the idea of multiple dragons, multiple sizes scorching your graduate to ash who gets to kill on your Andrei joy and probably Yara, right? Like Yar shows desert thing, and he gets you get great joy. Due six mackinaw this week dab, probably like, maybe maybe that's it. Maybe a went back to the iron islands. And it was like, you know, what we really the reason why this hasn't been working. We haven't been thinking big enough. We've been talking about see ships. We needed to be building airships. With west is first airplanes, and she's an a drop in on your on gray. Join their toast. They're screwed at that point. Okay. Don't think that's going to happen. But I just like the visual. Let's keep going on Danny some people frustrated with what's going on in Danny land right now. This is Megan from Canada who says are either of you as upset as I am that everyone into show is trying to make Danny looked courageously. Poor girl has gone through a lot in the last week. She's lost half her army. She lost her most trusted adviser. She lost her best friend. She lost her dragon. She had to fight her dead dragging people keep giving her terrible advice. People are treating her like crap. Even though she helped save their butts in the north. Oh, and she just bound out the love of her life as a better claim to the throne. And this is me adding and he is her nephew. I mean, give the poor girl a break. She should have just taken lady Alana's advice in the first place. Rob where are you at in terms of your sympathy or lack thereof? For generis. Tar garin. Yeah. I think that sympathy is warranted. But at the same time that she's also rejecting a lot of sound advice of hey, let's wait a second. We just went toe to toe with the night king. And our forces are weakened and Narus is like no I want to go to king's landing. Now, I wanna fight. I want to take on surf see now, I can't wait another month. I'm not going to do that. So I do have sympathy for her. That being said, I think we need to see what she's going to do next is she going to retreat or is she going to hop on Rogun and torch king's landing right now. Yeah. That we just nicely into this. Next question from the great friend, Jackie tone Meyer, who writes in and says is there a chance that Danny burns king's landing to the ground. And then is horrified by what she's done and realizes that people don't want her as Queen and rides off on drogue on to never be seen. Again. What do you think about that? Rob do you think that we are going to move into the second last episode ever of game of thrones Danny is going to do the thing that she never wanted to do. She's going to become the things she hates. She's going to be responsible for the deaths of lots and lots of innocent people, and she will survive the experience, but be horrified by herself and leave or do you think that someone would need to stop or like, how do you see all of that playing? I can't imagine that. That's how the show s. Yeah. That I could see denarius taking king's landing. And then there being some sort of a decision that has to be made between the forces loyal to the Starks and the forces that are still loyal to the Mariners about what happens next. Right. But there's still and I hate to keep bringing up season to believe me. I hate to say the words house of the undying. I just had. I just had a blue bear blue raspberry, drink in order to say those words, but that that prophecy that vision that she had of the of the red keep in the iron throne being covered in snow with a with a hole blown through the roof. There's brands vision of a dragon's shadow cast all over king's landing that has yet to happen doesn't it feel like the stage is set for Danny to do something that she's going to deeply regret? And like insurgencies backing the red key with all the innocent people and sees she's losing so much in such rapid succession that I think it feels very jarring. And I do think that this is an area. I think almost no character on the show right now. No important like really important character on the show right now is his potentially getting shafted. By the shortened episode order harder than to narrow like, I don't mind this being kind of the trajectory of her character. It's just happening so frigging fast, but maybe to some degree. That's the point that she has lost so much over the past several weeks from starting with facility in all the way through Masan day in this past episode and everybody in between that maybe there is this, you know, this the Matic idea of of ruler on the brink who is just like completely out of Fs. She just spent all this time of the north realizing people in west rose, don't really like her that much. She's a weirdo. So maybe she's gonna stop caring so much about the people in king's landing. I think it's I think if it goes there like I kind of I see what they're going for it. I think that just like the execution of it. It's just it's too. It's too sudden it just it just it feels like to heart of shift. But it does feel like they are at least setting us up to wonder if she is willing to do it. And she wondering we're wondering basically sent to barris when various like gay per like a really cleanly articulated reason why she should not attack the red keeping attack king's landing Danny basically responding by saying like, I'm here. I was put on earth. I was put on planet owes bro this to wipe out tyrants. It's my destiny I'm supposed to do this, dammit. And I will do it at all costs is what she says, that's obviously paraphrase and with a little bit of John Locke thrown in there. But like she basically says, oh, tell me what I can't do. Yeah. I mean. You know, that kind of thinking doesn't always work out. So well. So I I'm wondering am nervous. And I get we're daddy is coming from. But I will start getting were Danny is coming from the moment. She just like starts annihilating people in the red keep just to get to serve see like that's the seriously playbook, sir, c wildfire bombs like a thousand people just to get to three. I don't think. So do it. I think it I think it'd be it would be really crazy to me if they if they went there. I think we I think we'll probably get to a moment where like it'll look like Danny's about to do that. And then she's going to like BIC. No can't can't do it person insurgency. I hope so that'd be my my sincerest hope. I can't imagine. The next episode starts with denarius hopping on drogue on and then torching king's landing. Yeah. Man, be crazy. Not to mention that the perimeter of king's landing seemed to be lined with all. Of those scorpions, which I was really drove on seemed like he was a sitting duck during that whole negotiation. Once you're beheading misunder why I don't know why they don't fire shot at drogue on or Danny? So the entire crowd and just see what you get. I don't know. They seem like that. They were like all right. Well, kill Masan day. You heard us. You heard our message. You're one other nit-pick. And and I've been generous to game of thrones is, but yes. We have to it's to pick. When I watched that back, how how high would you say the wall was that, sir? C was up on top of around the castle gates director David nutter says it's about forty to fifty feet up forty to fifty feet a lot glut going on, and you know, teary, and is giving his impassioned plea of, sir. See I think you as a mother if not for yourself three your unborn child. And I don't know how seriously isn't like why I can't. Yeah. You you have very far away. Tyrian projects. I guess so. I don't know. Anybody heard anybody in that conversation? Nobody is talking that loud. Well, maybe that's why why she goes through with it. Like, maybe that speech. Really resonated is. She had heard it if she had heard it. She. Oh my God. He raises interesting interesting point. That's why you're on great joy doesn't do anything because he can't hear what Tyrian saying. Yeah. But instead like, maybe she's looking down at Tyrian like when you look at Peter didn't coaches performance like he has like kind of these sad smile as a space sort of contorted in a weird way. And maybe he's just like kind of like sticky waiting at me, wildly this jerk. Nobody heard him a Sunday's last words. Yeah. Like, wait. What what? So it's very frustrating. Nobody could hear anything. Yeah. I think that that's probably correct. I think you're probably right about that. How about how about this? This is from Andrea who talk about Danny coming to the north in feeling like a bit of a weirdo. This is Andrea saying Danny seems so upset with John's popularity in the north. However, isn't it unlikely that he's going to get a similar reception anywhere else in west rose? He's only loved in the north, but elsewhere, I think she'd probably be more exciting to people, right? Shouldn't somebody point this out to her? Yeah. But he's talking about that. Yes. She needs like a good pollster to sort of tell her what's going on because he has she's like campaigning in John's backyard where he's very popular. And they knew that he wasn't even stark. Maybe you wouldn't even be as popular up there. And people hate the Stark's like the real they're just like fuddy-duddies knowing likes them. There are so serious. It can't crack a joke that being said the Starks never burn. Earned lords of the reach with dragon fire. Like, I think that Danny's whole activity during the the loot train battle at probably gave her a bit of a reputation town south, right, right and surf C is also helping to spread rumors about her. Yeah. And so there's a lot of stuff working against the denarius right now. I don't know why. This iron throne is worth the trouble. I it's not. But speaking of with there's a little bit because Dario in rule marine. I think that's probably a better move, west know scurry us you. Lame dropkick user saying I'm going back to marine marine is where she should be. The right place for being a myrie me's. Not the rest of the time. Josh before we get to more feedback questions. Let me think thank our sir here. Those are friends over at blue diamond almond. If you're watching game of thrones. You gotta be tired of these same boring snacks. Well, let me tell you winter's here. And so is the perfect snack blue diamond almonds. Whether you're going to work, you're bored at work leaving work these almonds are the perfect snack anytime Honey roasted flavor, Dahmane Saracho flavored almonds with Sabi and soy sauce flavored almonds. Do. We have your engine those poll. Great everywhere. Yeah. And the whole planet tennis planet says is eaten at their Albans. And they're just getting so strong. Why keep snacking on a boring chips when you could go to the store and pick up the blue diamond almonds right now. Listen, you're not going to want to watch the game ball potentially this week without having actually that's happening. It's happening. Go to snack handy. Like, some blue diamond. I'm Doug I go with the Honey roasted. Yeah. I mean one Honey rose is just a classic flavor combination. But let's look a little dangerously. Let's get ghost pepper up here. Whoa. Whatever it showed ghost some love. Right. Whatever the moment. Blue diamond dominance the perfect snack. Don't deny your cravings. Go pick up some great flavors right now and eat them, blue diamond, almonds crave. Victoriously? Okay. Josh where else are we going in the feedback show? Well, let's there's we're talking about the iron throne. We haven't talked a lot about John snow talk about Jon snow game of thrones feels like it's trending towards king. John like, I feel like it's a likelier than ever. I really would admit. I mean, I don't know. I really don't. I think that I think it's very likely. We will I feel like it's the kind of thing where he's like, oh don't want to do it. But you want me to do it. And I'm just going to do it. And I think that like this is the thing that he wants the least in the world and game of thrones ending with like a good person on the iron throne who wants nothing to do. With it like power going to the person who wants that power. The least might be very game of thrones, Ian ending. I don't know that I like it. And it's certainly not what I would have expected. But it's at the very least something that Varis is into and we've had some questions about that. This is from Ben stern with an e who says my question is after Tyrian embarrasses conversation. It sounds like various will attempt to back John for the throne. Instead of Danny who do you think is allies will be my question of piggyback off of that. Rob is Varis seems to imply when he's talking to Tyrian that he'll do something very untoward to Danny in order to make possible for John to be the king. What's what's various plan? Well, we'll take you to do. Whatever various is plan is. I don't think he's going to be successful. I think he's gonna get little fingered. Yeah. I think. So I think that if we go back to remember that's that season seven conversation where Danny was like called at various like in front of everybody. And it's like, oh, they're say remember you try to be killed. To kill you. If you ever do anything mistake. Yeah. He's toast. He's done. Yeah. I think that we lose virus this week. And I think that whatever he's up to I think that they Danny ends up finding out about it. And I wonder is could tear Ian betray. And wow, Tyrians gonna narc on barris at various gets killed for it. Who else is loyal to Danny that would potentially betray a various plot? Yeah. Maybe like various pools like the like the beginning of avengers Infinity war, and he's like he does like the low-key trying to kill Thanos move and Thanos just like power grabs locals threatens like yeah. No. That's a movie that's a year old. So I don't mind spoiling that but maybe various tries to do something. And Danny just like catches him in the act. I hate the idea of Tyrian selling out Varis Tyrian selling out, the one person who he has said he trusts the most in the world to Danny to somebody who he obviously has some doubts about at the very least. I think with this really let me paint really fast size in like that would just be horrible. Could there be some sort of conversation with with this Tyrian have a come to Jesus moment with denarius where he's like? Listen that you are losing support. There. Are there are people who do not think that you are the best and she's able to sort of piece it together without him gives up the goose? Yeah. He he doesn't mean to sell out the trying to say look that everybody's out on you. And she is able to deduce that Varis is also that that that Tyrian knows about this. And then also off the blindside she knows to play the idol embarrassed gets idled down, basically. Yeah. Yeah. God that sucks that feel so likely. Yeah. What a bummer. I I think next week. I think next week with put a pin in this. Because I think I think various is is done next week. I think barris is dead. I would love to do you think he makes it through episode five and then? No. I think I think well, I think we'll probably lose him next week would be my bet. But maybe not if it's the series finale, we can still talk about it, then, but if various dis I feel like we ought to we ought to compare it to the little finger death and make a call on the field as to who got shafted worse. Who had who who got who got who got got by got worse like which which character who was presented as such a smart intelligent, political schemer all the way through ended up. Just losing it in such an unfortunate way, I'm gonna I'm I'm going to be curious to come back to that. Because I I don't like viruses chances here, and I'm not happy with the scenario that we've laid out, but it feels highly plausible. Yeah. And look we are watching this basically, you know, two x speed. I think there's still a lot of twists and turns that we're going to get here in this final season. John Ramsey had written in is said for the life of me. I don't understand why anyone would want to support John snow to be the king. He has all of the bad star traits. He's not smart Orrin. He's not clever. I guess it's because Santa are various could manipulate them. But I think is misplaced honor. And loyalty would hinder that please tell me what I am missing. The floor is is yours. Okay. Rob the appeal of John snow as the leader is that I think that to the common folk that he doesn't come off with sort of like the air of being stuck up that he was like almost basically. Yes, he is a stark. But he kind of has the appeal of being a low born bastard, he is a war hero. And of course, I that plays very well in the north. And now we're also talking about that he does have the better claim as well as various points out. He also points out in this particular society, the idea of a male ruler is more favorable than the idea of a female ruler. And the tar Gary in brand, especially the dragon writing target. Aryan brand. I mean, John is sort of a target area in stark clothing. But the tar garrisons are are are not popular. Yeah. The other thing like John's deadly. He can be a real dummy. And it's nothing that he's going to want. He does he he's just like he's a straight shooter to a fault. Yeah. He doesn't like the political game. And he did get killed for it once before but that being said him bringing the Wild Wings in like, he did he did like create peace for the Wild Wings at the very least if nothing else he achieved that he brought the Wilding south of the wall. He saved so many of them probably a ton of them died during both the battle of the bastards and the battle at winter fell during the long night. But many of them are going to get to go home. Like, I think we've probably have seen the last of torment short of an epilogue, right? Like, I think that torment gets to walk away thing. Don't you dare don't you start with me? I'm very hopeful that we've seen the last German giants band. I want that man to live. He said, you'd never know. I know and I'm selling him like don't don't you. Don't tell me that just go out of here. You know? So like John has achieved something he achieved piece for the wild things. He bridged a gap between an entire culture. Bridge, this cultural gap that had never been done for thousands of years credentials as a leader you good resume point his heart's in the right place stabbed in that. Unfortunately, you know, that I think that without somebody without an adviser. I don't think he can be of advised either. He's the kind of guy that, you know, before before the big meeting like, okay, whatever you do don't say this don't say this to this. And you know, he's going to say in the meeting. Yeah. All of these people who are like the front runners for the throne. They suck does every candidate is flawed. Yeah. And it's this is to say, they suck is harsh. But like they are all so rigid. There's no there's no wiggle room on these people on John snow. He's the you know, he has that the Steve Davis once again, he was really pissed off about this. Steve Davis rodents, and everyone always says that Ned was the most loyal loyal person in west rose, including. John, but I beg to differ. There's a big difference between telling a lie and admitting the truth for the good of the realm net. Omitted the truth about John for twenty years. John could do the same by just keeping his heritage to himself. But he just had to offer up the information for some reason. So he is not like Ned because Ned would hold a secret to save lives. When John just always feels compelled to tell every truth. No matter how many lives are ruined. I think that rob speaks to your thinking about John's snow as somebody who he's not going to be advised very easily. He's going to do it. He wants to take advice. No is going to run out into the middle of the battle of the bastards. Even if that's not the plan he's going to drag and ride into the middle of the long night. Even if that's not the plan. Just because that's what instinct tells him to do that's where his moral compasses pointing? And while he does have a strong moral, compass. He lacks the. The analytical skills, I believe to know when is the right time to pivot away from from what the compasses telling you. When is when is the tool not doing its job? When do you have to use your gut and make a choice to do something a little more creative? I don't think John's no necessarily has that gear. I'm with you. I I don't think he'll end up on the iron throne by he's going to get much closer than I thought that he would get it'd be dead by now. Yeah. Again, I still think that Danny could kill him. Yeah. I think that's possible too. Other people who might kill Jon snow animal activists everyone's very upset with John snow for the way feel about this shaded ghost. This is a ton of lead back. Jackie Jackie Tomar. Once again, doesn't go deserve a quick scratch behind the now missing ear for fighting all these years as I John John can't even wander over five steps and look longingly in the eyes and say goodbye, come on and Tobey Pollack read come on John always come on, John. I mean. Yeah, it's it's your dire. Wolf dude so much happened. After you got the dire wolves these very symbolic for house. Stark this this poor guy. Lost an ear for you. You haven't talked to him in years. Yeah. And and you just get you give them the head not. That's it. Give them a hog come on come on. Don't be a jerk. Make people happy is stupid. I thought that was bad. And another instance of just like just let John snow that dog. That's like the obvious move. It's an emotional moment that he gets to go to the dog, and like you can imagine like to too strong solemn northern creatures respecting each other from across the distance. They know that the hearts belong in the north. But only one of them can truly go even though they both want to stay. And so they have a longing rance across the courtyard. It's like just let him hug the dog. Let them hook the dog show us that Jon snow's, like a little sad about the fact that I couldn't hang out with his dog more. Maybe the ghost is a shell of his former self. I mean the last time we saw. Nightmare Lia seemed like she was like twice the size that ghost is currently. Yeah. And I am I am I off on this. No goes to Guoco Stras, the runt of the litter. So that's that's that's fine. That's that was always built. It was always billed that way. Jack from Maryland also pissed off about the ghosting. You can't even Pat your dire wolf and give them a proper goodbye. John's a horrible pet owner in this was an awful moment, uptight. I enjoy the phrasing of but jacket also asked I two of a pet lover. So I understand the ad is well RIP Leah part of the cat trio and Isabel. Okay, weedy. I don't want to give her the short shift Jack Romero wind had also added with only two episodes left to you think that was a real sendoff for ghost in torment. Or do you still have do you think they still have a role to play in the game? I will take the official position that we will not see torment and goes again, unless it's some sort of epilogue thing in the final episode. Maybe if we have like John snow like him like some sort of ceremony in the winter fell Crips like his body being returned to winter Phil I could see torment and goes there. Yeah. I I don't think that we will see them in any kind of dangerous situation again. Now, they're they're they're good. They're gonna make it. I'm very happy about it. Speaking with people who are going to make it. I'm being challenged on a preseason position prediction that I had had Jessica writes in and says Gilly revealed in the latest episode that she is pregnant does this change Josh's prediction that she will not make it out of this season alive. Yes. I will say yes. Although I will I will say the fact that she survived the long night was the thing that if she wasn't going to die there. I think that she's going to be fine. I think salmon Gilead both going to be okay here. Yeah. What's their future role to play here anything or are they sort of like in the montage with torment and ghost? I kind of feel like their stories done. I kind of feel like there's not there's going to be so much that has to happen in episode five and we've already seen structurally that they are willing this binal season. That's only six episodes long. They're willing to sideline major characters for multiple episodes at a time. We did not see at all in episode two. We did not see her at all an episode three. And even. Though, she made major moves in episode four. We didn't see her until basically the very end. So sir c sits out half at the very least of the final season. I think that torment making it through four episodes of the final season more than enough time for giants being salmon Gilly making it through four episodes of the final season more than enough time for salmon Gilly, we can throw them in the epilogue. But I think it would be enough to know for me. I would like to know a little bit more about like what their alternate. Landing spot is is just why hope that there's something in the series finale, but an episode five which I expect to be the most dangerous episode left on the board. I expect the final episode. You got imagine that's mostly like resolution stuff. I feel like Sam is going to be okay. I feel like you always going to be fine thing that they're going to you know, they'll revamp the citadel I'll get to be happy librarians that what they were off to the citadel. They're currently just chilling in the north. I think hanging out no. Iron hill. I don't know. Maybe I kind of thought that maybe Sam would end up with high garden since the tar we were promised high guarded after the deaths of the Tyrrells. But apparently, Brian is going to be the Lord of high garden, which takes me to fifty are, sir Brendan of has fifty cents at a lot of great feedback. But I'll just cherry pick my favorite of his feedback which was Braun. That was a weird scene. Yeah. That's it too. Yeah. I mean that seemed to me just like, well, we gotta get back in here. People love Braun. Gotta get gotta get more Brown broad second high garden and bronze nut killing Tyrian, Jamie. So what's happening here? Josh bronze been Dorn. And this was the worst Brunson of the series. It was so stupid. It was just it was like cartoony to me of just like all right? Well, what's your offer do better than? In that. Okay. Well, let me see. But no way that Braun ends up the Lord of high garden under denarius is rain right in felt like a bad attempt at Quentin. Tarantino scene was Braun like coming into the in with the crossbow, and like the staging of it and just like being very very talkie. And and, you know, cock of the walk type stuff if it was like reservoir dire wolves. It's very stupid. I don't know. I I look I don't I think the fact that it was on the show and there's only two episodes left. Like are they going to reverse course on that? Aren't we now just going to get white Braun is Lord at the reach seems so stupid meat? But like, I don't I don't know what kind of story energy is going to be invested in in reversing that unless like unless maybe like the funny kind of arc for for Brian is that there's always another job and the prize could always be bigger in the promise can always be higher. So. By the end of the series. Well, whoever likes survives. What's coming up? Like, if it's Tyrian, Jamie. And they're like, I know we said, hi garden. But there's one more thing we gotta do. And if you do for us, we'll give you the moon. You know, whatever it is. Maybe there could be something like that. Where bronze just like on? All here, we go again, have you ever heard of marine? Yeah. Sentiment marine. I thought that scene sucked. I thought that was terrible made no sense at all. Even if Brahmin a was going to then. They weren't going to give them high garden. How was Braun going to catch up with Jamie interior Tyrian again? One his one shot to kill them. He didn't put like a tracking device on them. He's lurking. He's lurking. Just like always in the shadows. He's fairy sneaky, I thought that it was the same as I thought that brand was gonna come in and then kill Braun from behind. Now. I don't know why it existed what a bad scene. It's just awful. Yeah. This is a really bad seeing people want to know what's coming next for the Lancaster brothers. Chris from New York had written in instead of noticing an interesting parallel between tearing and Jamie developing. Both of them are being told by others that their Queen Danny, and sir c respectively are not fit to rule, but for the longest time now neither of them has been willing to accept this back. How do you think each of the brothers will deal with the Queen that they have at one time pledged loyalty to rob? Do you have a prediction for how this will go for Tyrian as it relates to Danny? Ultimately and Jamie as it relates to search the ultimately Jamie's going to kill, sir. See, right. That's what he's going off to do. I don't think that they can give aria the kill of the night king, and sir see that show. I don't think they'd let her kill both of the big bats. She got the night king. I don't think she gets Hersi. Yeah. I agree. Jamie is the one that her. Jamie is the one that his story line his arc everything in the series has always been about him in, sir. See I think that he's the one who ends up taking out. I liked the I like the idea that he is he is going to king's landing, and whether he means to do it or just kind of ends up like echoing what had happened a dozen years or so earlier that Jamie kind of like follows in his father's footsteps of when tie win came to king's landing in mad kings hour of need as a friend, and he comes into king's landing and causes the final act of the mad king because he betrays him and creates the circumstances under which Jamie has to become the king slayer and killed the mad king before he destroys king's landing kind of like the idea of Jamie coming back to king's landing. Posing as a friend or actually because he is addicted to search and he just needs to see her. He needs to try to talk out of all of this stuff, and he gets to her and she's about to do something terrible. And he stops her. And he kills her. I think for Jamie Lancaster to kill, sir. See there's like the Vallon car stuff. That's not really a part of the show. And I think that we learned a hard lesson. Some people learned a hard lesson with the way that the show views prophecy in in the way that they handle the night king. I feel like to to lean too hard on Vallon car. The prophecy of the younger sibling killing Sirsi is probably a mistake. But I still think that there are story arc reasons. Why it's a very sensible decision from the writers to have Jamie kill survey and for the kings player to become the Queen slayer. I think just kind writes itself what about for Tyrian? I think that he ends up staying by generis side, and maybe ends up being her only friend and trying to be the voice over. Well, how about this? And this is something that I hadn't even thought about until I saw the feedback. Come in today. You know, my my thinking is we have we have the scene with hound and aria they're leaving winter fell. They're both heading down south to they have. They have they have unfinished business that they need to resolve the hounds clear-cut, right? Could gain Bill. That's happening. He's going to kill his brother aria. I would assume is going to cross off the last major name on the list that he wants to that. She wants to kill somebody. Easy. What if she wants to kill somebody else? This this is from Lauren Lauren wrote in and said, do you think it's possible that aria is going south to kill Danny? Not, sir. See we saw her as she was about to get the news met John being the true king. And the next scene was her heading south could a name have been added to her list. Trevor Chong ads and says since aria has ended the life of the night king in his blue eyes. There's been a lot of speculation about who are is green. Eyed victim will be most people assume this is pointing towards, sir. But there's another notable character with green eyes. And that is none other than our co Lisi who away of purple is in the book, but not on the show after the events of this episode. Is there any chance that REM makes a move against Danny to devil's advocate that out just a tiny bit just to like to kind of work with like a fairly active theory as far as I've encountered it aria says she has no. Intention of coming back to winter fell out because she thinks she's going to die or is it because she thinks that she's about to do something that John can't bring himself to do that. She is uniquely qualified to do because of all her ninja skills that she is going to do something that is going to break her her bastard brothers slash cousins, heart and killed generis and solve that problem. And then just like never show her face and winter fell again, like she's going to she's going to bear that moral burden is what she's setting out to do. I don't see aria killing heiress, you're killing the night king. I didn't see her. But but at least the song of ice in fire. She kills the night. King the ice. She kills the dragon Queen the fire. I don't think that deniro's dies without her. And Stephen I were debating about this. I think is pregnant, and I think she lives to have the baby. Yeah. So I don't think that aria. I mean, maybe aria. A tempts too. But I don't see aria Killington heiress being part of the show. I don't think it's going to happen. I think it's it's it's fun food for thought to think about that as a possibility and think that scenario is pregnant with John's baby. Yeah. I mean that was that was my thinking coming into the season. I don't I'm trying to think of if anything happened that really changes my mind on that front you that. I wagered knowing it snow it all on that. Wow. Said yes. And he said, no, he said, no way, he said, no way. So I. Preseason bet was your bet. So I don't just like kind of like thinking about I haven't seen anything that really moves the needle too, far one way or the other other than the fact that a lot of time seems to be passing like at least like two months, it feels like have passed since a month or so since they got since they were on the the boat. Oh, right guy. So I mean, obviously, I'm not a father. I don't I don't know how these things work. You would think with maybe like we would have an indication two months since they were on the boat. Hey, it's probably not that much longer than that. And they're also like now that she's back and dragged stone and has gone to king's landing. I know we're traveling by map and time is a little murky. But this is a significant stretch of time. I think. So I don't know. Okay. Anyway, was something anything about it. I haven't thought about the possibility of aria going to king's landing to kill the nearest. But. I figured let's plant the flag, some some strong feedback last one for you is testosterone Tommy, which is a great handle. I know saying how long's it gonna take anti-tory allies that by legitimizing gantry? He's now Robert Baratheon legal heir to the iron throne. King Henry, what do you think? He's a man of the people. Why did they bring him back on the show if not I something like really important, and like not to take anything away from the very special night. He shared with aria not to take away from the fact that he helped build all these super cool funky new weapons for all the people in the war against the white walkers. They seemed like they you know, they were they had that on lock because they had an aria stark. Much like the vendors having a Hoke why bring injury back and why make like a big moment of him becoming Lord of storms end if not because gantry is going to get thrown. I think is going to get the throne. Well, they needed his Smith thing prowess in we needed his amazing running. Don't forget beyond the wall that the show has like the big four houses of the Starks. Lancaster's the target and the Barath Theuns, and maybe they just wanted to leave the show with, you know, something intact for the big four. Maybe. You know, they they had basically taken all the Barath Enes off the board. And they had they had the Gandhari character. And then get a love interest for aria. He served a couple of things. I don't know if the show ends with Genry is the king. Good guy Gandhari though, you know, good guy Gandhari little bit dim kind of dumb. But really good guy lanced MandA people spend time in flea bottom. You know, he knows what it's like to be on the on the receiving end of these horrible power structures Bremen winter everybody. Yeah. You know, he knows what the bowl Brown is. Like, he's got a good name. Now. He's got a good story. He's got good people around him, you know, Davos seaward hand of the king. That's great. Yeah. Yeah. It's possible. I don't know if everybody's pumped up for that. I mean, it's not the sexiest ending. Now for some people. It is very attractive, man. But one hundred anyway, there's there's other stuff, but it's over an hour at this point. Okay. Well, Josh, hi, how are you doing going into the last two episodes kidney kin the season be redeemed? Can the season be redeemed? I don't know. What's find out? Let's find out. I haven't gone through a loss rewatch recently when I really disliked the final season while it was airing. And then I really liked the final season when I realized it recently, and it just played a lot better. I wonder how this you know, what will history due to the game of thrones final season a couple of years from now, I think I have seen enough at the very least now at this point four of six episodes to to know that this final season will be thought more. It will it will end closer to like that lost sopranos side of the spectrum. Then like, the breaking bad the leftovers. The the Friday night lights is the the shows that ended in a way that the people who loved those shows the majority of people were outspoken, and how much they appreciated how those shows ended versus the people that there's at the very least vocal minority of people who are angry about the way in which a show ends if not a majority, and I might thinking about the people in my life who who've watched every episode of game of thrones. They watch it every week. They don't think too hard about it like how how are those people reacting to this final season. They're not loving it. So I I wonder I wonder I think I've seen what I'm saying. I think I've seen enough to know that I don't think that the I think that it's going to trend towards a thumbs down in the immediate moment. I think that game of thrones. Like, it's just the bar was way too high and it's hard. It's going to be too hard to clear, I might enjoy it. I've enjoyed large parts of this final season. So far. I've also not enjoyed parts of it. But I'm I'm open minded as we get into these final two episodes. Yeah. I think that I expected whatever they did was going to be met with criticism. So I think I had like a middling expectations of what it was going to be. And so I I haven't been like that underwhelmed. Yeah. It's been fine. But that's not a glowing review. It's on me. But I I've enjoyed for episodes. It's exciting. And I'm looking forward to seeing you know, how it's going to be. It's it's. Not going to be the the book version or the really long form version. We're getting it on, you know, fast speed, and they're still almost three hours of show to go. And I do think that there's going to be some big twists and turns here, and I'm here for the ride. I think I like to fantasize about George arm Martin in his secret evil layer, like doctor, claw, laughing maniacally as he sees like the blood pour through the streets of the reactions to game of thrones real opportunity. She choose to basically like, sir. See with the Cup of wine and looking at the septum day. Lord just exploding right now. He's like, oh, man. What I've got is so much better than this. Oh my God. Yeah. Light, please. Give me your strength. You know? I think I do if he does not come back and write the books in a in a way or just at all. But if he doesn't write the books in a way, that's really really pops. I think that the reputation of game of thrones. As a franchise may be a little roughed up. And I wonder like what the appetite for like the successor shows and stuff I always wondered what that was going to be like anyway, but I feel like a successor show of game of thrones is going to come on a year to a year and a half after the series finale of game of thrones. And given like the current apparent attitude towards the final season of game of thrones. I wonder if we're going to be hyped about it or they're going to be like. Oh, yeah. Here we go. Again, I've been burned by once. You're not getting me again HBO. Well, I don't think it's going to have the same audience that the original game of thrones has, but I think that even half of the audience. I think it depends how good it this. I mean writing about it. Obviously. Yeah. Watching it look we we have to take a we we have to embrace. What what what we like about this? This is it there's only two days left. Compelling times. I love this stuff. You know? This is all very fascinating to me if nothing else. So I can I can appreciate it on that kind of like clinical level of what's going on here. Why why is this not working? Why is this part working? Why is that part really not working? Why is that part really really working? What are they getting? Right. What are they getting wrong? And why that's that's interesting stuff to me. So. I was going to say, I'm happy, but I'm Mike probably too tired to to be like outright happy. But I'm I'm invested. This is a compelling time. This is historic times where we only have a couple. We only have a few days left on the planet in which we don't know how game of thrones ends every every day during this time is a fascinating day. Yes. Okay. All right Sunday night after the last war. I guess Stephen fishbach. We'll be back for more snow at all live. We were on around ten forty last week eastern time. So expect us back or again around that time on post show, recaps dot com, and then Josh, and I in one week's time will pick up the pieces on the feedback show since you questions G O T at post show. Recaps dot com for Josh wig ler is that fueled by the Lord of light himself. Over at HR dot com slash game of thrones. So many different articles and interviews everything you need to know. Follow at round Howard on Twitter. Josh anything else? No. That's that's basically it. Okay. All right. Thank you guys so much for listening. Hope we get a good show for everybody on Sunday night. Where you're throws returns. We appreciate your feedback in star ratings of the apple podcasts store when you go to post show. Recaps dot com slash GO T, I tunes. Take care. Have a good one. Bye.

Danny John John Josh Wigley John snow HBO rob director Jon snow Starbucks Starks Dan Weiss king barris west rose Jamie night Stark Walker David nutter Kit Harrington Steve Davis
To get paid, hospitals get creative

An Arm and a Leg

15:30 min | 2 years ago

To get paid, hospitals get creative

"James cornell is a woodworker. He makes furniture out of reclaimed wood. Boards mold house sells it on oetzi. He does pretty well. He's got a big shop of his own. Business grows grows every year but can't afford health insurance this story a few years ago so that day i was making picture frames of rippin boards on the table saw and made the last rip turn off the table saw and for whatever reason just looked away from the blade for a minute they reached out to grab the off and put my hand in the still spinning blade so fortunately meli for me. Since the power was off once the blade hit the bone it pretty much kind of stopped the blade so it didn't go all the way through the finger but i was pretty pretty gnarly pretty gnarly situation. You're by yourself yeah so screamed for about ten seconds. I didn't feel anything but new happened and then rando a shop neighbor leaving a trail of blood on the way over to them they got me bandaged up and and took me over to the urgent care because i know going to an emergency. The room is going to be just an obscene amount of money but the docket urgent care looks at chips finger and says new. I'm not the guy for this. Yes he was like they're probably going to have to amputate. You're going to have to go to an emergency room jim his friend get back in the car. That was a pretty rough drive. The pain was so excruciating that i couldn't even talk. If i wanted wind screen. I couldn't even scream. I was just i don't know which is worse than the pain or the fear of what is going to cost me <hes> but there are a couple of nice surprises waiting. I he's not going to lose. The doctor came in contact. You look at everything correct jokes news all right we can set you back up took him an hour and a half to put ten stitches for him to kind of find signed enough skin to reattach and works that surprise number one and then jim stops at the desk on his way out to sign the paperwork and the person behind the counter. Tells me if you give us three hundred fifty dollars. If you pay three hundred fifty dollars today we'll take sixty percent off your bill sixty per sixty percent so doc. I'm thinking again. This could be eight nine thousand dollars. I'm like yeah. Here's here's my credit card. This is an arm lick show about the cost of healthcare. Dan weiss jim by the way listener he sent the story in just after the show launched last fall and full disclosure is the show on atrium and jim situation worked out ended up paying about fifteen hundred bucks. It's a a lot but it's a lot less than expected his fingers and he sees a big question industry. Is this a normal the thing if i walked into any hospital. Is this something that they offer ordered. I look out and just happened to walk into one that offers this sixty percent off program. This is a super good question. I don't think there's any way to know for sure to find out what kind of discounts and what kind of prices are out there but hospitals getting creative. That is definitely a thing. They've got to do it a couple of months ago. I sat in on a webinar about the patient financial. Oh crisis by a woman named sarah nettie she connected some dots start with she says half of people with employer based insurance have a deductible of at least east a thousand bucks. That's the amount you pay out of pocket before. Insurance pays anything and we know that seventy percent of american have less than a thousand dollars. There's the failings at any given time so for our insurance kicks in seventy percent of us have a problem and over half of americans say that receiving a large medical bill can be almost as traumatic as receiving a very severe diagnosed even though and here's the thing i didn't tell you about sarah nettie and she's the revenue director for a hospital so our patient financial crisis. It's her patient financial crisis because when hospital bills are so high we can't pay them. The hospital doesn't get paid so sarah's here telling other hospital administrators one way. Her hospital is dealing dealing with this patient financial crisis. Her hospital has brought in a company called care payment like carpet with the silent e in the middle to collect money from patients since and care payment makes paying for surgery kind of financing a car down. Everybody qualifies payments zero interest. This is my promo clip. The company posted you very happy to find out some care payment monthly payments. This is an upgrade the usual medical billing approach bad cop pay up now in full or we send you to collections and wreck your credit which most of us are pretty familiar with sara. Gianetti says the good cop approach is working for her hospital. They now collect twice as much money from patients as before and that is after care payment takes. Its cut so all those bills. We can't afford their good news for care payment like the company commissions surveys puts out press releases to say so here's one from twenty the eighteen new care payment research shows americans can't afford their medical bills awesome rate. I talked with laura aylward. She's he's a marketing executive at. She gets that went bad times for people mean good times your company it means things are a little messed up. You know it's the incentives senate misaligned in many respects and you could even argue like why do you even do your plan. Why why do you even have to exist. Why do you use a company to exist. It's like what what is the what the shouldn't it be better and yeah and yes maybe so but the but the reason that a company like ours will always exist is americans do want to pay their bills when we owe hospital most definitely cannot pay the whole thing in one go so care payment is doing great. A press release says it's business really went up fifty percent in a year and then their hospitals getting creative on their own. That's just a minute senate on armenta league right after the break and i'm going to lake is a co production of public road productions and kaiser health news nonprofit newsroom covering healthcare in america. It's an editorial independent part of the kaiser family foundation. It is not affiliated with the giant healthcare provider kaiser permanent fear and ancestor. It's a fun story. You can read all about it at arm and a leg show dot com slash so bravo hospital bills that are too high for people to pay means people. Don't pay their bills. Hospitals lose money so some of them are getting creative for instance. A pair of hospitals in eastern ohio offered a special recently bring bill from last year. You can pay it off at fifty cents on the dollar. I talked with jose guevarra the revenue director for the two hospitals they are owned by the same chain they shared administrators and stuff. He started last year and things were looking bad. People were just not paying their bills and i said how do i reach out this community because when i got here <hes> the first thing that was phone to me. Was you know we're a poor community. Are people don't pay their bills and i said oh you know. You really don't realize i come from a state. That's number two is the poorest state of the nation albuquerque new mexico you know and people pay their bills and when we give them discounts and we work with them and so so a little while after he arrived he got okay. Hey free one-month experiment fifty percent off on old bills they just put up some flyers in the hospital to see what would happen and that worked out really good our collections for that month was almost one point two million dollars for the whole month and what is it usually usually run but maybe six hundred thousand so we almost double that so you you you gave people at a discount of fifty percent. You took in twice as much money you yes yes yes that was last fall. They liked all that money so they ran a special again in february and march of this year and this time they pushed it harder they hit facebook and twitter got local media to write about it. Suddenly jose's team is getting calls from all over the country. People people were calling me. They were gonna you know. My mother said that <hes> she owes bill. I mean i'm in columbus ohio. Can i pay the bill for her. By of course means you. You know we have taken money from atlanta georgia. You know nashville tennessee columbus. Ohio hospitals ended up extending special offer through tax day to get people's refund checks this time the tripled their usual take so this raises kind of an obvious question and so how how can you how can you afford to fifty percent off. There's an obvious answer fifty percent of some things better than one hundred percent nothing. It's even better when people are calling you to pay instead of you having to spend time and money chasing them to maybe pay it but jose gave me a second answer to well. You know people have asked that question. This is the thing we used to get paid sixty percent most of our cares you know like medicaid forty four percents <hes> so fifty percent is affordable google to us. He saying that carriers insurance companies pay them. Sixty percent medicaid pays forty four percent so fifty percent. It's in the range of what the hospital expects to get what it routinely except the big players who pay most of the bills which raises a whole nother question if you can afford a big discount like why did you set the price so high in the first place wherever you look look the prices don't seem real. Jose is happening at fifty percent partly because otherwise he's likely to get nothing james cornell and that emergency room gets a sixty percent discount mostly for the same reason sarah. Janetti is happy to give care payment fat cut because her hospital still gets more money this way an an all these cases. The hospital are looking at losing money because they've set their prices. So hot seems like it's not working for anybody except upped maybe for care payment in the next few episodes of an arm and a leg get right into this. How did we end up with the prices. Begotten we'll start with one procedure a brain m._r._i. And four wildly different price tags from one thousand dollars to twenty six thousand dollars two of them from the same hospital the same patient on the same day that's next time on an arm and a leg till then to carry yourself. This is an arm and a leg show about the cost of healthcare this week stories came from listeners not just james cornell i found out about sarah nettie eddie and jose guevarra after following a tip from a listener who works at a healthcare thank you and keep coming arm and a leg show dot com slash contact contact. This episode was produced by me. Dan weisman. Our editor is whitney henry lester. Consulting managing producer is daisy. Our music by dave winer and blue dots doc sessions at emory monday is our oil interests is daniel fernandez. An arm and leg is a co production of public road productions and kaiser health and nonprofit newsroom covering healthcare in america editorially independent party the kaiser family foundation. It's not affiliated with giant healthcare provider kaiser permanente. They share an ancestor. I ancestor it's a fun story. You can hear it at the end of this season's first episode or check it out at arm and leg show dot com slash heighten. Dan weber is the national editor for broadcast and tanya. English is senior editor for broadcast innovation at kaiser health news there the editorial liaisons this show and two of the world's nicest humans and diane joined arm and a leg as a patriot supporter justice season one ended so diane is the first of more than one hundred people. I'm about to thank right right now. Because anybody who pledges two bucks a month or more gets a shout out right here and now. Are you ready. Thank you so much. We support amber cdo. Laura l. curio wpro who pilot tony bucco rachel fedor. Susan jocelyn matt fe ben perished craig wilson janabi burgess walter ian duffy shelby u._p. Nathan lawrence james cornell liz saw me thomas montor karen murtaugh tailored duct edward louis chris community joshua d he shoots joe g orion o. rien willett amanda creek robert stones and tony caitlyn maluluke ryan rack david gene justin mills aaron erin fiji philip andrew read albro martinez rook vander offered the tory krieger via pollock smith james darren kevin griego ben rockwood would dr travis jane elliott lisa's everts jason ash baugh stephanie rossi chris clark alan candice sparkman brandon johnson angela four via david zanny jillian friedman seth goldman danny lynch michael sibito elizabeth puska jeremy brill joyce mcmillan melissa 'cuius shelly steiger aggarwal to amber green tyler bosna arthur wong elicit e-coli phillips marv hoffman doug shaw justin bosley jack phelps john f. meyer catherine walker kerr chris brown jeremy would ryan gee chocolate juvie bury paul de blanchard busy dot tv tina favor or rosco nathan starred good alec and sharon floyd passion chelsea laskey mcfarland arthur were kaiser sicilia sicily lucas john stalbur devon olsen george laura ben ghaffari kristen hitchcock alita p sarah andrew worsen dr april hendrix vicky broach melissa parker lucy renou jeff jeff clarke crystal amador laura w k kirk donald macleod mic donkey beverly chapelle steve vance david cintron michael frolics dean thomas exchan- leonard shepherd beth lang jake burton denmark nick mike hamlin josephine elder everett mills edina love maria albena jewel writer elizabeth feldman amy benz kelly good tweet who but faneuil kasey kerry williams meaty kendra daniel renowned and thank you so much is so awesome to say all your names lame enough. I got yours ron. I'll redo it k- okay. Dan waste <unk> out of here. This is season two so glad you're with us.

jose guevarra kaiser family foundation jim ohio senate sarah nettie america James cornell director kaiser permanente Dan weiss Nathan lawrence james cornell meli james cornell sarah editor laura aylward
Breaking Down Game of Thrones, S8E3 | The Watch

The Watch

51:37 min | 2 years ago

Breaking Down Game of Thrones, S8E3 | The Watch

"The watch is brought to you by just cracking egg. You wanna talk about great production value? How about a legit hot fluffy breakfast, grandma? That's packed with all your favorite ingredients. It's called just crack Neg. And all you have to do is a fresh egg over there hearty ingredients than stir microwave and enjoy any day of the week. It takes less than two minutes to make find all seven varieties of just crack Neg in the exile. Today's episode of the watch is brought to you by Bud Light, Bud Light is all about bringing friends together. And we're wondering which unlikely pairs team up this season on game of thrones seen so many old friends and new come together as pretty amazing last night, unless it's up so Tyrian and sonza had a really like just tender moment when they thought they were about to be killed by obvious. And those quite moving Bud Light is reminding you to enjoy responsibly Twenty-one up. It's definitely. Walk. Hello and welcome to the watch. My name is Ryan I haven't editor at the rigor dot com and joining me in the studio e still alive, it's degree. Well, I'd like to consider myself one of the main characters of this show core five us. Was guaranteeing to see her. Oh, my still in the main cash. Yeah. That's right. Eighty what's up, man? It's monday. We are here as we will be for the entire game season on Mondays talking exclusively about last night's episode of game of thrones. So while we wanna get to bury we're going to get to a vendor's on Thursday. When you see I haven't seen the guys I'm going to see this week. And we're going to do a special Thursday. Don't call the special one eight hundred number that we have next to our computers here in spoil vendors for Andy has not been spoiled for yet. It has not get I was gonna make a couple of references on last night's talk to it whereas going to spoil it. But but I didn't I that's good that this. We wanna do an early podcasters. They issued psyched traffic's get a straight. You all on the road today. The sort of like that Don Henley song boys of summer. Did she stop in pick it up, and no she just seemed disturbed by? She also saw dog with sunglasses just filling in she seen. She seen. It did hit sticker on a Cadillac. Wow. This is guys we have content to get to last night. Chris was season. Eight episode three the long night game of thrones. This was the one it was a long night was the one everyone was waiting for. And it, you know, according to these parts did not disappoint. It was an hour and a half of dimly lit carnage. And I found it thoroughly engaging offended often exhilarating founded deeply entertaining. And I find it shocking. That this episode is in some ways divisive. So what's our best way in here? Well, because I wanna talk about it all. I want to jump into the straw, man. So let's do the episode. I because I think that we should talk a little bit about why we liked the episode, and then we can sort of we can address them like of the critiques of the episode if you if you'd like to. Yeah. Because I think there are techniques techniques there are critiques on technical level. They're dark those people's critique. Yes, now, I I just took it as an encouragement to invest in the latest sixteen k technology. Via deepen day that case to your wife, my television set. No, I think I told everyone on the podcasts that I mentioned to her the other week that I thought maybe our TV was a tad small by current standards. Didn't go. He told me if I could find another room where I could put a large TV. I was welcome to do it. And if you could find another room secret library in the crypts of winter. So go great. But let's talk about what we liked about this episode, first and foremost, I thought this episode was a marvel I thought it was incredible. I do not know how they do what they do. And I am saying that wearing the Jonty cap I've put on since I started trying to make television. And I'm wearing it. I'm saying it wearing the drab Press Club cap with a little card in the Bill that I used to wear when I was Julie critic from start to finish in terms of in terms of production in terms of direction in terms of choreography and visual imagination, which is important considering it was a relatively dialogue light episode. We have the close captioning on when we watch for for talk. The thrones. In case, there's any mythological nuggets we need to get out. And it was really just wind whistling come. On retreat. Yeah. A lot of the chestnuts here during battle men the wall archers. And I'm mostly judging it on a curve of mouth dropped emoji in terms of what they accomplished and particular shouts to Miguel politic. It's one thing to pull off the battles that he's pulled off on the show in the past. It's another thing to come back knowing they've written something, that's double what you did before. And everyone's expecting you to be able to pull it off. Yeah. And I think that I think that he did a little bit about the passion because known for doing these sort of huge action heavy episode for the for the show, he did hard home, and he'd about all the bastards. Both of those battles are shot during the daytime. Yeah. And features obviously, I caught imagery naturally during the day. You're gonna be able to orient yourself a little bit better in space. So while I found hard home like thrilling, I don't necessarily didn't always know what side of the gate. I was on in hard home when they were showing the whites attacking the gate, and then there's some people beyond the gate, it then there are some people on the other side. And then there's the water but for the. Part. I understood hard home. I thought it had those incredible moments of John catching is at the night. King all that shooting in the dark is a completely different beast. They obviously chose to shoot in the dark because they would be able to do different things via fax wise with night than they would if they had shot this during the day. I imagine radio he ain't the day king. He ain't the daycare. I mean, he he ain't the honestly what if he back and he the day king? Wow. I mean, why not three episodes left, and we have Charlie day, right? Dake brother of they were trying. They were trying something different. They were trying something by the way, even more difficult because I cannot imagine was this a month of night shoots. I mean, that's that's hell marshalling this many people shooting from what I imagined was sundown to sunup for weeks at a time. It's outrageous outrages also felt and it's interesting to compare it to heart home, heart home was such a unique set piece because it was on the bad guys on the white walkers turf, more or less, right. The the it. They matched the terrain. This was kind of a intentional mash up of all the styles of battles. We've seen before there was horse combat favorite been less. Too long though, there was trench warfare. There were there was siege. Horses would have been better off on the show luck. Well, the night king would have done great on the set of luck. Because then the show would still be running because he just would have raised them. Yes. He's right. It was all the types of combat we've seen before I guess, not naval. That's coming up. All the same time. Ariel was. There was right. We hadn't really ever seen that before. Somebody are you. We still haven't seen it because it was quite dark anyway, I mean just back to Spacek. I just thought the opening I thought he basically set it up this felt more like a movie than an episode of television. Yeah. Felt like even the beats where they were the sort of crescendo and the coda to accept that. There was one briefly felt a little bit more like a feature that it did an episode of television. It obviously broke away from the traditional game of thrones story structure, which is room to room to room to room going from these two sets of characters there's a lot more movement. There was a lot more running around. I thought it had half a dozen absolutely astonishing visuals. You know, the dragons coming back down through the clouds, the swords lighting up the firefly's going across the. Field the swords extinguishing the horses running back the trench lighting moment when they figure out that. The whites are going to sacrifice themselves to get across the trench. I do understand why people might have been like there is just like twenty minutes of savage people being torn apart, but didn't die like there was a couple of times Jamie, Brian Sam were literally like being swarmed by weights. And we're able to somehow fend them off. It's see it's hard because were dancing around some of the critical points of the show when I just I thought it was breathless than I thought it was richly entertaining. And I thought that in just we're talking about the direction. I I'm not a battle guy. I often find battles visually incoherent, and ultimately uninteresting what I found. Very interesting was the way Sopotnica moved his camera in the quieter moments to communicate everything they needed to be communicated between characters through the way, they looked at each other through the way, they were oriented in space and particularly coming in the heels of two that were sensually characters talking to each other. And and, you know, get into no one another again and reestablishing a resetting their relationships. It was a very very nice counterpoint to that. Because this was mostly visual. It was non verbal. And yet in many cases, just as powerful I am not a fan of watching shows or movies for body counts. I do not have an aria like hit list of people that I think despite my joke last week of people that need to die in an episode in order for it to be satisfying, though, none of the three people on my McBain hitlist died last night. I don't find that particularly disappointing. I also don't find it like a red wedding. Twist Jerry we expected tonight. Didn't right there are a lot of not dangerous. But I was gonna say I was gonna say dangerous precedents. They're not dangerous, but they are risky precedents. Established on the show on the part of Benny off in Weiss and a lot of that came from this. I see seasons where it confounded our expectations to such an unprecedented degree that people were spinning now if you had read the books, I'm sorry. If we read the books if other if one had read the book, you wouldn't have been when wouldn't have been surprised by the outcome of the red wedding. Or what happened at the septa? They learn etcetera etcetera. At the time when we were talking about them on the podcast. And we were I was reviewing them in recaps and things like that. I think we were very much knowledge ING that these are the sorts of wild choices you can make only if you have a track that runs past the present moment, you can kill him in character. If you know that there are three or four seasons of television based on existing share of books to carry you. Or if you have plotted it that far out the ability to do radical ripping up of the plan or of the map of what you expected to see the opportunity to continue to do that after something like the red wedding. After you run out of books is extremely limited. Right. The show profoundly changed two plus years ago and everybody acknowledges that but one of the ways that it changed wasn't necessarily in the shortcut to his taking or the way certain characters were written. It was that now was about the end game. And it was about steering to a destination rather than subverting our expectations of what that destination was what I'm trying to say at great length is that when you're this far towards a destination and with theirs. Destination coming at this point. You can't do shock for shock sake. I don't think the red wedding was shocked for shock sake. That was that was storytelling. But we've left that script long time ago. You cannot you cannot rip up the manifest shots the popular NBC series manifest this late on the journey. Yeah. I'm saying is people love to talk about like are they going to stick the landing. Are they gonna land the plane, right? You know, what I don't wanna be pranked or surprised when we are approaching final descent towards our destination. Let me make the devil's advocate or intimate. And so all I'm saying is they have a they have a plan. Right. If we don't like the plan what we got three more weeks to decide that. And we'll see people are still going to die. If you're really watching the show with that kind of blood lust, which I think is bizarre and counterintuitive sure, but this was this is what they gave us in the the deaths were, you know, dramatic if not all altogether meaningful, although Joran theon were major characters that I think we're kinda yada yachting. Yeah. They certainly had a lot of screen time. They did. I think that the problem people have. Okay. So here's a couple one is that we went right into strowman. But I mean like there's no point in. It's just I thought the episode is incredible. You thought the episode's incredible. We can go through every scene and be like this is why like this. Then I could also say it didn't bother me that XYZ happened. We can do that. That's fine. What I'm saying? Is that like there was a specific. I think the game of thrones the show has gotten. It's lost hold of slash perpetuated, some unfortunate like tropes about the show itself that they now can't control. So it's one thing to be like who's going to sit on the iron throne. It's going to be another thing to be like who's going to die next week. And it just becomes this thing that even if it's not the intention of Benny off in Weiss and the people who are making the show becomes the dominant discourse around. It is death is the only sort of meaningful thing that can happen that being said, the doth Raqi are like pretty much like late eighties early nineties UNLV, and they go out and get smoked in the first thirty seconds of this battle, but pod lives. Like, I get that. There are some. The things that it's like don't make a ton of sense. Well, the Padres thing doesn't make sense and it, but frankly, it's not important enough for me to care. Yeah. But that's that's the other thing is that like just like watches Lord of the rings. Once you know, you know, like, I know it's weird that people were saying, and I saw a bunch of this criticism that the show just doesn't understand the fantasy world that it's based in. But in my understanding of a lot of fantasy mythology. There's hero myths and good guys for the most part win at some cost. You know what? I mean, that's not necessarily what the fantasy. Critique, you know. And I know about that. So do I. Yeah. So do I. I'll say. Honestly, I was maybe this is also took some of the some of the the wind data critical sales. I was this is there's no way for this to sound good. But I was bizarrely and perversely cheered to witness. The death of Our Lady of perpetual fan service Liana we got a more a character whose continued strong presence in the show was to me a larger indictment problems of the show. I didn't credible. Take you. This is your was good, which I agree with and that they should have killed more deathly on who. I definitely expected. You be like that's fucked up, bro. No, okay. That that character is a cartoon care. Yeah. There was supposed to be in one scene. And then, you know, in the words of Paul wall. The internet was going nuts. I'm sure that's your TV wise, David Betty of was like the the tweets are talking about the auto. We gotta get her some more screen time for the first time ever. I watched the broS talk about the show on soc. And let me just tell you their Oxford game does not speak to someone who's been listening to DJ. Screw tapes. I'll say that nor does nor does mind. I'm just saying. I don't think they do. I thought weirdly I thought that was a brave inappropriate choice for character. That really just seemed to be there for for the tweets. Yes. And I thought it was a well-constructed a well-constructed end. Didn't I thought a lot of the stuff that happened in this in? This battle stuff was not that different than battle the bastards. You know, and I knew people had some issues with parts of the bastards. I think it was a lot more coherent because it was during the daytime I also thought it was a little bit Dolor because it was essentially just a pile of bodies until sons of finally wrote in. With the veil nights. Right. That that was essentially that battle, and it had a really really really cool image of John pulling out his sword as like a thousands and thousands of soldiers were running towards him. Yes. But it wasn't any more unlikely that he survived that initial clash in battle of the bastards or survived being at the bottom of a pile of bodies that it was Jamie Umbrian pinned up against a wall by dozens and dozens of zombies somehow surviving until the moment. Arya kills the Nike. Right. But also battle the bastards. Also had the moment where young Rick on didn't get the memo that offenses have changed. Sure. And just ran a straight line. And we respect the route tree, and we had a lot of fun with that about how he needed to be doing RPO not just that not just the one route ahead Jerry Rice run on the Madden games. Genesis Mark, Layton, Tecmo straights. But. This stuff is hard. You know, I don't really know what else to say. I think that you're always going to be cutting corners, and ultimately you want the show to be I wanna show that if it's gonna make mistakes because all shows make mistakes, or you know, or not be completely thorough about something. It's going to be in battle mechanics, or you know, and I say, this is someone who criticized aspects of last season or in the sort of yada yachting of journeys the emotional journey in the character beats you have to be true to so when I watched last night's episode, and I see what happened to theon. I think that fits that isn't appropriate are for this character who is given a sendoff that was appropriate to his journey on the show. Do I then think he should've just hung out for an extra second and not died. Frankly, I don't you could make that argument. All you want true he could have. But like clearly when brand is like your good, man. This is now I already know what you're going to do it. End of it. Yeah. And then that by like slowing him down by eight seconds allows Ari to be exactly where she needs to be to do that. Here's the here's the other thing that I that I have to cop to about this. And I I am legitimately curious. What others think who watched the show regularly? Religiously sure they will reach out. They're not shy. I am. I do not watch the show for profundity. I've never. With a few occasional moments. I've never found it to be a a deep meditative reflection of the human condition. I found it to be visually. Dazzling with storytelling. Verve and ambition and risk-taking bravery and dragons unparalleled. Yeah. And for me, that's why last night was a towering chief, I think that it also was a smart reflection of the facts on the ground. The fact the ground were quite deadly last night. But I think the facts on the ground in general for a show like this where it was going is you can only go so far with a mute super villain people arguing they wanted more night king. Why I wanna talk about him as a as a character? Let's take a break here from our sponsors. And then we'll come back, and we'll talk about talk about the night. King problem. Today's episode of the watch is brought to you by Oreo cookies. The most epic cookies of all time are here. Cookies are coming brace yourselves Oriole game of thrones limited edition packs are in stores now while supplies last. Where does your feel t lie to whom are you bending the knee? I personally drop the need for the Lancasters. First of all the cookies, look, great and second of all they're smart enough. Not to go north so good for them. Go to Oreo dot com and pledge your field t to the house or Nike of your choice and tune into game of thrones. On Sundays on HBO. Today's episode of the watch is brought to you by a way away offers high quality luggage at a much lower price by cutting out the middleman and selling directly to you choose from over nine colors and four sizes to carry on bigger carry on both of which are compliant with all major US airlines, the medium or the large also cases are made with premium German polycarbonate which is a lightweight and. Unrivalled material in strength and impact resistance and the three hundred sixty degrees. Spinner wheels guarantees smooth ride. Best of all both sizes of the carry-on are able to charge anything that's powered by USB cord and thanks to their lifetime warranty. If anything breaks away will fix it or replace it. Try it for one hundred days, and if any point do decide it's not for you for turn it for full refund. No questions asked. I personally have a brick colored carrying on that. I cannot wait to take on a US airline when game firms in the NBA playoffs are over and disappear from this world. So when I do my brick away carry on. We'll be be my satchel charges. My cell phone the material sleek, it's extra durable. The interior design helps me keep my knee and organiz. It's all I ask for my luggage for twenty dollars off a suitcase visit away travel dot com slash watch and use promo code watch during checkout. That's a way travel dot com slash watch and used. Promo code watch for twenty dollars off a suitcase. All right. We're back. Let's talk about a bunch of the characters and what happened to them last night. Maybe that's the best way to discuss this into one that I wanna start with the night king because I think he is this enigmatic cypher, and like whatever you kind of think about game of thrones. You're gonna put on what happened to him last night. It was a really distinctive turn. I think it was very like difficult. Turn this show made a few seasons ago were they made the threat of the night king the the larger threat than the people who were cutting others throats at weddings ref, and you could be a person who's just like I wanted an existential empire sore on level bad to focus on because it wasn't a really for me. I was I never cared about who sat on the fair enough. Then you can be like, I actually always preferred all the backroom dealing and never really gave a shit about zombies, nor did I understand the mechanics of. What they wanted. I think both of those parties probably left last night. If you if you really strong on either one of those sides, I think he'd probably left last night a little bit disappointed deputy said. I didn't really walk out last night. Being like, I don't know what the kings motivation is like I felt like the night kings motivation for doing what he was doing was spelled out. Pretty clearly now did he get a rich myth like backstory other than the few flashbacks? We saw his creation not really often those characters don't really like I don't often get like a huge explanation as to why back. I wanna be bad. They went to the world. Ultimately for you. Was that a satisfying conclusion of what was a multi season arc that really ends pretty abruptly. Yeah. And to what do you think it says about like the larger decision of like how much of an investment they made in a character and in threat to to just sort of like brush the chessboard off. We'll look if it was a macguffin. Some people were saying it was it was a macguffin to bring the disparate two dozen characters of the show together in one place. So it worked I think as a uniting concept it worked if I'm going to peak at said, he's the he's the Infinity on it. Basically, if I'm gonna peak ahead and think about some of the lines from last week's episode about what we do after engineers, creepy smile that you gave to San so that then took over the internet. I would say that the show is trying to say something potentially sneakily profound, which is to say that you can't beat a made up enemy like death. That's not the point. I think someone last night said we can't. You can't be death. You could maybe like the hands. Right. He was like how you can't beat death. That's when that's when barracks like she can or she is, but all of these outrageous sacrifices and behaviors and triumphs all of it in the name of something that felt larger than life was truly existential. And now what? And I'm pretty curious about a show that gave it's giving us three plus hours of now. What? Point to to your question is I'm not sure if it's done. There are many people who think that brand becomes the night king somehow, and that there's some sort of time loop stuff. Now, I don't get the strong vibe that that's what the show is doing. But the moment for that to happen was lessening probably my third point is back to this idea of having a mute super villain. Then I king kinda sucks. He's boring. We don't wanna spend time with him, sir. See is fascinating. And low some compelling and interesting, and she talks she has a history with these characters. I'm glad that they show rightly decided that she was the big bad or the final boss, or whatever you wanna put it. However, you wanna put it. Not only the night can kind of suck brand kinda sucks. I get that. That is hearsay. If you have read the books and all the accompanying literature, and the mythology and everything, but the books of mythology and the books period are the place for those stories that is the best way to be delivered those stories you could spend a season on it. You could tell me that he's no longer brand that he's the three eyed raven, you could have a character literally turns the camera and say all this is because he wants to kill brand because brand living memory and without memory were all dead fine. I'm still not that interested in frankly, it's kind of empty to me. And I think that this idea that some people seem cheap field cheated because they were taught John kept saying, oh, there's only one more left in. It's the great war against death. Will that's life. That's a metaphor homeys. That's what life is. I can't believe anyone would want more than ninety minutes of that. What was it? What are they going to leave and suggested this last week where they going to fall back to the iron islands and then re-engage the forces of death at a later date where they're going to be a series of skirmishes with death over three to four. There is no, obviously, what we saw last night in the battle is there's no way to beat them without going around back and cutting off the head, right? So there was never going to be like we had a we had a military victory over those on these. So I think it was best that it was in parenthetical 's of this ninety minute movie that featured highs and lows in very different types of storytelling. I mean, we when we talk more about aria, we could talk about design B movies put in the middle of the battle movie, which was really clever. I wouldn't be so quick to say that it meant nothing. So we because television shows are about journeys not destinations and everything except maybe the dirty dozen mission was kind of worth it to get here. And. Whether I think that there are the master storytellers that some do or not I am not even weighing in on it. When I say that there are more cards left to play. Yeah. I definitely think that the next episode could be could have huge twist were brand and the magic fantasy element of the night king and their transference between one another could come into play or not or it could immediately. Go to sonza Danny giving each other like death stairs across conference tables. And that could be the story for the rest of the episodes. I think it's complicated. Man. I think that there because what also happens and this happened a little bit with lost. And this happened a little bit with breaking bad. And this happened a little bit with sopranos. I mean well with lost. I'm getting incredibly like heavy lost vibes off of the discourse around game of thrones. Now, I agree that lots of people like I understand why people didn't like the end of loss. Totally. But I think that. In some ways. This is a story that probably should have the game of thrones story should have been told for like ten seasons or eleven seasons. If you wanted to have that perfect balance of the every moment seems earned and built up and explained properly motivated and everything is coherent and clear, but that's just not what's happening. So I'm kind of enjoying it for what it is. I guess. The naked stuff is. Is interesting. It's it's like. I don't know what the alternative to last night would have been. I think that what you're one thing. Also to remember in light of the conversation. We had the other week about how everything is an extended universe. Now. Did they have the confidence to write off essentially a major mythological portion of the show as a character beat which is what it was. It was essentially they turned it into an aria attest, the final test area where they confident enough to do that because they know that there are going to be prequels and sequels and spinoffs of the show for the next two decades that can we'll have a lot more stuff to play with. I think the president mouth brought that up last night about whether or not there is some element of the long night. Prequel coming that they were like will answer all the questions you have about the night king with this other show. I think I think there has to be a part of that. I think I think and I don't even say that in a cynical way or in a ferris way that I'm not suggesting that someone at corporate told them to pull their punches in there. Feels more stories to tell I think the knowledge that there would be more stories gave them the confidence to make it a character. Which is probably what they always wanted to show you way. It's funny. This is why it's taking him probably so long to write these books. Yeah. Is because they actually write out this story the way people have it in their head in the way, the people all all the questions and to show all these things. I'm sure that beat for beat. This will probably be what's in those books, if they ever get published, but to tell them in the way, the Benny often told them to at and it is I grant you that it does feel like it's listening to a podcast on one point five speed right now, it is it is racing towards the finish line. But. At no, it didn't bother me. I thought it was a really cool moment. I guess people. You know, let's let's talk a little bit about are just to say this is one of the chestnuts. I bring up all the time, but I'll say because it feels very relevant here. Which is that endings are hard, and people are very very. Uncomfortable with endings because an ending the moment where you have to stop pretending that your version of the show is the canonical version the version of the show that you carry with you the character that you think is the that you actually think is the hero the ending that you've dreamed up the the this is why people lost their minds about last July. Right. All the theories that you've been that you've been working on intending to and and publishing or blogging about or the entire industry in the in the case of game of thrones us included that has grown up around it. Ultimately, it's not our show. It is an I don't even know HBO show because I think that HBO like many. TV networks have in the past. When these circumstances over the last two decades, let this be David Benny off, Dan Weiss show. And this is the ending for these characters that they've decided no yes was their George Martin influence, do they get secret scrolls from him, probably, but you mentioned loss that's the piece of loss that is most relevant to me that that Damon and Carlton ended the show the way they wanted to end it the show they were making the whole time and people lost their minds because nobody wants both people don't want things to end full stop. But they also don't want it to be taken away from them. There's a possessiveness of fandom particularly television phantom that is one of the reasons why television is so unique fantastic. But it also can be cancerous during these sort of less skirmishes before the end. Yeah, I also think that things have changed so much in the last ten years where our engagement with popular culture is largely seen on in terms of return on investment. Was this worth the time that I spent on it was this worth the time that I spend. Reading about it was this worst worth the time that I spent thinking about it was it worth the time to orient my week or Sunday's. So that I was home to see this thing that I was told was supposed to be the most important battle sequence ever filmed and it cetera et cetera et cetera. And all the time that we spent wondering about whether or not brand was the night king or whether time travel was possible and whether or not. One of the core. Five characters going to die in the battle of winter fell. Because the show is taught me that a main character could die anytime in the whole point was to subvert our understanding of these hero stories rather than to just execute along. The same beats that we always see all those things I think that largely what happens is you're like that was not worth my time. That was not worth my effort. When was the last time a major game of thrones? Character was killed in a surprising way. Like in a way that caught the universe off guard owners prepared for? Brin? I don't know. I mean, like, yeah, I think so too. It was all from the book. It was all seasons ago and we've been coasting on that. Outrageous, not just goodwill, but on that sense of danger never since aspects of the storytelling once it became a TV show, by the way, not an adaptation of open ended beloved books. It got the storytelling more traditional and it happened years ago. And and it's interesting to me that that people are suddenly complaining about now. The Bill is do you know what I mean? I'm fine with that. Yeah. Let's talk about aria. Let's talk about every who became the hero of the show last night in some ways. I mean has always had that. And then if you go back, and there's some great writing about it. But there's just they've basically been been pointing towards this the most of the show, you know, I thought that that moment was really cool. I mean, the staging of it has its detractors. I thought it was pretty neat. I didn't really worry about like how she got there or how? She managed to get by undetected. I mean, we spent so many seasons with her in Esso's. Yeah. Like doing different crap that I didn't need to see her like quietly she got out of the library. So we saw her not just fight. But be the most interesting fighter on the show. Yes. And I thought it was it was a really amazing moment. I think that there needs to be another beat about it. I don't think that if that next episode is like we killed the night king. It's over. Yep. That's that's gonna be a little bit abrupt. But what this means for her? What this means Marlboro this up last night. What's this what this means for all the mess? Ionic prophecies in this in the story, and like for the assumptions about who should be the king or Queen of the seven kingdoms. But also who is the prince or Princess who was promised is all really really fascinating to me now. Yeah. I mean, look set your pale, though, are you is the the return on investments. Stark's gotta protect Stark's. I mean, I think that what the show kind of did was say that it was just about family protecting your house. You know, the Mela Sandra part was great great having her back loved her her her common depressure unless geriatric nude scene. But until you for the people what was she doing in? What did she do? And what about her profits prophecies were right in what was wrong because she had magic power in the Lord of light definitely could light stuff up. But to your point this final thing happened in the place. It is most Representative of the old gods. And death blow is delivered by someone who is deeply steeped in multi-faced eastern prophecies. She she basically read the liner notes to three Tang album, and then came home from college. Guess what shell in? Could be dangerous. But ultimately, she was just protecting her brother. Yeah. He's not her brother as he loves to say. So I'm interested in all that. But but truly I I've never cared about anything less than how she got from the window wall. I have the ancient prophecies of the gang twins told me as she was able to do that. I mean that was when I was when they got me tweeting again last night man, the gummy tweeden I- lugging onto Twitter after watching the episode last night, I felt a little bit like Tyrian in the crypts rows like I should go do something. And someone should have said you're here for a reason because you're smart, you'll die if you go out there. And I was like, Nah, I go out there. That was my mistake that was the one character I related to and the other character I related to was the hound being like fuck. Like, I I don't think I could really defend or shoot arrows. But have a panic attack nave somewhere? Yeah. I could manage that. Anyway. It was it really was significant for me in the spirit of the show that we've watched and the character that we've watched and the actor that we've watched to suddenly see her be the hero to be really good at fighting to be really good at fighting in a unique in interesting way. That speaks to who she is who she was and what she became and to see her bring all of the. Trauma and tormented stress of her journey to bear in her decision making what version of last night's show is more satisfying? If we tipped what she was doing and saw her make her way to the tree. Yeah. No version. I that sort of stuff maybe that speaks to a larger flaw with the episode that many people were immediately drawn, you know, they they wanna get into the meta data and see where everyone was every moment of what it means. Now, they're able to pull it off as opposed to saying look at the editing ear, and the emotional storytelling that has woven together in these last minutes to to to to get us to a point where I did not know what was going to happen where all this brand king stuff. I expected him to just like, you know, damn up and be like, okay. Let's do this. Let's become the same person. I don't know. Yeah. Yeah. I didn't see that coming. The sleight of hand is really impressive. Do you go to the magic castle? Like that was great. That was great. But how'd you do it? No seriously. How did you do some people do and that's fine? I guess. Brand largely out of commission for this episode wargin out flying crows Brennan soup, not helping anyone out with his crow recon really not doing anything with that. Also now that the Nike is dead brands utility. It's like the Bill is due on bread. Yeah. It's like it's like a startup that everybody is put their VC into like, guess what? No, go public. He's he's like he's like the team championship aspirations that keeps Lougee on its roster. Yeah. You know what? I mean. It's just like well that that team has a power that team has left handed power bat. You can't pitch, but you can do one thing. Really? Well, the realize the other guy and that guy goes on the injured list. His he probably has the most crucial episode of his characters next up because if they just keep wheeling him around, and he's just like, I know what's going to happen. But I'm not gonna tell you dog. It's gonna talk that actually is going to be like what is happening guys because. And this is where the rubber really meets the road for the fantasy story line for me. Because in the beginning, I think the show brought on a lot of skeptics and even HBO brass because they were saying it said in this world, but it's not that thing. This isn't talking. This is deadwood, right? We're saying this last week the wire, this is all these other prestige dramas that are about life or how to live life power and dour and all these other dynamics, and I'm the type of fan that is hopeful we can return to that again. And be about these characters interpersonal relationships in the actual busy work of governing and asking these tough questions that are rarely asked in an epic of this nature. What now what's what are we supposed to do? Yeah. And having this sort of vestige tale of. Fellowship of the ring hanging around wargin. Yeah. Who's just like you can do this thing. But it's already been done. That's exhausting. Yes. And ultimately, not that interesting. So can they pivot again, can they find an interesting way to integrate that I'm curious to see I will say that my biggest critique of last night's episode was that and this is not a critique so much as it is. It's almost impossible question to solve against is that they all these characters together they obviously gave. A tip that they tip that any of them could go because we are going to sing Jenny of the old stones and and night brand and drink a lot. And it's gonna be a nice sendoff was Jenny of the old stones on an early bone Sebastian EP or was that later the Trevor horn album, it's on a tiger milk. Yeah. They they then basically only had enough room to give half of the characters something to do during the fight. So not di-. Yeah. Like cla gain had a plot. Are you had a plot to some extent even Tyrian and Sohn's ahead a plot because they were able to talk with one another and a coherent way. John and Danny had apply in so much as they were flying up in the air and getting caught in a blizzard. Really can't we from an X country cross country flight winter, and then you got characters who are incredibly interesting like Brin, Jamie who were essentially just background. And that was the one of the things I was just like at the end of the day. Jamie didn't have to be there. Right. Like Jamie's purpose was filled when he knighted Bryn Mawr. So when he just told them, by the way, he's not coming. Well, and that he did this with them and has now experienced chess side of the one now is out. Yes. Bound to write his companions in this world. Right. I thought that that was a fair critique that it's just like you've got these main characters who are essentially spending the entire time somehow, overcoming impossible odds to stay alive until the moment are able to make everything. All right. I mean, the the the bummer can be when characters who were compelling interesting entertaining in their own rights secondary tertiary characters their deaths are purely in the service of more important characters Dolor said, by the way should have been number one on any ranking this when they on him being there because he's such a long time. But as soon as he helps up or reaches to help up Samya, no. He's going to get that. That's the prize. Look men only get when a spear enters in the back of their skull. Yeah. Is it really distinctive? Look it is. But similarly, I'll give you that look one day you've given up look when I told her I wasn't coming on Thursday show at the last minute you felt the. I've seen in your eyes. That this is also the limits of TV show versus the book like I always really liked the character, Barrington dairy. And he looked cool. A flaming sword. Great actor interesting point of view coming into the action. But deeply supporting character were never really gonna tell his story when it means or the only has one life left. So he gives his one life left in support of keeping REO live a character the purpose. He was supposed to serve according to Melissa nder. Right. Okay. Okay. Then then that was it wrap up this way. What's a satisfying for next week to begin for you? Grey worm blows up. Just spontaneously sixty two minute tracking shot of gray were beginning out of boat and leaving no. Just gray one luxury eating in an open field where no one has across bolt aimed at him. Where do you want this to go? I do want to just take a moment and say before we get to that. Because we the one thing we didn't talk about was. Deniers is real reckless with her dragons just because you have three like she shouldn't go to a casino. It's like pull up maverick pull up. That's what I'm saying. Like, we've talked about this before many times in person occasionally on the podcast. I don't understand gambling. I don't understand the desire to do it. If I won five dollars. I would be like that's fantastic. Good night and good luck dinners sitting down at the blackjack table being like, I love craps. Yes. Yes. Aka how do you play craps play? I just feel like they're probably better ways to utilize what we all thought was the nuclear. She's quite literally a hothead. Yeah. So that gives me some gives me pause. Yes. Sure. That's it. I think that John's journey from rookie to quite literally maverick top gun on a dragon that he is flying. Without speaking any of the dragon language that he's flying just by holding on. In really tight. It's pretty impressive. So but to catch up because again, I had the wrong TV for this episode. I got the message what dragon survived. They both hers in Johnson. Where's John's these Chilin? He crash landed is just just relaxing. He's he's like in be icing, his knees. He's just load management. It's gonna be a game time decision. Wink, wink, wink, g has guest row. Intestinal today. Embiid. Yeah. I've never related anyone. Okay. So I I am very fascinated by the fact that. Will they take everything that happens and basically like stick to it? Because are you is supposed to be reckoned with now? Now sonza still on the verge of zombie death was still throwing shade at deniro sheets or John his whole platform has gone. His whole thing was like the Nike. I looked into his is this the real threat extension death. We can worry about other stuff later and PS. My name is gone targe area, by the way. Yeah, I'm your nephew. And then Danny in the trailer looks like she's doing quite well, they everybody's toasting her that everybody's just like thanks for doing that. You got it. What you do just kill like ten thousand whites with her dragon. I just feel like ten thousand more. I've got note. See you're just like everybody else makes what what satisfying about next week? I mean, I am very curious. What this show is now this was the existential threat. This was this was everything that was that. We're building to this was what John Indonesia's United for. This is why there were unsullied into three key in northern soldiers and Atlanta Stor all on the same battlefield for the first time in the show and essentially the first time in the show's fictional history. So with that out of the way, what have we got? And one concern. I have is this show is now quite top-heavy in that it starts in your ungraded who no one cares. I curve conservancy. Give urine great joy known cares. Every yes, sir. See is enough to care about quite a bit. Yeah. But certainly the mountain Khyber n- in your graduate. And I guess just Braun as wildcard is not exactly a stack deck against every other on kills Jamie's like in. The next episode was like I'm here. I got goal by your sister, your dead that everybody will get their death that they were like it's a ruthless show. That would be like, but this is also the people I think were complaining most about the deaths are probably also the people who care a lot about prophecy in the show. And so you knew going into this that Jamie wasn't going to die. It was weird. The people thought he would it was you know, you knew the a j or the the hound hound is gonna fight against that. Is that like Jon snow was the wolf of the north the king of the north? And that he was like the one who was figuring it all out and that together slit. Together slit for love. Rob john? Yeah. Rob. Oh, yeah. Look. Yes. But rob didn't have a prophecy. He had there was expectation or prophecy in that point in the show. Right. Like if you were just watching the show. I don't know that principals promised was. I mean it was stance. You know what? I mean. Like that was like a fringe kind of like idea. Right. I think now the only people who were mad or that diehard stances, right? Stana stands. Stan. I I'm really I'm really curious. I think that this was I stand by what I predicted last week, which which is this was an unprecedented episode. I think it was a a marvel of execution and production and of visual storytelling. I love watching. It thought it was thrilling it was fun. And now, I'm really curious. I'm really curious what? Now now that we've cleared the debris. We've de-iced the plane. We're gonna stick with this metaphor. I'm very curious where they are landing. It. What is the show that most interests and motivates them? Is it a show about that? We that some of us hope from the beginning of the show about power dynamics and the impossibility or of compromise chain along periods of time, especially in such entrenched in deep dark and violent world. Or is it the plane that I think some people, and I mean, this charitably and honestly, some people fear and accuse the show of being which is essentially at this point unworthy errors doing kind of fan service to characters that they love from the outside that they don't have as adapters of the work that they don't necessarily have profound things to say about either the world fictional world or the real world with they are doing is trying to service the world and characters that they and now millions and millions and millions of others, thanks to their efforts love. Yeah. Which is a very different kind of thing in and should be judged on kind of a different scale. But. I am. I just say again like what a pleasure. It was to watch that show. And to know that everyone else is watching it to it's it's the debate. About really interesting stuff. So we'll be back on Thursday. Yeah. For ventures. Yeah. You committing to me. Yeah. Yes. I wanna see this. This. All right. I'm not gonna stab you in the back. I'll see you Thursday. You looking at me like I'm not going to be there. I said meet you at the tree I'll be at the tree which one of the I have your Mark on me. Now. Thursday.

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Sunday, June 16, 2019

60 Minutes

43:59 min | 2 years ago

Sunday, June 16, 2019

"Got to that. I thought nothing's going to help could a simple shot in the neck, the potential breakthrough for the debilitating symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder is like a big weight has been lifted off my, my shoulder and my chest. I can actually relax and the first couple of weeks. I didn't. People be like, hey, you're persona have really changed and stuff like that. I think we're going on two months. It feels like I got a second chance of life. Can we not one? Where's your? People in Huntington West Virginia were dying from drug abuse at eight times the national average. It was so bad chief of police call in the national guard. Usually reserve for -mergency hurricanes to help battle the opioid epidemic. Can we talk? I, I gained withstanding a hair under five feet tall. This woman may be doing his much to help Huntington's drug problem as anyone here has ever seen have ever had treatment before. Nova's don't trust outside his game of rooms each PEOs, blockbuster series came to a blood. Controversial end west moment you don't have to fan or two launched it at all cruciate acting and fantastic plot. Tonight. We'll take you behind the scenes one of the most expensive in epic TV shows, ever. I'm Steve Kroft. I'm Leslie stall, I'm Scott Pelley. I'm Anderson Cooper, I'm Sharon Alfonsi. I'm Bill Whitaker. Those stories tonight on sixty minutes. These are the everyday flats for life on the go. They're stylish comfortable and go with everything from yoga pants to dresses and skirts. They've quickly become a most love gotta have them brand. Thanks to their wide range of colors and patterns with new ones, launching constantly and there's zero break in period, since Rossi's are crafted using three D knitting techniques in hand assembly, there, seamless, designs means, right? Out of the box comfort. Best of all, they're made from recycled, plastic water bottles. 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The new procedure called Stella ganglion block, or s GB is so fast acting that many believe it could be a game changer used for decades to treat chronic pain. It's only recently been tried for PTSD now, the US army's spending two million dollars to find out more, nobody is calling it a cure, but the promise of a new therapy, can't come soon enough for many veterans. We spoke with frustrated and despairing that nothing. They've tried has worked. PTSD. Was like a monster on your back that controls your entire life. This is what sergeant first class Jonathan zeroing faced during his four hundred fifty five days as part of the American offensive in Kunar province in eastern Afghanistan. Densely forested mountains, provided cover for the Taliban fighters launched almost daily attacks after fifteen months. Zeroing couldn't shake the feeling he was going to be ambushed at any moment. So your instinct served, you will Afghanistan. But what about when you came home, what I came home at did not very well because my brain was still in war, but I was living trying to be a father and a husband and, and trying to be a circle a whole room squares do not feel like the same person anymore, he suffered for twelve years. His marriage fell apart that went through this period of time, where I was like, man, I wish I would've just died in Afghanistan, I could have been remembered as a hero in a shining beacon what's soldiers supposed to be. Finally, he reached out to Walter Reed medical center where you aware that you were suffering from PTSD. I thought it was a joke. PTSD was a joke. At first everyone knows it's hard being in combat. But, like that's our job. So being around only military veterans that are all combat guys it was difficult to ever. Raise your hand and ask for help after eighteen years of continuous war, the numbers of soldiers in veterans suffering from PTSD has reached an all time high first line treatments at the VA are antidepressants and talk therapy. Zeroing, told us he was asked to write down his worst combat memories. They wanted me to read it twenty times before I went to bed, and I did a one or two days and the piece of paper and threw it away. I'm like, why am I doing this? I'm like, I watch people I know die. Like always gonna bother me. Did you see any improvement zero marine sergeant Henry Koto also was at the breaking point I thought if I keep going the same way I was going? I give only two ways I was going to end dead. Or in jail. He spent months patrolling Iraqi towns like this one the war on every corner. After four deployments Koto told us he was plagued by nightmares. He self Medicated with alcohol. And marijuana even though I try to tell myself, hey, I can calm down on no longer over there. It was really hard for me to shut it off. What did you think of that at the time they got to the point that I thought nothing's gonna help? I'm gonna lose my relationship with my kids already lost my relationship. My ex wife. I lost a lot of friends, especially because, you know, they didn't want to deal with me anymore. Sco in. He told us he had tried twelve medications. All the VA had to offer but nothing worked. All right. Henry, your glasses to come up when his doctor suggested an experimental treatment called Stella ganglion block or s GB. He had nothing to lose down. Please. We went along to watch Henrico chose second treatment at the Long Beach. VA the injection took less than five minutes within two minutes. Koto told us he felt a huge difference. I can't control my smile right now. Is it like a sense of euphoria is like a big weight has been lifted off, my, my shoulder is my chess, I can actually get lax. He came back for a second s GB to bolster the effects of the first two months earlier it immediately, changed, your mood or behavior. Immediately, my brother took me home. He saw that I was constantly smiling and he's ideas like I don't know what they did. But it's amazing Kleenex. This is how the procedure works, a local anesthetic is injected deep into the neck to bay the cluster of nerves called the Stella ganglion. I'm going to inject the actual medication right? These nerves help control the brains fight or flight reactions signals that go. Oh, haywire with PTSD. And please go bleak, tres you doctors use a florist and contrasting die. You can see it spread out next to the spine to guide, the needle to the stellar ganglion when the anesthetic is injected, it seems to numb or turn off the PTSD symptoms. It clears the body in a day, but the effects last up to six months for some even longer. And there are no known side effects were you surprised at the outcome. Extremely extremely surprised because there's very few things in medicine that worked that quickly. Dr Michael higher is trying to pinpoint changes in the parts of the brain associated with PTSD doctors don't fully understand how s GB works. But the newest theory is based on research that shows PTSD is not just psychological exposure to bomb blast and the prolonged stress. Of dangerous redeployments can cause physical changes to the brain making it hyperactive. Dr Al Qaeda told us eighty percent of their s GB. Patients had relief from depression, and suicidal thoughts on the sounds like you're rebooting, these vets brains. That is exactly very good way to think of it. In the waiting room. Henry kudos mother is overwhelmed after watching her son self-destruct. She told us s GB gave her son back. It's not a standalone cure, but Koto told us his regular therapy now is starting to work in the first couple of weeks. I didn't believe it people be like, hey, you're personnel really changed and stuff like that. I think we're going on two months. It feels like. I got a second chance at life, despite its promise SGB is available at only twelve of the one hundred seventy two VA hospitals. It's still considered experimental. The army study is the first clinical trial for s GB with placebo over one hundred active-duty soldiers with PTSD participated, and it's now under peer review, if the end dodo success of s g b is duplicated. It could revolutionize the way PT as d is treated have been going pretty high for now. Most veterans rely on word of mouth to find private clinics like this one run by Dr Shawn Mulvaney, a former navy seal the night, stuff's getting a lot worse among military doctors. He was the first to see SGB's potential, especially after his years as a combat medic for special operations soldiers. When we asked them to go to dirty job, we didn't tell them, what was going to happen to them. We didn't tell them we're going to break them to KOTA Meyer of former Marine corP sought, Dr movies, help in twenty eleven he was the first living marine to be awarded the medal of honor since the Vietnam war to three Stu Dr Mulvaney, stumbled onto GB ten years ago and slowly into engines he had read a newspaper article about a treatment for of all things hot flashes that targeted the same nerve signals that PTSD disrupts. So he tried it since then he's done about a thousand injections has he found seventy percent of the soldiers. He treated had reduced anxiety. And paranoia. Can actually breeds. Dr move. Any is hoping the results of the army's clinical trial will make s GB more widely available these people. They're at a blank check to their nation that included their life and. As citizens, we, we need to help them when they come home when they're roken Jonathan zeroing also found his way to Dr Mulvaney for an S GB felt like a brand new man. What I see a brand new man. What was I had to control my feelings? It was like I was my own self my old self. I was John's earing pre-combat again after the shot now sharing found something else had changed to he had a different attitude toward therapy, does not eliminate you. Having PTSD does not make it so you no longer went through those Matic experiences. But what it does is it makes it, so you're not drowning, it gives you a little bit of room, gives you room for tickle to get there. It gives you to get help think there's enough evidence out there that this is a valid therapy. And it's, it's something that works. Former Brigadier General, Donald bull, duck, had an S GB injection when he was commander of special operations in Africa. It made such a difference that in twenty sixteen he became the first and so far, the only active duty senior officer to admit that he too. Suffered from PTSD it took him eight years to overcome the stigma remember the soldier. I certainly do marine special operations a former green beret, Bolduc showed us a memorial in his office to the seventy two soldiers. He lost over ten deployments. He cheated death himself numerous times surviving firefights a two thousand pound bomb, and this helicopter crash, which knocked him unconscious. What was it like to be around him during that time? You just don't know what's coming. You don't know what's going to set them off. It was his wife sharing who finally made bold confront his PT as dean, get help. She said or she and the children would leave him. I'm done. I can't do this by myself anymore. I didn't I didn't marry you to be a single parent. That's bold duck had tried traditional therapy with little relief. It was the s g GB. He told us that finally. Lifted the fog, most magnificent, everything was crisper and clearer. And I was so much more relaxed often relaxed gently than I even said, why didn't we do this years ago? You know, but I don't think we knew about it. Now, retired ball duck told us, he was bypassed for promotion, part of the reason he believes is outspokenness about PTSD among active duty soldiers. Not one of my superiors reached out to me. One told me that it's not going to bode well for me and recommended that I stopped talking about it because the more I talk about it the more problems, they have it's so widespread in the military today. But yet, there's this stigma, terrible stigma lack of understanding not understanding the science behind it, not understanding, what's happening. So how important is still at ganglion block in fighting post traumatic stress. I think it's usually important, and I think that it needs to be an intervention. That's part of every post traumatic stress therapy. This is Victor part of Boll ducks therapy is Victor his service dog who helps him. Stay calm. I'm a leader bull continues to speak out and tells audiences all over the country that treatment for PT as de should carry no more stigma than a broken ankle. You'll a strong when you ask for help, not weak, you are strong. So don't be afraid to ask for help, no matter what it is. Jonathan's airing told us s gbi was a game changer. Henry Coto said he wished. Other veterans could find the relief. He did. I've lost a couple of friends to suicide. You know, just thinking that, you know, this treatment, if it wise, Wiley, available, you know, those guys could have been around. I've never had this relief for it wasn't a pill. It wasn't a bottle alcohol. It was shot in my neck. I never heard of that lasted. Maybe a fifteen minute procedure and healthy. Ways car. Pool is not a boss ways carpool. It's not a taxi ways. Carpool is not the metro in DC riders ways car pool is not a slug line. What is ways carpool? Ways car pool is a new app that lets neighbors coworkers and fellow commuters ride together to work and home fast drivers say, Hello to that express lane and get reimbursed for gas riders getting affordable commute and help save the planet and carpoolers, get to know their neighbors and co workers, a little bit better ways, car pool is smart. Not only does it match you with people who are going your way. It connects you with people who you'd actually want to ride with she you commute smarter with no headaches people. If you use ways ready, you know, it's built by community to give you the best traffic picture in real time all the time. Ways carpool functions with the same high quality standards inefficiency download the ways carpool app today to catch a ride or give a ride to work or home, right? Together with ways carpet. Nestled in the Appalachian mountains along the eastern borders of Kentucky. And Ohio, sits Huntington West Virginia a place so consumed by the opioid epidemic. It has been crowned the overdose capital of America at its worst. People here were dying from drug abuse at a rate, eight times, the national average, the small city of fifty thousand fell victim to a fading economy and birth of despair, the depths of that despair unfolded in the summer of twenty sixteen amass overdoes pushed desperate city to try something never done before. They're single mission saving Huntington. On the one we. A one where the calls started coming in three twenty one on a warm August afternoon. We're trying to get people were collapsing across the city. Jarl rocky Johnson, a twenty eight year veteran of the police force, and head of the drug unit was on call that day. I'm drawing up eighth avenue and the chief of police calls me and he goes, I have your radio. We've got twenty four people in counting overdosed. It just went crazy. The police department EMS fire department because they're trying to bring people back to live, it just four hours, twenty six people had overdosed on a batch of feno laced heroin. I think everybody became aware that things have changed that day when hang dial stepped in its police chief, seventeen months later. His force was overwhelmed. Huntington once a thriving industrial hub had been crippled by years of job loss, rising crime, and sixteen hundred overdoses the previous year chief dial two good drastic step. He asked the feds to send help even requesting the national guard. I didn't even doing about the national guard. You think about an emergency. There's been a flood. There's been a tornado something terrible. Did you feel like this was an emergency? This like an emergency. That's call anybody that'll help last April dozens of agents from the DA, FBI, and ATF, KOMO KOMO KOMO on joined the eight-man Huntington drug unit. Small army working block by block. Rounding up attics. Arresting dealers. Shutting down drug dens that had taken root throughout the city's residential neighborhoods inside one raid, the remiss pipes on a baby's changing table. And a handwritten note telling Addicks not to use dope in the bathroom because that's where the baby will be taking his bath when you go out on these raids look around on the floor, and there's diapers bottles kids toys that stuff takes your breath away. It does. It's always had an effect on me. But it really changed about six years ago when I had a daughter. Man. That's it's not good. Did you think this is not winnable? Yeah. Tell you what we pay on that day in day out, almost twenty four hours a day, me and my guys and you'd think I'll good. We didn't catch breath the next couple of days. The next day, they're right back at it. Somebody just filled the spot. And that is when I started to think, as hard as we're presson and pounding away at this problem. We're not making any difference. You guys realized you couldn't just arrest people had to do more. Our side is to disrupt the supply. But what was invariably left behind was a group of people who the buyers who were still coming to the store looking for that Huntington police realized to break the cycle, they had to curb demand that meant getting addicts into treatment Sioux, Chief dial took an unusual step. He hired Christiana harmless a mental health addiction specialist. She was dispatched to the frontlines to work with the drug unit. What did they tell you about what they were thinking, and basically our city was in a crisis, and their officers were figs Ostad, and they knew that they were missing the ball that they couldn't arrest their way out of it? And they weren't sure what to do. But this was something they wanted to try into you kind of making this job as you went along at first we all were. Yeah. Down here talk to you. She's a she's not a cop. She's a billion. She specializes in mental health services, especially re have at least she's got to say about that, when TV interested in talking about detox today, and getting into a program going together, send allowed typically, that's not something that we encourage this whole process. I, I had to find my fitting at the police department, then I had to get in with the drug unit, which was rocky, and that was not a small task. Tell me the first time someone brought up the idea of having this kind. Softer edge to the efforts to curb drugs here. How did you react, be honest? I was a no. I don't wanna hear this thought. What if this is salsa? Here we go. It's the same thing. Bunch of people, talk and doesn't want to get done. To get out on the street and I had to really meet with people all the time and be there all the time to the point where even rocky came back to me and said, people talk to me now that needs to talk to me, because they me different because I have you with me. We were hand addicts off to her, so she could do her job, and that freed us up do hours, which was target the drug dealer standing just under five feet. Tall Carless is a huge presence on the streets where she spends most of her working hours, the rest of the time, she's finding open beds, and rehab, and advocating for users in court, she gives all the addict, she meets her cell phone number number right here, the cell, you can call text me anytime they call at all hours, a hand on holidays, and she says she always answers. Hey, can we talk for a second? They gave me my information. I money Christiana. Have you ever had treatment before? No. Are you interested in getting some treatment? Like to work with eve, what would be best for you and get you in somewhere? There's a lot of individuals that are left in the aftermath that just need help, and that's where I get to go in, and as a social worker, that's huge because there is no other job, that I could have that would afford me that opportunity to meet somebody in that position in that moment in that moment. An and the look on their face stages. Look like they just can't believe it. We're not. So I've been at this for twenty seven almost twenty years. And I've seen programs come and programs, go most failures most did not fix the problem, most moved a problem around. Okay. Because I never had that option before. Okay. I never had an option of rehab Mer cover. And a lot of talk a lot of noise nobody ever really fulfilled that promise until now. Dozens of police departments in areas hardest hit by the drug epidemic. But none has a program like Huntington's putting a social worker like harmless on the front lines. She has an incredible amount of patients, she will sit there and talk and she's not pushy. She's not. Shelvin something else, somebody's throat, she just stands there, and she's very calm and collected hand very passionate about what she does a passion and patience born out of pain three years ago. She divorced, her husband once a decorated soldier he'd become a drug addict. You know, and I would find myself, you know, L alone trying to hunt him down because I was worried that it was dead and finding him like. You know. A crack house. I really get it on a personal level and know what it does to families what it does to the person. And I think that all the time because if somebody had said, can I help you, they really minute and they helped us navigate the system? Maybe things would be different. Crews shown a harlot says her husband never accepted, her help boost addict, she meets do today. She's working with over three hundred users seventy three percent of them have gone to rehab. I remember going out looking for you on the streets. Yeah. Let's get to see where you're at now I'm still alive. I am too. Aren't there enough programs and rehabilitation facilities for all the addicts that you come in contact with now it can't be tricky? But I think that's one of the things that makes us program unique is that these individuals who are already suffering from diction. They're not trying to navigate the system. They get to work with me, and I can help them navigate the system. Really, like get in somewhere. Get in somewhere. We don't ever turn somebody away. There's never a time that somebody says, I need help, and we're like, well, you'll have to wait a couple months in why is that so important what can happen in date a week month while they might not be here anymore. We saw that during her short time with harmless. So it's been going on. We met Thirty-three-year-old Norman Stanley, a year out of rehab, and working construction, he told us he was clean, and Crisan harmless was a big reason why it's really good to be standing here with you and know that you're doing good. But addiction is in easily beaten four months, after we met, Norman Stanley overdosed on heroin and died. Yeah. Misleading this job. I mean, we also see a lot of people that don't make it. So he say a lot of people pass away people that you might have worked with for a long time. And they were doing good. Those are all these hard days. Yeah. Harmless says she won't allow herself to be defeated by those hard days, you had a few minutes to talk brianna, demand started using drugs, when she was a teenager. This was how she looked when she was first arrested at age eighteen for DUI. This was her second arrest here. Twenty six years old, just ninety pounds, this past January Christiane harmless got her out of jail and into treatment to come here. Because they offer -tunities that they. Offer you and you're in a long-term covered program, which you need. Definitely. Everybody's always told me that. I might know I can do this, but you're out there for. But anyway, damn good. Yeah. Don't really ready to move to the next. Thank you. A lot of those faces a lot of the people that we dealt with over and over and over again, they're not here anymore. They're off the rehab, or restrain their life up, and moved on program is part of a larger effort across the city and state to tighten controls on opioids and stiffen penalties for drug crimes show up tomorrow, health department Huntington's new approach is just over two years old, so questions linger about its long term impact, but the immediate results are restoring a bit of hope here. Police say drug related homicides are down almost seventy percent overdoses have dropped more than forty percent. We have to figure this out because it doesn't discriminate and it's not like people always say, like why do you wanna work with those people? And I'm like, what, what are those people people? I mean because it can be anybody. Really can? By the time game of thrones Rapids eighth and final season hundreds of millions of fans had watched in more than two hundred countries. And territories around the world HBO based, the series on writer Jorge are Morton's fantasy novels, but don't let the dragons and magic full you, it's no kids show characters or complex, and the story lines full of graphic violence, sex and shocking surprises when we first broadcast this report in April, we thought the unlikely story of how game of thrones began, and how it turned into one of the most popular television series ever was a tale in itself. Game of thrones set in the mythical seven kingdoms of west rose. Ruler, historically sits on the iron throne. Feuding families five for power. I have owning one woman, nip Yele shin murder tools of the trade. Gosh, stat. Joint wall protects the seven kingdoms. Has come and with it the threat of total annihilation from a seemingly unstoppable, army of the day for you. What is the show about pal power? What it does to someone how much we coveted how it goes wrong in the wrong hands on how different is when you have it is when you coveting it. Pleased to nearest her. Daria also noon is the mother of dragons. Army's raise dragons in his killed a lot of people in her quest to take the iron throne. Sheer number of ways that people are killed gets incredibly. We really kill. Didn't ariza's pretty old school type ending dragging so it can eat people. They charge them before they always ten attraction. They like that meat cooked. Full down these steps serious has every heard is the lesson. Maisy Williams is are stark teenager, seeking revenge for the murder of her father. Well, how many people have you killed? Gosh, I've lost count. I think in the book, she has like the highest kill count Williams was twelve when game of thrones started, she's now twenty two this was her first acting job. I wanted to be a dance and then my second notation was game thrones. And then it will just they're actors all over the world right now listening to that screaming things do for love. George or Morton is the novelist behind this murder and magic. You see nineteen ninety six he published the first in his series of books called a song of ice and fire for years, Hollywood pursued him trying to turn his books into movies. They're pro choice, inevitably to simplify though. Okay. These folks are too big. We have to cut it all down. I didn't want it simplified. So I said repeatedly, the sexiest word Hollywood. No. That's the sexiest where now but no I don't wanna do it until David Ben came along. Federally part of the sequence was pure CG David and Dan or David Benny off. And Dan Weiss at the time they were young screenwriters and novelists with no television experience. But they love the massive scale of Morton story. I mean, no disrespect you were relatively novice in, in this realm of television disrespectful. It's the fact. I mean, we'd never produced anything never produced anything that we thought we were facing was a real uphill battle of. Trying to explain to him why he should avoid all of these film offers and accept these two guys who've never made a television show before in their lives. And really, he just wanted to know if we knew the books, they knew the books cold and convince Morten that of HBU signed on, they would make an epic cinematic television series. That was true to his story. I knew that none of the conventional networks, wherever gonna put this on not without taking out all the sex, and ninety seven percent of divide Lynch, and making it a kiddie show that it was on. Eight o'clock, I wasn't going to let that happen. You agree seeing it as a series about much more than just dragons into Cajun? Magic if you have a story that is about the human heart in conflict with it self about these very basic human emotions about love and, and ambition, and greed for power. It doesn't matter if there's a dragon it or if it takes place on alien planet, or if it takes place in, in Faulkner's, Mississippi human stories are humans. Human stories are human stories. The rest is, is just furniture. I drink and I know things that focus on the humanity of the characters is what appeal to Peter Dink Lynch he plays Tyrian Lancaster, an outcast member of the ruling family of west roads. Dink ledge was the first actor to sign on despite reservations about the fantasy genre. Jordan in this genre, always have pointed shoes and big beards, and relegated to either comic relief or angry warrior. Without romance and human characteristics, really. And that just doesn't attract me as an actor. But this guy, Tyrian Lancaster has all of that, and then some. Dinka recommended Lena to play his sister the cunning and ruthless. Search Lancaster enough my brother. The way she also happens to be in an incestuous relationship with her other brother, Jamie played by Nikolai Kosta WALDO. I mean I read the script, and then I was like, who what I couldn't remember half the couch isn't it is confused. Then you don't remember the names, I felt like that in the beginning who's gonna watch says twins dragons like Paul, thanks. I don't know. And then it showed all of that. David was shot in ten different countries. Dozens of locations many in remote and desolate. Places hundreds of crew members worked behind the scenes and in all more than twelve thousand extras were used attention to detail was critical major battle scene. Sometimes took weeks to shoot and had to be carefully choreographed. And then there are the dragons challenge was making them as lifelike as possible, especially when actress Emilia Clarke was supposed to be writing on them those seen start as per to, like animation in a process called pre visualization Melia Clark was, then filmed writing what in early episodes was a pretty low tech contraption. You're writing on a hard green shell and then there was like a poll, I the end, and it was essentially like the on the railway, and I'm kind of trying to like as bad as. How are you? Stick, and people just kind of looking around. Look weird. However, edited together with special effects. Some of the most important sets, they actually built from the ground up, like hassle black, which is an Corey outside Belfast actor kit Harrington who plays one of the central characters Jon snow showed us around. But it's interesting that they built. You feel like this is an actual castle. That's been here for hundreds of years. It's an odd some should've CGI creation, that was always with thrones felt was amazing. There was a level of detail that went beyond the audience. See John snow was killed in castle black and then magically brought back to life. Other me characters weren't so lucky. It star played by actor, Sean bean appeared to be one of the most important characters in the beginning of the series, then he got his head shopped off before the end of season. One, I could not believe you killed off Ned stark reputation of being exceptionally bloodthirsty in person. You don't seem very bloodthirsty Star Wars kills more people than I do. I mean right. In the opening of Star Wars they unleashed the death star against the planet all Doron, but, you know, who's living on all roads? That's should mean something, so I try to make you feel the deaths. I don't necessarily have more than any other people. But I try to make you feel more after Ned stark was killed all the actors realized their characters could be next. We get all the all the scripts in one package all the scripts for that season does go to the end the last page of the last script of episode ten and go backwards to see if you were alive to see if I die. Yeah, you just wanted to go out on a heroic way. At least you don't wanna go out like offscreen. Like, hey did you hear about period? What? You don't wanna go out that way. Liberal brutality in game of thrones has been controversial. Particularly scenes of sexual violence. Degrading treatment of women actors Gwendolyn, Christy, Liam Cunningham, and John Bradley say, there's a reason for showing it all, you know, terrible things happen to some of the women on the show. This story is loosely based on the war of the roses, and I would say, learn learn that this is what has happened in history. And this is not what needs to happen in the future. Growing up show, written Legrand this far grownups violence, disgusting. Yeah. We show Clinton, the reality of unpleasant, overly nature of what human beings are capable of doing the human beings nailed it. The final season has ended their plans to shoot a prequel series HBO intends to turn castle black in other locations in Northern Ireland into tourist attractions props used in the show or still stored in a warehouse outside Belfast, dragon yet, it's trash. Baby dragons. Wow. For Finn of the series. It's like visiting a shrine their stacks dummy dead bodies from battles dragon head skulls, and one of kit, Harrington's, most famous condoms, which weighs about thirty pounds out. Not hanging. She. Fairly all. Yeah. Wow. Remember Ned store and lost his head and season one we found it. That's an edge head. Oh my God. Perhaps the most iconic characters of all and game of thrones are white walkers, supernatural, villains who control an army of zombie like followers old whites. Their look was created at the studio in Kent England by Barry, gaur and his team say, Walker all the time. I had fun of all the time, Gower agreed to show us just how complex the makeup for white. Walkers is comfortable enough. They separate pieces of silicone, or painstaking applied with glue then make up and paint fills in the details. The whole process takes about four hours. The transformation is startling. I keep forgetting that I'm dressed like a white Walker. You would think, would you would feel this, but it actually after while it's just kind of feels like your regular skin temperature. The patients will tell you and body temperature think he's quite easy to forget that you're wearing something it is, like a second skin, despite all the meticulous attention to detail and careful planning about halfway from the series. The thrones executive producers, Dan, Weiss and David Benny off realized they had a problem. The TV show was catching up to the end of George are Martin's books. Didn't hit promised. Two more novels to end the story, but he'd missed all his deadlines. He told the producers how he thought his books would end but he didn't have all the details. So for the final seasons Weiss and Benny off who produced the TV series from the beginning were on their own decide how the game ends, what is the feeling as a writer, whose dreamed up all these characters all of a sudden, too? See taken in a direction that is not directly of your making David Danot on the most popular TV show to world. I gave my baby effort action, and, and it's not my baby anymore, but the books are still my baby. The game of thrones finale in may attracted a record number viewers for HBO more than nineteen million Americans tuned into see who would rule the seven kingdoms. I'm Scott Pelley. Thanks for joining us. We'll be back next week with another addition of sixty minutes.

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TV's Top 5 - August 9th, 2019

TV's Top 5

1:04:55 hr | 2 years ago

TV's Top 5 - August 9th, 2019

"Welcome back to tv top five the hollywood reporter's t._v. podcast unless the goldberg west coast t._b. Editor and i'm joined as usual by my partner in crime my dear friend the one and only dan fienberg tv chief t critic what's up dan well press tour is over and as stone temple pilots once saying. I'm half the man i used to be. Uh this week we are thankfully coming to you back from our cozy pseudo studio here at the hollywood reporter's headquarters where we just wrapped what feels like an eternity of the television critics association definitely feels like sixteen days ernest sixteen days eternity. It feels like a month and oh that part all i will grant you. It probably does feel like a month it. It feels like it's been a long journey and even being in a slightly different location for this is revolutionary mostly. I know how excited you are to be out of. The air conditioning at the beverly hilton was cold and if you had that on your bingo square you may check it now what's press tours over press tour bingos comparably over well dan the other thing that's over. Your presidency has come to an end. Let me be the last person or the last of many people to congratulate gradually you on a terrific run and keeping that event going and going strong so congratulations my friend thank you as the poem goes. I'm nobody who are you. Are you nobody to continue but no one needs to hear me reciting poetry well on that note. Let's get into this. Week's headlines this this week. Netflix canceled the show after two seasons and renewed mr iglesias for a second stop taunting me with mystery laziest news uh-huh elsewhere the streamer alicia silverstone and mark fierstein will star in netflix is live action comedy babysitters club. We'll start in making you feel old that to you over at n._b._c. The network has ordered six additional scripts not episodes scripts for the jimmy smits legal drama bluff city law more than a month before its debut that is what they call in the industry st early confidence or utter meaninglessness over at the c._w. The one hundred will join arrow and supernatural and sign off next season additionally network president mark said at t._c._i. He's an early development on drum roll. Wait for it another arrow spin off. That's what the world needs a._b._c. Had a busy day at ta confirming to more live comedy specials from jimmy kimmel norman lear announcing a little mermaid live concert starring ali criollo of milwaukee fame fame and carry bags network also found itself in hot water when if don williamson revealed that she quits nathan fillion cop drama the rookie after experiencing varying racial discrimination and sexual harassment and abuse from guest star and a member of the shows hair department dan developing story. We don't have a ton of info beyond what she posted on instagram and we'll continue to do that. We do not want to jump the gun on that yeah well with all that out of the way. Let's dive into this. Week's top five topics the number one leading up f._x. Had the biggest announcement out of when it revealed that the third season of its emmy winning anthology american crime story would be called impeachment impeachment and focus on the bill clinton and monica lewinsky scandal with the latter also on board to produce dan. That's a huge huge announcement. Does it get much bigger for you. I think probably that was the biggest pure news story announcement and kudos to ethics for not somehow letting that news leak a day before their press tour panel all though maybe if they'd let that news leak debut for the rest of the panel john landgraf would have been more prepared for the let's say small backlash that occurred on twitter with people claiming that having anything that presumably will be anti bill clinton in the media verse as we head towards the election and it's scheduled premiered september twenty twenty seven th two thousand twenty might have a impact on this election. I don't know that i actually believe that in the slightest. I don't think that affects f._x. Miniseries that will be watched by a couple million people is likely to have a large impact on how deeply horribly entrenched we are the nation and there's also not anyone with the last name clinton running in this election so i am just naive enough to believe that that won't make a difference but a well. We'll it was a wrong. We're the john landgraf also agreed with you and this was his direct quote from the stage would ask specifically about the timing of airing impeachment just a few weeks before the election quote. I don't believe it's going to determine who the next president of the united states is yeah. I'm inclined to agree. I just don't see i don't i think we live in a world in which people are waffling on how they're voting in this upcoming election that they're gonna. I don't even know what the reaction to this hypothetically would be. Yeah i mean the i mean as it was in the room. Is you know this is basically going to be a target for trump to be tweeting about just like i said you know days before the election but to what what in i mean what would that accomplish. It's an f._x. Miniseries about a person who isn't running for president also and i tried suggesting this several liberal people on twitter our president does not really watch anything of any particular substance on television he watches fox news and watches the opening earning of saturday night live to find out if they're gonna make fun of him the idea that he's going to sit down and binge-watch an f._x. Miniseries and have deep analytical thoughts about it. I find that that almost impossible to even fathom so good luck proved me wrong. You know start start giving me your substantive analysis of succession president trump. I'm happy happy to hear it all. Let's talk about the casting so impeachment will star sarah paulson as linda tripp a role. She campaigned for since ryan murphy first option the book that they're basing seeing this on two years ago be feldstein of book smart will play monica lewinsky and ashford from masters of sex. We'll play. Paula jones dan thoughts. I believe those are three emmy nominations. You can simply right into the emmys for what is now twenty twenty one. That's a long time in the future to be writing emmy nominations in for something that it hasn't shot a second. I love the beanie feldstein casting. I think that is just great. She has been a scene stealer for a couple of years. Now and an actual starring role for her seems seems well deserved. I was just talking with one of our colleagues in the office a couple minutes ago about the clintons and honestly if i were doing this i wouldn't have them on camera. I would treat treat them as entire not non factors because there are obviously important to the story but i would not have them at all but i don't think that's really the way that brian murphy goes on that. Dan and we may have a story coming out soon but i'm told that hillary may or may not have a smaller role she we'll be character obviously but not central. You're saying i understand for now. You're not suggest yes hillary clinton obviously the year. They don't think the real hillary. The clinton is going to be in this miniseries fatigue definitely. Have i do too yeah i. If if i were them i wouldn't have anyone playing bill well. It's too obvious a recipe for someone to go and be hammy in their performance and if the goal is to have this be the story of the women them and their role that should probably be to my mind what the story is on the other hand also think that you can tell not to interrupt apologies for their dan but i think you can tell from the way that they announced this with all the actresses. I playing these characters. I think that speaks volumes of f._x. Intention and i think that's i think it's the right thing to do. The only question is if john travolta wanted to whip out his primary colors bill clinton impression again and and do that and sort of tone for how mediocre and utterly utterly out of place he was in the o._j. Season of american craft story but otherwise. I don't think it's necessary but i'm very curious because the first season was fantastic television. The second season was also extremely good television so bring it on yeah mom and other f._x. Extremely good television news atlanta has been renewed for a fourth fourth season and will film concurrently with season three in the spring. There's no return date for either season but they're basically taking advantage of donald lovers availability and they're gonna fill in both seasons back to back which will certainly help f._x. Up that emmy tally wants that show does officially return yeah that was one of the first things that john landgraf acknowledged college in his talk to reporters at the press to our was sort of going through the numbers that they got for their various shows in the emmy nominations and kind of explaining all of the nominations for atlanta the drop the board all of the nominations for fargo the dropped off the board the various other nominations the americans that dropped off the board kind of trying to explain how it was the f._x. Felt so very far in the emmy nomination slate and they still have things that obviously are still players whether it's posted while for that what we we do in the shadows did well for them with the emmys but less so but fossey verdon pros both did very well and so there are at least in the conversation but yeah there was there was not a great year but having landed back whenever it comes back. We'll be good because it's a great show. Now also coming back snowfall will be returning for a fourth season on f._x. And wrapping up their day at which is very eventful always is john lennon also revealed his first slate of documentaries he'd been talking about pushing into the non scripted space for i think it was two years now and this is the first lady got stuff like there's a look at women in comedy. There's l._g._b._t._q. Docu series. It's a good slate. I won't rattle it off now but it's at t._i. Dot com slash t._a. If you look for it this is what the beginning of what we're seeing for f._x. Getting that disney fusion where they're really ramping up originals be it scripted or unscripted. I'm strongly in favor of anyone who wants to push into the non fiction space pushing in i. I just think it would be worthwhile for f._x. To kind of figure out what corner of that genre they wanna attempt to fill space in because for example showtime has done a remarkable job of kind of grabbing the high ground in music base documentaries for example and so you know doing a documentary sure you can do it but it's going to look like you're sort i'm trying to do what showtime doing so but they've also got stuff in the true crime space and i think for a first slate. It's it's pretty robust. It's pretty yeah. I mean look. They're gonna they're gonna put these on and we'll see what works and maybe from that. There will be a strategy emerge but i think for an initial slate. It's pretty impressive by all means. I strongly encourage f._x. Is to do this. The more places there are on television for nonfiction storytelling to home the better and also the more lists of nonfiction storytelling that you agree agree to do that. Don't involve documentaries about how hunky <hes> ted bundy is or was the better in my opinion. That was the point where i left the room when an exact and and i won't name who was described as hunky ted bundy that's when i knew it was time to go out to the bar yeah enough enough already with ted bundy folks move on yeah well. That takes takes us to our second topic of the week. I feel like we've been talking about this now for a couple of weeks but david benny off and dan weiss have departed their longtime home at h._b._o. And after offers from disney and amazon have signed what sources sources close to leslie. I have no sources say is a two hundred million dollar overall deal to create tv series as and films for net flicks domes is also <hes> that is a a a lot of money and good gracious. That's that's a lot of money <hes> leslie i have. I have almost no way of processing that amount out of money for two people whose t._v. Resume contains one entry right but that one entry happens to be one of the biggest shows of the t._v. Era i've lost count of how many awards it's one. It's one i think didn't win. A peabody definitely talk so it's basically the show of the moment it's gonna win another regardless of how divisive the series finale with fifteen to twenty more and i mean you know the big question for me is what netflix is actually paying for what they're going to get on this return turn. This is the story that i'm i'm reporting out a little bit more right now but you know look benny f._m. Weiss have three star wars movies already lined up for disney so i can't can't imagine disney or lucasfilm is going to be all that jazz when they're like yeah we're going to focus on those and then we're also gonna do these other things at the same time it just seems like netflix paid two hundred million dollars to be fourth in line for benef- in weiss's services and to your point. They have one credit. It happens to be a good one but it also happens to be one that wants it. Straight from the source material became a little bit more questionable in terms of quality and you can speak to that but i feel like we've already done that in some of the other episodes we've recorded by amply it just it doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. It's a vaguely strange thing. I think basically it's netflix. Doing what netflix does more than anything else. <hes> you know this is simply them saying okay. There might have been one or two people who just signed big deals with other people here they were in on mike sure they try to get the good place creator as it everyone else he i think he had offers from like amazon. Warner brothers and a few others and mike opted to stay at universal when you look at the roster for netflix. It's ryan murphy shonda rhimes. Can you bear as many f._m. Weiss i mean these are some of the creators of the biggest shows of the last decade. Come on it's like a murderer's row. It is and that a certain point that murders rose going to start producing tv shows and we're gonna have to start seeing if any of them are good and if any of them are starting any sort of conversation whatsoever and that is the question to which we can't have an answer yet and sean is i showed won't premier until twenty twenty and that's i think what is is it to years after she signed that deal i mean that's the term is he's got a bunch of other like eighty seven or eight other projects in the works but this is the one. That's you know they have this soap. Nope that's already been cast but we haven't heard anything about any other stuff and ryan. Murphy has his first netflix show coming up. It's not even a show under his deal right yet. The politician is from twentieth that he's got the one flew over the cuckoo's show ratchet which is also from twentieth and then he's got hollywood which we don't know a whole lot about but that hollywood show will be his first netflix original original yeah. That's the funny thing we keep we keep talking about the gigantic ryan murphy deal and we're going to keep talking and impeachment is ryan murphy raffi show lest we forget yeah so we're still waiting to see what any of these deals are going to actually do for netflix than reminding people that net flicks is capable of buying anyone. Anyone netflix wants to buy and in the short term. That's a perfectly viable business strategy because it keeps it keeps all these people from going other places and as long as everyone else getting into the streaming space for networks to be able to say okay we have all of these people locked down. There's value in that regardless of whether they get literally anything at all out of it saying you're you're not going anywhere else to do. You're nothing you're doing. You're nothing right here. Part of me wonders if this was a defensive move. Another part of my brain thinks like imagine i'm trying to think of netflix disney plus homepage where you see the buttons for like star wars and pixar and disney and all these other big brands and marvel were imagined that like a netflix homes green says shonda rhimes ryan murphy you know benny often weiss i mean i don't know how much benefit wieser household names like a shawna or ryan murphy but that's still it's merger if you're thinking about it and in terms of baseball to me that benef- unwise deal feels like bryce harper going to the phillies where you know he's great didn't for the nationals but then he goes to a new city new team lots of new things and he's you know you kind of not the same player we have a question that goes to exactly that point it comes from from the unnamed but pointedly named entertainment strategy guy who writes given the reason benny off and wise net flicks announcement and last month j.j abrams overall deal and this podcast still hasn't been confirmed and we should remind listeners that more brothers has not confirmed j.j abrams. Pardon me last month. Hypothetical j.j j.j abrams overall deal and this podcast established love baseball. I was wondering if you could compare the recent blockbuster. Overall deals to some of baseball's biggest deals are arbin often wise. A bryce harper deal or a mitro deal is j.j abrams albert <unk> holes or clayton kershaw. What is the best big overall deal on the market burkett or the worst. Those are all really great and fun questions like i said i think ben and wiser probably a bryce harper. You know i think ryan murphy is probably the mike trout because he's the one with the best track record pretty much everything he touches works. Who would you say shonda. Is i mean look. She's kind of like the cal ripken to not to go back to far but to go back very as far. I mean colorado iran right broke. Lou gehrig's consecutive games played streak. You look at grey's anatomy. It just broke ers record for tv's longest running medical drama but but then a lot of the other stuff that that she's done hasn't necessarily worked scandal worked but everything that she's exact produced how to get away with murder is a pete no ach show that that's kind kind of limping toward the finish line station nineteen. There's a new showrunner coming in a lot of the other stuff. She exact produces hasn't exactly been home runs. It's kind of been a solid double. Well here in there and sometimes not even that she's had plenty of shows. That haven't succeeded all. I think i think definitely bending often wise are closer to bryce harper given that you're given bryce harper's current statistics. You're effectively saying you have this. One gigantic hit so bryce harper has won m._v._p. Season but then he had a bunch two other seasons also comes onto the market really young so there's value in that mike trout. I think i would say probably the greg. Berlanti is closest on that one. I mean just in terms of overall volume but those aren't they are massive hits or not but he doesn't go for the same thing and they're not awards this season player. The crowd is definitely always top three m._v._p. So he's tough to put in there where so i can. I can accept ryan murphy. Keep in mind. There was a long time when ryan murphy was there was the impression that he wasn't producing these acclaimed shows. I don't know whether it was actually true or not but you know oh he was. He was guy between unpopular. He was the guy behind nip tuck. He was the guy who and sure but he was the guy who for a longtime had a reputation as the guy who could could bring you a provocative first season of t._v. Show and then the show would fall off the cliff the next year he's now largely moved beyond that though i think we still whisper about that but i don't think it's functionally relevant to what his career is at this point. I think he's proven enough second season so i don't know if it's exactly a mike trout these are these are tough questions questions because we have too much information about the baseball players and not nearly enough information but look i think in terms of what the best overall deal on the market is. I think you'd be hard pressed to look beyond greg berlanti. You know look my wife works on bat woman which is produced by greg but from an objective standpoint. He's got eighteen shows on ear. It's a t._v. Record eighteen scripted shows currently in the works on the air streaming however you wanna qualify it and there are more that are out in the marketplace as right. Now are aren't ready to be announced yet. I mean he has incentives worked into that deal for other bonuses. The more shows he gets on the air. It's incredible and yet remarkably bang for your buck zero t._c._i. Press tour appearances this year though his partner in crime sarah scheckter made many threes three three and his husband made one yes so he was amply represented if not literally himself represented so yeah whatever i'm trying to think of who the best mystics who that who that would match up with because as you say he's not going to get you emmys. He's not really probably gonna get you the show. That's going to attract twenty five million viewers on the other hand. He can basically churn. I one show after another never stopping half of the shows that he has our franchise -able and so they can immediately generate spinoffs and he's grooming the next generation of show runners and they are continuing to develop for warner brothers. There's and sometimes with him too. I mean you know there's there's another project. That's out in the marketplace. I can't talk too much about that. May change the conversation around so i mean there's your kripke but goodness we. We're not necessarily breaking news but we're definitely teasing news shirt but yeah i mean i think like i said you know what's the best big overall. You'll on the market in the worst. It's hard to qualify. What are we talking awards. Are we talking ratings. Are we talking prophet because if we're talking profit which is ultimately what most of these deals <music> are about bringing. What kind of financial windfall can you bring to your studio. Warner brothers bought out the back end on a lot of the c._w. Over shows i mean that's profit immediately. These shows are sold all over the world. They've all got netflix steals. The new ones will be on h._b._o. Max i mean there's a lot of bang for your buck there. I think there's no question but yeah so job. I don't know really whether benny often whites even really fits with bryce harper. It's like trying to think it's probably maybe comparable to. I don't know whatever the big deal that adrian bell trae signed was when he basically was this guy with all this potential who no one thought was going to be anything and then suddenly he had one massive year immediately left the dodgers. Sorry contract year contract so so basically as game of thrones the ultimate contract your season there it is that's a great analogy analogy but yeah because otherwise yeah i mean many officer novelist. I'm reluctant to qualify. Any of these deals is the worst but considering. There's a lot that i don't understand understand about why netflix would pay two hundred billion dollars to be fourth in line. I'm gonna qualify. That is the worst right now. Just because i don't have information i think you're right though about the theory that it could it just be a defensive maneuver and i don't think there's anything wrong with that. I think in this marketplace keeping them from going anywhere else is an entirely valid business strategy whether it required spending spending two hundred to two hundred and fifty million dollars that i have no idea and we should i should also note. It's a film and tv deal so they're going to both for netflix so who knows what could come from that deal when and if if they decide to do something that's not star wars so a lot of money. That's a lot of money well up next. Let's talk award season dan number three an award season is the emmys will air on fox without a host when it airs in september and dan as we mentioned at the top of the show your tenure officially came. I'm to an end with this year's t._c._i. Awards which here was a lovely night where amazon's fleabag just completely dominated. It was indeed fleabag won. The coveted sir wasn't i'm gonna say coveted but the coveted prestigious that won two prestigious and coveted t._a. Program of the year award which has in the past gone to such shows as heroes season one and glee but also lots of really good shows that we're not at all embarassed about also i can completely justify i four you why both heroes and glee and empire in fact one the t._a. Program american idol we've given a lot of odd things the program of the year award and i am totally okay with that because they all did things in the broader television universe that explained why they won that award we've also given that word the americans game of thrones and a bunch of other truly truely wonderful shows including fleabag which also one individual cheapen and comedy for phoebe waller bridge and comedy series for being in comedy series and yes it was the only multi winner at our words so big night for fleabag and i hope because i think that is a wonderful show that this gives it at least a little bit of emmy buzz slash steam 'cause. I don't expect it's going to have a comparable sweep <unk> at the emmys but i would love to see it win a couple of big awards. I'd love to see phoebe win. I would love to see phoebe win for writing. Those those are the kind of things that i think this might get that show more in the conversation for giving us the highlights from the show. I heard david milch made a rare public appearance. Yes david milch made an appearance because deadwood one are somewhat confusing heritage award which goes to a show of some significance within a certain strange parameter of time time off the air on time on the air when the heritage award and he won a lifetime achievement award and he was there and was in reasonable spirits much has been made of his declining health and i would say he did seem he seemed a little frail but he also seemed very happy to be. They're happy to be being honored. In this moment. He gave a speech that did make me cry was hugely emotional and i'm happy that we got to give of him that award at a time that he was able to appreciate it because you don't wanna miss out on honoring important people and he is unimportant person jason so that was a great moment we also gave outstanding drama to better call saul which is a show that always in my mind deserves more recognition and that will get crushed by game of thrones at the emmys but as we'll everything will everything else so no shame in that yeah it was it was a great evening michelle williams one our individual achievement award and drama and gave a lengthy lengthy speech probably over five minutes of the kind of thing you would never get at the emmys or anywhere else. This is why we do not televise t- awards because it's nice nice to give people the feeling that they can just say what they want to say and she told a passionate story about loving doing television because it produces a feeling of family emily and how it's what she's been looking for since she was a little kid auditioning in hollywood and how she founded on fosse verdict it was very very good and emotional moment and i suspects you will get to make a shorter but still accepting speech at the amazon a month or so speaking of the emmys so on fox this year her and fox ceo charlier which is a fox entertainment c._e._o. Charlie collier announced that he would officially forgo a host for the ceremony and his reasoning ning or spin however you want to read that is that going without a host will afford producers of the show an opportunity focus on some of the big programs that have ended this here like game of thrones like big bang theory or veep and oranges new black and unbreakable kimmy schmidt and jane the virgin and crazy ex girlfriend and you get the point about the number number of impactful shows that are ending this year but dan. What do you think of the hostess. Emmys have no problem with the homeless emmys. I don't particularly by the explanation for the host the emmy's as as you said on twitter because to me the best thing several people suggested to me that that would actually be much more effective to raise the ratings than going host louis yeah i oh by it all the the we wanted more time to honor things. A host does not really get in the way of that. That's part of the overall production of the show if you if you want to honor broad city you can honor broad city and if you want to honor game of thrones the entire show is going to be dedicated to honoring game of thrones. No one's worried that the emmys are gonna an elite you going to game of thrones and this year was was that a significant show. I just want to know how much time they're gonna spend honoring the final season of fox's gotham. You said no one ever excuse me. I watched every second gotham. What are we talking about. What are we even talking about here lasley. No i think it's as simple as the reason that we've all known the whole time. The basically fox doesn't have someone who's inherently suited for the job. It's simply don't have the right person. Amber hosted at the last time at aired on fox. He was of course the star of brooklyn nine nine when it aired on that work and it doesn't aaron that jane lynch before for that so they've they've had to be because they don't have a late night comedy presence. They had to reach into their programs could they. They have done that this year yeah of course they could've. They could've had an animated comedy with amy poehler. 'cause they've got the kind of money but they also they do have multiple former oscar host or single oscar host however made times mcfarland so he's available except probably didn't wanna do it. His show the orville just move into hulu so but do you still have family guy which is now owned by disney but do you think that if they'd offered tim allen that gig he would have taken it. I don't offer tim allen that gig note. The question is not whether you do and whether i think it would be a good idea but do you think tim allen says yes. I'm speaking of the person who is their biggest. I live action comedy star. I don't even want to think about a world in which tim allen is the host of the line. I'm new there are reasons why i'm just seeing he is the person who could have been a contender and and he's not doing it and that's fine. Whatever makes no difference it would. It would have done zero to make me more excited for the emmys. If you'd said tim allen hosting i'm just saying he's the person who might contender but whatever i'm still not over the fact that you watched every episode of gotham hundred episodes enjoyed many of them it was a it was a show that frequently did amusing and and crazy things and that was in always admirable in its production designing costuming and if you are the emmys and you wanted to pay tribute into that shows audacious visual styling new could do worse. That's my only point. They're bound to forget about a bunch of shows of superior. Quality also don't expect they're going to pay tribute properly to catastrophe or or broad city which they should and chose well at least catastrophe if he was nominated for writing at some point but i do. I don't expect they're going to do that a fleabag sending this season apparently so they can honor fleabag there if they're not gonna give it other awards anyway i don't buy for a second has anything to do with honoring fallen shows it has to do with them. Not having a person and that's okay i the the oscar showed oh. You don't need to have faster so fine number four now. It's time for our show runner spotlight segment this week we're joined by. I am a writer producer who cut his teeth on saturday night live in the office before creating or co creating parks and recreation brooklyn nine nine and the good place which will tragically end end this season as a producer credits also include master of none abbes and n._b._c.'s upcoming comedy sunnyside. Welcome mike sure two t._v.'s top-five flow. Hello thank you for having me so mike. If there's anything that's sort of unifies your tv output to me it's sort of a sense of optimism about people and even even sometimes institutions that have been maligned and i know that when it comes to sports and politics you're hardly immune to frustration and anger. We're at the world. Is it heard when you put on the sort of artistic hat to be off domestic to be hopeful. I don't think it's hard. I actually think it's therapeutic repubic because it allows you to channel your frustrations and anxieties about the world or whatever you're writing about into a potential solution solution like that's the way i thought of it especially on say parks and recreation government. My whole life has been maligned. I i was born in nineteen seventy. Five and one of the first things i remember is ronald reagan's. Tang government is in part of the problem. It is the problem or whatever that line was and i found the opposite to be true true for most of my life which i know is an extremely privileged statement because i grew up away kidding connecticut but to me the government was the swimming pool a public swimming pool. They swam in in the public school that i attended and the people who fixed the potholes on my street when the rebuttals on my street so i was frustrated at the idea personally finally that government is universally maligned and parks and rec became away to sort of say like well. What if it isn't terrible. What if it's just a group of people who have of a lot of <hes> you know optimism and who believe in the power of community and want people to have fun places to go play soccer and go to festivals so it's it's not hard to to take that attitude <hes> i in fact. I think it's the opposite i think it's much harder to live in a sour way all the time and by the way this doesn't mean megan amraam and gen stats here sitting just to my left they've worked with me for many years now and they can attest to the fact that our writers rooms very frequently are just bitch sessions whatever's whatever's happening in the world because the world is dark and scary and awful and terrible and so we talk about that all the time. We're not pollyanna ish about the problems that we face but it's it's nice to write things that propose solutions instead of just saying yes. The world is dark and scary and terrible and awful. That doesn't seem there's no point to that in my opinion. It's it's just reflecting. If you're just reflecting back the awful parts of the world we live in then. What are you doing. Just you know go outside and start yelling the sky but that's incredibly high pressure sure also on the panel today. You're basically being asked when you realized the religion that you created yourself might not be wholly effective. That's a lot to ask a showrunner the t._v. Show i don't know i mean look the places a different kind of animal right that that didn't start off from mike. Let's examine this institution of american culture and the way that even brooklyn nine does a little bit. It's like what's it like to be a cop brooklyn or what's it like to be a you know a parks parks and recreation supervisor in in southern indiana. This was a different animal. This was like let's do a sort of like long-form investigation about the concept of goodness so it started off from a place of of like yeah this. This is going to get weird guinea get this is going to be strange. We're going to have to come up with a bunch of rules. I'd never written anything anything even remotely what you might call genre ish or sifi ish or anything. Some of the writers on the staff are big genre fans some of them. I'm had never aren't at all but from the beginning we sort of knew like we're gonna have to propose some big ideas here and we might screwed up. Mike and we might proposing awesome big ideas and then find out. They're wrong and that sort of what. I did like that point system like i said this on the panel. The point system that i invented was the idea of it was what if the afterlife is is accurate what if it's just mathematically accurate and what if no one could argue with it and what if your final score was just your actual final score in terms of how good about a person person you were and it wasn't until i got pretty deep into the breaking of the pilot story that i was like oh. What a terrible system awful so i. I don't don't think it's a lot of pressure as much as it is. Just like it just requires you to like. Just keep thinking about what you're doing and and and not be afraid to kind of reverse course if you feel like i grew up one thing. I'm curious about you know look good places thirteen and that was originally the pitch per episode so it was or per season. I should say the idea that you've you've been able to come in and say this is closed ended. This is a short order per season and by the way it's not going to run for ten seasons like which is the of course you know the the pot august the end of the rainbow for a broadcast network share. Can you talk a little bit about how that it's becoming increasingly common but it's also not something that networks enjoy hearing well gessen. Listen no from a creative standpoint. That's the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow if what you care about his pot of gold and right if you care about a pot of gold then you're doing a different. You're not doing this version of a show right. You're doing you're. You're trying to conceive of a show that could just run as long as possible not exclusively. There's plenty of people who conceive of ideas for shows that can run as long as possible who care very deeply about the artistic merits of their shows. I'm not saying those things he mutually exclusive but now the bigger thing is that it used to be the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow for the network and studio because he was the only way to get a pot of gold they would deficit spend every episode and in order to make their money back they had to sell it into syndication syndication or to a streamer or whatever and that was the only way to make money so but now that's not true anymore like shows get a little more expensive every year but they also sell them to netflix amazon or hulu or whoever after a year or sometimes before they air and that deficit goes away like network t._v. Right now is the closest thing to a no lose proposition for the network and the studio that you've ever had in hollywood at least since the days of like i love lucy where you know they made fifty six episodes a year and the sets were so cheap that when ricky slam the door the entire set shook back and forth because he was made out of balsa wood like back then like they're rolling in money they still wanted to make as many as they could because they were making money every episode so they they made fifty a year but but in the intervening time it just got really expensive and so it used to be that the only way to do it was to maximize the actual number of episodes you made. It's not the case anymore like their networks. Studios can turn profits on things that make a total of ten episodes or twenty or thirty or whatever so the downward pressure coming from the people who buy t._v. Shows is much less than it was a while ago because they're not so scared. I heard about how much money they're losing the. They're they're making more money on more individual projects than they ever have and you recently signed a big overall deal to stay put at universal television which of of course produces parks and you've had a long relationship with their on good place was that part of the appeal of staying with them considering that they will soon have a streaming service of their own to supply yeah although although every place has a streaming service of their own in the next two years so the appeal to me of universal besides just familiarity and being place. I've worked continuously since january of nineteen ninety. The eight was that they are still very good from the studio side about taking stuff elsewhere brooklyn ended up at fox and master of none was on netflix and and i've already worked on projects that are targeted to be a place as other than n._b._c. that you know who <hes> hopefully in the next couple months weeks years whatever we'll get set up other places like they're still invested in that idea. They're not completely silent off in terms of what their strategy is now. They might get silent off because these this other places might say like we don't want your shows anymore. We only want shows from our people but at least for the time being they've been very good about saying. Let's take this idea and find the best place for this idea and go try to sell it there and make a deal there so it's a very weird world. We live in now but you know. I think that all for for many many many reasons universal is just the best place for me for what i do and what i wanted to do and you're being pursued by everyone netflix amazon. I heard everyone was was <hes> chasing him. You al chasing might be strong. They were mildly interested in my whereabouts glancing at their own own to check their g._p._s. tracker on me occasionally to see where i was but i i you know i certainly had a lot of meetings at a lot of places and they're the world is changing so so fast that there are very strong arguments to be made to go to any number of different places right. Now you know like benny off in waste just went to netflix and and and like i'm sure that they did the same thing i did and they met with everybody in town and then the whatever the specific set of parameters was for the shows those guys wanna make that it was the best place for them like i. It's what everyone's doing right. Now is just sort of poking around and trying to figure out like where's the best fit. When it comes to parameters you haven't been entirely monogamous is to broadcast but you've obviously shown a lot of dedication and faith to that side of the medium. Are there parameters that you think would make you want to do a show that was four or streaming informat whether it was being able to swear being able to run thirty three minutes per episode. You know whatever the reasons would be. I mean there's certainly aspects of like the way that other places do business that are that i'm jealous of. I'm jealous of the time most of anything. I think it is a huge pain in the butt. I've said this many times. I'm sorry if i'm repeating myself but it's a huge pain in the butt to have to get every episode to exactly the same length and it's also extraordinarily unlikely that the optimal length of every single episode that you make is exactly twenty one minutes and thirty seconds and and you know we really some producers cuts we call them of of good place episodes that are anywhere from forty five seconds to six minutes longer than the ones that they are in those episodes. I think are the best versions of of that individual episode that i'm very jealous of but but i honestly think that it starts from just what the idea of the show and where does that show wanna live and like master of non was a show that could not have been done on n._b._c. for like fifty reasons netflix was the exact right place for it at the right time and i would assume that in the future and this is again the appeal of being at universal for me personally personally. There will be things that i'm involved with some level with that aren't best suited for n._b._c. Their best suited for some other place and then we'll try to go to that place and see if they want to buy them so so in terms of what appeals to me about other places the time is the biggest thing cursing i dunno. I love cursing. Don't do it too often in my in my own life but that doesn't make me. I'm not jealous of that like i think i mean the thing that most people in the world who are casual fans of the good place and know about is the way that we got around the cursing problem and like to me the best thing about network t._v. Is i think limitations obstacles are good for comedy. I think they force she to be inventive and they force you to think hard about what you're doing and come up with interesting creative solutions. I think i've used this analogy many times but i remember reading a story about the which off skis making the matrix and they were like we need seven hundred fifty million dollars and warner brothers was like you can have like forty eight million dollars and they made one of the greatest scifi i five moves have all time and then when it made a billion dollars they were like we need seven hundred and fifty million dollars and warner brothers was like here's seven hundred and fifty million dollars and then they made two big it flat fab flabby bad movies and i think that that's because people stop giving them notes. I'm guessing and stopped good. They stopped having obstacles they had to they had to navigate navigate an obstacle course in the first movie that didn't have unlimited money they had to be really invented with the way they did things and they had to hone their script and i mean i'm lou. This is complete conjecture. I've never i've never met them at all but even if it's not drew it's still a good analogy in my opinion. It's like the network t._v. Gives you obstacles and i think especially for comedy. Obstacles are very good for comedy film. Twitter is about to come after you for maligning those two real any movies. Oh yes you kidding me. Nautilus twitter is gonna come after me for the matrix sequels. Oh you met the sequels not the movies they made after the matrix. There's a deal there's a renaissance the second one it's a crazy one right there long bacardi ad where they're just braving out in like a weird slow slow cave philip twitter does weird things. I can't be held responsible for thank you for the warning going back on the on the t._v. Track you know one of the things that i think is interesting about the overall deal market. Is that so many producers. There's are are getting these big deals but it's a lot of them. The common thread is that they're prolific so you are producing multiple shows some of which you right and some of which you shepherd shepherd other show runners. How do you approach that balances. It basically who comes up with the idea or i mean. Sunnyside is from matt murray who you work with on the good place in brooklyn nine parks and rec. Can you talk a little bit about that. Finding that balance between how much you actually want to write and where your responsibility and an interest is in jeopardy new voices uses yeah. That's the fun part of. That's the most fun part of being the exact place i am right now. Which is i've worked with. I mean i've known matt murray since nineteen ninety five. You've worked with them continuously he was s._n._l. With me he he <hes> you know came to law those shows you mentioned and so you know he's a a wonderful person and incredibly incredibly talented person and there are a number of people who fit that profile who i've worked with for a long time and the really fun part of having the job i do you. You get to say like well. What do you wanna do now like if i can help in some capacity capacity could be co writing. It could just be producing it. It could be doing neither neither just giving advice and thoughts and pitching jokes on a script or whatever that's the most fun part of this to me like i think my ideal world is something very close to what a have right now. Which is i have a show that is mine technically that i created and i work on and that is the main focus of my week to week life but then also there's all these other people who are more than ready to be running their own shows and have a thousand good ideas and if i can help shepherd them through the weird process awesome getting a show from an idea to an actual pilot or to a show ideally great. That's great like that. There are so many of those the people that i've worked with two of them are in this room to my left and nothing would make me happier than to have all of those people get their shot and like come up with their idea and say what they want to say and i think that the you know the the key to this to me is i don't want to be a person who like makes a bunch of uniform stuff. I don't i want to go in and tell everyone. This is how you have to do it or this is what the characters have to sound like. This is who you have to cast or whatever because i think there's plenty of me now and i don't wanna i don't wanna have like a weird homogenous empire of of a bunch of stuff that just where everybody sounds like me that's not fun what is going to be very fun. Is there being shows where everybody sounds like meghan amraam and jen statsky because they sound different from me and that would be the ultimate goal to me is as if if the people that i work with and love and admire and respect all get the chance to do their thing just the way greg. Daniels gave me the chance to do my thing. That's the way that this tako system works. When it works well is that people who have some amount of success and get to a point where they can then shepherd other projects through shepherd them through and then back the hell away so that the people who were actually making them can actually execute them the way they want to but does it feel like you want there to be still up a brand if not a homogeneous watching us voice. You know things that you want. I mean represent. I guess i think that first of all just hearing the word brand makes my skin crawl a little bit <hes> universal reaction that i think that in lieu of the word brand let's call it a worldview or or something right like if i have a certain worldview about about tv and that worldview encompasses a general sense of how people you should be presented in a general sense of what ideas are good and what ideas are bad in general sense of what t._v. Show ought to try to do and a general general sense of what kinds of people should act on that t._v. Show and that worldview now after a while of doing this is kept consistent by the people people who work with me on these shows and by the people like allison jones who casts all of them and by the people like morgan sackett and david hyman who produce all of them like the the brand is the people and the the writers who i've worked with and who i've shared of writer's room with for between three and in fifteen years are the reason that they've been around that long is because we sort of get each other and we sort of fit in some weird way and we all which is not to say that we all have the same perspective on anything. It's it's merely that the creation of a t._v. Show will remain generally consistent because because the people who were doing it are all sort of like minded for a better word like minded is second only to brand in terms of making my skin crawl but but it's slightly better better but but that's that's how i don't worry at all. I don't think about her. Worry at all about any of that stuff because i feel like it's going to happen naturally because someone someone who would make a t._v. Show that were wildly what you might say off brand for me personally. I'm not working with that person at all right so it doesn't that doesn't concern me just feeling though that like you knew what the mary tyler moore cat stood for. You knew what you knew stood for you you know so yes those were brands brands but they were also kind of worldviews. Yeah that's true and yes in the those those logos that like say do boost it right. I remember being like when i saw that i was like yes. I like this on the other hand. <hes> before curtis hanson died. I met him at a party and i said i have to ask you this. I never met him before for it and i was like there's literally nothing consistent about what you do. It's fascinating. He made like in her shoes and he also made l._a. Confidential and he also made like that weird weird poker movie that <hes> eric bana i was in and i was like how do you what do you what's your what's your deal man like do you. How do you do this and he's sort of shrugged and was like i do do what i think is interesting. I find an idea. I think is interesting and i i you know eight mile. He'd also made eight mile like what crazy career and he just said i do it. I think is interesting. I i find an idea. I like and i find actor alike and i pursue it for a while and i do it and then i move on and you wouldn't say that curtis hanson had a brand but i think you i would say that he had a very good and happy career and he made a lot of really interesting stuff and so i i would rather go at it that way. I would rather say like i'm i'm gonna i'm gonna find people that i'd like and i'm going to find ideas that i like and we're going to try to make them and some of them will work and some of them won't end at the end of the day. We'll all be happy with with the with the admission. Sunnyside is comedy about immigration but given what's happening in our country right now or how are you balancing humor with. Maybe taking on some more serious subjects given the sorry of what is happening in our country. Where do i how do you how do we balance the comedy in this area stuff look. The show is a comedy. The show was conceived of its original form by calpine five years ago. It is not a reaction to this in the same way that the good place in some weird way seems like a reaction to trump but isn't because it was conceived of unwritten before the entire first season as was done before the election almost all of it so it's not a reaction to it. It's a very present issue in the lives of many many many americans <hes> <hes> all all immigrants and then all people who care about immigrants and even people who don't care about immigrants like it's a thing that's out there all the time now so i it's first and foremost to comedy show it is it is attempting to be we described it all through the process of developing it as a patriotic comedy. It's about 'bout what why people love america and why they wanted to be in america and there are many obstacles to loving america frankly and to also being in america. If you're an immigrant emigrant and those obstacles include a very byzantine process of application for immigration they also include a number of people who don't want you here and they also include at a current president who <hes> actively doesn't want you here and telling you all the time so i think that like the main thrust of what what you're gonna see on that show is comedic stories about a group of people who came here from all different places in the world who all love the country and all what to be here and are all just trying to do their best to <hes> to pass that test to take that class and pass that test and join a place that they truly love the underlying background the sort of like low rumble that goes through it. It is going to be that like that's very very hard right now. In fact it's probably harder right now than it's been for at any time in history or at least for a great while that doesn't mean that episode assode. You're going to get any kind of story about <hes> about immigration officers you might or you might not. It's just sort of underlying threat that accompanies. He's any any group of stories about immigration. They've i three episodes of written. Two of them have absolutely nothing to do with the actual process of immigration and one of them has a lot what to do with the actual process of immigration so i think it's like anything else. The writing staff is pursuing the gym. It real true-to-life stories about what the immigrant experiences like. They're going to write those stories. Some of those stories have to do with very silly stuff that has nothing to do with the drama that's unfolding nationwide and some of it are directly going after the drama unfolding nationwide but the primary goal is always going to be entertaining and funny we talked about early on when cal was sort sort of explaining the idea to matt and me we say i i remember thinking like the goal here should be to make a show you know like when you watch a michael bay movie and there's like there's like a moment at the end where there's like a slow motion montage of like kids like norman rockwell painting looking kids like blake flying a space shuttle and there's an american flag flapping lapping in the breeze and you're hearing like a john f. kennedy speech or something like it's so overblown and and like ridiculous in terms of how america bre american it is the goal is literally to make a comedy that makes you feel like that a comedy about immigrants that makes you feel like that. It makes you feel like the things that this country is capable of and is the potential for this in this country for greatness is so massive and people love it that much and the idea of it is so great that we can make people feel like they felt at the end of armageddon and then we will have done our job but the ridiculous thing about that of course is that five years ago or ten years ago that sentiment wouldn't have been at all political the idea of people wanting to you come into the united states and be americans was literally america. That's right but now it's become an explicitly political so but i think the i think the point the show was was trying to make it some level is it should not be political. It should not be a politically controversial stance to say. I'm an immigrant who loves america and i wanna live here. They're like there's nothing inherently political about that that is literally literally factually how the country was founded so the idea that it's become a political we'll sawhorse or whatever you call it is not the fault of the people who want to come here and it's not the fault of the idea of the country in fact it is the idea of the country so that is exactly the point. The point would be our point would be. It's not a political position to say. I am from somewhere else. I love america and i want to become coming citizen. That is inherently not a political position. It has become a political position because of this debate and because of what's happened in the country so we're trying to get we're we're trying to approach the problem apolitically as much as we can lou along those lines. Are you somewhat tremendously relieved that you never had to see how the optimism of the parks and rec played against trump's america or alternatively. Do you kind of desperately want to see how attitude i've thought about this a lot and and i have very boring enter which is i don't know i honestly don't. I don't know what would have happened if in season four of parks and recreation if the election of two thousand sixteen it had happened and what it would have done to us and how would have changed course or whatever i mean to be fair we introduce a character when leslie nope got onto the city council who was has basically. He wasn't donald trump but he wasn't far from donald trump. He was a self interested guy who is corrupt and he he moved upon you because he was a dentist chest and ponti didn't have fluoride in their drinking water and the main business in town was a candy company and everything he did as a member of the city council was an attempt to increase his own personal fortune and he he had absolutely no qualms about doing it. He was openly corrupt and blackmailed leslie into giving him her bathroom and did a bunch of stuff celebrated and celebrated. That's right yeah he made t shirts and by the way also love golf for the record so it's not like this. This stuff didn't start with trump. You know this stuff. There's been around for a very long time so i i. I don't know that we would have done anything differently. I think it would have played out pretty much. The same it's just the jeremy jam would have seemed like a reaction to trump instead of being a precursor wrapping up. The culture is well. We don't need to explain to you what it is. The office exploded unpopularity with netflix is now moving to n._b._c.'s upcoming streaming platform. I i was curious to get your thoughts on what you what you think of that and how big that show has gotten years after it ended ended and the rumblings that there could be a new take on it with a new cast mostly what i think of it is that i'm annoyed that people yell mos at me now because that had gone away for a while and now it's back like i picked up my son from baseball camp the other day and i was like hey buddy ready to go and he looked at his councillors countered looked at me when hey how's it going and i was like damn it you told them i was most didn't you that it is wild though that that's happening. It's it's it's it's very i mean well deserved. I the i mean. I only worked on the first four years of that show but i've been watching it with my son. It's quite good. It's a t._v. Show off so i you know it's again. It's part of this new weird world. We live in now. Where this thing that ended many years ago that started i mean i moved out here in two thousand four ford. Take that job. It's fifteen years ago that i started writing on that show and suddenly a bunch of ten year. Olds are super into it. It's very weird. I mean as far as what the future sure holds. I don't know you can't do that. Show frankly you can't do that show without greg daniels running it. I'm not sure he has an interest in doing. I have no idea if he does or not i. I don't know why really why he would sense. Everyone's still loves the original so much. It doesn't seem like there's any cause to rebooted people who are just continuously watching the original one so i don't know i i look this might be a craze. You know this reboot thing and might be a mighty here to stay. We might just get caught in a loop where just every fifteen years. Here's the entire slate of t._v. Shows from fifteen years ago gets rebooted. Put back up again. That's truly the bad place but i don't know it's i mean look it happened. The thing that is interesting to me about this briefly. Is it happened in movies. No one talks about this but like this exactly what happened in movies people just in order to cut through the white noise in the clutter people just started remaking movies with titles and some of them are great and some of them stink and so i kind of feel like that's probably what's going to happen with t._v. Shows too like they'll be rebooted. Sometimes sometimes the original casts or sometimes with all new cast but this isn't a new phenomenon. I mean hollywood is incredibly good at ringing blood from a stone and they are like the the idea of like we can make this thing that people have heard about and that will increase our chances of monetize by x. y. Percent whatever that's they're going to keep doing that and they'll they'll. We'll do it forever so i think that's the the the mistake would be to do it simply to do it. If there's a new reason to reboot a shower remounted show great if there arisen find a new idea the good place returns for its final season followed by sunnyside on september twenty six n._b._c. brooklyn nine nine will return midseason mike. Thanks so much for joining the thanks for having me number five as usual. We wrap things up with the critics corner. This week's new arrivals include clued the terror and lodge forty-nine on a._m._c. succession and our boys over at h._b._o. Owns david makes man why women kill on c._b._s. All access and the following up from last week's critics corner dan. We've now seen two episodes of the new b h nine. Oh two one oh show within a show revival reboot. I'm not sure how what to call it so petty yeah. I think that's what the jennie garth called it a soapy. I don't know dan. There's a lot going on. I missed that panel so i don't know what jenny earth called it. I how power watched two episodes so oh. I know that it's okay. I don't think it's bad it's it's an amusingly complicated conceit for something that could have been very simple simple and i appreciate that they at least put the effort into trying to do something more complicated the reality is i don't think anyone working on the show show is i don't know talented enough frankly to give it a high ambition smart take aac so they have a they have a funny concede that they drag out sometimes decently they get a couple laughs to me. They didn't do a very good job honoring luke perry at all but that's that's on them. I don't think they wanted to do it poorly. I think they just weren't equipped. I mean you also don't know who who wrote the episode right down. The the the episode did air with a writing with writing and directing credits so that's that's fine but it sounds as if there was some dragged out process and trying to figure out stuff keep in mind that a bunch of writers and the showrunner left some weeks ago before this was while this was coming together but anyway wait l- let's talk about some of the others. There are a lot of good things to watch on t._v. Over the next week. Just tell me succession. Season two is as good as season. I've seen the first two episodes and they were terrific. They're they're just great. It's it's everything you would want it to be if you if you dig the vibe of succession and some people i know do not it is exactly cle- what you wanted is full of lacerating profane language. The performances continue to be great and the story continues to get more complicated located and twisted as it progresses and as people aspire to greater power so that would be the thing. I would tell people primarily to watch this week. If there's another second-year near show that you should check out. Everybody really should be watching lodge forty nine on a._m._c. but i'm not sure everyone would actually like lodge forty nine on a._m._c. and at this point i can't i can't really explain to you what lodge forty-nine even about it's a odd southern california secret society slacker drama eighty that has a vibe that is completely unique and it makes me laugh and it makes me smile and i i just love settling into its rhythms and the second season starts out totally confidently. I think it is a great cast from white russell to brench endings to sousse anya cassidy and all of these supporting players one of the one of the high powered executive producers on the show gets a little acting this season not going to say who that is but it's fairly obvious and it's it's just a really good show again won't be for everybody. It's completely and totally vibe and the you catch it or you. Don't actually true about david makes man on own. It's legitimately one of those shows. That is actually a tone poem. Even though critics critics often use the phrase tone poem when they don't know how else to describe something but it is a poetic depiction of a young man growing up in florida being torn in between different worlds and it's it's quite beautiful at times so you've got that the new season of the terror the terror infamy on a._m._c. <hes> <hes> has nothing at all to do with the first season so if you haven't watched the first season a you should be whatever it is a spooky ghost ghost demon story set around the internment of american citizens of japanese descent in world war two and it's just a version asian of this story that we haven't seen before and i appreciate the audacity of turning this into an anthology and this is a good way of doing it so oh. That's a lot of things to watch and i'm already terrified about what i'm gonna find on my p- d._v._r. If i ever get home well that feels like a good place to wrap things up up. We'll be back soon with another episode and until then please be sure to check out. Josh wigley series regular which this week features great interview with showrunner from the handmaid's tale. If if you like us be sure to subscribe to t._v.'s top five on all of your favorite pod casting platforms if you really like us rate us if you really really like us writer review you can also tweet at us. We're always happy for people to tweet at us and if you have questions comments concerns or baseball related questions you you can email us at t._v.'s top five. That's the number five at t. H. r. dot com until next time lesley until next time dan.

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"Treading Boldly" with Daniel Weiss and Joshua Glaser

Legacy-Dads Podcast

53:05 min | 2 d ago

"Treading Boldly" with Daniel Weiss and Joshua Glaser

"Christian parenting everyone to here with my partner. Dave and we want to welcome back to legacy. Dad's were you get your weekly dose of biblical manville. This podcast is for men husbands and fathers in all stages of life where we promote an advocate proven principles for leaving a lasting legacy now that we have that business out of the way. Dave what's been going on with you my friend dante. It's good to talk to you again. i'm really excited for this for this episode to come out in terms of my my life. I'm still working on the transition and moving down to south florida Over memorial day weekend. It was rainy and cold here so there was not a lot of outdoor activities. So that was that was pretty recent. I also promoted by promotion ceremony which was a lot of fun. Had my best friend from high school who have known for thirty plus years now who. I've also served with for twenty plus years and he was the presiding officer over that ceremony. So it's just a really neat kind of experience for me so we had the family out with some friends from church. We had some friends around. And it's just a good time so that's kind of what's what's been going on me you. We had a eighth grade graduation yesterday. The weather it was outdoors so thankfully no rain and we had all that going on grandparents and Hustle bustle today. My wife was all day at a great america eighth grader. In a bunch of other eighth graders in a few other parents and tomorrow we're going to have something like seventy eighth graders over at our house for a pool party slash graduation party. It was one of those things where you just sent out the invite to the class thinking that you know maybe like forty or fifty will say no and as my wife will tell you one after another kept going. Yes yes yes. So we're gonna have to with seventy people running through our house in outdoors tomorrow. Hopefully by friday my wife will still want to be married to me. So we'll see what i'm hearing is. Dante has a castle got it. Yeah no we Years ago we did a weekend. Good going from good to great and we had one of our care pastors that him and his wife let it their parents of three boys and one of the things that really resonated with my wife and i was you know with with the sign of the times that we're in with a broken is out there you know just parents not home. Single parents and people trying to work full jobs. You never know where you're putting your children too so why not make your house the most inviting and they said you know we. We saved a couple of trips. That were vacation. We put money down and we eventually put a pool in the house. We finished our basement. And they said some of the conversations that we have with our our boys friends Just was spiritual just was great and above all we were just friends and it just allowed them to ultimately come to church in you know through relationship come to know the lord so we were all on board. Were like we're going to do that. We're gonna make cuts to everything else we have to do. And honestly we've done that and we really have seen the fruit of it so onto onto this dave. So i gotta ask you. I've been a men's ministry leader as we talked about on this podcast in two thousand seven. You try to leave. But they won't let me leave so they keep having me do more and more things not getting i love. I love these guys. A bunch of guys meta faith. But i've also been another for over nine years. And i have a question to ask you related to this podcast today. All right i like questions. Shoot all right in my experience and what we've talked about what you've heard on. Podcast the podcast. Before what do you think. One of the most serious hidden. Pandemic matt pandemics. That men have church and for that matter less you say men in general in the church and in the world have or you talk about pandemics and i think that's kind of a sensitive subject but i don't think we're going to go there right now but i do think one of the one of the most serious pandemics that men have to deal with Is probably pride of life and lust of the eyes. I john two fifteen through seventeen. You nailed it right there and Anything that goes before the lord and with that pornography and it is such a sensitive topic and you know some of our listeners. I know right now either. You're just going to tune it out or turn it off but before you do that you know. Give us thirty minutes. Give us forty minutes in. Open your ears. Open your heart and just ask you know. God maybe is this. Is this the time that you really want me to take the the stewardship in my like. Is this the time that you because you're a holy. God really want me to take purity series in my life. So what do you have to lose. Because if you're still in your same routine it's not gonna matter but if you really want to honor. God let let. Let's let's go. let's go for it. Let's take a listen to what this podcast for you today. Yeah i totally agree when we were asked to do this interview with The i guess the leading line on on one of the on one of the things that we got was any kid can get addicted to porn even church kids and that really you know really raise my eyebrows alot bassett. Well that's probably true. You know when you look at all of the statistics and everything in terms of you know people who are getting exposed to pornography. I think ages are getting younger and younger and so we've got a couple authors of a new book so we've got josh glazer and dan weiss the authors of the book treading boldly through a pornographic world a field guide for parents in it provides parents with the tools. They need to navigate a hyper sexualization culture as leaders of christ centered ministries aimed at helping families live in god's design for sexuality. Josh daniel are passionate about helping parents raise healthy. Kids both relational and emotionally in their book. Josh daniela the experts. Parents need to help their kids. Navigate a digital world full of landmine land mines and with that dan josh. Welcome to legacy dad's podcast. Thanks dave. thanks dante. We're really glad to hear so for listeners. Tell us you know this project How did you guys come together. How did you guys come together to write this. And why is such an important topic in your lives. I was actually we so my ministry regenerating. We've been doing a parenting conferences for several years. And i thought we got to put this into a little little booklet. Some small get this in parents hands. And but no i kept with product offsite. I was reached brands and said you know anybody could do some writing for us. And a mutual friend brought me in touch with daniel called him up pitch the idea to him and over the course of a couple conversations we really really resonated with each other kind of vision for this but eventually said this isn't this isn't a booklet. This is a book man and And i want to write it with you. And so if i can insert myself into this like let's let's do it and it has been a truly challenging but wonderful collaboration that i think guys really brought in to guys who are have similar heart for this topic but who are very different gifts and perspectives. And so i think it's become a a great resource in an honestly. I mean it's hard writing a book. It's definitely hard. Writing a book with co author is joshua. Tell you it's really hard writing a book with me as co author with him. He's done a great job with us and the reason we're passionate. Yes why we're passionate about it like we. We have seen so many parents. Increasing number parents who feel really intimidated overwhelmed insecure about raising kids in pornography saturated culture. That is also immensely connected. Digitally in we are still in the first generation of parents where kids walking around devices numeral devices that can access porn and so we thought we gotta get after. We have to help parents get in this with your kid. It's too important. I think it's it's a lot of parents. Feel overwhelmed or or or i would even say under educated as far as the prowess of kids today. you know either via video streaming you know whether or not moms and dads you have a disney channel you have a flicks. You have amazon. You have cable channels whatever you are kidding yourself if you think that your kids have not been exposed either via texting either via sexting either via inappropriate images i i was walking with a high school student asked me to. He knew me through when i was teaching. Kids ministering the asked me if i would mentor him through high school and it turned out to what i thought would be a year that i saw him through the following three years and then it turned out into college and then in college he graduated in one of these guys. That was just so proud of Just for walk being honest with his struggles you know. He was telling me like even in his high school. You know christiane man. It really took purity seriously and married now. Very proud of Is named josh and know. Listen to this is josh. I wanna tell you. You're you're god's You blessed my life in so many ways but he was telling me you know sexting in high school is a really big deal and the images you can all of a sudden you know you just exchange numbers hits you. You know you're caught and the reality of it. Is you know. I think the parents we have this ostrich appo- approach that you know we. We expect our kids to know the boundaries know the rules and and then we just kind of put our head in the sand and just pray that they're not they're not gonna be exposed to this to have access to that and with that being said i mean some of the statistics out there are unbelievable but like in your experience. You said you've done a lot of parenting you know Conventions and everything else like that talking with parents. What what are you guys. See in like what is paramount that you know at least okay. I'm overwhelmed. I know i'm Man i know that i'm out technology for my kids. What what are some ways that in just you suck apparent parent. You're dropping the ball to know you can do this. You have the ban with call the holy spirit. That's going to equip you but you also have the the ability of those who've gone before you. What do you say to our listeners. Here right now. That are overwhelmed. Yeah you know you mentioned. I think a lot of parents do feel overwhelmed or fearful and a lot of what we do in. The book is trying to flip that script upside down. And that's why we titled it treading boldly not trading fearfully and a couple of things To remember his parents one. And you mentioned it dante. The holy spirit of god is with us in this journey and he doesn't leave his people he doesn't i say us or abandon us. He's not gonna leave parents hanging out there in the wind with no resources. No hope but we've got to open ourselves up to the working of god we've got open ourselves up our place and honestly i mean josh and i know we're we're dads do is hard places to go and just because we wrote the book doesn't mean we've escaped all of these issues we haven't because and that's the other thing this is. We got to get beyond seeing this only immoral issue and what i mean by. That is definitely a moral issue. You're living in a factory town and their soul. Furic fumes just pumping out day after day and your kid comes home coughing. Mean you're not gonna be angry at that kid because he's getting sick but that's what's happening in our culture is there so much pornography not just internet porn but the the messages in the attitudes in pop culture what they're being taught in schools What we're seeing on even tv news. I mean it's pretty highly sexualizing everywhere. You go and is not a healthy sexualization. It's a very distorted sexualization. So let's let's understand that. Our kids are breathing. Yoon something toxic and that's another really hopeful thing is. Parents are the best tool their kids are going to have to get through this. We don't parents we wanna build an uphold and lift up parents because we know and really the research shows parents are the best people to walk their kids through this challenging tot needs challenge this challenge culture. No that's absolutely right. I mean you know you sunday. Schoolteachers are youth groups. Maybe you have them. You know one to four hours a week. You know teachers. You know eight hours you know. Seven hours may be depending on what grade level they are but as the parents you know around the dinner table around weekends have the most time. I think you know it's whether we want kid ourselves or not in my experience especially men's ministry and walking with marriages and all that is guys first and foremost you gotta take purity seriously yourself and so it's cleaning house with where i'm at and then next like like i love what you guys said earlier. Honor we were talking about before the podcast but casting a vision and what is that vision. Looks like and so with you guys in in going back in writing the book and into the context of our listeners are looking at this what does it mean for you guys to cast a vision. I know you alluded to it a little bit here but give us some of that vision casting coming out the other side. Were moving our kids from adolescence to teenagers to adulthood and releasing them into this world. What is that vision. Look like for them when we talk about in the book is is. I think there's a lot of misnomers around the idea of purity oftentimes when we're talking about purity. We're talking about the absence of something. But you don't take just remove junk and find something pure dexter to begin with something good and so we actually challenged the idea of instead of thinking about purity. We we kinda pull up his antiquated word of chastity and chastity has more of a kind of developmental process to it so one way of thinking about it is and we think about vision. We're thinking about. I like to ask question like can you want to be pure but sure what what pure what we're talking to men here we're talking dad's one of our goals is dazzling boggles as men become good godly loving med. Who love with a christ like love and so when we're looking for a vision for our kids we want. We want to cash in for them to people who learn to love well and and they're competing messages in the world love his pornography certain as his ideas about would love is the reason i love. This is because think about Some of us who who did not quote unquote step your until marriage. I mean i. I got into syria ministry because my answer with pornography and other sexual sins. That's how i came the ministry that i now lead i. I was in over my head. And i could not break even though i thought it should be able to anyway another story but but a lot of if we if we have a fall if we have sex for indulging important for addicted corn. We feel like we're now a ruled out. I did it so As opposed to a bigger vision the visual casper kids to sustain falls long way bumps along the way moving towards chastity moving towards becoming whole whole man or woman and cash noted for our kids means. Okay you had a fall okay. You're struggling what. What is the path of becoming christ. Like from here. How does how does a person has a fall new toward christ likeness doing well. You're doing great. Haven't looked at porn for three years. That's great what is a person who's growing christ likeness goethe go from here and that that's vision we're always gonna be chasing that's vision. We can always be and vision that we can be on with our kids because we're all trying to grow in christ like love so that that's just one example of kind of division. We're trying to cash in this book To really elevate the conversation above just what not to do. What did abstain from really. What are we moving towards her new before josh. I think you bring up a really good point when you when you talk about those things in and you talked about your own struggles a little bit. And i think that's really important to cover You know in terms of the book itself but also practically right when dads are when dads are trying to figure out how to do this so my kids right. Our our ten five two and i've got one on the way and so i have just started talking to my ten year old. I mean we found a book Another book that just kind of explains what pornography is just in in very basic terms. It allowed us to have that conversation right. But i think one thing you brought up when we were talking before hand was how do you bring your own history or your own sexual experience your own sexual story into that. In order to help. I guess vaccinate your kids against the the virus that is pornography. Well that's a big part of our book actually is. This is not just a journey. Your kids are on. It's something that we want to be on that journey with them and so the idea what. You're sharing davis how do i. I need to become comfortable with my own story. And for a lot of parents men and women alike. They didn't live sexually pure lives ahead. Premarital sex they looked at porn and may have had same sex attraction more out of it is and they many times don't haven't found healing Sometimes they haven't even been able to admit that to anyone else in so what happens is bound up in that sense that un unredeemed sin and so we know that if you're gonna talk to your kids about sex and pornography whatever their ages are it's gonna stir up your past you and so part of it is walking through in into your own story so that you could be become that whole person that your that your son or daughter needs in so we. We do have a whole chapter on ten of coming to terms with the fact that we didn't all live at out perfectly some ongoing healing in that and not not to put aside having the sex. Talk of the porn talk. You know i over years while you're getting nearly but to take care of yourself as well kind of like the the airlines tell you to put your oxygen mask on first for put it on your child because if you're not healthy if you're not engaged you may not be able to help your child and i think that's where a lot of fear and shame in that feeling of being stuck in bound up in this topic comes from yeah. I think that's a good point and it. It takes me back to kind of one main part of my job which is being an instructor right. We learn how to do very basic skills in. Do you know and do things right. But we're not considered really good at it until we're able to teach other people how to do those things and that's when you really start to flourish but you're still growing like you're still learning. Hey i can. I can improve. This process can continue to do things better and better. Because i'm teaching people different ways and i'm refining process and so you know i think about that and say look if i'm still working on my own process whatever that might be but i'm using that in order to teach my kids it's only gonna make things better like you're you're you're only making the prettier thing pretty right now. That's kind of how how i'm thinking about it so i really like what you what. You stated dan. It gets real practical dave. I think i think the first step for if there's a dad listening and pornography has been an issue is an issue for him really first step. Is you got to find a band of brothers to be walking with some people that were open up with other adults who can help shoulder that burden for you so that you can to help shoulder whatever burden your son or daughter to carry can even for just a word of hope even for the parents who still struggling where we're all growing towards becoming christ like our loves but we live in age right now. Where if we don't if we not leading and parents air kids near of sexuality than pornography is you think about that like the internet is incredible competition for parents in the sense of even in the case has never seen pornography now they have questioned. Somebody's using a word at school. I don't know where it is. It sounds like might be something sexual nature will. Are they gonna come to mom and dad or they're going to type it into the internet you know and find out what it says and even that is more than willing to play that role and they will never shame. Internet will ask how old you are the litter say. Where'd you hear that word and the internet will tell you what it thinks. And it'll show you often what images and videos your kids never wanna see so part of what i mean by. All this is not to be scourged to say parents like however bad job you think you may do however unprepared may think you are. We guarantee you. You are better sex educator pornography so you know stumbled through it mumble through it funneled through it but but get in there not just for one conversation. Don't have to get it perfect in one time. This is part of your relationship with your son or daughter of and you'll grow in it just as they grow in it. So yeah josh. I like what you said earlier. You know as far as your background. And i certainly didn't wait you know and i. I didn't hide that from. My kids is as a matter of fact. I was really struggling with that with my wife. Like you know what conversations do i have. But then i i one of our passers one wednesday night service. Just kinda really put it out. There you know said dad. If you're leaving the sex talk or the sexuality up to your wife or or to somebody else in your life because you haven't done it. Shame on you and he goes. You know that that's give it up and that's not gospel minded and that's not biblical truth and it. You just really put it out there. And i had a couple subsequent conversations with him afterwards and you know he was right and the reality what it was like my my son. I remember one time. He's seventeen now. Is you know any just kind of threw that me. We're just challenging about some purity conversations. Some choice in france and you know inappropriate. You know some stuff Not getting into the details but taxed in just the the company that you're choosing an how does it line up with where you're walking. I remember his jab was will dead. You know you didn't wait. And i looked at instead of shying away or like. Oh that really hurt. You know the conversation was you know you're absolutely right but the choices that your dad made is consequence. It's something i have to live with the rest of my life and you know and the putting in that context with you. It could be a place or it could be a perfume or it could be an event that just triggers. That and i said so two things. I did wrong is number one. I stole that from from your mom. And i didn't give that to her and i said so. That was my bad number. Two is that you know when you compromise yourself early on and you don't do god's way i said you're you're robbing yourself when you're putting your mind in prison that you've got to get out of and that's the reality is like if you're if you're listening to this in their shame in you're stuck in that oh you know if somebody finds out you know. I'm a youth pastor. I'm a music director. I'm you know this person in this Nobody will ever stand the last. I checked you know everybody in the is center and the the last checked is everybody falls short. There's only one perfect person that we know. And that's the lord. Jesus christ so the reality us get over yourself and secondly you know once you realize that. None of us are perfect. We don't live in fear. Show shaming guilt because that's the unholy trinity. The and we lived through the gospel of jesus. Christ who gives us the ministry of reconciliation. I love what you said as far as getting our tribe getting these guys that we know there there's relationship in relationship there's discipleship and really not being afraid to hold back and in that testimony giving them permission to speak into that and knowing that i'm listening to this or others are listen do as We have to admit you know the healing process. The problem the solution starts with dad starts with mom taking things. Seriously taking purity seriously Where do you guys take snacks. Okay so i know. I need other brothers. What's the next step. Where where do we go from here. Well you know there's there's multiple roads through this. And i think a lot of that does depend on what your story was and how comfortable you become with it and buy comfortable. I don't mean that it didn't mean anything but precisely that meant so much but you. You're walking that journey. With jesus his point a lot of us were walking that alone in shame and now many people as joshua san as you were saying dante we've learned to walk that with brothers. We learned to be honest. And that's actually one of the one of the things. I think a lot of parents don't understand. Is that this generation of kids. Authenticity is one of their highest values. So if you're honest that yeah you may have fallen short You do it the way you wish. She had didn't follow. God's plan. I think it actually for this generation. It kind of gives them or is it endures. A respect for you because you're not trying to pretend you're the perfect parent ula perfect dad. And so you know that's in that story base but i think a lot of parents on to go back to your question dante. We have a chapter in there. We talked about getting rid of old maps like treating this journey so i think a lot of parents have some notions that we call them team the pads of striving and then we contrast them with paths of grace insa. Josh had already talked about one. It's if we treat purity as an on off switch the moment you fall we. We heard stories of kids. Will i've i've. I've slept around. I slept with somebody now. It doesn't matter why sleep with her many times around because we've emphasized purity versus cultivating that habit of the heart the disposition that moving towards holiness moving towards health moving towards christ likeness. That's a discipleship path on in. So there's there's some other Pads of striving. We wanna push your path of striving is pushing perfection. Push pushing rules verses in cultivating relationships. So yeah we have to have boundaries in our families we all agree on that but are the boundaries more important than the relationships and so there are so many hurdles that we worry about in the book there there may be subtle but they can be very important can mind set changes for parents that actually free them up to engage what is honestly a difficult topic the to engage it with greater freedom and flexibility. You talk about the habit of the heart. Dante reminds me you know a couple of episodes ago were about. You know some of the ten commandments. And how you know in the old testament it was. Don't do these things. And then the new testament. Jesus came along like everything turned into a heart issue. Right and so all of this is that it's all a heart issue And you know. And and where's your heart leading you and so if you if you have these These tools and the skills to be able to lead your heart in it up in a better direction. I think the the fruit is is gonna be way better one question. I had though you mentioned obstacles. Dan danner josh. You guys can either answer this. I think perhaps one of the obstacles is a dad or father or somebody saying f. My kids never seen it. It's this is aimed at people who are maybe a little bit older like maybe college. But i'm no i. I think there are some some pretty solid arguments against that. So can you guys kind of talk about how The pornography business in particular is maybe targeting younger and younger generations yet. That's absolutely true. We actually in developing some work our material one of my colleagues Was just sharing some statistics about early exposure to pornography and and some people suggest pornography. The onset is eight years old where that comes from not sure. That's entirely true but she was just mentioning that to another friend who the friend said. There's no way no no no that that's not that can't be but out of curiosity. That friend went to her her kid late in the day and was pulled up his tablet was looking through it and lo and behold i think he's eight or nine year old she was like there was pornography on it and it just center senator reeling i think oftentimes like that that mindset of like this is not an issue for my kids is more rooted in the parents fear of that might be a possibility than it is in the world. We're living in if it's not an issue for your kids. Praise god but eight years old in this culture is not in by any shirts imagination too early to begin talking to your kids about. What is god's design for sexuality we don't start having this conversation around pornography we don't start by pointing out what's bad. We wanna start with what's good. What's god's good design for your body for male female for marriage for desire we want to have those conversations and you can have those conversations with your kids. When they're you know two three four five years old we start talking about the way that god is designed our bodies and this culture. One of the great places to begin is by talking about the differences between boys and girls and we. We've had commercial dinner table. My kids were little. Just where we we'd say you know what what something great about being a boy. And then we just everyone around and they answered. What's great about being a girl. And you know some of the answers larry's and funny and the we'll talk about. You know when you touch. Daddy's face like scruffy at hurts like. Yeah yeah so. It's two mommies faces. Nice soft software grateful because the reason for that likely foundation because we are according to genesis. One we are created in god's image and so we and paul travels on this enrollments one retox. We're actually visible expression. There's guys made is invisible assets visible through the how he has made and and so we can we. We know that there's something about mom's softness teaches us something about god's glory dad's scruffy nece. Her dad's strength that teaches us about god and into we talk about that larger vision that will cast for kids when the very very young we're we're beginning to cast vision for them. Who want to grow into those good beautiful strong wonderful loving aspects. they can see mom and dad So again whether the whether pornography's insurance we wanna start talking about about sex. I'm going to start talking and that that includes no gender. So what else would you say about the sexiest part of that question. No going back to dave up in that question. We actually includes Got some research in our recent two thousand nineteen study from england research like to parents or families in the three quarters of the parents interviewed. Felt that their kids had not seen online pornography. Three-quarters said no no not my kid families had seen And we've seen similar research in the us where parents vastly underestimate. How many whether their kids have seen pornography at pretty much any age they measured in so what this tells us going back toward a sugar. The question is not which shouldn't be. Would my kid be the kind of kid to look. Largely the question is is pornography is the internet pornographers going to respect our family's values and the answers unequivocably. No they don't respect our values or boundaries and said that you ask you know. They're intentionally putting porn links on sites which are very popular for young boys down to six and seven so if you click on something that looks innocent. You're going to be taken immediately to a porn site in and the problem is research tells us in image will register on the mind. Three tenths of a second. That's faster than it takes to click out of something so the damage is definitely done damage in varying degrees. You know pornography is. I don't mean oversell it but it's after our kids in. Maybe when we were younger we had to go looking for it. In know you'd find it a dumpster. Something snead pass a playboy around. But that's just not the case and so that's really what we're saying late. Don't see this as a moral issue. It certainly is but understand. That culture is taking no prisoners in so parents. We want them to be bold. No he took that that language oldness from jesus. He sat out the seventy to go and cast out. Demons preached the gospel. Heal the sick. And they you know. They went out with boldness. The boldness wasn't because they were so awesome the boldness because they were going out with the power and the authority of jesus in so we believe parents have the calling to bring god's power in his authority in this realm. You know in in the the disciples came back and said they were stopping on serpents and scorpions. You know those are spiritual enemies and this is a spiritual enemy that god gives us the authority the power to go boldly into it with our kids and so You know don't think it's not an issue for your family. It is but that doesn't have to always be a bad thing in in just opening up the conversation. Hey i heard this podcast in talked talked about parents talking to kids about pornography at it. We never talked about that. Can i ask you questions and you seem this. Do you know what that word means. What are your friends. Say you hear them talking or use that word and then you might find out. Child has seen it and that might be a really beautiful moment of rain that relationship or integrator light and they might be very relieved infect. A lot of kids are really relieved to to have their parents on board and walking with them on this journal. So there's so much what you said right there. Daniela and josh like my head is swirling with with a couple of things in. I don't wanna miss it but earlier on. We talked about the trafficking. And you know we're looking at like one hundred billion dollar industry here and so if you don't think that this impacts in the midwest the tri-state area where i live. I can tell you that i've seen a ten churches that are dealing with victims of trafficking. And so don't be naive to sit there and say well i'm not doing any harm in this because it's just me and my my solace of my what i wanna do in my house. You know the reality is. It's so much more serious than that. And then just putting on a biblical lens. You know taking this idea of you know. It doesn't say perfect. Righteousness you know through our life process of sanctification but scripture new testament. Clearly says for us is to practice righteousness and righteousness in that term is being right with god end. So how can you sit there and take something that is not god's will and that's pornog- pornography or pornographic end sitting there saying well you know this is my justification with a holy god there's no justification so you're not gonna hear me advocating for youtube. But they they had this great Documentary especial out. It was a social dilemma. And you know if you're not a youtube subscription or you don't have that find out a way to get it from a friend or whatever that you can watch this because we talk about and a lot of these creators. a lot of these social designers you for facebook and for major media outlets will not let their kids have access to the internet. They absolutely refuse to let their kids have access. And you know it's kinda like you have to sit there and say a listener. This is crazy that the developers of this and the outcome of how dangerous algorithms are for your kids for your mom for your dad's for your church for your community. It is very serious. And you. Good into the gaming thing and i want. I don't wanna miss this point but the gaming thing you know one of the most dangerous places for your kids is exactly that because a lot of these gaming a front systems allow you to have chat. And that's believe it or not a lot of predators are grooming your kids. You know through shock-and-awe daniel you said that as far as images that flash and so before you even realize it you know your kids likely talking to a pedophile likely. Talking to a sexual predator thinking that it's somebody else their age somebody else in their understanding and it has nothing to do with that and so it's just it's more the seriousness of educating yourself of realizing what you're dealing with here but the other thing too an and maybe i wanna go this long way about getting to this point of my question but thanks for letting me elaborate a little bit on that is pornography steals intimacy. It doesn't build it it. It doesn't bring you in in your loved one. You're you know covenant. Marriage that god gave us between one man and one woman it doesn't build it doesn't build intimacy. It destroys it. It's a steeler steals joya steals intimacy. We have to have to take back the fact that god gave us sex. God gave us intimacy between man and woman. I mean this is the god that i gave you know that that gave us his son. Gavison word i mean. He gave us the book of song of psalms. Solomon song of solomon. And i mean when you read that in the context of like this is just an awesome and incredible god and you start having these realistic conversations. As as the mind the young mind can start to have it about. What's good between men and women when they become married you can take back this territory that the enemy thinks he's got a stronghold on and you can say no. No you know. God of holiness. God of purity. He intended all of these things for you with the bride with the groom to to come to be one flesh and when you become one flesh how awesome and just mighty that is and so like getting into this like taking it back like what are some of the things that you say you know what. What else do you want to tell. Our parents tell these individuals that are listening to this podcast. Why do we have to tread boldly and not like shy away from territory that the enemy is already like seeped into. I love that. I love the positivity and the this is what we're for one of the things. We advocate daniels before is just. We're not having a talk having conversations and so we mean to things that one is. This isn't once done. This is an ongoing process is part of our parenting. We talked to our kids about manners. What six seven days. A week in my house like no. We talked about sports. We talk to them about all sorts. Brush your teeth and you brush your teeth. Appreciate like sexuality has to be a part of our conversations from from when they're very young as as long as they'll talk to us about conversation is is it has to be two way so it's it's us sharing. It's also us asking good questions. It's especially as our kids get older we want. they're buying. That's a huge thing. We underline the book a lot. If we'll ever kids in our house for so much time. Might my oldest will be off to college soon. There's just we want to do. Is we want to bring our what we have and download as much as we can but we really want our kids engaged in thinking. One of the great things about teenagers is their brain is actually developing which way they want to process. They want to argue. They wanted to debate. So we're like let's bring that so just a practical example but the you watch the shows you watch the music you listen to like wind it up like what's is real love look like and and and what is left look like so i like as simple definition like lust is using somebody else's body from my sexual pleasure. It's a selfish thing. Love and contrast is me giving myself for another good. I think you're of jesus's words last supper. This is my body given for you. And so that's a beautiful expression of love and that's that's really what the marriage bed is supposed to be. This is my body not held back nine apart but fully given to you And so we want to begin comparing. What are the messages on the shows music. The movies were watching. And is it a message of love or is it a message of lost because we want our kids to begin interpreting what. They're what they're seeing as they get into teenage years like you'll have lots of conversations. I mean we countries by house where. I'm literally looking at something going like well. This was crap. Now let's expose this and my kids are pointing out like why sell love here. I saw love here love this. I've been blown away. I'm like. Oh my gosh i got other watch what i say And the other thing about this is this is woven into what it means to be human being and so even in some not in every place sure but even in some of the shows. I've thought like it's just not their mea knows what sells and we really are all hungry for authentic self giving love and so there are expressions that that continued. Come through even in our in our sex crazed depraved world so to answer your question no cover there but yeah. There's a lot to chew on but i mean the the whole point is having this conversation not being afraid to take back territory that the enemy thinks in. He has on it in a love that you guys are bringing a practical way by which to challenge our listeners. Challenge readers to you know. This isn't a beat. You down drag you down and just tell you you're you're after you're you're you're not qualified or you're not gonna have the bandwidth do so but really there practical ways by which to do this and so i really liked that day. They what say you. Yeah i totally agree. And i wanna take one more step. I think before we close it up practically speaking we talked about the devil. The enemy having maybe a little bit of a foothold. What if the devil opens the door a little bit and you have discovered As a father as a parent that your child has been accessing. The stuff has seen this stuff whether it was one time or whether it was habitually. What do you do we actually have. We dedicate three chapters of the book to really talk about when you discover hundred dollars exposed to pornography and and the kinds of questions you can ask the way to approach it the way to really invite them into conversation because pornography shameful experience in itself. It's and there's a cyclical nature. What happens with the an how shame feeds into return pornography. So it's not all that here but but it's it is one of places that's one of the hardest places to go back something i said earlier. You need to have your tribe. You need have some safe people for you to talk to so just first step. I'd say fuck. I maybe two or three steps one. Is you go to your people. You're adult people the trustworthy people who are not going to betray your kids confidence and you say you freak out with them because you don't wanna freak out for your son or daughter because you don't want to scare them off to have if you're gonna for life down what did you don't don't and then and then you number seventy two when you're ready and so you don't rush in but you also don't wait forever when you're ready you go and you tell them what you found to me parents. They they beat around the bush they ask questions they already know the answers to which is just setting your kid up to run and hide. Don't chance it your kid an opportunity to lie to you like it's natural it's sinful but it's a natural response when you're feeling ashamed and scared instead is to run hide. Adam need it. Your kids do so johnny You left your phone in the county picked up at it. And there's a lot of porn on their Just tell them what you saw. Gently look into the eye and then an open question and we actually give a lot of examples of open ended questions in this in one of the chapters but so when example would be like. Can you tell me what's been going on. Ben and listen and know that whatever whatever your son or daughter does or doesn't say that moment when they know it or not they are looking and listening pink real close attention to what you're doing and so even if they don't open you'd deny it right away They're paying attention to find out. Am i safe to talk about this with mom and dad So we want one of my favorite versus romance to four. It is the kindness of god. Leads us to repentance. And so we we want as much as we can approaches us in a kind way. We don't want you don't do this. You don't come you know. It's not a battle. You really trying to come alongside your son or daughter. Enemy is is the porn. And we want to come alongside them to get on their team in hopefully walking away from this. Just want to add. Josh is given like the really ideal situation is someone who is not always walk. That apple with my own family. I can affirm what he's saying is really good because i did have a situation earlier this year. We just gotten my daughter a phone and she started. She rented someone on facebook. She thought was from old school and within about honestly ten minutes the guy was reviewing pretty clearly that he was his creditor and she showed this to me. It was late at night. We are about to go to bed. And i'm like what i completely. I did everything josh said not to do. And i spent several days walking that back in. I felt horrible because she did. She wanted the height she didn't want she didn't fully trust me. What was i going to do with this. And i had to be really clear with her or several conversations. I'm not upset. You my reaction. Because i'm so angry that someone would do this to you so you know. Were all going to make those mistakes. I think just being prepared and equipped can help. Lessen them but also give us the next step so parents don't be too hard on yourself. The guy that wrote the book. Josh made the same mistake. And i'm giving that deal but yeah the rest of us looked perfectly and we've never make mistakes. Daniel you know so you can. You can talk to all my kids. They'll tell you different story astronaut. Heritz it's It's it's really hard and we're being asked to do something that no parent should have to do. And we just have to reckon with the fact that we live in a sinful world and it's affecting us and That's why we appealed to the grace of god. We asked for the grace of god to go forward. We asked for the grace of god to cover arms stakes to heal those reaches in the relationship into build that trust and you know we work at it and guys with us and that's why we're hopeful because god is always there. I appreciate that So daniel josh show. I'll i'll let dave close but before i do I'm going to ask you guys each one question so the question is for both of you. If you had one listener that you had in mind when you wrote or co wrote this book that you wanna reach tonight is listening to this podcast this morning when we release it. What do you want them to hear from you like what your takeaway what you the most in either writing this reading this proofing at re proofing at what is the one thing that spoke to you in. You're hoping that the holy spirit will meet them right. Where there man you know. This might sound like it's completely different book but it's not. I mean we really did. Write this book for parents not to school not to not even so much to teach like we really believe in parents and believe that god i mean we are all parents but god is still our father so if i the one thing i want to say is Jesus loves you immensely. And he's with you in this journey. You don't need to be afraid all all the things you want to build a bring to your kid that you're struggling to bring jesus brings to you because you're his kid. Your his boys will gotcha. He's with you right up right. Thanks josh for that daniel. What about you. Yeah we from the very beginning when we decided to write this book. Can we started spelling out the content. Josh and i we met weekly for several years working on this book. And we know we met by phone Talked about the writing in different concepts a we. Every week we prayed for the reader every week we pray for the parent that might pick this up and in really is take courage because god is with you. We recognize these are. This is a hard topic. This is shameful topic this touches parents were. They may not feel doing it but god wants to be in that space because he wants to redeem. What's been broken in us in our kids. So take courage and let god be with you while listeners. That too we'll wrap it up right there. I would like to thank josh. Glazer and dan weiss the authors of the book treading boldly through a pornographic world field guide for parents. We will put this in the show notes So you'll be able to click on it there guys. When does the book come out. Is it out already. i don't think it is. it comes out pretty soon right. You june fifteenth june fifteenth. Yup so it'll be a. It'll be ready to go a couple of days after this podcast posts and And you can pick it up. It will be super helpful for you. If you're trying to navigate this conversation in trying to figure out just how to through this process in this digitally saturated world that we are now living whether it's a whether it's a covert environment and everybody is working from home or otherwise and everyone's working on on their devices so gentlemen. I truly appreciate your time on here. I i'm i certainly a plucked out a bunch of great information and i'm certain that our listeners are going to have that as well so we'll put that in the show notes. If you'll enjoy the podcast today please go to whatever platform you listen through. Leave us a review. Five stars is great and if not just let us know what we did wrong once again. We'll try and fix it next time and You were aware always up for course corrections gift you know. We'll we'll try and keep on the right path and with that. God bless y'all and we'll talk to y'all later god bless.

josh dante dave matt pandemics josh glazer Josh daniel Josh daniela dan josh Dave Dante dan weiss joshua san christiane bassett Dan danner josh south florida Yoon daniel joshua ministry of reconciliation
The insane, surprising history behind insulins crazy price (and some hopeful signs in the wild)

An Arm and a Leg

26:36 min | 2 years ago

The insane, surprising history behind insulins crazy price (and some hopeful signs in the wild)

"Adalina <unk> b._a. Went to bed without dinner a few weeks ago. It's the thing she does sometimes not because you can't afford food because she can't afford insulin. She's a type one diabetic and if she skips dinner she can skip a dose and be pretty sure she'll look through the night so that way i can save enough until i get my next paychecks that i could also afford lord my rent my car note this that leads twenty five and she does not have to do this kind of thing as often as she did right after college when she was interning with a startup now she works at a law firm and it's a good job with health insurance but there's a deductible so in june. She is still paying for insulin herself about three hundred and fifty dollars every four weeks. Abilene has known since she was a teenager that the price of insulin was gonna play a major role in her life after dad died. We didn't really have health insurance. You know so oh me and my mom would go to the c._b._s. And they're like you know for her insulin. It's going to be three thousand dollars it. It was so heartbreaking. I think that's when i really realized oh like i'm on my own like this wasn't something her mom could really protect her from not for for the rest for life her mom found the money it was not easy and from then on it was a scramble credit cards help from relatives from nonprofits whatever it took and since adelines been on her own. She's always found a way including skipping doses skipping meals which isn't really safe. People die every year. Insulin for diabetics is like oxygen for us. We need it if we don't have it. We're not going to be able to live until the next day. It's really that simple and that's how i tried to explain it to people and one out of every four type. One diabetics rations their insulin. It is hundreds of of thousands of people <hes> this old school technology insulin was discovered almost one hundred years ago like canadian scientists who didn't even want to patent. It just wanted people to have him. That story is told in an amazing book called the discovery discovery of insulin. Every especially scrappy naive researchers swatting away flies nee sweltering added leading the trail of dead dogs and that story has a ton to tell us about how we got to this point and where we might go from here may not be entirely hopeless. This is an arm and leg show about the cost of healthcare. I'm dan weiss. <music> life before insulin was stark. Here's jeanne lou. He's a doctor and harvard researcher who studies access to insulin through the nineteen twenties type one diabetes with that sentence starvation in the midst of plenty kind of a rough way to die yeah unquenchable thirst constant hunger and rapid wasting frequent <hes> bonus symptoms include blindness itching thing and boyle's boyle's all accompanied by non stop peeing in greek diabetes means pipe like liquid goes in one end and out the other an english surgeon in the sixteen hundreds called it the pissing evil and the urine is full of sugar in addition to having profound thurs drinking a lot of water. You're peeing all the time. Your urine was sweet. So doctors confirmed your diagnosis with a taste test early. Twentieth century medicine had exactly one treatment for extending the lives of diabetics slowly starving them to death. It was unbelievably grim. I find myself pausing in lake wiping away tears reading about <hes> you know for example all small nearly blind boy whose wasting away initiated who they could not figure out despite a very very very very stringent jin starvation diet why he was still having glucose in his urine and it turns out that he was eating the bird feed from his pet. You know that's like crazy. How can we do got to people and that was the state of the art treatment. Yeah and starvation only worked for so long enter a struggling country country doctor frederick banting seeriously struggling. He hung out his shingle in july nineteen twenty and got no patients for weeks months went by he worried his fiancee. They would break up with him. Then one night banting got an idea he hoped could give him his big break finding a treatment for diabetes and he stayed up till two a._m. Thinking about it at the time. Scientists thought something the pancreas might help diabetes but something else in the pancreas they thought interfered and banding had this complicated idea for isolating a good stuff. Take a bunch of dogs make some of them diabetic by removing their pancreases then raid the pancreases cases of the other dogs using a dicey untested surgical protocol that banding or got in mind to isolate the good stuff they made a tv mini series about the discovery coverage of insulin in the nineteen eighties. It shows banting telling a friend about his idea. Make an extract from this pancreas and pop fat into the diabetic doc now if diabetic dogs blood sugar goes down a week after his sleepless night fred banting was at the university of toronto pitching a big time professor of physiology he i said gimme a lab a salary and some dogs the professor thought banning was kind of a rube and his idea was going to half-baked but maybe not entirely worthless bliss so the professor said no salary but come back next summer you can have some dogs and maybe a medical student to help a may seventeenth nineteen twenty one banting banting and that student assistant cut open their first dog in the next two three months and killed a bunch of dogs some from diabetes but mostly incompetent incompetent veterinary surgery the movie does a great job showing them literally sweating it out fans going no shirts flies everywhere and just fumbling butchering another dog. James louis shot cofre sake. No girl dog dies. It'll long long pause. Assistant gets up slowly walks over means against a glass cabinet full app stuff killed anything before so much for that cabinet but for all that they did produce <unk> some blood test results that showed promise hints that the stuff they were getting from dog pancreas might not be a total bust so they got more dogs by hook or by crook going out and i'm buying them on the street from well probably talk napper's and as summer ended they managed to keep a diabetic dog alive for three weeks the game on the university to buy them some more talks and in the next couple of months they learn they've been taking the long way round. There was no no need to get the pancreatic good stuff from surgically treated dogs. You can just go to the stockyard. Get some fresh cow. Pancreas pig could work to grind it up and go the next a more experienced guide joined the team. A biochemist named james column within a couple of months cobb had nailed down a method for making king insulin. It's a big the mini series really plays and then the moment the team try this stuff out on a human subject fourteen year old kid who's down to skin and bones and and it brought the kids blood sugar down to normal levels they tried it on six patients good results and so a few months later less than a year after fred banting canting coat open his first dog they present at a big medical conference and everyone they're completely loses their mind but by then there were some problems for a couple of months. That's bring could not get a decent batch of insulin made call up. The biochemist was beside died himself. You'd think recapturing. It would be easy especially for me. I saw held it in my hands and and there were other problems too behind the scenes banting got convinced that the more experienced scientists on the team trying to hog all the glory he may have beaten up called the biochemist. Maybe twice and meanwhile there's all these diabetics starving themselves to death and a u._s. u._s. Pharma company ally lily had been tracking the insulin research in toronto for months sweet talking the researchers at every opportunity and the toronto scientists had had been putting lilly off all this time they did not want their discovery to become someone's commercial enterprise but they needed someone with resources bigger lapse apps more capital to take insulin over the finish line so reluctantly the researchers called. Eli lillian said let's make a deal and the rest you could say is grim corporate history the deal the toronto researchers made with lily was supposed. Let's be limited way to get some insulin tear. Toronto figured out a way to get more insulin for everybody got an exclusive license to make and sell insulin but just north american just free but a year was enough to give alive every such a headstart no u._s. Company could catch up and i did the the other two companies that sell insulin today or european and they also got the basic science directly from the toronto researchers in that first year lilly made improvements to the insulin making process patentable improvements trade secrets and then over the next few decades. They went on to improve insulin itself these early products are quite rudimentary because you know they were large amounts of volume of liquid. You'd have to inject into into your let's say the fat just <hes> by your by your belly button <hes> or on your thighs and you'd have to do that multiple times a day and and you know because of impurities you might have injection site reactions <hes> inflammation and pain that may come from the fact that <hes> who knows what's in this ground up pancreas you know modern insulin is a completely different thing. We're not going to to stockyards anymore. Looking for animal pancreases these are all synthesized <hes> <hes> these are more like designer insulin's. They've been really modified at a molecular level. It's cool stuff. It's super cool stuff and there there are multiple nobel well prizes in physiology and medicine that have made this happen. The modern insulin is not new anymore. Lillies this product. Huma log came out in nineteen ninety-six. Some modern insulin isn't even under patent protection. So why isn't there generic insulin jing luo says basically they're easier things to knock off. Insulin is harder to make than regular tylenol and it's in a special class of drugs for which the f._d._a. Requires especially stringent and especially expensive testing and then there's this even though the active ingredient of brand name insulin may not have changed there have been big changes and improvements to drug delivery systems like wearable insulin pumps patients like these pumps a lot better than shooting shooting up with a syringe in the belly button and the dosing steadier which means safer and there are a million patents involved in making insulin that works with those devices once you add all these different layers to this thing to the medicine itself companies can stack dozens of patents and on top of each other to try to thwart generic competition because they can say look. We've got three patents on the active ingredient. We've got patents on the medical uses of the active ingredient. We've got patents on a non active excipient associated with this ingredient radiant. We've got multiple patents on the devices and so you who are trying to enter the space. We'll see you for patent infringement on all of them. Jing luo says this is standard with big pharma pretty much everything when you listen to these c._e._o.'s pharma companies being interviewed at c._n._b._c. You know like what about junior competition in for this product and they'll just keep saying no no. We've got this really robust patent portfolio. We can withstand any challenge. We're going to tie in court forever and don't worry about it. We're gonna continue view this gravy boat for a long long time. That's the way they reinsure investors but the upshot is hundreds of thousands of people can't afford the insulin they they need to live which is why jing luo finds the book about insulin's discovery so move. We've come so far and yet we you still have adults dying from ration their insulin because of cost like it's it's it's so disheartening <hes> so this story started with a group of scrappy underresourced researchers searchers and it turns out there is a group of exactly the same kind of people working on the problem of expensive insulin today in oakland california. That's right after this brick. An arm leg is a co production of public road productions and kaiser health news nonprofit newsroom. The covers healthcare in america kaiser health news not not affiliated with a giant healthcare provider kaiser permanente. We'll have a little more on them at the end of this episode. Also i wanna tell you about a new podcast. It's from kirk. It's called by the show explores the hidden stories behind how we design the world we live in and what we learned when those designs fail the first season. It's called utopian and is hosted by avery truffle man. She is one of my personal favorite storytellers and see actually makes a cameo on this show in this episode suit but forty five seconds from right now in nice try every investigate some of the world's most fascinating communities like enclosed bubble of environmentalists and a nineteenth century religious sect became household brandt. I just listened to that one so crazy soak it. These are gripping being forgotten stories on the very human urge to build the perfect place. You can subscribe to nice try for free today on apple podcasts or wherever you get podcasts okay since twenty fifteen volunteer researchers at the open insulin project in oakland had been working on a recipe for insulin with the goal of sharing that recipe as widely as possible. I mean in an age where it's possible to three. D print an actual house. Yeah really google it. Why can't we figure out how to make our own insulin. The project runs out of counter culture labs. That is a micro biology maker space in what sounds sounds like a kind of anarchist community center producer avery trump woman lives and works nearby and she very kindly went to check it out so i just baked liked up from my house to telegraph avenue to shattuck to omni commons which is a collective of collective. It's totally really awesome. It's like a very cool place <hes> and in its in this big beautiful building in the have a theater and <hes> food not bombs is here and and a lot of other organizations and it's pretty funny that this is the place where it goes down avery met the project's founder anthony franco anthony ed. Hey every nice to meet you letting me come crash. Anthony is a type one diabetic. He is not trained as a biochemist. He's a computer science guy and he doesn't have consulting assaulting with those skills to stay afloat and he devotes the rest of his time to open insulin. This is a lab with murals on the walls and a bike rack by the door. One of the other projects here is an effort to make decent vegan cheese and even the fanciest lab equipment like a super cold refrigerator has quirks. It's kind of funny because it does look like a bridge at like <hes>. I don't know house with a lot of people in like there's lots of different link wishlist his handwriting and it's it feels very homey. It doesn't feel like a science fridge but it feels like a communal science fridge either. You don't kind of have to feel like you're. You're on a movie set. That has the ideal of science. You can do real science and just kind of do what you need to do and what anthony he wants to do. In this funky little app is to address the enormous problem profit-driven medicine starting with this and i think there's really broad acknowledgement that something something really terrible is wrong with this system but we just have to have the courage to name it and to propose turnips later. I get to ask anthony some questions about their progress. He says after four years they've got a process. That's producing a little bit of insulin. Next steps refined that process publish it and help other other people learn to do it. It's somewhere in the ballpark of what it takes to brew really good beer so i don't think it's something that most people can't do but it does require are you to put the time in and the attention to get right so this would be a like a homebrew beer kit france. Yeah i mean it might be a little bit more like what you would defined in a microbrewery then like a homebrew kit. He thinks a neighborhood operation. Maybe in a storefront or a clinic or even a pharmacy could serve a local community. You kind of like a craft brewery. They're starting to think about the practicalities. They've recruited some pro bono lawyers. They're forming committees dr bylaws for a tax exempt nonprofit nonprofit jing luo the harvard researcher would expect the craft brewery model to hit a regulatory brick wall. You can't make enough of it in a sterile enough condition chen at capacity in order to get the f._d._a. Who's going to inspect your plan to say okay. I'm going to approve you. This is not homeopathic treatments that you can just sell it the farmers market because of the d. a. and the f._d._a. <hes> they would just shut you down. Here's a different perspective. John petco is a professor at colorado state. Who's written about oakland's open open insulin project. He's kind of a fan claim him as an ally. He's also skeptical about getting f._d._a. Approval for open source craft brewed insulin but he's he's got his own idea bypassing the f._d._a. Just like you don't need the liquor commission's okay to drink the beer you brew at home. You don't need the f._d._a.'s permission to make your own insulin. There is nothing that prevents a patient from manufacturing a drug for himself. You know you can inject yourself which whatever you want what he imagined sounds even simpler at least for the user than a homebrew kit for beer yell level of complexities more bright meshing tool for making incident. I mean that's what's the level of complexity that we're talking about. He tried raising money last year to get a project going. Put out a youtube video but it didn't take off you only collected one hundred ninety seven dollars half of it from his teenage. Kids just gave you money from their allowance to do. It was cool did you. Did you give it back since you're not yeah i asked anthony to franco at the open insulin project how he would deal with the f._d._a. Well that's that's. That's a good question. I mean all of these questions of what this count says in terms of regulation are as far as i know open questions were eagerly awaiting the opinions indians from our legal counsel. I asked him how sure he is. They'll get it working and practical will was the deadline <hes> fair question. Meanwhile diabetics diabetics die rationing their insulin every year and last year. I really took in about three billion dollars insulin so it sounds like the score is e reliability three billion scrappy researchers zero so far as wrapping up season one of the show i i got an email with the subject line. I am part of a movement news from terry lyman. She's a type one diabetic in arizona. He does not make grown insulin but she has hacked together an artificial pancreas panam begin to tell you how different life is with it then it was without i would never wanna be without it. Her pancreas it uses open source software that ties together an insulin pump and glucose monitor together. They monitor her blood sugar and gifford just the right amount of insulin to keep a healthy level. Her rig uses an out of date pump like from two thousand and two and a similarly clearly old glucose monitor. That's tackle and a little thing. She pulls out of what i think is an eye glasses case while we're talking faced. This rig is a computer that little thing there. This is the communication board it looks. This is like this is like a raw motherboard from this is what the inside of my computer if i took it upon exactly that's the brain that little silver thing. That's the communications. That's where all the antennas are because it's got wifi since she put her system together the the company medtronic has come out with a machine that does similar things her doctor keeps asking her if she would like to switch she keeps telling him no so that new pompous hugely expensive and it it doesn't do half what does she has customized her system to give her more information hour by hour day by day about how her body processes glucose glucose insulin and more control. It took a lot of work. I built my system over the course of a year. I was learning how to program computers shooters. I mean that process for me was long and slow. I'm fifty three. I am not a spring chicken and learning to code is tough. She succeeded because the other people out there doing the same thing a community a movement even though it was hard every time ahead question every time i needed help. There was somebody online who could answer my question or could tell me where to read it. No you're on the wrong page. Go to dispatch no. You don't do it that way. You do it this way. She shows me the real time readouts her blood sugar insulin levels all kinds of things i tell her the whole thing seems pretty overwhelming and it is a lot of commitment but diabetes isn't for the week in the community around these tools is bigger than when she started the tools are easier to use. She says the big medical companies haven't taken legal action to stop them. They called us names. The big ones were rogue cowboy hackers. That was one slur which we were around cowboy hackers. That is exactly what anthony franko wants to be for insulin. It's what fred banting woods we need rhode cowboy hackers to combat or at least complement the eli lilly's of the world and there are other ways to be part of a movement. Remember adhaline will be from the beginning of our show. She has started volunteering with group called t. one international the advocates for type one when diabetics around the same time. She talked with me. She told her story to more than a dozen members of congress at an event in washington d._c. And i hope that i can help 'cause sparkin american create a change me to climb on an arm and a leg by medical device is spying on me for for my insurance company so they can deny me coverage now. It's like a bilateral swear on this. <hes> what what are you talking about. You can find links to a bunch of stuff about insulin prices on our website and even more in our newsletter including pictures from the open insulin project and notes from a listener but what she does to make sure she's got enough excellent anthem some other stuff you can sign up an arm and a leg show. Dot cops slash newsletter catch you there so then to carry yourself. This episode was produced by me down weisman. Our editor is whitney. Henry lester are consulting. Managing producer is daisy rosario. Our music is by dave winer and blue sessions. Adam raimondo is our audio wizard. Our intern is daniel fernandez. This season of an arm and a leg is a co production with kaiser health news. It's a nonprofit news service about healthcare in america. That's an editorially really independent program of the kaiser family foundation kaiser health news foundation are not affiliated with kaiser permanente the big healthcare provider. They share an ancestor ancestor. That's it is a fun story. You can check it out at arm and a leg show dot com slash. Diane webber is national editor for broadcast and tanya. The english is senior editor for broadcast innovation kaiser health news. They are editorial liaisons to this show. Finally thank you to some of our new backers unpatriotic. A literally could not make this show without your pledge two bucks a month or more. You get a shout out right here. Thanks this week to richard wine. Meyer claudia and larry frame keke otten helen lobby lisa bernstein enjoys fox david linski william tanner david and no promises but some people full report a lot of satisfaction a feeling of real accomplishment when they pledge their support to an arm and like this guy <music>.

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Can TV Survive After Game of Thrones?

Little Gold Men

1:17:40 hr | 2 years ago

Can TV Survive After Game of Thrones?

"Hello and welcome to little Goldman the award season podcasts from Vanity Fair. It's such an honors present this next award nominee. The group bills via. And I can't deny the fact that you like me now. The. Mistake. You guys won best picture. I'm Katie rich, the deputy editor of Vanity Fair dot com. And I'm here with our senior writers JoAnne Robinson. Hi, Katie are chief critic, Richard Lawson. Hello and back in studio. Long-awaited our digital director. Mike, HOGAN, guys, Mike. In. We would never dream of locking the studio doors against you. So this week we're going to be sharing an interview that Richard did with Alex Ross Perry. The director of the newbie her smell, which has a pretty fearless and phenomenal performance from Elizabeth moss. But then the big topic of the week. I think in the entire world is game of thrones. The return of the biggest show on television and the end of it, and what TV is going to be like after it's gone. But first we have some really important business to take care of Mike. You set out the episode. Where we suckered XL and predicted this year or next year's best picture winner. You're not going to get away with sitting this out. Mike what's going to win best picture in twenty twenty? Well, I don't think it's going to be us because it's just like a can't you can't do that thing in two years in a row. And then I don't think it's going to be the Irishman because I'm really very concerned about the Irishman frankly, and it has a net flicks. Aging doesn't appeal to me in the state of the Irish, man. Yeah. That's that's a perennial concern me. Once upon in Hollywood. I don't think Quinton is going to like quite figure out twenty nineteen not to say that green book quite figured out twenty nineteen the goldfinch. I didn't like that book as much as I wanted to. And I feel like it has little reminds me of some other sort of ambitious things that didn't make sense. I think it's going to be cats. I think it's going to. Tom Hooper, my formative, I think Oscar campaign that I watched up close was the year that layman's rob was in there with all kinds zero dark thirty that was like a crazy year and Argo, I guess one right? Yeah. And I feel like Tom Hooper really wanted it then. And I don't know. I love cats. I watched I saw cats as a kid, and I listened to the record on vinyl. It is really weird tobacco cats. About cats. I don't know his is in a best picture winner from this past year. Then Taylor swift should be in the best picture winner. Or not up this Fisher nominee any winter. Yeah. Only fear that an engine. The lion king's going to get nominated and then the onset can be in one two. And it'll Joe. Oh, good. We'll we'll relitigate beyond say versa. Tellers moved. We're definitely do that in the original song category. Remember Jesus Christ superstar was was actually bizarrely good. So that's proof that like an Andrew Lloyd Webber thing. That's bizarre can sort of exists in the late twenty teens. Totally. I don't know. I don't know. This is what I'm really excited about. I'm like a cuss gen X millennial. But like, I'm kind of gen-xer and I'm really excited for Mike. Okay. Tonight to bond over the fact that we are two people who actually like cats in this season. I seen so many people being like cats like tried to pretend that casts wasn't like enormously popular and beloved like, what is this crazy musical? I'm like, maybe crazy, but a lot of people loved it. So let's just come. Remember the ad where the old lady was like, I laughed. I cried if became a pot at me remember that. I don't know if that's probably moved to New York in the mid two thousand I might be a state area. Anyway now in forever. I have no idea what's going to win on. That woman was Glenda Jackson. Okay. So let's talk about something that we know will win some awards this year at least as we discussed last week. We think will give me thrones. It's coming back for its final season. It will be eligible for this year's Emmys, and we can get into kind of its awards prospects later on and what we see it really competing for. But I think what's interesting about this is not just that it's back, and we to talk about what's going to happen and who's gonna live on who's going to die. But that this is truly the end of an era for a certain kind of TV and Mike. You were at the big premiere of the first episode at Radio City Music hall last week. Did it have that kind of like end to fall of Rome feel to it did? Yeah. And it's interesting because they had the rumor that I heard was that they had the premier for five thousand people, and then the party for like, you know, eight hundred or something which felt like a very post plus ler thing I feel like player would have had a premier for one thousand people on a party for three thousand people. But this is now the AT and T era where they're actually like spending dollars, you know, in what is extensively, you know, kind of more pragmatic way. So it's like, let's let people go in there. But we don't need to serve them, all drinks. There were no drinks. Which was was on issue. There was popcorn and water. I guess there's usually no drinks at these things at the screening premiere. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I assume there I wasn't invited to the party. This is just about you not getting invited. I know. It's not, you know. But anyway, but yeah, I mean, I think we were kind of everyone was sort of talking about why this is likely to not happen again. And one of them is how many how many series debuted the year that game of thrones did probably a few dozen and now. Now every year it's going to be a few hundred at least right, and so just the sheer competition, we also kind of talking, and you guys probably know better than me. I was trying to remember when did game of thrones make the kind of quantum leap from like a thing that a bunch of sort of fantasy fans and HBO completeness were really into to like the world crushing juggernaut of pop culture. I feel like it was season three. Yeah. I know. And it was you do grad wedding. What was was the red wedding happened? Those viral reaction videos happened and executive producer Brian cognitively the next day when you went onto items the number one downloaded thing on itunes the day after the red wedding was a season. One episode one winter is coming so late. So like the red wedding happens. There's this viral online reaction, and then the next day a bunch of like, oh, I gotta catch up with whatever this is. So and then if you look at the ratings, I mean, the grew it was a thing, you know, grew from season to season, but there is like a huge leap from three to four so season four, which is when I started at the F, and covering VF is when it really started to like kick off into that larger strategy or and then I think at the end of season five win, Jon snow temporarily that kicked it up into an even higher sort of sphere. Okay. Yeah. Because when I was at huffpost for season, beginning season three and Arianna was basically like, you're the entertainment editor you need to be recapping game of thrones. And I was like, okay. I guess so I went back and watched it and that was the season where like HBO was playing ball with us because they were still had something to gain. And I like had the banked interview with the actress who played Catlin stark for the red wedding. I'd seen it in advance. Like, it's just it's hilarious to imagine that they. That now. So they were like sure you can watch it. You know, we'll get we'll get an and now they've gotten to the point where Mike has a low red laser dot on his forehead because someone outside to shoot him. If he mentioned anything about what happens in the season premiere exactly we got screeners for season four, the those are the only Skinner's ever got because that was my first year via and so I was like important enough to get screeners. And I got screener season four game of thrones. And then a bunch of those leaked online. In not through me. And then they stopped giving out screeners at all for the show. I just want to say really quickly. If you're listening to this podcast. This is the Vanity Fair game of thrones dream team that you're listening to right here. Mike HOGAN was at the premier Mike HOGAN, and I started like work writing game of thrones on Vanity Fair together. He is back with the final season two recap episodes. I'm so excited for Monday night. And the dynamic is Joanna knows everything, and I know nothing. So if you're like kind of just, you know, don't really know what the hell's going on then you can share my bewilderment. And then go read of all all of Joanna's articles. And you then you'll know what's going on. Richard. And I are doing the still watching podcast where we've been like re- watching episodes for weeks. Now feels like years are fifteen top episodes have a bunch of interviews going on there. So we'll be talking about it over on the stove watching podcasts. And then Katie rich is like my mic. Tyrian Lancaster, my whatever. My rock. Yes, she is on with me on Sunday nights. And she is just there and she's like act when she's confused something and asked me a question. That's how I know that I need to write about it for you guys understand. So anyway, this is this. This is the team and Mike has even seen the episode. And I know some things I won't talk about them. And it's going to be like it's going to be great. So here we go. We'll the other fun thing that happened. And maybe it's worth talking about a little is when the series moved past the books, then it became that. Both of us at the beginning of the episode didn't know anything, and then Joanna would actually understand every single Easter egg. And I would still be baffled at the end. And then, you know, but, but at least there wasn't this kind of like, yes, I know what the next five episodes are going to be because I've read all the books five times. So it's interesting the rise of like explainer culture like that man, thrones has to increasingly depend on this thing marvel studios depends on that. I that I like to call it. I'm sure many people. To call screener culture, which is just a bunch of nerds like me and other people going line. We'll get like, well, actually, this is what this is. To me, leaving the theater, and googling it vendors end credit scene. Explain to someone who can tell me who fan noses at the end of the vendors. I need someone to to do it when Google friendly neighborhood nerd friends. I want to save two mikes. Earlier point about the end of the era. I wanna give credit and I've been doing this. I've been interviewed a couple of places about like what does it mean? The end of game of thrones. And I bid giving credit to Matt Lynch who like two years ago. I want to say maybe even three had a conversation with me about how like the end of thrones meant the end of the monoculture. And I was just like, oh, okay. And I've been thinking about it for years because Matt Lynch lake planned to that in my head and a now like maslow's sites wrote this article culture this week is like, hey, did you notice that? It's the end of monoculture, and I was like, yeah thing. So here we are at the I did want to talk about that. If we if we fully by the idea that game of thrones and CNN monoculture, I think it definitely is the end of like, this particular kind of TV show, and all the culture that group rented we're talking about. But we're also only a couple of weeks removed from the release of us, which is a movie that obviously everyone felt compared to go see opening weekend and talk about and. Persson game is not far behind it. So I get that. It's going to change a lot in TV. But I'm not totally sure I think this is the last thing that everyone will want to talk about at the same time. Well, I think that we're going to keep talking about things at the same time. I think the question is can we sustain that conversation for eight years. You know, that's something that remains to be seen. I think that even. I mean, we're going to have more hit shows that's going to happen. You know, big little is season two's on its way like things, you know, things are maybe his dark materials, which is going to debut this year and other things, but will that conversation dry up after a second season, you know, because you really have to you know, you know, when you're pitching, a TV show a lot of times, you'll write a treatment, which is like really detailed description of not just the pilot episode, but of several seasons of the show. So what a network would have to find or Netflix who are apple TV or whatever would have to find is the show that says, but wait at the end of season three this enormous things going to happen. Then is gonna you know, you know, Dennis going to have people like salivating for the next couple of seasons which game of thrones head because the books are written. You know? So I don't know if that book series is out there, but I have faith in the sort of communal experience of being alive that we will not just all sort of wander away from each other at the end of game of thrones. But and I think the whole I mean, remember the whole idea that the long tail culture was. Is gonna mean that a million things we're going to be micro famous, and almost nothing was going to be big and part of it turned out to be true. But it also turned out that there's always room for like in a thank you next Arianna 'Grande moment for that everyone can kind of participate in. But I think you're right like the duration of that. And really does it. I feel like game of thrones may be the last one that crossed basically every generation like any kind of demographic thing think of is a big one and actually one of the things that's interesting going back. And watching it from the beginning is it really is kind of a product of a complacent Obama era where people are like things are pretty fine. Like, let's watch it weird show about dragons with where like a bunch of women get their naked breasts out, and like there's all kinds of weird like, it's it's it's a problematic Fave, actually when you go back to the beginning. But it was just fun. And it was a era where you could see maybe. Like feel less bad about having that sort of like guilty pleasure fund. I don't know that. That's what strikes me going back to it. So so things have changed a lot one thing that was cool at the premiere. I can't talk about what happened on screen. But was that. There was a bunch of stuff that I wouldn't have thought to laugh at that people in the audience were laughing at and I was like, wow. That really is funny. There's all I realized one of the things that seems to have happened is when they went off the books arguably some of the dialogue started getting corny. But it also it also works in this communal environment where you're all sitting around and people are like Zing each other with one liners that you don't necessarily think of coming out of Georgia. Martin's typewriter or whatever, but that work, and then I realized that there were some characters and ongoing things that I had taken rather seriously at home alone and people around your cracking up. And I'm like this show is funnier than I realized I hadn't actually gone explored all of the the camp potential of it. And there is a lot. Camp stuff, actually in it for sure they should do like, the marvel marathons, and they just show all of game of thrones in a movie theater for four days and let you experience among people. I mean, I'm sure they will. Right. And and that's something that you guys have been great on two on the site is just like this is actually just the beginning. Like just going to be a billion. You know, this is like the end of the original. Three Star Wars movies, right? Yeah. HBO's not just to be like, well, we're done. Yeah. How bullish are? We feeling about the not just the game of thrones spin offs that are to come which I believe we don't really know the details of, but you mentioned his dark materials is coming Emma's doing Lord of the rings. Like, do we do we feel like any of them really have the potential to capture even some of the game of thrones appeal? I don't think here's here's what I think is the actual. Real issue of what's going forward. And I don't mean to be demon gloom. Like, we'll have plenty of talk about this, please keep Vanity Fair dot com. Living Sorrento, but with with Lord of the rings with his dark materials with wheel of time. Amazon is developing with in the name of the win that showtimes, developing all of those things a lot of them, certainly the Amazon properties are going to be dropped on the bench model and the binge model. Just means that once again, we're not talking about things at the same time. We're not watching them at the same time. And we're not watching them week to week in the what HBO is doing you know, because HBO is doing his dark materials is like a co production with BBC would HBO is going to be doing. They said an interview is increase their programming by fifty percent this year alone. And so it's going to become, you know, more and more like Netflix in that. There's just gonna be too much to watch. So how can we all just like press? Pause and focus on one thing for two months. You know, what I mean when when our attention span like, yes, everyone went to go see us. But are we still talking about? Us right now a couple of weeks later, not really, you know, not I don't that's not a knock on us. But like it's not the same as having sustained conversation about one cultural thing for many months at a time. Yeah. And I think the joy of that is something that we kind of discount like game of thrones can be exhausting and its violent and the as Mike was talking about. It's kind of like had to evolve in its views on a lot of things. But I really love having like a weekly appointment with just the TV show. But like, the everyone of my Twitter feed or the people who I'm going to see the next day, like the idea of having that thing that you all experience the Oscars that in some way, but a show that does that game of thrones really is the last one that has that kind of like weekly ritual attached to it. Yeah. And I think the other thing about, you know, wheel of time or Lord of the rings or already we've seen shows. Come and go like the Shenar chronicles or chronicles of Shinohara, the bastard executioner, beware. The pale imitator. You know, people are not so easily sort of like, oh, this is kinda like that thing. I'm going to watch it. You know, look at all the shows that kind of crashed and burned unintended sort of after lost. You know, like like so many one season shows trying to capture that same sort of energy, and it's really hard to do not just because you know, it's hard to recreate a sensitive singularly good idea. But also, you know audiences are sort of skeptical of it. So I think that the next great monoculture tune in every week kind of thing is going to be in a totally different genre. I think it's you know, who knows what? But you know, there are many different ways to offer people in scape into a world that does not resemble our own. So I'm curious what it'll be. But I don't think it will be any of these shows that are trying to draft off of game of thrones of success, Dan and David were talking about this a little bit at the premier. But like it's very clear that there was no way to predict that. This would have all turn out the way that it turned out. You know? I mean, they they must have had hopes of a great success. But not like this thing like this is really it's it's the. I mean, it's like the most dominant thing in our pop culture may be at least on TV. I oh, yeah. I mean, especially because it has far it has the bash. You know? You know, you like we talked about it. I think Joanna still watching or maybe on this podcast. But like how like the city of Dubrovnik in. Croatia has been like had a whole economy because of like game of thrones. You know, location tours or whatever, I'm sure the same is true of Belfast to some extent. You know, like this thing is just the everywhere. And you know, I don't know how else you do that. I was actually talking to on on this podcast. I was interviewing the production designer Deb Riley whose job is to location scout. And I asked her I was like do tourism bureaus. Did they Email you before seasons? It'd be like have you considered? So it's. She's basically like, Yup. I see, you know. So yeah, I mean Dubrovnik basically kicked game of thrones out. They were overrun. And that's why like you'll you'll see some stuff in the final season set at king's landing, but they were not allowed to shoot in Dubrovnik. So they had to recreate too breath Nick in Belfast, basically, I think is a Belfast orange Spain. But like they had to rebuild their set that because they were basically kicked out of the country because it's overrun with tourists and attention and all like, they couldn't handle the amount of attention. They got out of hosting game of thrones for Croatia is not a stranger that there's a fascinating New Yorker article from years ago that people should read if they're curious. It's basically about how this one seaside town in Croatia. Got so overwhelmed by British like Stagg we last weekend. Delic everyone moved out of town and just came into the bars and then left and like basically gave like ceded the town to the British tour. Fascinating and horrifying. So I I can understand Croatia's sensitivity. All right. We've had enough leave. Out of. Yeah. And and so and the other thing that you know, like Mike was at the premiere, and that's that's like I was so interested to hear Mike feelings around the premier and being there. So that the other interesting thing, I think about that big, you know, they did Radio City Music hall. They didn't do it in LA. Like, they usually do it. They like they really splash out. There's a giant thrones in Rockefeller plaza. It's like that they had most of the cast their. I mean, I I don't think Amelia Clark was there. There were one or two other main people who weren't there. But like it was was there. Lena Hiti wasn't there because she's sick. Sorry. Handy wasn't there? But like it will it reminded me of like being a kid when you took all of your like Star Wars figures and laid them out across the stage musical I was like, holy smokes. Like, they were all there all the dead people. Sean bean was there. Yeah. Also, there's a symbolic the symbolism of Radio City Music calls a few blocks north of HBO's headquarters in New York. Yes. I think they were like this is our turf lake where we're bringing this home for the one last thing, you know, I think as sort of a kind of HBO specific branding their their with location and also started a full damn our late because the red carpet long imagine. I'm sorry Joanna. I interrupted, you know. No, no, no. That was a great point. But the the people who were there who work on the show who were maybe like burnt out from all the work. They put into the final season or any number of other things got reinvigorated by seeing all those people there who were excited seeing the enormous throat. You know, they were like I was feeling disconnected from this all like end we finished shooting, and it was sort of over. I was talking to Paul Fairfield who does this out on the show, and she's just she's like she works on her own in her own house out of our own studio. And she like, you know, she's been isolated and just like making dragon noises like. Doesn't wasn't really connected to the larger thing. And then you get to go to this thing. And just see like, wow, what an impact your, you know, silly drag annoys job or whatever has had on people like the story is so important to people so fascinated me, and my friend Margaret who came as my plus one she was she is like a political person. And so she's like so who's here. What is those? I was like I think it's the people who worked on the show or like filling out huge portion of this audience. And I mean, there's a lot of people who've worked on that thing. And it was cool that Dan Weiss said and their remarks beforehand, he was like this is the last time, you know, he said this is bitter sweet because we're really excited to be here. But this is really very likely to last time. We're all going to be in one place. So it really is. I mean, they understandably they were they were aware of the momentousness of the occasion. And you know, and rightly so I mean, no one they were saying like, we'll never experienced anything like this. And how could they I don't I don't think you ever could. Yeah. Apparently there. Yeah. Apparently their slogan for the season was we'll never see. It's like again or something they were making it. I wish it was a little owes lately self-important. But like, it's also true. You can't you wanna be like come on guys. But then you're like, well, no, you're right. Actually, nothing really say about it. So Mike you've seen the first episode in Arkansas spoiler for anybody. So think they should be concerned. But I wanted to talk like generally about what we feel like is going to come out of this last season less plot wise at least for now. And like do we feel like they can live up to all of this like is this final season going to send it off in the way that everyone is expecting which seems kind of impossible given how many people have so many hopes pinned on it. My my thing, and we again, we talked about the sun's still watching. So if you want more of that listen to that. But is my understanding is that at some meeting years ago. George Martin the author of the book series told Benny off in Weiss how it was going to end, you know, and obviously at the time the hope was that he would have published the last two books in the series. And so they'd have all that to work off of obviously that didn't happen. But my understanding is still that they are working toward the ending Georgia Martin has in mind, which, you know, however, many, you know, depending on your your your opinion on it like narrative missteps the show made once they ran out of book material, they at least have this original thing to return to. So that gives me hope I don't know how they're going to get there or what that ending is. But I I liked that Martin is sort of at the center of of this finale, although Georgia are Martin as much as we all exalt him. He has completely like frozen and has been unable to right. The last two books. So on the other hand he might not be that good at endings. We don't know. We will. We will. But I do think I feel like, you know, if you're. I will say this. I think it's going to be a continuation of last season, which I think was great in many ways, you know, the plot started hustling along, and and but it also has this slightly different. I think tone and vibe than than it did when they were following the books, and it is hard to imagine having seen the first hour that they're going to wrap this all up in like six more hours. But but it wasn't the episodes like an hour and a half long at least after the first one eventually. Yeah, I think the first few are under an hour, actually. But yeah, I mean, it's what do you think Joanna? I wanna know what you wanna thanks. I agree with you about about sort of the like, you know, Martin. I don't think that Martin has an issue knowing how to end a story well because each of his books end with this tremendous amount of like. But I think he's got lost a little bit on the way of like trying to reach that end goal. And that's why you that's what you see the show. Will why some Benny off and their writers decided to do is like, okay, we just need to end this thing. And that's what you see a lot of what Martin did stripped out in the final seasons, and it's just like efficient and big things happen. And maybe everything that happens doesn't make sense character wise, and you lose a lot of that texture as they sort of try to hone it back down to the ending. Whereas Martin's mistake, I would say with respect that he made was to expand and expand and expand. And then got it got so sprawling that he couldn't bring it back. And so the things that you see in the adaptive changes from the book to the show is like why somebody off making these executive decisions that they had to make like, okay, we've heard the ending guess what this little journey over to Dorn doesn't really matter to the innings. So we're going to strip it out. Or this doesn't really matter sorta strip it out and that. You know, your mileage may vary on all of that. But at least they're going to be able to end it. I have heard from people who know how it ends that whatever you feel about the ending. And I think they're all well aware that like, you know, lot let loss to be our guide again. Like, you can't end something this big without at least soon people being very disappointed in it. Right. Like just going to happen, and they're like fully clear eyed aware of it. I think what we will be able to accuse them of is of not really going for it not really going for it in the spirit of like the way the show started. And so I think that like what happens is going to like upset people in a way that I find so interesting, we're not going to get Johnny dean heiress, and you know, they're baby live happily ever after you know, like in the kingdom, and this guy or something like that like something. Big is going to happen. That is going to make people have to reckon with what the show has always been since the minute. It chopped off Shawn tendencies in one brand out the window in the first hour push or introduced twin siblings who have sex openly all the time. You know, like, that's what this show is it has that darkness. And so for whatever it's become in the last few seasons in terms of leg. Wow. Sick dragons, bro. Like, whatever that is. There's also this other thing that I that has popped up a few times when they've hit these things that Martin told them were true like Shreen being burned something that Martin told him that he planned to do the the like young status as young daughter or who door the way that door died. That's something that Martin told them about. So every time it's like a Martin thing. I feel like you can really feel it because you're like, ooh. Yeah. Yeah. That's Martin thing. The fact that like Jon snow in are related. That's a Martin thing. You know? And so like, there's there's at least one more thing coming that. I think people are gonna. Like. Wow. Wow. Well, I know and not giving nothing away. But like in the previously on game of thrones. When you see that zombie dragon like down the wall, you're like, holy smokes. Like extremely high dune. Yeah. I mean, Mike bay question is at the end when deniro's is walking triumphantly down the streets of Manhattan, if she's going to look at her cell phone, and it's going to reveal the night king's name. Yeah. I mean, I think I think there's going to be a lot of that. Exactly. What you're talking about? Mike that leg the ice dragging mental wall. There's these thebig promises. It's not a spoiler to say. They've been promising. These big spectacles, they're doing ninety seventy minute war movie in episode three. They've talked about that all up and down everywhere. You know, thirty days filming that one episode t fifty five nights shoots and like the entire production run time on season two of game of thrones was one hundred days they spent fifty five nights shoots on this one battle in episode three and like, and that's not even the only battle in the final season. So they're making these war movies. But I'm just saying like, my hope is in addition to war movies of dragons, and like, obviously a bunch of our faves dying. Of course, they're going to die. Like they've got what they've got. Is this whole roster of be players think about like, sir, Dabo, sir. Giora the hound Barrick Gandhari pod. Well, above these are all be players, but we've been with. Him for so long that like God. Think about. About him. Thing is is is going to be as big as like sh- Ned start dying in season one was for a student. I mean, like one thing I think you notice in that in that first episode is how many despite all of the destruction. How many of your faves are still around that gives them a lot of stuff to work with frankly. Yeah. All these people who, you know, have like are not likely to play a key role and the way the final battle goes. Right sit on the iron phone, but like pod like I'm going to be pretty bummed. I if they if they hurt though, I'm going to be so furious. She does not have anything bad happened to let her and little Sam live in peace protectively, enter baby. I mean that I think that was one of the big criticize or a criticism than I had I guess of one of their big app says last season was this one called beyond the wall where like a bunch of our heroes go north of the wall in a bunch of stuff happens when we lose a dragon, but like the seven of our heroes go north of the wall six came back, and like really the seventh which was throes of MIR like. You know, our our friend and colleague Matt Lynch in lake top not preachers. Like, you didn't really even have a name that people cared about Blake the literal red shirts with them in that episode. They had literal Wild Wings with them that they just used as cannon fodder like that episode. Okay. What if that? But with characters you've been with for a decade. That's what the final season gets to be in nuts. I'm just saying. I hope that's not all it is. Because that is that is an easy layup on the table of things that they could do is kill your faves. But I think and I hope that there's going to be something even more like Morley murky and fun for us to play with here. I guess what? I'm wondering is. You know, in we watching some episodes in in preparation for the premiere is like it's so rare on game of thrones that you have any moments of peace or happiness, or whatever and that can get kind of like exhausting, especially like, you've mentioned Mike dot show premiered in a very different American reality. Than it is right now. So I'm just curious what sort of mood will will sort of prevail towards the end of the of the, you know, the finale like will there be happiness? Will it be troubled with worry for the future? You know? I think the show is so much about history in about how things repeat themselves. So I don't think it's going to be a, you know, everyone walks off into the sunset in the end credits. Roll kind of thing, but I'm hoping maybe naively for at least maybe some of those ancillary characters that there's like some grace note of like good feeling at the end of it because I'll be kind of bummed if it's all just like dark, and you know, tragic in a way. Yeah. Like the same way free that it doesn't seem like it could all be happy ending. I can't imagine it being like, well, then I king wins and the world is over Roman sound Beasley that that. Feels also tonight lists. Well, it's not going to be documentary. Actually, what if it's zombie, sir. C charge would be kind of again. No, he becomes the night Queen with like really do it for me on. V. Here's here's some things. I will say without any spoilers. I promise. George Martin has said for years is that the tone of his ending is the word used is bittersweet and the comparison that he's is for that is the ending of Lord of the rings where like your your heroes win. If you recall the end, the return of the king like your heroes win, but Frodo has to sail off on the ship to the grave out. Nerdy. Do I sound right out for sale off on his ship. He has say goodbye to Sam Sam just live happily ever after the Shire, but Frodo s to go burden with like purpose or whatever off on the ship to like live with the ELLs because he no longer belongs to the realm of men. And so is this like separation this cost, what is the cost of your happy ending? And so like, that's the he mentioned specifically that ending photo Goto the grey havens as the tone that he shooting for for his ending. And then each be all the people involved in the show picked up that word and have just said bittersweet bittersweet bittersweet bittersweet the other thing we know is that George Martin's laugh. The book is called a dream of spring. I will plunk all my money down right now and tell you that I think the finale with crazies if you don't know any of the episode titles of the final season gave it thrones not even the premier that literally thousands of people watched. I bet you the finale is called a dream of spring. That's my guess, I mean, the idea of photo style ending like that sounds like a happy ending for game of thrones. Like if someone gets slick sale off and live in heaven, I'll tell you, but he has like the lake Sam sweeping saying goodbye to photo. Like, it's you know, it's poignant Sam, well, Charlie. Get ready. You got re coming your way. Okay. Before we move on game of thrones. Does anyone have like I don't want them to touch delays. Anyone have any like red lines for the season of either? Please kill this person. Or please make this happen. You brought up hot already. I'm hoping injuries. Okay. I I think it's more from me less about like who lives and more about who sort of has a moment of triumph. You know? Like, my theory is that Santa is going to end up on the throne at the end. I think she's going to be sort of the the kind of consensus pick in some ways for it to in. And I think that would be good because I think that her character has endured so much throughout the run of the show. And Sophie Turner been so good at it. Even though she's been handled really a lot of tough stuff. So that's where my investment lies. I also am have become totally addicted to the theory that search Jamie gonna kill each other. Yeah. I saw that theory pop up on Twitter, and I totally bought in. You've never heard that before Katie rich. He'll join I forgot that little finger died last season. I don't know anything about this show. Sorry spoilers for last season a game with rounds. Here's here's I don't have any. I don't have any like protected faves. Like, I need them to live or whatever. Here's here's my only wish that everyone asking right now who will sit on the iron throw at the end of game of thrones will know that by the end of the game of thrones. That is that was not the question does that make sense like the dragons will melt the Dommie dragon will melt the iron throne, and it doesn't even need to be literal. It's just sort of like, that's what the first book is about the first book is a game of thrones. I I'm still Celtic about the fact that HBO's hashtag campaign for the final season for the throne. When I'm like, it's not about the throne. That's not the point. That's the iconography of the show. But it's not the point. So like either. Yeah. A dragon literally melts the throne thou be great or something else. But I just don't think like insert name here sits on iron throne is a satisfying like no salt on Richard's petition for sons because I like that. But like that that is not what we're headed towards you know, it does seem like if anyone ends up sitting on it. It will be pure victory. Right. Yes. Although we've had that with certainty already. But no. Yeah. So there's there's a certain amount of repetition. I just want to figure out what happened in Bayonne. When George are Martin was growing up that made him so interested in Unix and incest. That's all that's all comes back or what happened. In bayonne. Mike snoop. This series. I mean, there's a lot of both in the show and has recently income clear to me, I am I am like, I'm a Tyrian. Stan, I don't I feel seems entirely likely. The Tyrian will end up somebody's it was like the New York Post or somebody had this thing. I read it somewhere. They like, it doesn't it seem like Tyrians gonna end up in some great act of sacrifice and not have anything could happen to them at the end does seem likely, but I don't know. I love Tyrian. I'm a big Danny fan. And weirdly, like, I really just love Jon snow. I know it's kind of like a very basic thing to do. But like, I just I just root for the guy. This is a constant thing. We're Mike HOGAN apologizes to me for liking John's, no engineers. They are here. It was just not interesting or anything. But I'm just that's how I feel though to my actual feeling about the show. Mike, cooler more interesting, take is Jaime and Brienne are the real heroes of this show. No. But in all seriousness, I think there's nothing I make steak is one hundred senators thing, I think what is true though, is that the amount of track that the show has laid towards whatever Jamie brand get to do in this final season is so much more rich and long-simmering than Johnny generis met last year. Literally, you know, what I mean like, but Jamie, Brian, which is starts in season two, and like comes and goes and comes and goes and comes and goes like that is and it's not even like a romantic or sexual thing. I think it's just sort of like a it has to do with the growth of Jamie, Lancaster, which is something that I care weirdly a lot about. And I know Georgia Martin cares. A lot about Jamie brand as well. And that got a little screwed in the middle of the series when they decided not to do zombie Catlin stark, which is what the Jaime and Brienne storyline revolves around in the books, and they decided not to do it. And so they'd send like Brian has to watch for candle at a tower for an entire season. You know, so like. But has go to Dohrn like they're like, I don't know send them this way. But but they're coming back together. Right 'cause Jamie's headed to winter fell. So the coming back together this season that's something that I'm excited to see the payoff for so the Tyrian Bron, Jaime and Brienne and aria and the hound could be an interesting like wheel of going on. Yeah. I know there's a lot of great possibilities. It's gonna be fun. And I think the saddest thing will be that at the end of it. The most of the possibilities will be foreclosed. Yeah. It is more fun talking about what might happen these favorite characters. And probably watching them get picked off one by one in the final season and weird to think that it's all been shot and probably close to being edited. I you know, there's so many after-effects on game of thrones. Now that they're like they're still working on it like right up until the week before it airs, basically, so. Yeah. One other thing that I want to say, oh a little tidbit. I don't know. Let's let's get a little little gossipy on this on this podcast. I just wanted to alert listeners to this. If you didn't already know this Jerome Flynn and lead a he will not be in the same room together ever. So then who plays Bron drone who plays Bron lean place Hersi. So if you will notice there never been associated bronze scene, despite the fact that brought his lot to deal with the Linister families keep keep an eye out for that in the final final. Why is that I think they dated honestly? And it went sour. I believe that that's the story. So they will not be the same as. Yeah. So internals Rama. We will probably spend the next six weeks. Resisting the urge just talk about game of thrones every week on this podcast. So certainly this won't be the last word. But yes, you should listen to still watch it and subscribe now if you want to hear Richard Joanna talk a lot more about it and subscribe demanding fair. Right. So you can get you in its coverage. Any you've been beaten that drum if really effectively for us, don't let the pay wall. Stop you. You're dragging can. Cannot take down the pay while. So it's something we have a really good sale going on right now. Go subscribe. It's totally worth it. Mike, and I will have so much fun. Thrones coverage for you ritual will probably write a thing or two if he wants to whatever, and it will be brilliance and. Come come. Join us. Join us in this final watch. Join us. So we're now we're gonna share the interview that you did with Alex Ross Perry who is the director of many films. The latest one is her smell which the phone festival last fall. And I feel like it was one of those movies that everyone knew it wasn't going to be coming up for the Oscars that fall so kind of was like bubbling under the radar. But everyone saw it was kind of raving about Elizabeth Mawson. It can just like set up her smell for people who might want to catch it. Yeah. It's a fascinating movie. That's I mean, I guess you could say loosely is, you know mirrors in some ways the life of according love when she was a, you know, at the height of her music fame or the kind of waning of of that height. But I, but I don't think it specifically about her it just that's kind of the closest comparison point. It's about a woman who's the leader of a band who is very well respected, but also a complete mess because of substance abuse. And it's told in a sort of not quite a triptych, but it's just that they're doing broken up into different parts, but the continuum throughout all that is this Elizabeth moss performance, which is striking. I mean, I I knew that she was a good actress from, you know, madman Handmaid's tale in top of the lake, but this is a whole different other side of her that is, you know, I think it's one of those things kind of like Natalie Portman inbox Lux where some people are going to love it. I love it. Some people are going to be like absolutely not. I don't think there'll be a lot of middle ground people who are like Lisbeth Masa. Is fine. So I wanted to talk to Perry about this movie. It's kind of a departure for him about what we know what the casting process was like, I mean he'd worked with moss before and, you know, just kind of pick his brain about where the hell this movie came from because when people see it, which they really should you'll see that it is a singular type of film, and it's a hard set for part of it. But it's really rewarding by the end. All right. Let's listen to your conversation with electrons Perry. Well, I'm really excited to be sitting across the table in the studio right now from a writer director who I have long admired and also been a fan of his other podcasts period. So is fun to have him on our podcast, Alex Ross Perry. Thank you for being here. Thank you. So we have you here to talk mostly about this film called her smell, which is out this week in New York in L A, and I think is having a wider release in the coming weeks is all right. I think yeah, I think LA is the following we. Oh, okay. I don't know if this. Coming immediately. Right. But the film has been seen before because it was at the Toronto film festival where it got, you know, a lot of great reviews, and it the film's star Elisabeth moss. People were kind of chattering about her. And then I finally got to see it a couple of weeks ago or a couple months ago. I guess, and I was really, you know, I sort of skimmed the reviews, but I I didn't really still know what to expect. And I was totally blown away. I mean, it's I think extrordinary film, and I think it's maybe Tom question. But I just wanted to ask you like where the heck did this movie come from because having seen previous work of yours. I see DNA, you know, shared in her smell. But it feels like a different sort of Alex Ross Perry movie. Well, there's always some part of each one is kind of a pivot away from the other one and the previous movie golden exits was a very calm quiet movie. And even in the in the completion of that. I was already thinking. The next one ought to be a very loud crazy movie and each one of the movies up until this has like sequence in it. That's this kind of choreographed blocked party sequenced. It's always kind of chaos, and we just end up rehearsing it shooting at five or six times, and then cutting it together and making it feel exciting, and those are my favorite sequences in each movie. So then I thought maybe we do a home movie like that because that's always my favorite part. And then kind of in tandem with that. There was this idea kind of predating the notion of the next movie should be big and crazy of a character that came to me just looking for another Lizzy collaboration before Queen of earth even came out where I was working on a failed TV pilot that was set in the nineties, and I had kind of gotten reintroduced to a lot of music that I loved. And even learning about how much music I never heard. And then at the same time, I was trying to make a different music movie sixties music movie that failed for various reasons. And somehow the combination of those things like a little bit of the failed music movie this nineties mill you this character for Lizzie the desire to do the big loud moving at all just landed in this kind of shape. What was some of that music in particular that you revisited or discovered that helped inspire the movie? Well, it's a lot of the stuff that I think is kind of in the bones of the movie. I mean, I grew up listening to what was, you know, the alternative rock station. So I was really just listening to everything from stuff I'd missed entirely like social distortion, which I had never heard any of except for what was on the radio. And I couldn't believe how much great music I had missed, and it was just really kind of exciting because I had kind of come to New York for college in them like a lot of people moving away from what you loved and cared about. I was listening to new music and important music, so to speak and things you were supposed to like. And then all of a sudden, it's like two thousand fifteen. And I haven't listened to what was my favorite music for ten years in fifteen years, and it kind of all got to come back to me as a you know, like a weird inspiration. Like a lot of movies people always think this ought to be inspired by movies movies should be inspired by movies. But movies inspired by a CD movies. Inspired by a play a book. These are all valid things in my opinion. Yeah. Yeah. And I think it's interesting, you know, thinking about you going to college and sort of forgetting about the music you'd liked, but then realizing later will those people were still recording. They were still putting stuff out, you know. And I think that there is that in her smell because this is a character. Played by Elisabeth moss, who I don't want to say that she's at this sort of day new Ma over career anything, but she's at a point where she sort of past. I guess what you could call a prime, partly because of substance issues. Was the substance aspect of the drug aspect of it? Always a part of the narrative in your head. You know, is that how it started? Yeah. The whole the the initial presentation to her of a character via text message was mother rockstar addict. So that was always there. It seemed like the right vessel to sort of create the character inside. But not because I have the experience with it. But because it's appropriate and because of the characters in the way that they end up always being written in the movies. And then some of the response to them, you know, if someone says in your movies, and your writing the characters can be very abrasive very confrontational, very unlikable. I always I always want to push that as far as possible not in that direction. But in saying like, well, what if all those traits are because of this, and I've in one degree or another what if those traits are because this person is seriously. Depressed. What if those traits are because this person is going through an extreme crisis in this movie? What if all those traits are because this person is out of control with a disease that has completely taken over their life. And if all of that behavior, and all of that attitude is because of her substance abuse are people still going to say boy this character. It's really hard to take. Or are they going to say boy, this character is really sick? Right. Yeah. I, you know, a comparison that has been drawn not by you. But by people who've seen the film is to Courtney love because there's a young daughter sort of at the center of things. And I mean, obviously, her smell is not the same story is that we was she on your mind at all when you were making the writing the movie, or is that not a comparison you like, well, I don't I mean, there were hundreds of of bands and records and women and men on my mind, you know, like, none of them are fifty one percent of the character. And people, you know, you can I mean, of course, Kernan love is one of hundreds of women up on the walls for hair, and, you know, makeup inspiration and attitude and everything, but there's ninety nine others. I think it's just because people only know her, right? Like, no, one knows the names of any other. This is this is like Chuck lost Herman's theory that reggae has been reduced only to Bob Marley. Uh-huh. Women in alternative rock have been have has already in twenty five years been reduced to one person, which is great for the historical value of that person. But there's so much else. Like if there's a continuum. I don't know how well, you know, Bill gold mine not too. Well, but I'll follow you like that movie. Half is just David Bowie and pop right? Like literally, and I can tell this just as a fan not as like an encyclopedic fan of them or of glam rock, and then you read about it. And it's like. This character is David Bowie's first manager who he abandoned, and this Carter is his first wife and this and that, but I don't know any of that when I'm watching the movie, but then the movie says, well, what if at the height of his fame he disappeared. And then this movie is about a journalist with the structure of citizen. Kane trying to find what happened to this guy. So it takes something that is so close to something that we all know. And then just does whatever it wants with it. Which is kind of one thing I'm trying to do with the script. So there is no. But in this case there is no lake. This is Boeing this Ziggy pop and on the other end is like boogie nights with a master phantom threat, or that style of writing where it's like, it's just a little of everything it's kind of this, you know, phantom threat, it's kind of this designer, but it doesn't really have any of that person's details, and then there's this other character who that person didn't have. And then there's this whole storyline that that character never experienced. And but it's always just like oh. But the writer of this movie just viewed this character, and these types of people as the avenue for this particular story. So like this is closer to that. I would say, right. Did you consult with any musicians when you were either writing the film or making it or did you kind of just do your research and then go on your own now? I mean, I didn't want to because for the same reason that I'm talking about is that the closer I looked at anyone the more of that one threatened to get in there. And if I sat down with two people and just took tons of notes, and listen, everything they said, and then I went back and thought about the next year after the script it would only be informed by those two women's experiences rather than my preference, which would be fifty or zero. Yeah. Because then like again like in terms of, you know, corny love or any other of the, you know, women who are making this music like there's nothing that was. Ever going to work of like, I want this thing that happened in the movie, right, right? Like, if you do that, then you know, like in boogie nights, he doesn't do the wonderland killings. He does this thing that's like kind of a heist, but like has a young Asian boy fireworks. And like it takes the idea that this guy ends up in this kind of a situation. And just does something that is not the thing that we all kind of know happened. But at the same time, it's like this could have happened. But it didn't. So like talking to anyone I think would have colored it. So even in my research. I didn't I tried not to read too many personal memoirs or personal, you know, autobiographies of women in this era. Just because I was too nervous to just be like, oh, this is exactly what I want. This story of this person in this one band is what the movie needs to be. So when you were having conversations with Elizabeth moss about the role. How does that conversation happened? I mean, did you just kind of let her go with the script? And she came back to you with this version of this character or was it really like, you know, beat by beat collaborative effort to to build to what we see on screen. Well, the last couple of movies are always written with somebody in mind. But this was the first one that was just like it's just written for her. It's written for her voice. It's written for her face. It's written for her physical presence. There's you know, it's written for her eye color. It's written for her height. Like all these things are just baked in. So in the writing of it knowing that this was the deal. I really just felt like I was just watching an existing performance. And then just writing down what was happening in it. So then the material in her hands becomes like, it's all just tailored to you doing this. It's all a challenge. But there's nothing in here that I wrote not thinking how will you do this? Then the chaos of it was just kind of up to her on the day. Right. Like, the controllable nature of how to replicate it performance often enough to film, a movie for a month was not something that we could have predicted or planned on. It's very different from the way most actors work to do one thirty page scene for three days in a row and then move on to another one. So the conversations were always kind of me saying you can't fail. This is just yours. It's in it's in your wheelhouse. And everything you do is just exactly what's supposed to happen. There is no like degrees of like, oh, she's kind of not doing it. Because like, it's just yours. So it was really no way to like analyze it. That sounds so free for an actor. I bet that was you know, bet she was excited for that kind of opportunity. And I wanted to talk about the I mean, we have to talk about the chaos of it, all you know, you mentioned that you had done these sort of. Party scenes and your other films. And then you said, okay, we'll we'll we'll make a whole movie out of that sort of. You know, it's chaos, but it's also beautifully choreographed. I mean, it's obviously specifically made what was that like to make a whole movie almost a whole movie in that sort of mode was it exhausting, or what did you get out of it? You know day to day. It was actually I mean, unfortunately, for, you know, storytelling sake. It was really easy. Not filming. It was easy because everything was challenged. But we spent a year kind of creating the parameters of the production to make it so controllable and streamlined, which is something that I think most people neglect most people when they're putting together a movie be at twenty thousand dollars or twenty million dollars have no creative impulses, and how to structure things on how to spend money here instead of there. How to balance the schedule on the way that's not just logistically, correct? But also creatively inspiring for the crew and for the actors, but we had the opportunity to do that. So. You know, like starting. Eight or nine months out. We were saying like each act will have a full day of rehearsal. So they'll be a day every four days where we don't film anything, and we just plan and rehearse and everyone on the crew watches and thinks and then we come in the next day, and we do twelve pages, and that's kind of the chaos of it. And you know, I wanted to not have lunch breaks. I hate having the break in the middle of the day. Everyone kind of gets out of the head space. Some people get tired some people, you know, get on the phone. They get bad news. I said we can't have breaks we have to spend a whole day, basically, not working but thinking, and then three days where I don't wanna see anybody taking a break because the actors won't and that will be the performance that they give because now they're actually really worked up there sweaty they're exhausted. They've been doing this for six hours straight without an hour. Two hours in the middle of things and the whole everything about. It was just like can we do it like this? So that every day everything is easy except for what's happening in between action and cut. But if we've done our work that will not be easy, but it will at least be predictable and controlled and consistent. Yeah. I mean, I think it's people can watch a movie like this and say, oh, they all were, you know, in a room, and the camera was just sort of wandering aimlessly around. But like, I don't really think that it can't really work. Exactly. Like that. Right. I mean, there has to be a sort of. I mean, I guess a day over hersal is sort of parameter that you're following. I mean, it's kind of the irony that like in order to film to capture chaos on on film. It kind of has to be the opposite behind the camera. Is that is that true or? Yeah. No, no, one who like has been onset would think that this is just a mistake that people in public audiences. Get tripped up on because it's like the movie is so chaotic and there's so much happening. And there's seems in rooms that are small that have eight nine ten eleven characters in them, and every single one of them is talking and moving, and is one of those things really shooting it and editing. It I just know like we'll never get credit for how hard this actually was. I'll never get credit for the fact that every single utterance of this dialogue scripted because it just seems like madness. And this room is such a decrepit mess that the production team will never get credit for how much work they put into this. Because it just looks like some backstage hellhole, they'll never get credit for the fact that this was constructed from nothing, and yeah, I mean like it's just the steady Cam alone has to be measured for every shot every take. So we we have to know where every actor is going to land or move. So that the steady Cam operator and the focus puller tracking them. So there's so much rehearsal to then saying we're going to shoot this six minute. Take five times in a row until like the sweat on people's faces is real there's no way to do it. And then yet, I mean, this is kind of been a thing since even listen up Philip, which was similarly kind of blocked and rehearsed in terms of letting the actors create the scene. And then following them consistently. But the style of that movie, which is a very shaky handheld camera suggests people we just kind of winging it, but it's as precise as can be. Yeah. Yeah. And then I don't want to spoil anything for the audience. But later in the film, one of the acts of the film is quieter, and it's more still, and it involves fewer people shifting to that. With that kind of jarring was it was a relief in a way, or or, you know, how do you kind of plant this very different sort of paste and energy seen in the middle of all that frenzy. Yeah. I mean, you know, that's the only act that we didn't rehearse we'd rent we that was the only there was no time to rehearse. But we knew that, you know, like, the irony is that as you're kind of suggesting like this is the kind of film making people actually think takes time quite like perfectly. Composed locked off shots where the camera doesn't move for four minutes and people sit perfectly still this is something. People actually think you have to deliberately plan, whereas that one had the least planning because to us. Also, we filmed at last those were the last three days of the shoot to us like after everything we'd already been through. You know, one house location with just three actors like this was kind of a lovely little postscript to the actual challenges of the movie. But there was something. I'd never done before. So the whole challenge is like, I don't know if we can just set a shot like this and hold it for two minutes because I've never tried that it requires a lot of patience and a lot of trust. But again like we just thought about it and talked about it. And at that point we had done everything else. So we had nothing left to try other than minimalism. So is Elizabeth performance in the film. What you invest? I mean, I guess you were saying, you know, it's kind of what just whatever happened on the day. But like when you first kind of restarting conceptualized, this movie or this character. What did she do anything that surprise you that that we see on film? Or is it kind of everything what you expected it to be. Well, it's all surprising because I don't expect or think about anything the only thing I'm expecting that. She's going to memorize all the words right beyond that. I really don't know. Which is sort of why the collaboration works for us at this point. Because that kind of all she's going to do is memorize the lines, and then come in and figure the rest out is very similar to how I work or like, all I know is that like this whole sequence is going to be like this and they're out here and there and there, and then it's chaos, and then so and so happens, but like I don't really know that details until we're doing it. Because I'd rather find those details than create them by myself. And then force everyone else to understand them. So everything is a surprise. This a surprise what she's doing? But then it becomes a surprise. And like how we want to cover it. And then she moves slower than we thought. So now, we're adjusting or she moves faster than we thought. So now, this whole scene is different. And and then yeah, I mean, everything is just kind of up to spontaneity. But then there's little things like there's a moment as easy to talk about. Where like in the second half of the movie, there's like a very poppy song played by the younger band and in the script. It was written the Becky like dances around and likes the song a lot and she had been watching some drug movies. She was talking about goodfellas and boogie nights. And she was like what we haven't really seen yet. Is that kind of like dazed druggy feel so far it's all very high energy. What if instead of dancing? I just sit here, and we play it out like, you don't know what's going to happen. And then when we go back to the script to the words everything's the same. But at the meaning is different because what's happened during the performance is not what's written. And this is exactly my challenge to all. The address was like we're not going to change any of the lines. Everything is going to be delivered as written, and we'll figure that out, but any physical things you wanna do any body. Any props? Like, these are the ways we're going to create the characters, and this is a perfect thing. Right. It was like, yeah. That's much better sitting down and looking. In that kind of jesse's girl. Mark Wahlberg, boogie nights facial expression. Like, this is actually a thing. We haven't done yet. And this is what the movie wants right now. And this is much better than what's written. But then when we go back to the dialogue, then the the whole the whole thing is the same or better. So working in that way. I would imagine that you have to assemble a particular kind of cast to cast it's willing to do that of in past Elizabeth for you have a working relationship with can you talk to me a little bit because they're great performances in the film from Agnes Dane in particular, Dan Stevens, Virginia madsen's grade Ashley Benson. How did the casting process work past Elizabeth, well, it's the kind of thing that has happened in one form or another with all of the movies in the last few years, like everyone sees the script, and they know that she's in and then people can picture themselves in it, and they really want to be a part of it. So I'm always very very lucky to have a script that goes out with in the case of something like listen. Fill up like Jason Schwartzman playing this role. And now everybody can see the movie, and they wanna be a or in Queen averge. Liz is playing this role in this movie. Lizzie playing this role and people are like, okay. Well, that's going to be exciting. I want to get in the room with that. So then you just kind of end up with your pick of so many exciting options. And then the conversation for them was like, look, this is going to be like theater, we're going to be doing these long scenes over and over. We're not going to be doing shots ever. We're going to be doing whole sequences and entire constructed moments that go on for four five six minutes. It's never going to be one line one line. So you just have to be prepared. If you're not, that's okay. We have hersal time built in. And then it's just chemistry like for the something. She Agnes and Gail plays drums. It's just like how do they look with Lizzie? What is their vibe in terms of chemistry? Which we will never, you know, we don't know because we're not getting them together. We're not doing chemistry reads, editions and most importantly, like does this just seem like some band that I would have seen on TV. And then the acre girls were the same. It's like they need to represent something. So they need to look a certain way in relation to themselves in relation to each other in relation to the era in relation to Lizzie. They all just kind of have to. They just have to be able to picture it. And we always get very lucky like Virginia Madsen someone that we were so lucky to have kind of looks like Lizzie seems like good mother daughter casting. But then I, you know, Skype with her, and she had some very interesting ideas, and some little things in act three of the movie that immediately kind of made it better and just listening to her not even suggestions just questions during our Skype resulted in some changes that I think totally fixed some problems that I think otherwise we wouldn't have fixed, and they would have just been problems that we had to live with so great actors like that come in for five six days, but they can really contribute a lot. If you ask them, and let them you have a really wonderful breadth of interest in film from what we might want might call high to low or whatever, you know. However, you want to categorize it. And and not that it's a little movie at all I really liked the movie, but you know, you worked on the script for Christopher Robin, which came out less. Summer. I'm curious what that experience was like sort of like lending your name to this kind of bigger project. How did that sort of go for you? What did you did you enjoy the experience I did? And I can only really sort of like refer back to my experiences with it like as it pertains to the writing of her smell because the two movies were written at the same time largely and what I enjoyed about. It was just I like finely tuned massively invested in studio tent pole film making. I always have an I always will. So getting to sort of see how that's done was the biggest education I've ever had about my own work about the art of script writing about the production of Hollywood, movies and. You know, I compare it to like like if you're just like a sort of self taught chef, and you opened up like a counter a food truck, and you made a name for yourself. And you did okay. That's like me as an independent filmmaker. And then suddenly someone picks you to go on this like two or three year in the case of that movie over three year journey through France. And Italy an Asia and everywhere you're going, you're tasting new foods and learning techniques. And you're like, oh, I'm really bad at what I do. Like, I've made food that is edible and people like it. But I actually don't know the first thing about what I'm doing. I can just kind of present something that is good enough. But now, it's really embarrassing to see how much I didn't know about how to do what I do and working on that movie. As just as a script was that. Like every time. I. Would have story talk with the producer everything. He would say I would just kind of like God. That's so that's so obvious. That is exactly what every Hollywood successful movie needs at the thirty minute, Mark. And God, that's so obvious. That's what every movie needs at the fifty minute, Mark. I wonder if I can apply these lessons to my own writing. Even though I'm writing not a classic three act studio tentpole, but a five x sort of messy epic with five long scenes, can I just take all these lessons where it's like at this point people really will want to check in on what this character is doing at this point people need to know that our main character realizes that they are wrong about something. And at this point, we need to see that our main character despite knowing that they're wrong still can't do the right thing. So I created that exact thing for Becky like her realize ation at the beginning of. For when she sort of hit rock bottom and been an isolation is just the classic thing. Where like in a, you know to our studio movie like at the seventy minute, Mark the character realizes they made a mistake, but they can't fix that. Until the hundred minute Mark because then they have fifteen minutes to wrap it up. And I I just wanted to do the exact same thing structurally. So my experience with Disney was just like God. This is so easy to just do things. Exactly. Right. But then you can do whatever you want with it. You can write whatever movie. I mean, I just learned everything just changed everything I knew about writing, and it was just really rewarding. That's fascinating. Well, yeah. I mean, I it makes sense. I mean in some senses, you you feel like, oh, isn't that depressing? That everything could be so reduced to you know, here hit this beat at thirty do this at seventy minutes, but as her smell beautifully demonstrates, you can have that in your mind while also building strange forms around that. Structure. I mean, it's just the loosest of kind of skeletons. Right. I mean, is that sort of how you look at it or I mean, 'cause, you know, a young screenwriter, you would you tell them like yes, followed this this rigid formula, or is it more just like cab bear that kind of vaguely in mind when you sit down to write. I mean, there's no way to really like adhere to it unless you've spent three years like forcing yourself to adhere to it. But if you just instinctually get and like movies, you already kind of know it in the way of you can already kind of buy food cook it and serve it to somebody. But there's just like there's a sophistication to it that. If you're cynical. It's like, yeah. Most that like some tent pole that is Solis and made by committee, and it's like, well, no it's not like it's really made by people who like what they're doing. And most importantly, like they know what they're doing. So the other thing about it. It's like in terms of advice that it did teach me was like writing is nothing like you can write a thirty page sequence. Turn it on a Friday and be told on Monday. This is not right. We we're just gonna start the sequence was do the sequence. Again. Let's just create this entire thing. Over and previously is a writer you relate your I was like, well, that's kind of not. I mean, I did it. It's it's good like I'll I'll tinker with it. But it's pretty much there and working for studio for that long, especially when they're paying you. You're like, yeah. I'll start over this is after all what they're paying me for. I'll just start this whole sequence from scratch, so and Christopher Robin. It was like we know that on page thirty he enters the hundred acre wood, and we know that on page fifty. He leaves what we know happens in the middle is character. But we don't know what happens in the middle is plot and moments and story beats and we probably wrote that sequence forty times and every time it was entirely different in terms of like who does he encounter? I what happens. What happens here what happens there, but he still leaves on page. Fifty the only thing that matters that he forgets his briefcase, and then his friends have to bring into them. So writing her smell. It was kind of like that. Or I was like I can just have these sequences where I can do whatever I want to act two it doesn't really affect act one three because they all begin and end in the same place. It's not like if we change this the nothing in the later, one makes any sense it just has to start with this. And it has to end with this than anything else. That happens only gets us more or less credit in the Bank. And if it's more great, and if it's less, how do we then change the next thing? So the lessons of writing on on Christopher Robin were just like it doesn't matter. Don't sweat it. You're going to be writing this forever in the way that I was like writing new jokes on that movie after they shot it, and we were watching edits of it me. And Allison Schroeder the movies co writer like we were just writing new jokes and new like eighty are lines for the animals like four months before the movie came out like in her smell. I was writing new. Little tidbits of dialogue and eighty are lines like three weeks before we premiered it just because we could get the actors back in and I could keep adding little extra story moments. Little extra someone's off camera, but we can have them yelling into the room just to show that there's like more anxiety happening. And the lesson was just like writing do it as long as you want. Don't ever be like, yeah, why already wrote that scene? So I'm not going to do it again. Because you can't even you should. So like writing her smell while getting all that Disney training was I really think the only reason I do something that was such a substantial script. Well, who would have guessed that her smell was so inspired by Disney. But you know, wherever it came from. I'm glad that it exists. It's a really remarkable movie that I hope people will see an Alex. Thank you so much for coming in and talking to us better. Appreciate it. Thank you for having that doesn't for this week's a little gold men. We'll be back talking more game of thrones. And everything. Else going on in this fascinating time for television in for movies. In the meantime, you can find us Vanity Fair dot com where if you get past a pay well, you can get all of the game in front of the coverage that you need to get through the next few weeks. You can find us on Twitter at little Goldman and on our own. I'm Katie rich. Joanna jareth is and Richard Rilo and Mike had to go. But he's at Mike underscore HOGAN this episode was edited and produced by Brett Fuchs and this week's award for the best prediction for the end of the cats movie poster, Katie rich, if someone gets slick sale off and live in elf heaven, I'll take it. Panoply.

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The end of the blockbuster? Museums in a post-pandemic world

The Art Newspaper Weekly

1:07:58 hr | 1 year ago

The end of the blockbuster? Museums in a post-pandemic world

"We cannot be tune associated with Christie's visit Christie's come to find out more about the wills leading sixty six auction. It says hello and welcome to the WIKI NAS. I'm Ben Lee this week. We're looking at museums in different parts of the globe. What's their future in a world? Change by correct sir. The dose of museums have slammed shut over recent weeks as Cova nineteen lockdown countries across the world. So this week we're asking key figures in museums in the UK the US and China. What happens next? We speak to Francis Morris. The director of tate modern to Dan Weiss the president and Chief Executive of the Metropolitan Museum of art and to Philip to Nari the director of the Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing leaders with Indifferent Museum cultures and with very different challenges ahead. We also have the latest on logged works series in which might wonder the artist. Explores Jackson pollock's autumn rhythm before we go any further? Just a reminder that you can sign up for the newspapers free daily newsletter for related stories. Go to the newspaper. Dot Com and the newsletter links. The Right at the page and as I mentioned last week we've launched a readership survey. We're asking for your views on everything we do including the podcast is still active so please visit survey dot the aren't newspaper. Come and give us your feedback now. Tate modern along with three sister galleries in London. Liverpool INSEN is closed its doors in March as the UK. Moved INTO. Lock down the galleries. Andy Warhol Exhibition was opened for days. Steve McQueen show was only open for four weeks and a show of the South African photographers. Anneli Mahaweli which was due to open in April has already been postponed. Its the twentieth anniversary of Titans opening this year and there was due to be an extensive series of celebrations from the eleventh of. May including a display of two of your Qassam as infinity rooms. Which no doubt would have joined false numbers of people to the museum. So what now? I spoke to Francis Morris the director of Tate Modern to gator foods Francis. I thought we begin by picking up on something you said in an Oscar in the Guardian this week which was which was the oddly because the art world has shut down like everything else. You've had more time to talk and it seems to me that this is significant. This can be yes. It's a horrific period but it can be a productive period concept by if we can. We can talk through how the artwork move on from this. You know I think we we would you for polls I've had in the last two decades have been so incredibly intense by pass but I think across the whole sector and what happens with intensity is that you don't Ford moments to reflect and we do need reflection time and this emergency has has all sorts of hugely unfortunate consequences but I think one massively valuable thing is. It's stopped us in our tracks and that once you stop in your tracks you do tend to look back and looking back. We'll help us move forward and I think we need to think about the moment wherein and the implications of this pandemic but actually we need to begin to have a much longer sense of Ford Strategy. Indeed will come back to that but let's begin by talking about where we were when the tight shut its doors. Obviously the star you said the first of May Audit Organization said the first of May that's been extended to the first of June. Is that still the aim that you may open the doors again on the first June or do you think it will be extended again. Then we have no idea. Honestly I'm we wait clearly await as Dave from government. We looking with interest to see what's happening in different parts of the world and different museums sectors. One thing for sure is that. I think it's likely to take us much longer to open up than it did to close down because we have some choices. We have some options and we need to think them through. We need to think very carefully about how we open We need to think about the safety of visitors are reach. We need to think about the safety of the stakeholders and the context. So it's helpful that we have some international comparative to look at a not a note. Today number of German museums very tentatively opening their doors so the the discussions around that timeframe will be seriously starting which we once we have a stiff from government about when there's a beginning of the unlocking and at what point cultural institutions will be invited to open. Their doors am. Can you liaise with your colleagues in German museums? Will you be talking to them and saying well? How did this go? And how did that go? What did you do about this that sort of thing? Yes I mean those. Those conversations have already begun because of course there there. There are other institutions in other parts of the world that have dealt with the lockdown differently and some of those protocols an and systems that those museums are working with may or may not be useful to us because of course we're all very uniquely situated and local context but of course I've been talking for example with the music Singapore. I've been talking to Hong Kong and getting very useful sense of not just of mechanisms for supporting a return or open up institution but the likelihood of the psychology of the visit of the psychology of the Front of House Staff. And think one of the things we need to remember is that business on just as museums aren't just defined by visitors that Complex de dedicated teams of people every single person involved in the exchange between the museum and the visitor will in some way have been shaped or reformed or impacted by this pandemic. So there's no normal visited. Let's come back in. A single person will walk jaws who won't come with a different mindset themselves. It's going to be very interesting. That's right and again in that Guardian. Ask who you talked about this sense of a before and after it does feel like that doesn't it? It's not quite reset. But there's a there's a sense of something of a reset button being pushed. I mean it's just sort of enforced as I said enforce moments of reflection and there's also huge opportunity when you do research to we set things slightly differently and suddenly a tate for museums. We've been hugely successful in in a way evolving a kind of twenty first century persona. But I think we're all really keen to have an opportunity to think. Well okay so we've got to this point. What would we want to do now differently? What would we want to retain? What would want to build on where we want to reemphasize? I think it's a IT'S A. It's a really useful time. I was actually very moved. Or I'll full disclosure. I used to work at the tate. I worked there for many years before became a journalist. And I know when I was there what the Vision Tate. Modern was and that vision. I thought was utterly clearly accomplished when I visited one of the uniquely tate late nights because the vision tate modern was that it would attract a very diverse audience a much younger audience and huge numbers of these people. And and when I was there I was I was I was acutely aware tainted achieve what it set out to do. Twenty years ago this year you know but but also thinking about that now. Song much of that was about about close. Nick people altogether in on mass about large numbers of people about performances which involved am close physical connection with the audience. All these sort of things. These are the kinds of things that they're going to have to be rethought. But there's such a crucial thing about what makes tate modern so dynamic on the yes they are and other things. I think we feel rightly proud all but one of the things that I've found interesting almost revelatory since we locked down that I've actually being able to have the kind of intimate contact conversations with people who are close to tate via zoom. That just as real if not more close than the kind of conversations that I have in a public space so to give you an example we have a really wonderful group of Tate. Neighbors Group of people who live very very close to take physical proximity. Who Works together with Tania Bruguera on Turbine Hall Project A couple of years ago and they include Nagy Bell. Who's an extraordinary? A social worker in the in the neighbor nicknamed the building upon which symbolizes the importance of community and neighborliness to tate. And that group. It's a small group but it's proving extremely resilient and the kind of conversations that we've been having live but by Zoom Achy. Take each of us into each other's homes so there's a closeness that that we never get when we meet in the kind of civic space to the museum so there are some interesting things that are happening and I think those conversations are you know they're going to build a support system and I hope that that will that will stay rest going forward and I think it's interesting. We're talking on Earth Day. Actually this can be catalyst for the International Museum community to really start to put their money where their mouth is in terms of the climate content. Yes absolutely I think as a sector. We've been sleepwalking to long. What is brilliant about this? Awful tragic time is that we're all listening to science. Scientists are telling us what to do. We should have been listening to scientists for a very long time. So there's absolutely no excuse not to hear what scientists attending us about longer term prospects for the world. Of course you take like obviously. Many organizations already has a long-standing commitment to sustainability in terms of our buildings and programs and many colleagues have really dedicated a great deal of time and energy to putting our house in order but the lockdown has also brought its revelations not just us but across the sector one small example. I used to travel great. Did of my time and always thought the face to face encounter in the space in the location was absolutely crucial to the negotiation of contracts to sharing evolving shows together but how amazing it is to have these focused clear effective and enjoyable conversations without the fog of jet lag but very interesting being to Sydney up into Hong Kong. I was in New York yesterday twice a back in New York this afternoon. And all of it for the price of zoom call. This obviously connects to this idea of blockbuster exhibitions and it's very interesting. That in a letter was not by Manuel. Dura who's the director of the Renaissance Fear Museum in Madrid and in again in the South Korean cool there? Is this idea that there must be a shift in blockbuste- culture and blockbuster culture is one of the most obvious? Conspicuous ways in which museums are contributing to to sort of carbon footprint for the art industry. They are essential money-making events for museums as well. So how can blockbuster culture shift as it were well? Okay first of all confession time. I love blockbusters. You know. They are hugely significant for bringing US extraordinary. Works of art from Unique opportunities to see deep real content and I think for us that also really important the most museums what we would call trust. Builders they bring transformative experiences two generations and particularly they are the exhibition that reach haunt to reach audiences because they come with high profile big marketing budgets that talking point so in themselves they can be wonderful things but I think waters so often. The case with very successful tried and tested formats is that the danger is that they crowd out the other things that are also hugely important and valuable all that simply alternative emerging of minority interests. And all those other things you will turn into it. The minority interest in the emerging. Mardi actually things. We need to drive the future with the whole ecosystem will collapse if we don't bring on new perspectives if we don't nurture younger artists if we don't as a modern has done shed a spotlight on artists who have fought outside the Canam who haven't been subject to Las bus bus so I think that that we must be complacent. Here coast. Blockbusters are absolutely central to the Economy Museum but they are difficult to realize they are expensive and the in the end then less sustainable so I think there is a complex piece of work that all museums muster. We must do it together because this can't be about competition there is there is of course competition for audiences and ticket sales. That drives blockbusters but we must work together to really think. But how do we right? We vitalize the amazing resources that we already have that are in public ownership and then we also do pay a put a great deal of investment in both in terms of building our collections and the research around them and so I think there is. There is an amazing opportunity now to recalibrate to think about. How do we bring the creativity and innovation that we brought to our exhibitions? How do we bring that unused that in relation to our permanent collections and public programs? And how do we then bring them to the fall of really hungry and interested public? But that's the sort of a question that the museum community is asking for so long isn't it? I mean it's something when I was at the tate it was how can we? How can we bring more people in to the extraordinary resources that we have on the wolves every day of the week rather than just for say a warhol retrospective and I think it's it's some people do really interesting things in this in this direction? The titans and example other museums across the UK are too. But it somewhat elusive. This idea of trying to I suppose if in an event culture and a culture driven by happenings how do you? How do you create happenings around? Something which is just their seven days a week. Twenty four hours a day but the absence. There's absolutely no reason why we can't adapt some of the essentially marketing strategies and bring them to bear in relation to collection hands. And of course you absolute right that We have done quite well in that respect tate. Modern I think I'd say with some conviction that when we opened tate modern we offered a hugely challenging very unconventional way of presenting the collection and it was extremely well received controversial enticing provocative people wanted to come and sit and we have very short memories. But we when you look at what we've done in the past and what I think what Birmingham museums have done recently. What magister then. Mazing examples at other museums both in this country and abroad. We have radi strong rich. Toolkit drew that we can draw from invasion to a past but also we have a brand new tool kit now. We have incredible new digital technologies. We have new ideas. Ross slow looking around participation about different voices. So let's just get creative. You know. We're not outside what we call creative industries. We have this incredible talent pool at tate and among our networks. You feel quite actually excited about about doing that. I think one of the things one of the examples that tate modern had when it first opened was the drawing these enormous audiences seventy. You had new anchors as you call them. The these new works which suddenly became pivotal in your collection in which the public needed to see for instance Cornelia Parker's exploding shared. You know this. This work co dot matter of this exploding shared the that suddenly became an icon of the tate collection. And I suppose that's what you've got to do is sort of animate. These works may may not yet be losing large in the public imagination. But have the opportunity to do. So if you if you present imaginatively. All collections have things that they overlook and I think one of the one of the things we need to get better at is looking at our collection with outside is meg. We should we should be. We should be doing that with with people who do come from outside the institution take the temperature and one of the projects. I was really excited about that. We have had to put on hold was the presentation of these two fantastic. Kasama rooms that we had in the collection and when I think about Qassam is history from when we made a retrospective less than ten years ago. Unit seems astonishing that at that stage we thought a medium-scale show. You knew it'd be sort of a moderate to high interest amongst visitors and the accumulation of interest around Zalm in that decade. Is being absent stanching into have these works in the collection? They are a gift every bit as a as attractive as inspiring as any blockbuster we could mount so. That's an example of the way that you use the collection. I was intrigued by something that you said about wanting to prioritize the also the future as it were but also how much that depends upon the bigger more obvious show. So is your ability to do shows lucky. Would you to of Muhammad Ali and Mike Delano Abbott Arnovitz? This summer dependent upon also having done warhol in other words. Did you need the money that that would bring in in order to have a program for you know shows? We should obviously not not moneymakers. I'll planning cyclists much more long term and I can't comment yet on the outcomes of the kind of the the financial impact of this period. But what I can say. Is that when we closed? We closed with three exhibitions in situ one off. Way Off the walls and that There are another six shows in the pipeline for the remainder of the year and over the next following year. I'm too much in the period that we're on -ticipant being disrupted for their another you half a dozen at least shows planned and in final stages of preparation in some respects and all that program sits in a network of around thirteen not collaborating institutions so each exhibition happens at. Tate will have been produced either. In collaboration with partner museums. In North America Europe and Latin America all will be an exhibition that we have originated that then. We'll talk to other venues so you can imagine that the complexity is a little bit like having created a the most beautiful and tightly. A tightly made jigsaw puzzle and somebody's scattered all over the flow and have pickup. Hp and and put it back together and some of those pieces will need a little bit of reshaping and the final picture will look slightly different but each piece is loved and each piece is a commitment and so the thing that we will really be working on over the next few months is how do we ensure that we retain as support that program. And I say that because so much of what will happen to us is outside our control because each of these partnership organizations is in its own journey with pandemic in its own city or location and will be In a part of his own network of stakeholders and and government and funding. So there's going to zoom cause and a lot of moving pieces around You can call it the chess set the jigsaw. Whatever but With we don't take on exhibitions lightly in exhibitions go through momentous processes of discussion before they even get on the shed show and we don't want any of that go to waste but of course reshaping reinventing re positioning. Yeah we will find a way but Kenny. For instance say the Warhol Show. It was open for a matter of days that I was one of the lucky people who was able to see it and but I also noticed this massive shop outside. Obviously a big draw for merchandise people. Won't they will t shirts and posters and everything else? It was due to go after the tate to the museum ludvig in Cologne but also oversee. There are as you say this those stick saw. There's the her sean lending exceptionally lending. Its Marilyn's lips painting that network of conversations that needs to happen obviously will happen with museums at different stages of lockdown and opening. So can you say for instance whether the Warhol Show will reopen at the tate? Even if let's say the lockdown last into into the summer and the autumn I just can't say I mean all I can tell you that we will on selling the t shirts and there's also look at our website. There's a great you can visit. The show is up to brilliant walk through with with the curatorial team is beautifully done and it is one of one of the great tragedies all museums all of us have shows just the we all would've loved to have seen those shows at other institutions. But all in exactly the same boat and there's a tremendous sense of solidarity and kind of liberation and one thing is absolutely for sure is. That warhol won't go away so I can't give you any of those answers but it's a really interesting. Octa WAY TRAE Great Fuzzy Sandwich. Joining us on the PODCAST. Thank you You can see the online tool of the Andy Warhol. Show that Francie mentioned at tate all UK where you'll also find a tour of tate. Britain's Aubrey beardsley exhibition and various other online content. And you can read an extensive story on the challenges facing museums online at the art newspaper. Dot Com on our APP for IOS and in the next edition of the newspaper which is out next week now. The Metropolitan Museum of art in New York lead the way for US museums in closing. Its doors in March and with state funding. The met face is quite different. Financial challenges to those British museums. I spoke to Dan. Weiss the next president and chief executive about the museums immediate and long-term future and know that we spoke before the mets announced on Wednesday the twenty second of April it was laying off eighty one staff members in its visitor services and retail departments as it braced for the budget deficit related to shut them down. The M- let the way in announcing that it would shut down on the twelfth of March. Lots of museums followed and in the following day's new times reported they would be a hundred million shortfall in the current and following fiscal year. And also the the museum wouldn't open again until July two I. Can you tell us something about both those those points? The the one hundred million short for to begin with no so why July. The first well as this crisis began to unfold for all of us our first goal was to really figure out. What the magnitude of this issue was going to be and how we best manage it. In the first instance we realized we had to close and as soon as we realized we had to close we also then turned our attention to figuring out. When can we reopen. Under what circumstances would be able to reopen and what are the financial implications of such a decision? So we put our team together to begin to assess what we think. The issues are and the hundred million dollars really came out of out of a series of modeling exercises. We went through based on the presumption. We would not reopen at least until July first. And we did that. I'll come to that in a moment as to why it was July first but based on that decision we looked at what are lost. Revenue would be what we thought. The implications would be as we reopen in terms of global tourism and the number of visitors that we would have all of those components and they as we put it all together. We realized the magnitude of this challenge is massive and that we thought the sooner we could identify that articulate that the better it would be for everyone. This is not the kind of crisis where we'RE BETTER OFF. Keeping the issue quiet trying not to upset people but rather face straightaway. What the challenges and begin to put plans together to address it so the financial crisis the financial magnitude came out of our assessment of what we thought. The implications of closing and staying closed would be the July first date really based on what we were reading and understanding from public health experts primarily around the trajectory of the pandemic and particularly what the curve when the curve would actually begin to descend when we begin to see that the environment is safe enough to allow people to come together again and social ways and I think July first is optimistic. At this point we chose July first in the first instance because we thought that was a reasonable approximation of several months anyway of being closed but at this point it may be that it will be after July first. The question of the hundred million inevitably win one. He is that stratospheric figure one wonders. What what it's going to affect so if you haven't got one hundred million dollars the you hoped you would have then. How does that affect the museum? What what what suffers as a result. Can you say something about where you expect that impact to be felt? Yes well the one hundred million or whatever the number turns out to be and it could be a little bit larger than one hundred million once we really know more about when we can reopen and how the global economy is going to behave but that number really came out of understanding the magnitude and duration of the financial distress we will be subject to navigating which is no different from every other organization in the world whether it's a nonprofit museum or business and so by the time we get through this crisis and we're back to some semblance of normal operations we will no longer be generating any deficits and that's probably eighteen months from now more or less that we would face that kind of resolution so the hundred million dollars is from now until eighteen months from now when we're balancing our budgets and we're moving along and in order to accommodate that kind of a burden we've looked at everything. We have reduced our overall programming budget. So we have cut back on the number of special exhibitions that doing and the number of other programmatic pro events that we have the met has an enormously ambitious and very busy schedule. Each year we do more than thirty eight thousand events every year so in order for us to address this budget shortfall. One piece of it is reducing programming as a result of reducing programming. We're able to reallocate some of those dollars to core operations that allow the museum to carry on and address this deficit. And we're also looking at how we can reduce cost just overall reduce costs in terms of the overall budget for the institution. And then finally we're also looking at fundraising we have friends and supporters. Who are want the museum to obviously to get through this. So if there is a there is light at the end of the tunnel. At the end of the hundred million dollar challenge we are healthy and vibrant and successful then navigating the hundred million as a temporary kind of a problem. And that's how we've thought of it and that's what we're doing. I'd like to focus more on this programming issue. So obviously if you're cutting back on program one imagine that would mainly be the big exhibition. So is that is that the case not entirely. Certainly the the major exhibitions are the greatest generator of of activity levels and absorb were of costs. That's certainly true but there are other things as well. We have conferences. Lectures live arts events tours. All kinds of things that go on and so as we look out into the fall if let us say we were to reopen on July first we would imagine or whatever it would be. Let's say September first. We expect that. In the first few months of reopening our activity levels will be significantly lower. Because there will be social distancing requirements in place. Anyway so that people who come to the Museum. We'll have to have the ability to be in isolated space more or less so we need fewer activities anyway and so it's a lot of things it's major exhibitions but other things too because there's there's an atmosphere around where museum directors for instance are questioning whether she we need a sort of paradigm shift in the way that museums behave. You know that we may be in fact past the era blockbuster museums and obviously you think about the implications in terms of air travel all sorts of other implications that connect to the blockbuster exhibition. What's your sense because because it seems to me that there's a there's a paradox at play in the sense that yes these massive revenue generators. They're also expensive to put on but they also intensive their logistics there the toughest things to pull off so there's all sorts of balancing acts seems to me that museums are going to need to strike in this new era. That we that will enter into. I think there is generally wide agreement in the museum world that we are experiencing a paradigm shift and in some ways. That are not obvious to US quite yet. The world will never look quite the same when we reopened and we settle settle into new environment and within that. I think there is the question. About how much reduction there needs to be or as appropriate in programming in particularly special exhibitions. One of the things I've observed and I'm no. I'm not alone that in times of stress like this when people are feeling scarcity and they're concerned about About core things what. The museum represents is very important to people. And it's not major special exhibitions. It's just the opportunity for people to come into connect with our our permanent collection to have a chance to be in this. Space digital is wonderful and people are looking at our our programming digitally but coming into the space and having direct encounters with art. Is something very very important people so I think when we do reopen they won't be clamoring for special exhibitions. They'll be looking for opportunities to have quiet reflective time and space in the museum with works of art that are important to them and I think all museums will be going back to those first principles much more than they have in the past over the fullness of time whether it turns out that that remains to be the case we'll see could be that there will be much less interest in special exhibitions of the sort. We saw before one of the things that is. I think very intriguing about this is that special exhibitions and the balance of that sort of event culture with the day to collection. This extraordinary collection. That you're talking about is one of the things that museums are constantly battling to try to achieve the right balance in in the sense that actually certainly in the UK. And I know it's true in certain. Us Museums is. There's a sense that permanent collections are in some ways undervalued that the museums actually could be doing very much more to reinforce the importance of their permanent collections. Do you think. Can you imagine that that is something that will doing? Well I do. I think it requires us all to reflect on why we why we value museums. And what it is. We're actually seeking. We have at least up until this moment. We've lived increasingly in an environment that is that dominated by a need forever exciting stimulation for something new and different in fresh and shiny and what special exhibitions do is provide an event moment for people to come to the museum to see what's new and to get a sense for what the latest idea is to have. People have an opportunity for people to discuss. Whatever the issues of the day are around the exhibition. And I think we're all reflecting on whether that is necessary to the same degree we have seen before my instinct is is not that I think what drives most people wanna cut go to art museums or any cultural institution is to have a direct engagement with the core collection of the core programming. And I think that's likely to be what will happen for us in the future. So the only fewer exhibitions. There'll be there'll be there'll be plenty of interest in the museum going back to the finances. There's a there's a fifty million emergency fund. Can you say more about what that is and how you are allocating? Yes we realized as we we dimension the magnitude of the overall problem that it would be very important for us to try to create a fund that allowed us to meet the needs of the museum on a day to day basis as the crisis unfolds and as new information becomes available to US ON A DAY-TO-DAY BASIS. So the fifty million dollar emergency fund which is actually now a larger than that was created in two ways. One we re allocated resources within the museum's budgets that were going to be spent on programming acquisitions or mission related activity that we had where we had the ability to reallocate those funds. We did so that they could focus again on core responsibilities that we have financially and second. We've raised money philanthropic -ly from are primarily our trustees so again the challenge were solving for is one hundred million dollar problem and we thought that if we break that down into a series of component parts about fifty million would be this this reallocated emergency fund that comes out of our own resources in our own endowments where we can draw them. Appropriately and legally twenty five million is going to be coming from philanthropic support that we raise from our supporters and trustees and then twenty five million more we have to find ourselves by reducing our own costs and just doing things more efficiently and less expensively and collectively those three Po pieces come together and they allow us to work through this crisis. Can you say more about the endowment because obviously subject to fluctuations in terms of the market am? Wha what is the current figure for the endowment and to what extent you mentioned where Lee way appropriately legally you can draw down from endowments you have done. So can you say more about our endowment was before this crisis was about three point six billion dollars and now it's probably three point three billion dollars something like that. It's a very large number and we're enormously fortunate to have access to that kind of resource by statute. We are allowed to spend about five percent of that a year. That's normally how endowments are spent and for us about half of that. More than half of it is actually already restricted to various kinds of programmatic areas or acquisition. So we cannot use the money for any other purpose other than what is specified for in the gift agreement from the donor. The other money is more available to us to be used in different ways and we already use the significant portion of our endowment to meet our operating expenses. So when I say we're using all of our endowment as that we can to meet our expenses really doing is making sure that all of the money that comes to us. Each year through the five percent draw is being used for the most mission critical activities that we have there is not at this point or likely in the foreseeable future a plan to invade the Corpus of the endowment and spend down. That isn't something museums. Do it is. It is extraordinarily destructive to the future of the institution and the met did not do that in the Great Depression. It did not do that. In two thousand and eight. We are not legally able to do that but we are going to use the money. We have available to us as thoughtfully and strategically as we can the full extent. This crisis oversee. We don't know yet and we don't know how long it's going to go on for an oversee. This makes it very difficult to predict how people will behave into the future. But for instance. Are you still involved in emergency? Planning for instance for windows doors do reopen and how you will ease the museum back to life as it were. We have done a lot of planning already in thinking through very carefully what the museum can do for the public one. We'RE ALLOWED TO REOPEN. What our operating environment will be. How do we keep it safe and secure for our staff who have to interact with the public who have various kinds of risks associated with moving around an environment of where the public health risk? That planning has already begun. Even though we don't yet know what the environment will be exactly but we. We anticipate certain things were preparing for them. There may be the requirement for timed entry in order that social distancing can be assured to the public when they come in the museum. We cannot have. I'm sure vast numbers of the public crowded into galleries engaging in a very close space to see works of art. So we're GONNA have to be navigating it very differently. We're doing that. We don't know yet. What kind of screening would be required at the door of our museum but we know in Asia various museums? That have reopened are you are. They're doing temperature. Screening the requiring visitors to wear masks various steps like that that we may be asked or required to do when we reopened. So we're looking at that. We're looking at how people purchase tickets to make sure that's a safe and secure way as possible to do that. So all of that planning is underway whether we open on July first or September. First we don't believe we're going to open up like we used to. We're going to have to be in the in the age of the of post pandemic period. We're going to be obviously working under great restrictions. It's really important to us to get the museum open as soon as we can in a safe way. No one wants to come to an art museum and have a cultural experience worried about their health but people really WANNA come. They want to see the art. They WanNa have the experience. That's so important to them. Spiritually and intellectually. Our job is to find that balance between providing access that is not intrusive or threatening. But that is safe and secure. And we've been working on that quite hard as I said right. At the top of the conversation it led the way in terms of shutting. The doors is in a way an exemplar of museum for the whole of the museum community. Do you feel to responsibility to lead at this moment. In terms of the entire museum community and also can you address whether this is a sort of paradigm shift in terms of just the entire model of the way that museums run in the US. Because this is such an enormous moment such momentous time. Can you predict that there might be a shift in the fundamental business model of museums? And can you lead in that discussion? Yes I think both are both true. The math has always been a leading institution by virtue of our size the magnitude of our collection the number of visitors. That we welcome them. It has always been an important and influential cultural institution so it is not surprising that we find ourselves in that role now and I felt very clear to me as this crisis was unfolding into my colleagues at the met that we needed to make a decision. Whatever we decided to do that would withstand careful scrutiny and that would likely serve as a model for other institutions because that's how the matter was often operated and I think we made the right decision by closing when we did and many other museums were actually appreciative. That we did that because it made it a little bit easier for them also to do that and they knew they needed to do that. So I think the met has led and will continue to lead but we are also on in on a regular basis in conversation with other museums. And making sure that we're comparing best practices. We're learning from each other. A group of New York Art Museum leaders last week for example also had conversation with several Asian Art Museum leaders who have already reopened their museums to talk about their experience. And what they're learning so ultimately the met needs to lead but we need to be collaborative and and we will do both of those things to as we move forward. I think we are heading into a very new operating environment for the next several years and maybe for forever in terms of how we engage the public what our budgets looked like how we generate revenues and manage costs how we develop programming to service the public. What kind of expectations the public has of museums? I think all of those things are up in the air and for discussion which also means it's an opportunity for us to bear down on our mission to think more carefully about. What is it that we do? That's most important and if we're not going to do everything let's make sure we're doing what's most important and not necessarily those things that are less important so a crisis like this always provides opportunities for reflection and learning and. I think we're doing that and as we enter into the new environment. My hope is we can be more focused sharper more mission driven institution than we were before. Even if we fewer resources to do the work Thanks much for joining us on the podcast pleasure. Thanks for having me You can read the latest news about stuff cots at the met heavy out. Newspaper Dot Com. And you can explore the three sixty degrees project allowing you to take a virtual tour of its various locations and galleries online at met Museum Dot. Org a bit later. We'll talk to two Nari in Beijing and we hear from the autism one in Japan Jackson pollock's autumn rhythm. But I hear a few of the top stories on our website as mentioned briefly in the interviews in Germany Museum said this week began to reopen Catherine Hickory reports that in Brandenburg small rural museums have opened for the first time with limits on visitor numbers and security precautions in place. It will take longer for bigger museums to follow suit according to the German Museums Association. And the a few states have so far set a date. From which may reopen in touring from twenty eighth of April and in Berlin and Saxony from the Fourth of May the Dresden State. Art Collections are planning to open gradually also starting on the fourth of. May the photographer. Pete bid the subject of numerous by Francis Bacon and a friend of several artists including Andy Warhol and Safdar. Deli has died aged eighty. Two Gareth Harris writes bid was found dead on the nineteenth of April almost three weeks after he disappeared from his home. In Montauk on Long Island he'd been suffering from dementia his most famous photographs where his images of wildlife statement released by his family said the bid was a pioneering contemporary artist who was decades ahead of his time and his efforts to sound the alarm about environmental damage and lastly Louisa Buck reports. That Wolfgang Tillman's has this week. Launch a twenty twenty solidarity campaign bringing together more than forty international artists including Luke tournaments. Andress Gerski the Code Eisenman and Betty Tompkins to design a poster that can then be offered as a reward on different fundraising sites in return for fifty pound or fifty dollars donation. The aim is to support cultural music venues community projects independent spaces and publications that are as tumors puts it existential threatened by the current crisis. You can read all these stories and more at the art newspaper. Dot Com or on the APP. We'll be back after this weekend. Out is brought to you in association with Christie's as collectors and art lovers increasingly look to browse purchase online Christie's significantly expanded. Its own winery. Sale calendar in April and May Christie's will introduce two new themed online contemporary art sales. Andy Warhol better days with proceeds benefit. Emergency Relief efforts for artists in America and then handpicked hundred words by together. The refreshed online only schedule. Compliments Christie's private sales of freeze bid and Bayat anytime and from anywhere find out more on Christie's DOT com. Welcome back now. In the next issue of the newspaper is an opinion piece from Philip to Nari the director of the Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing. Entitled greetings from a museum leaving lock down. The center hopes to open stores in earnest next month and was quickly put together a new exhibition meditations. On an emergency to replace shows that it's been forced to postpone because of the Pandemic Philip is in Beijing preparing for the reopening and I spoke to him about the museum plans so Philip in the PC say it's been a time to think can tell me something about what you've been thinking about in this period. Sure I mean it's really been a chance to think about who we are as an institution and maybe what our special strengths are. Especially as we're faced with all kinds of new challenges stemming from this situation and I think at the end I kind of arrived at this idea that you know one thing. We've worked really hard to overcome. Is this you know. We're we're relatively new institution right worth by Western centers. Thirteen years old. We spent a lot of time trying to build up different systems to do things more professionally. And we're seen as a kind of leader in that way certainly here in China but you know honestly we've now faced with a situation where our whole spring and summer and fall program is not going to happen as planned and But we were instead able to come up with an entirely new exhibition with which will reopen godwilling at the end of next month. So somehow that agility not improvisation spirit End Up being strengths rather than weaknesses. Tell me something about those plans because oversee one of the key things is international. Travel is down international movement on the whole is down. So what have you done in terms of this new show than what did you have in place before that? You've had to cancel so the show is called meditations in an emergency you. It's AS Roma's to a book of poems. Written by Frank O'Hara the Mid Century American poet is actually better known during his lifetime as Moma curator And the relevance of the name is pretty immediate. But we've tried to take this situation that we're now faced with and look at it from a number of different angles so as a group show of somewhere around thirty artists. Many are Chinese voices. Established and emerging but many others are international who are participating in not by coming with studio teams Not by making huge shipments China's those things are impossible. But you know in this organizational process which is really only been a few weeks long. We sort of started from this idea that you know certain things that we took for granted before are no longer possible but also that there's probably a willingness certainly from our public but I think around the world as well to see what a show might look like under these new circumstances so people have been able ready to work with us given these circumstances whether that means letting US install a video work that maybe you know under ideal circumstances that would require a technician coming or even in in one or two cases producing work here. based on proposals and instructions and specs the end result will hopefully be an exhibition that opens while of the museums around. The world are are still not able to do that and that hopefully we'll bring our visitors back into the fold but also will provide a to people elsewhere that this isn't going to last forever so in terms of the The social security situation and the social distancing situation. Can you explain how you're GONNA manage that? Because of course this isn't going to be like the museum was before before you close the were into a new era. Absolutely I think one thing to remember. Is that different systems. Different countries work in different ways In China where this all began. Mask-wearing became universal. Almost immediately there was never a significant shortage of surgical masks. Oh and there was also this experience of SARS seventeen years ago. Where where? We're this at all happened once before. So that kind of has been the case in remains the case. Now there's also temperature taking and in fact data tracing scantest code with your cell phone and it verifies that you've been in Beijing for the last fourteen days incubation period And that's that's par for the course really at anywhere you might go be that a restaurant or store or any kind of public space even some streets some alleyways to enter. They'll be someone from the neighborhood. They're collecting information. So we will. We will do that in accordance with local and national regulations. But we'll try to do it in in such a way that still speaks to who we are and then specifically in terms of the exhibition. Of course we've gotten rid of multi touch surfaces right so there are no headphones to be worn by different people and then the exhibition design is also such that it allows people to keep the appropriate distance from one. Another one of the things about this seems to me that you've corralled a community The way that you're talking about the way this shows being put together and it seems to me that one of the things that has emerged from this period is there's there's a greater sense of your weirdly given that we're all isolated a great sense of communication in our local communities and within within our if you like amongst our peers. Is that true of your experience and is it something that can be used not just now but in the future as kind of a kind of blueprint for how we got forward from this. You know. It's it's definitely made clear the importance of art and helping us to envision forms of solidarity for for us the probably the most Cathartic moment of this whole process so far was on February twenty-ninth which was really kind of the end of the most intense period of this in China's just as things were coming into order and the was starting to maybe be a little bit insight. We hosted this online concert with a different musicians. All stuck at home improvising And it was it was actually group. Grew out of the show that we had on view called voluntary garden which we had to close when the museum closed. But was kind of fascinating was just this idea of. I think we had about one hundred thousand visitors all over China sitting at home together right sort of in the words of hip we shall. We had last year. I was a section called alone together. This this this chance to kind of convene and commune not just virtually or digitally but still in the same in the same time albeit in these different places is something quite unknown before and of course something that will have to continue in into the future. Because you know them. We don't yet know when other parts of the world you know. We've had some museums in Germany this week. Opening for instance but it looks like the US and the UK for instance on not going to be opening up for quite a few weeks. Yes so you know all you envisaging that this kind of On the one hand local blue so more improvised kind of approach to formulating programs is sort of the future for the foreseeable future. I think it's going to have to be and I and you know we spent so much time in the in the last year or two thinking about how to voluntarily reduce our carbon footprints. And you know these these kinds of it can also very urgent issues that this kind of new localism or regionalism sort of brought on by these more difficult circumstances is actually responsible and I I think it also allows us to do to get back to the city and on the artistic community at our doorstep in in a way that hopefully will be quite productive. And is it right that you go to sort of preemptive moment you you the show where you're sort of welcoming back visitors to the museum as sort of public space before the are actually goes back on view so in fact today we opened our front door for for the first time since January? Twenty four th when we when we when we closed for all of us we opened it to campaign where we're running right now. We're calling empty. Ucla so we. We don't have any art on view we just have in. Our Great Hall are sort of signature. Eighteen hundred square meter column free space. We have a few stocks of construction materials. That are they're ready to be incorporated into the coming show. We returned to recycle elements from our walls. But Yeah we just wanted to open the door and get people in this Hashtag empty. Ucr main wall at the entrance. And it's just a way I mean it's a dry run for us to test these kind of protocols that we're going to need to have in place when we when we do open with the show but it's also just to send a signal you know to to our members to the seven nine eight our district where we're situated to the city a bit more broadly to people elsewhere That that we're here that we're back. And we're excited to to to re engage unto you know try new things and alongside excitement. Is there any sense of trepidation? Who so because it is a new era that we're entering into his now. Oh absolutely I think time will tell right when this when this podcast airs if if the show has opened as scheduled because I think that the most important lesson that we've learned is that all the plans we make are subject to kind of women's much greater than a nearby US law sleep you all in a way. A blueprint for what happens to the rest of the world. Because as I say. We're some weeks off other museums elsewhere. Opening 'em all you in touch with the your international friends at museums across the world. And do you feel in a way that you will be a key kind of test for for how we museum community is not community emerge from this crisis? Absolutely I I mean I. I'll get emails. I think a lot of a museum professionals in here and elsewhere in Asia our will be enclosed with colleagues in Europe and the US and elsewhere. I was on a assume call last Friday with kind of all of the museum. Directors of New York and I was there with from plus and Eugene Tan from the National Art Gallery Singapore and Eugene who are board members of. Sema have actually gone so far as to put together a set of specific social distancing guidelines for museums. That are now being circulated more broadly So I think paradoxically it's actually forcing us all in enticing us all to talk to each other and learn from each other and that's that's exciting To sedan good luck with Oland look forward to hopefully evidently opening the doors and welcoming visits Thank you so much And finally this week. The latest in all series lemony works in which we look at artworks museums. Close because of the corona virus this week. We're returning to the met because the British artist one in has chosen Jackson pollock's autumn rhythm number thirty from nine hundred fifty one of the great drip paintings bullet made in a prolific period between nine hundred forty eight thousand nine hundred fifty one and you can see images of the work as we discuss the art newspaper. Dot Com Click on the link on the homepage and look for this episode. Why did you choose? Autumn Rhythm by Polit- well because of its initial impacts of of its continuing impact when I got him revisit. But it's very much attached to my memory of saliva went to New York in one thousand nine hundred eighty and mobike given over the entire building to a huge Picasso. Retrospective so the kind of abstract expressionism. One of the girls in New York a lot. What could be moved to the Brooklyn Museum at the back of a Metropolitan Museum in in quite a promising? I'm proficient kind of interim rooms and I think policy cafe remember even being displayed on a sort of a Hessian coverage cut of temples. There it was you know. And so I have a huge fullness for for that work and that moment and that was kind of one of the one of those completely satisfying experiences looking at work about actually was the sort of rather sort of unlikely slightly disjointed experience getting and then seeing what part of it in a way because it's an enormous is it's an enormous paintings and it's one of politics biggest. It is it. Is it almost fainting? And Yeah I'd probably dealing with my own fatigue kind of consuming so much all in the Metropol in the museum and you kind of lock in itself is quiet shattering and then yeah with the dossier of energy left. I found myself in this space and of course it it is its own kind of Zone bomb. Full that came before it. You know. It's one of the things I mean. It seems to talk about purity when it comes to pollock but it seems to me that ultimate Amisi in a way the period the paintings is this search finesse and elegance in those marks isn't there there is there is. I mean I think. Hearing about in reading about him. Looking at reproductions and but somehow in ones mind's eye early on you you have excellent deal pollock and quite often. Don't quite match up to this Pollock initially this is an Polo. It does everything that you have a high it would do. Yeah it it has nothing nothing. Impose opponent Blue Poles to the other things you know. It's that's a kind of like they feel a little bit too much of an imposition on. This is this is a a as a purist and the actually kind of confused onto the statements. He made about what he intended to do. The painting has a life of its own and he's obeying that sense. Yeah it's it's extraordinary. Moving experience I had you seen the namath film of Him. Making Autumn Rhythm before you saw the picture so in a way where you invested in the myth of Before you had this encounter with the word yeah I mean I think I think I saw it on foundation course so you know you have the missing and you kind of I think in my generation had to go drip painting and just an and the results Jerry horrible you know and and everything about that moment you know because you know he's painting up so then could be pretty turgid really you know and so it was like in one bound he was free and and you know inspiration revelation Everything in those terms come comes together And that move from the ground up on the wall. I mean this is a yeah. It's like a physical metaphysical shift. There are no other paintings that do lie. And and so so it's rhythms and it's a line is as much to do with between pollock's gesture what gravity and everything else add to movements it. It's a perfect summation really. Yeah Yeah and of course. It came to the tate in nineteen ninety nine for a spot of extraordinary Jackson. Pollock exhibition I want to do you remember seeing in that show did in a way you've seen in this space in the Matt as you say we've visited it but seeing in your on your own turf as it were wanted. That experience was like it was wonderful but actually quite attached to to to wear is you know I mean I suppose one thinks of the National Gallery and the Titan serves to the Matt a moment you know. Those are funny. Somebody at the end of a post impressionism beginning of cubism. The is somewhere between them between the remits. You know and so yeah because it feels bowl the only one of its kind species in that the natural history of painting in the in that place that I don't like to sink and that speaks to what the reason we're doing this because all these museums currently shot and we want to in a way bring people's minds and is back to these paintings and thinking about this is crucial. Isn't it the space in which works? It's one's memories of a work have also bound up with the physical. Experience is visiting not just looking at him absolutely absolutely. I mean I remember another time. I was staying with some friends and Canal Street early nineties and decided I was. GonNa walk away to the met and I've got some new sandals which would shredding my fate by the time I got sick to central park so it really was a very painful pilgrimage. You know still worth it. Did you feel like you're on the on the road to Yoga? Es Telling US statistic took it took Find out more about awesome at met Museum Dot Org and you can see the latest work by Montvale in response to London under lockdown on the front page of the mansion of the newspaper which is APP next week. And that's it for this week described to the newspaper at the newspaper. Dot Com subscribing to the top left of the homepage and precepts his podcast. If you haven't already gives rating being if you've enjoyed you could find us on twitter facebook. Instagram and telegraph. You can find the telegram. Invite Code at the top of our newsletters the producers of the weekend GD housekeeper. Amy Dawson and David. David USA does the editing. Thanks to Francis Dan to Philip. At the moment I think for listening. We'll see you next week. Good bye now. We cannot Christie's visit Christie's to come to find out more about the wealth leading auction house in seventeen sixty six auction private sales online anytime.

Andy Warhol US Tate mets Beijing May Christie director China Metropolitan Museum of art Tate Modern Qassam New York Titans Dan Weiss Ben Lee Jackson pollock UK Philip Francis Morris
424 - Austin Film Festival 2019

Scriptnotes Podcast

1:06:49 hr | 1 year ago

424 - Austin Film Festival 2019

"Enjoy hello and welcome my name is Craig and this is script notes a podcast about screenwriting and things hades is John. Today's episode scripts recorded live at the Austin Film Festival. I wasn't there but I'm told the language it's a bit salty so keep that in mind before he listened aw just to mix it up a total failure I wish all of you at home could see the enthusiasm in this room right now I am so yeah I like it that's good enough for me next to them we have to up and coming writers name owner and Creator of the upcoming Truth Beats Bold on Apple Michelle tromble next to her Malcolm Spelman who have something in common we were movies we started in features and now we find ourselves in TV and I'm just Kinda curious for you guys is there any interest in going back isn't my oldest but is my dearest friend in the world and has written on empire and is the show runner of the upcoming Falcon and the winter soldier from Marvel aw Dan Weiss on the stage we have ion floyd who has written a very the David Mandel unfortunately has only written on Saturday night live Conan O'Brien Seinfeld curb your enthusiasm and veep I'm so sorry sure come on never want to sit around and wait and the Shelter Malcolm is funny I I did this little panel at the it's over more drinking right well so wanNA start with David Betty off and Liz and Malcolm we all Trimble has written unjustified the good wife and she's and you may know them from gummy of thrown with we all feel free chip in even necessarily address to you and we're GonNa have a little bit of a fun game we're GonNa play later and then we're GONNA turn it over to the audience for Q. and A. and it's going to be a great old time and right to be here John isn't with us this year but I'm I'm in control now so strap in everyone this is going to be interesting and I assure you as I always do there's a lotta time for Q. and A. Because I do believe that you know honestly that's why you're here we have incredible guests and so I want to introduce them one by one today joining us have the great Liz Hannah with us tonight Hannah has written the posts and she is also on mine we've got quite a show in store for you all I've got some normal questions and I'm going to throw it to you guys please or is this kind of a permanent exodus are people just leaving features and going and TV and not returning lose Ajay for black riders and the statistic was like if African Americans made up one point five percent of feature writers it went down in this diversity push to one so oh so the diversity is working and being I think the feature business is so hostile enclose it's a worthless 'cause I don't think we should bother with it they can have that shit it doing good stuff we're making a difference they is white people you so what was the woman's name from Dave Malcolm took my answer how is no the truth is you know an occasional thing might come around where it's worth it just note experiencing going to be great but I have no intention of you've given them my energy or creativity in a meaningful way ever again fuck them ball has shown up just in time for beautiful tonight did you put like okay something's going on this is great there's Celts ramble I got to think of his shell and her husband's right next to it's weird that was a bit of a mushy answer David many of you and then y you've made a new deal to make programming for it's their hand was very successful but she had difficulty getting paid what she thought was a fair amount to return for the sequel investment so the question for you guys is you know you didn't feature work you guys had enormous success in television is there any road back to features like traditional features or no rich Asians the writer down adult who needs that shit you know what I'm saying they can they can just fail on a little got to do that stuff and I was so much fun and that's so crucial to telling a story to give that up and go back I think would be really hard I mean that said Netflix wondering what it meant to be a professional parent is you're not that funny this is fluid in that way so if the opportunity arises to tell me some stories need seventy five hours some stories need eighty seven minutes and if we flex but Netflix it can be features it could be television does even matter is it just sort of much together for you guys now you can't throw this list and I know obviously Chernobyl most recently but you were a comedy writer as once in a while I was they I mean what little movies they make yeah I mean Malcolm's right like why shouldn't he feel that way and why it shouldn't he not wanna work in movies because of that like I don't I don't think it's high level on Hannibal and the shy and the upcoming cotton club series earlier the show Renault the upcoming conquest never once sat in hiring department heads any of that stuff because that's just the way it is for screenwriters and on a feature and so to have the experience the Dan I had on thrones have stories to tell that need eighty seven minutes and we can find a way to do them there that lets us did tell stories the way we've been telling stories for the past ten years US Malcolm Has Malcolm he has given his words were fucking give him and I was just going to say I think the thing that would be hard to go back to is a on every feature I worked on never once sat in on a casting session I never one set in in the Edit Bay none of them are comedies I mean the movies I guess what little I used to sell they don't even make those anymore I mean literally don't make they don't exist like the notion of the Oh movie that's funny just non existent and that's crazy I mean also counter the two movies that I've made are one was a political film about yeah that'd be great I mean we obviously we all all of us here grew up on movies everybody in this room grew up on movies we haven't haven't kicked to the curb the things that Aaron television it's a fact it is I have felt it myself well serious point just wherever this fits in your question of going back to features in working in TV is look we're at writers writers are not respected as much as what was the question Craig is this the vamping parted restart that this is all your cells holding onto your question so so welcome to the show and good luck watch greg go back to features you don't Misunderstand Malcolm there continue I'm just thinking of twitter and I'm protecting you as best I can like what I'm presenting dismissive is like yeah like I don't think it's a joke I think it's real like I think it's like yeah fuck I'm if if they're not gonNA look at you and respect you then don't do it and dream I think mostly what's available now for features is kind of what it is what they want you to do the inventory that they have and obviously a great night for those of you who want to be in feature or like nothing we think matters matters like let's just do the things we wanna do like I wanted to write the American President Twenty nineteen I wanted to write a movie about falling in love with missile ready and I wanted to ask the two of you what your experiences of that and if you think that the latter is being disrupted the normal progress yes the neural progress is being I have this weird feeling that these days that ladder is getting short-circuited that suddenly people are just showing up and make suddenly they're making the show and maybe comedies were data and not a lot of people other romantic comedy to be fair but people liked it and people had a conversation about what romantic comedy was in the the people want some people wanted to but what I'm saying is I think if we're going to make movies now it has to be about US investing enough in era and so I will say like what it taught me in that experience of working in features and working in television and is like nothing we think is expected is expected committing to do it has to be the way we're doing TV now which is you're committing ten years of your life to do moving now should be like I'm putting my soul into it well that's a great disrupted in on one hand it's a good thing because it's allow for people who look like me to kind of kick the door in beautiful that black the you know the first thing I did with the shave from Berg was a the goal was hey we're gonna sort of SPEC sow and make a fifteen million dollar eight people just coming in and kicking the door now right on the other side I won't say would show I have noticed that a lot of younger two hours into it like it can't just be about projects that were being assigned and it can't just be about things that were doing because they want us to do that like it has to be because will happen and that's why my thing is always you have to focus on the craft you have to work hard and you writing is absolutely not ready for and what's going to happen is what often happens is they get minimized very quickly and I ah allow many of us to come in because the traditional route that I went through that and he show through there is absolute value in it enters you impress and you go up we were talking about this dinner and you go up and up and up there's a ladder and you climb a ladder and you get to the top of the ladder and you make your own show you run your own show also it took me twice as long to climb that ladder and it wasn't always fun and there was sometimes harder than it needed to be so I can appreciate ears are just not equipped I mean they're just not equipped they're not ready they're not ready in there in rooms and they're getting opportunities there truth be told I would get some missions from agents for writers for staff and they were a producer level or supervising producer level to people in their fifty s in one thousand nine hundred ninety one and none nobody Fox and then the second one was romantic comedy in twenty nine thousand nine hundred when everybody said romantic worry we talk about this all the time when the industry starts to shrink because they will because there's so much television so much content where were those people go on and then when I looked at their actual credits they were on shows that had four episodes six episodes roads and so they were getting that bump after every year but the experience process is not a destination I still have insecurities as a writer I stay just calmly she'll couple of weeks ago I got a pitch coming up can I talk to you about it only by association we've all been ruined tonight it's very possible to sit in her but also like I want you I totally see color those types of things matter and I do feel like it has gotten a little loss professionalism is it seems like what you're talking about professionalism basically this odes so after four years on the good wife you've done a lot of TV yeah so that's that's a huge difference so if you come to me and you've gotten a bump up the ladder but you only abandoned it all comedies nobody's there and and the show two of you I want to talk to the think it's getting to the point now where we are initial personally trying to cultivate a farm league because and so they should just be thrown away no under no Joan would be very upset to try trying to be nice no no I I think that there's a real concern that that the door gets kicked open and things get short circuited some people are going to come broken down completely yet they just got no sense of regard for what you've done and so now I think the backlash a sense of entitlement TV exploded in a way I don't know if any industry has exploded the same way it is more than double than what it was seven years ago likely Yana Michelle said a lack of experience that really is you can't miss it you're dealing with people who are coming in men they're not ready they have an initial failure and they just leave where they don't they don't get through the shell what what's your perspective on this well the way that I saw that when I was staffing it's obviously going to be a little bit less what's the word like the fight isn't the same because fucking industry just blew up and so these people have twelve episodes total it didn't make any sense and it didn't make any sense in the room on the page because there were just a lot of basic things that weren't learned and work there like basic writing outline or story documentary something like that she's simple room etiquette and that's a big deal room at a a malcolm run the room how do you kind of bring the new kids along to kind of get them educated about what the remake it is and if they're struggling to lift him up I bar real quick when I first started roundtables which you and getting around guys like this at home and you're thinking you're super funny spend twenty nineteen and I thought nobody would want to see it and not a lot of people dead by nobody but people did I wasn't there and that didn't make any sense to me I felt like I know if you finish a season but seasons have shrunk on the good wife we did twenty two quite right which means if that many new jobs are occurring the venting system must be different and expectations for riders coming in not a good year and I blame myself partially the job was overwhelming I did not have the opportunity to mentor this person the way I hoped I would people I felt I felt like we weren't GonNa get a lot of wiggle room people had expectations and so there wasn't a lot of room but I did hire staff writer and two of you over a little bit to the television world in the way it's changing and I think the two of US great examples of people that come in kind of a traditional route you come in you're working who is a standup in her own world and in one of the stages sort of on the veep I guess for lack of a better word I gather all the success story and one which was my first season taking over shows sort of midway I mostly went with I guess veterans I've I wanted all I care about and at some point a couple a year into it someone said those are Amelia's getting a lot on jokes and stuff and it was just sort of like the people coming in now there's a culture clash that's going on with I'm not don't don't worry about going blow it all just said just say fuck fuck fantastic and when we came back we made her a staff writer and I think for her did help that she had been around the room I mean you know someone said rooms I don't think we're the only ones is people are starting to say Fuck Dat let me grew my own youngsters and bring in people who I think are solid 'cause he's other people off on her career and I couldn't be more happy so it does work both ways but it's hard you bump into people that have the exact producer credit and you just cannot walk into a room not having suffered the way pretty much all of us on the stage IV and the way they carry themselves is not appropriate and it hasn't been ah but I it seems to me that at some point there's more than just talent going on what Dave mandel down there because Dave when it comes to television you've had a remarkable run it's it's rare to just keep we're doing a scene I'm just got them and I get them anonymously and they're just handed to me by writer systems and I just go through and I'm mixing and matching and adding my own stuff and I don't know who's is what I'm just best joke winds coming in from the outside and get ill right they're not bill right and there's not the respect that's required on and I was just we had both ways on veep one even mentioned room etiquette whatever I think that she had learned the collages not just rooms in general but she had learned our room to some extent and she she's did and a couple of other senior writers tried to step in and I don't know it just never didn't work however we had a writer's PA alive Al Franken was kind of my mentor and then a man named Jim Downey which if you know sorry night live maybe people know the ledge and the Great Jim Down Yeah and you guys know him as the guy who says I learned I mean I I was there for three years and to this day I write a joke and I think to myself that's Jim joke that's an Al joke you know those pieces of it and then Winnie it's frustrating records show my movie credits are just shit I was going to go through those is going on there I guess for my perspective and I was really I was very lucky to work under some incredible people at is comedy rooms are atrocious comedy rooms are group's thought and group right and I do all the work but it's your turn to write it so you think is the secret to making what I think is the hardest genre comedy to make it work time and time again almost without Phil what I went with when I went on when I got the Seinfeld Larry Really taught me to write a show an outline and he had learned basically because he'd never worked most of anything you've ever liked on Saturday night live from strategically to Fred Garvin male prostitute was jim down and I got so you write it even though I did all the work and it's you know what seems funny at two am on where you're watching a show going why and and so that's what you just said maybe the stupidest thing and he was also the change bank guy but he literally might be the funniest human being on earth and sure we'll get to see you in a minute but first I want to talk a little bit more I believe that they used to have to do that was the height you know you've finally climbed to the top of the mountain and now they're just sort of talking about us talking pitch perfect and we are live in Austin want's GonNa be awesome writers conference a traditional Sitcom so he was not caught in a room by that an and just to be clear comedy rooms are very different than your guys room realize I'm gonNA keep it somewhat pig obviously you can look it up and it didn't work out all right now I'll leave it at that it didn't it did not work out it was just we'll tell them out and I was in the one of the scary movies Superhero Oh yeah yeah yeah and we'll more was killing me and he knew it walking is that he liked it he does throw it but no I do think it's become difficult because you're dealing with At any day could do that shit all day on his fastball. Yeah I think this is funny through I feel like well it has certainly worked now you too since you are so insistent Dan you guys uh-huh that stuff that structure those lessons that those of us that were there getting those lessons I think that's what we went out and did and that's that's what's carried us like the big US change the way that that the way that these stories affect us as a whole without question okay and you could always binge. Hbo Shows at like it's just Netflix doing that shit and no one else the people were about to possibly way it's something that obviously networks still do they show something once a week. HBO Still Doesn't they show something once a week but even for really I would get so excited and we get so excited to see how the season would end and that anticipation it feels like is kind of maybe going had I mean my heart legitimately would race at the beginning of a new season of game of thrones I don't know if I'm not jaded I mean you feel any difference in terms of or even any kind of sense of loss of that model or because it seems like it's going to just go away completely binge model or the the unenforced anticipation is something that is going to change the way you actually approach things creatively as you go forward sure of the medium like your yeah you do episode of television you want someone to watch the next episode of television but I don't think I'm speaking for me you don't and then you discuss it with the people you care about the next day and that that's what we've all felt that changing it's kind of replacing the water cooler speaking for me I don't think so I mean I think you're you're you want to tell a story you want to tell your episode you want to be the best episode can be your seats right and that experience extrapolated out to like what does it mean when everybody watches things at their own pace that change that's GonNa Change the group experience of and what you're talking about is is a is a group phenomenon it's a societal phenomenon it's something where something shows up and you watch it or we speaking for us not speaking for the companies that we work for because they may have different agendas but will it change the way that TV is experienced get their lunch doesn't about they'll release a couple in a row but they have all separately decided that week to week is more bang view tonight talking about it and he's like I'm on episodes this episode I'm on that episode every half the tables plugging ears when somebody else talks about the thing they have autour three so two or three and then they go week to week to kind of so they are obviously they see something inherently valuable in that kind of you know dribs and drabs used break some news because I haven't heard that I should send the stock moving down I don't watercooler was did you see blankety blank last night but how watercooler is have you seen have you watched this series yet din this HBO Show I'm referencing now not not it episode and you're telling the story that way in a very strictly amusing quotes as we know television format than yes that works and we want to be the best season it can be I don't think it would really you're trying to game the system to try to hook people into doing that anyway by the stuff like HBO Networks There's also the options weight and binging and the for net flicks there's no option it's just there do you think that the no no been show but like succession that water which is a water water cooler show and yet even that which is a water who showed his released week by week we're is why using whatever the three and six or full drop on who or whatever it is works like I think there is is a benefit to this fluctuating system we have as storytellers to say like mind hunter is a maybe the slowest burn ever like N N uh we're all fighting about this by the way off it is amazing the fights that go on it's gorgeous well I it was I was also doing myself one male in my mind I was and and yes as a three and then mo multiple drop and that's intentional and like that's a from the top down and so I think you have to look at it there's a crack dealer we know that that's brilliant I was just saying that's all Hulu Disney plus apple all using pretty much the exact same model with three if you are breaking something that you were using ten hours of television to be released that way then that doesn't necessarily work like that is why net flex exists plan it's going to be fifty dollars a month and it's only going to be on direct TV and it's GonNa be really something special HBO Seamy if you want to sign up and so I I for me for me personally in a positive way and like I don't think would ever be built to be as a weekly drop the end would ever be built marketing it gives people something to extend the conversation so apple will release three episodes and then week to week so there really is that boy that's actually that's a fascinating model you kind of so that sorta like the let's face it it's crack well I guess five years ago was released exactly one way week by week by week and there is so it's interesting to look at what this means and the only thing that Edano we've argued about that right I mean Malcolm things will come back well don't you think it's coming back is there another fuck them in our future is not going away so I had a shitty. Hbo Max Joke that was going to try no better time to workshop at the now they've got a different they don't like the idea that I want to be in the conversation I don't like the conversation to be ahead of the conversation or behind the conversation but we brought in Mandell and he just killed it just all the funny just something like that I say week to week I think that if you release it all at once there is a sort of implied devaluation of the material and so I really like this this kind of hybrid model where they're sort of acknowledging they say it's it's has to do with like what the point of what you're releasing inspect if you're releasing something that is episodic based in you are breaking natively from the beginning of like what is the story telling how do you want this to be told and how do you WanNa Talat and then say where we don't really there Malcolm I think that's a really good answer I think somewhere like in the middle I think these compromise solutions are really interesting because the only thing that I've ever thought about this releasing stuff just because television up until he just smiled that's a terrible smile seen it before it's horrible only terrible things come after Dave I think you were going to say some watching it both ways was incredible and the end of the day because breaking bad was fucking great and so the arguments interesting and it's professionally very interesting just like why don't we look at it as there is a plethora of options and let's make content we want I'm show wannabe one thing some other but Netflix is like but this is how we do it because this is how we do it if you had a choice how would you see what's your druthers you're all too impatient to wait but I will say something like Chernobyl like what was it six episodes five okay who wrote it should be nine yeah I think I think week to week I don't know I I have a touch of add so just a touch yeah yeah but to and between the first half of the final season the second was when I started watching it and then I just became an addict and was watching an episode on the way on the IPAD and the well before she was born I mean it is transferring things that have been skilled I don't understand why we're having the argument or like having the that it wasn't funny it wasn't funny Sitcom on Fox Quality I was going to say not a joke I do think the week to week model allows you to grow into a show shows that develop reefs refigure themselves out a little slower and there is something I guess I am a fan of the tradition it doesn't matter that much I came to breaking bad really late because we were in the middle of of making thrones and I didn't get to it till I think the final season was split there are shows where I think if they were just dumped out there and you were only given the binge option and there was either exceed and then on the way back from set and and just blew through it and a couple of weeks and then had to wait for the final half of the season where I'd watch them in real time with everybody and they were both I'm doing one of the game of thrones spinoffs works Malcolm you weren't empty it all out there or do you want to kind of go the week by week because I can see positives and other direction I like I just watched the show on Netflix car rhythm and flow it was great it was a rap us but I don't know if there is necessarily an answer or it's just if the show is good enough you know that it doesn't really matter I think matters more to the people who aren't US dates right can't go wrong with that look let's just agree to fuck it fuck it getting the short attention span just turn it off so that was a great not argument that we had lists I thought to make a real point Cook Games and they were going to turn it over to the audience for some questions this Games real easy on it's just run by me and I it it's called how you follow that up it should matter more to the people who are in this room and the people aren't dust in the people this is I'm not saying we spend no time thinking about it we spend not a lot of car show that nobody expected to be a massive hit massive hit you're on a marble show you're following follow it out are and I'm not talking about a situation where you're binging late and other people are saying to you not know stick with it get at least two episode four that there are certain I'm in how do you follow that up Dave Mandel VP is over and you know this is television I love cotton club it's gray script if I may say so you may but it's having some challenges in the marketplace right now tiny bit of time thinking about it but honestly the phone yeah I mean I'll tell you actually watch almost exactly the same you did and I take your point I think maybe he I suppose you could say the fact is released week by week helped it become what it was so it helped people also netflix helped up come on it was it it is impossible to do anything better than you've already done that for she's following up over to you on Cotton Club please speak directly to net flix executives make and let's find the place to make it and find the place mall will let us make it the way WanNa make it well the good news is more of those places than ever Mr thank you so are you GonNa follow it up Greg Fukushima in the way released it they did three episodes every week so they did okay come up with new players the already falling you have no problems whatsoever show I saw the show you're fine have you guys seen the trailer. ESPN game of thrones the biggest television show of all time no show could possibly be bigger or better is one last this is a real game so David so my friend David who's magician and puzzle genius and I put together a little puzzled unloading a check just to make a point I think when I truly the should I have been saying not what you need would you with dead gish is there any chance of a movie that would be perfect to serialize I five means it seems like I would say there's there's an argument let's just raise your hand I'm GonNa give you a movie quote that I've taken I've just changed all the words but the but the meaning is still down the post bohm minehunters bom followed up I'm an orchard these guys all right all right all right so let's get to these guys it's so easy referral we've been drinking so before we before we get to the we know that that's how that's how we all archie during the auditor has watched every episode of friends a show that was made writing emmy producing saw him double fisting beard the greatest limited series Burge's except whatever succession identity found himself give it a couple to get there I would worry about the Oh no attention is to suggest an undeniable proposition decent proposal know God yes it's not great but yeah it's on the way I feel like that's on the way if you had a choice Iona you've got a choice just Liz saying is impregnated relating show run sure noble rate is limited series according down television foray ever yes I made one this up if you know it don't say it until the fail is this like jeopardy do we ring in just a raise your hand we're very competitive so I I think you are it it's guys good simple search and replace John is so mad so much smarter than you guys I'll have what she's having Harry met Sally Alright not sell them right now the best answer now we only a real name is the timing see how you see how professional aches my choice is now identical to hers nothing nothing nothing to the audience I am completely superior to the famous enlarged primate of mythology King Kong got an annulment yes thank you an offer you can't refuse godfather don't get too thrilled about it super easy launch greets might diminutive companion philo to my friends carpet the dirty dancing no no one puts me being the corner dirty dancing competition for people and this is one of the puzzles that we played but this movie it's going to be fine there's this movie quotes you guys should be able to nail this this game sexist game sucks I'm winning okay last we got one and then we go to audience fair in with remove protective coating I got your number last year the kind of person mythology to that's not the same words let's let's just talk about what it means to play a game L. Woman whose name is the Feminine version of Felix Expire Audience Brand name this game yet it's your awesomeness aiming at protectively the yes wait wait wait wait wait wait wait are you changing words are you shitting so this Cuna and you can ask anyone of these brilliant people any question you want do you game of thrones are you did you SASS that question curious too much worse than that to know that these were the rule is that I was rearranged got shit on me and so and said I know it it's King Kong I am following it up with something else but I can't talk enough though because the second Liz motive that it's actually King Kong ain't got shit on me right so what did you just say I am completely superior to the famous enlarge primate way your church did something different from other churches applies at story so I guess what I'm saying is everyone has that reservoir and I think better than pretty much anybody that I've ever exposes a television watcher made me enjoy and dress over to answer begin yes Ma'am Hi my name is Kiana and I TV writers and Oracle Infants shall not be positioned at the junction of two walls by any person puts baby in a corner it's my favorite one now the last ones changing the words audience unions that movie Oh my God and if you are a storyteller there's still one more learned skill set which is a here's what the answer is you pay attention to how the more senior people are I just waited there dave just weighing in with the real opinions just using the tower like Barry Pepper winning shooting in the head okay yes do this Dan that each person usually has led them very few people have not live worthwhile life the gap when you walk into a writer's room you have to that into each other you're all professional writers so feel free to a first half I think I got it takes practice to start to understand get into the habit of paying attention away the story is going and naturally knowing that maybe a story about the way your mom cooked meal or the media landscape changing how do you translate experience and other arenas it's experience for room and can risk like how do you take that ride as you experience you're talking about and like in areas that aren't in their personal lives and then you very quickly start to understand Oh shit well I remember my brother needs to go fishing at this thing and and you'll start to see how that ritual pulling your own life and applying it to other people's stories come you come from what I was just thinking when we used to hire people on Seinfeld the literally the hiring that shit on me this will be the worst ever I didn't know the rules okay now I feel prepared here we go number three actual ridership like how do you translate do that and like the real world outside writers rooms so you're learning lessons in the writer's room you're learning lessons in life how did these kind of the ion is falling asleep getting this you're GonNa go this way this is an easy one AAC a fight with fight with Uber driver whatever it is and you go

David Mandel Dan Weiss Austin Film Festival Craig Hbo HBO John US Netflix Apple ESPN Malcolm Spelman Michelle tromble eighty seven minutes ten years fifteen million dollar seventy five hours fifty dollars five percent seven years
D. B. Weiss, Co-Creator of Game of Thrones  TSC031

The Supporting Cast

52:18 min | Last month

D. B. Weiss, Co-Creator of Game of Thrones TSC031

"Welcome to the supporting cast. This is ally goldsmith. Today's guest is deby. Weiss co creator of the hbo series. Game of thrones in this episode db or dan as he is known familiarly speaks. About how game of thrones came to be. I reading a song of ice and fire with co creator david benny off and believing. They understood how to adapt this complex narrative to the screen second convincing author george r r martin and hbo that he and david who would never run a television series. Before could help this. Goliath of production then came shooting pilot. Which had to be almost entirely reshot to flaws in the narrative but despite all it game of thrones became a worldwide cultural phenomenon with more than thirty two million viewers per episode across all platforms and regularly crashing. Hbo servers on sunday nights. Dan also talks about growing up outside chicago attending wesleyan university and other writing programs and the profound impact. The teachers had encouraging his writing from a young age. Dan speaks about wanting to convey the same approach show. Running game of thrones keeping clear channels of communication across multiple countries and production teams recognizing and nurturing telent and knowing when to suppress ego for the good of the enterprise value that he and david benny off share. D b weiss on medieval realism human intrigued and the iron throne. This is the supporting cast. d b weiss. Welcome to the supporting cast. Thank you. it's a real pleasure to be here. Thank you and just to clarify you. Go by dan informally is that right yes. Dan is great. There was already a dan voice in the writers guild of america. When i joined so attitude something else got it the first question. I'm asking now that we are are thirteen months or so past the beginning of the covid nineteen pandemic and everyone's lives have changed one entertainment and all of us personally and those of us kids in school. I i question just about you and how you're doing personally. How are you andrea. And your kids doing weeping. You know. it's kind of hard to complain. We've done of us We were lucky enough to not get ill and and to to get our vaccines and you know. Leo's back on his way to her westlake which she could not have been more excited about. I mean yeah. It's face when he came back from school that first day it was like he had just spent all day at disneyland. He would sounds over the moon about the whole thing jumping over finally to see his friends in person than than you know have some facsimile of normality return to his life meant the world to him destroy thing for him because he was so excited to go to harvard westlake but the whole thing happened in the choice was made at the beginning of the pandemic anyway right and so i guess there was kinda that Missouri that we all sort of share that somehow this was gonna end of its core magically after a few weeks or two or three months and so the the anticipation of being able to get into the actual school and get to the actual campus was. It'd been so long in coming to finally be able to get out of the car and step onto the each campus just almost took on a surreal quality to him because he'd been winning on for so long. That's so great to hear. However you guys holding up. We've been fine. I have a two and a half year old daughter. We have another on the way. And it's a pretty decent time to have a two and a half year old actually. Lean school yet and congratulations on the on the new the forthcoming rival. Your daughter probably thinks that this is the best thing that ever happened. She gets more of mommy and daddy. You know home all the sudden. You're she's the only person on earth for like a whole year exactly until her little sister comes in a couple of months and that's going to be interesting awakening. She had her moment in this. She did she did so now. I'm curious about kind of how the last year or so has gone for you professionally. You guys signed a big deal. Netflix's obviously also been an. I was up in portland. I have family in portland also in portland recently shooting something. We were there at the time. And so if you wanna talk about that project or something else. I've ever since thrones ended. We moved over to netflix and having a great time in it's just a fantastic environment but of course the pandemic in general really upended everybody's ability to carry on as normal and do things that we do it through a whole bunch of obstacles in the way that and there was that the first couple of headless chicken weeks that everybody's spent like not knowing what to do with themselves and buying toilet paper. Yeah like would not knowing whether to stockpile supplies in that once things settled down we got moving and we actually largely. Thanks to my friend producer. Greg shapiro. we pushed a movie into production in what happens to be not by design but what ended up being kind of the height of the surge of the pandemic. We were shooting in november in portland which was spared relatively speaking yano the worst of it but it was win l. a. was going through the worst of the worst but with somehow we managed to get shot and it's called medal lords and it should be coming out. I would guess sometimes towards the end of the year and it's called metal lords metal lords music music movie. Not necessarily when you hear b weiss. Say something about metal lords you think west russ not not like plate mail and and armor and more like the music and to heavy metal kids who are in high school where exactly two kids care about heavy metal. Wow they're the only ones. So they're like alaskan the mohican story about heavy metal kids. It was a lot of fun to make an felt as difficult as it was to produce something. Under those circumstances it was We also really fortunate to be doing it because that time. That really was very little introduction so the other thing that you guys are celebrating. I suppose right now. Is that april of two thousand. Twenty one marks the ten year anniversary of the pilot of game of thrones Coming onto hbo. But as far as what i have read is that really. It was five years earlier. That this idea kind of began with you and david two thousand six and so. I'm curious i as you guys discussed adapting a song of ice and fire to the screen. I know that you obviously had to pitch this. Hbo at some point. But the first pitch. From what i understand was to. George r r martin. Yes the author and so could you tell me a little bit about. I'm curious about that. Conversation sitting down with him and trying to convince him. That you guys could do this series and how you could do this just frightening because we we kinda gotten into the having already been doing it for a while and then working in hollywood for a while kind of gotten into the rhythm of putting yourself forward for things and having people either say yes or say no when you first start out the first time somebody says no. It's devastating and you think the walls are gonna fallen around you. Then by the thirtieth time someone said no no just becomes a part of your workday and so you just yet learn to kind of take it in stride move on but this was different because it was having read the books we kind of felt in our bones that there really wasn't anything else like this in both read a lot in with both read a lot with an eye towards what might potentially be a good at a patient for film television or whatever and we just never read anything. That seemed is ready made for something. Fresh and exciting. In excellent as is georgia's books and so can stop you there. It's such a complex plot line. There's all these simultaneous plotlines all at once and even though the drama and intrigue was there wasn't there also as great as it was the first time you read it an inherent challenge in bringing something like that to the screen. Yeah definitely and we knew for that reason. it's funny. They had been sent out books had been sent out. This two thousand six remember so. Hbo it already turned tv into a different place than it had been before with the sopranos. The wire deadwood and shows like this but but it still it was ali would was still very feature movie centric and so the books had been sent to us with that in mind with features in mind and it took about one hundred pages into the i nine hundred page book to realize that there was no feature version of this. It was going down viable. There wasn't executive one studio who called in said that we really needed to talk to him because he'd cracked it. You know would meaning the movie version but we knew we we knew in our bones that there was no movie version of it to crack and we knew that at the time you know this is there was not really the netflix's production entity wasn't amazon. That the brian venues for something like this. The production entities that had the resources to make something of this scale. There was only one. We knew it was an hbo show so young away. There were two kind of very fraught situations where we had a meeting with. George and george said no that it was dead right so that meeting. We went to the palm for lunch. We were there for three and a half hours with george. Sun was going down in the waiters. Were cleaning up the tables for dinner. We were still sitting there. I don't know drinking more. And more t in tommy about it and the certain point he. He kind of gave us the the test question. Who who who did. We think john's knows mother was which luckily we'd been after our second. Read the books before meeting. George we'd been discussing amongst ourselves and we got a pretty good handle on what the right answer was with you and by the way. Don't give it away while with that question in mind the second time through. It's actually if you're thinking about it. It pops out a little more first time through a it about nearly as much anyway we got it right and I'd like to believe that. Maybe he would have our passionate for. The project would have led him to say to us even if we got it wrong but i'm not sure that he would have said yesterday. S got it wrong. You never know. Yeah but yeah i just. It was difficult because couldn't make any grand claims about our competence as tv producers because we never produced any television before. Yeah so it was really kind of a giant leap of faith on george's park to save these guys who clearly know the books inside now and clearly understand. What's great about the books did that. I wrote these guys who never done this before. Are still somehow going to do it without capsizing the boat and then we bill was very similar situation where we knew we a couple of one or two other people we pitch to at the time but we knew that none of them had even if they said yes. They didn't have the resources necessary to make something like this. I mean we didn't ryan we weren't lying producers but we knew enough about the features we knew how much things cost and we'd seen enough feature budgets to have a basic understanding of what it would cost to make something like this even on accelerated with the time tv schedule an interest. It wasn't viable anywhere. Besides hbo so yeah. Last season wasn't it costing six seven eight nine ten million dollars an episode by the last season when a lot more a while it was the first the first season was it was expensive. But within the ballpark of it wasn't unheard of but as it went on it got to differ place but but so is your viewership. Yeah it was it was. I mean we did know then some level that it's kind of an all or nothing proposition where there needed to be lots of people watching it to make it viable and if there were then we get to keep going into their works than you know it would have been a valiant effort but when we went into pitch carolyn strauss in march two thousand six. Who is the president of hbo at the time. We didn't get into any of that stuff we try to focus on. What was it hand. And and it was scary to go in and pitch carolyn strauss because we were told would a difficult pitch. She was how would what she would be icy steely and not smile at you and we really felt like we'd won a major victory when one of us made her laugh with something that we said over. The course of the pitch and funny thing was that she said yes to a pilot pilot script then over the course of the production relatively early on there was a changing of the guard at hbo and caroline stepped away the network side and became producer on the show and when she walked into. The meeting is a producer of the first time. We were like how did this happen. We didn't no one informed us of this but It would very short order. She became one of our best friends on. Earth is one of the funniest warmest best people we've ever had anything to do with became like a sibling to the two and it was just looking back at how we saw her when we thought she was when we walked into that room pitcher the first time we kind of hilarious house to look better when routed dinner with her now to look back at that perception to see how completely diametrically opposed it is to she really is as a person but anyway she could could have cared less really about fantasy. She wasn't genre person but for whatever reason she said fine while. Roll the dice and border pilot from you guys and then over the next three years it just. They were kind of a bunch of hurdles to clear in we in clearing them all off. And i think by the skin of our teeth and two thousand nine we actually started shooting pilot thing which was itself kind of shopping with even gotten to that place. You mentioned that. She wasn't genre person and i know for me and for others. I'm not necessarily a fantasy person. I didn't grow up reading fantasy books. And and so for a lot of people when they first saw game of thrones maybe not for me but then once they start watching they got hooked and from the beginning. You had the sense that you wanted it to be. Medieval realism is the phrase. It's been used to describe it almost like historical fiction or the dramas coming from the human intrigue rather than sort of the magic and sorcery. Which really cool interesting elements but not really what brings you back. What brings you back. What's going on with the stocks in the lancasters and the people. Yeah i think that some of the other stuff. It always held my attention. Especially when i was younger. And it's it's fun for a while and it for two hours done. Well it can definitely like grab you like whether it's neat wizz bang effects and magic and all that kind of spectacle for a better word whether it's that or whether it's really cool ideas and concepts fantasy science fiction ideas concepts i think those can pull people in and hold them for a while. But if you're if you wanna pull people in hold them not for two hours or three hours but for twenty thirty forty sixty hours has no spectacle that is going to be interesting enough to hold people's attention for sixty hours. The only thing that people are interested in for sixty hours is other people right met was. When we read georgia's books. What really jumped out at us. Once we started to get the lay of the of the name landscape with stark's truck areas. Figure out that you took. I mean that was. It was the kind of thing that i was. Maybe thinking about wondering whether or not this was booked for me. When brand got pushed out the window ryan ends. The pilot of the yasser not huge spoiler event. The pilot and i just i you know. Add the situation surrounding his out the window. What he's what are you seeing from the window like. Oh okay. so there's that's happening that and it just it was just kind of like getting shot out of a cannon and every subsequent chapter you kept getting shot out of different cannon and every subsequent chapter. I realized i was reading this book. And i was like i need to know what happens to this person. Now know what happens in general need to know what happens in this battle or you know with this spell that somebody's casting. I need to know what happens to these people in the fact that it was the to these people that i think made it really clear to us that this could be an hbo show because that's really what they did. They took all their big shows. Were genre shows like the sopranos genre show. John was more tired worn out and gangster stuff. But i have the supreme. I remember. i could pretend that. I knew it was gonna be brilliant from the beginning. When i first saw an ad for the sopranos. I remember kinda rolling my eyes thinking like oh man another. We've seen this before just yet another east coast gangster drama and they took something that seemed familiar in played out. And let you know chase let you know that. It wasn't familiar with played out all that there was a whole human way into this kind of a story that would you for a long long time and we realized that deal with the western was to a lot of people not to me. Because i love western's but i mean to. You didn't see many westerns. Because it was kind of dead in the water to a people in deadwood came along and dave. You're very different. Version of that. China the wire did it with with you know cop dramas and the wire also had a lot of intricacies to its plotlines. Yeah it took a cop. Drama is like a cop dramas not just about the cops. It's about everybody who makes up that cuban matrix that they're all so into together and the school system and the grass hop drama necessarily involves the school system necessarily involves the press necessarily involvement a longshoreman. Who are you know generally but importantly apart of whatever criminal enterprises you're going on that the cop cop drama to begin with all that stuff really let us go in there with a fair amount of confidence in saying that this kind of story is in. Hbo show is worthy of that kind of treatment even though on the surface it seemed like maybe it was something that was meant for thirteen year. Olds right which is the show is is is not really so then. You make the pilot and from what i read and understand. The first pilot didn't go so well that you showed it and you got some not so great feedback and you had to almost reshoot the entire things that right. Yeah well the problem with not ever having done something complicated. Before is that. You don't actually know all of the thousand things you need to know about how to successfully do something complicated. So we we we. We made a lot of mistakes and was information that you needed to know spoil anything but there is information that you needed to know that people really smart people that we showed it to. Who do this for a living. Watched the pilot and they didn't understand like oh they're brother and sister like they. They didn't pick that up from the show rank as we knew it so well. There's that discrepancy between what you know what somebody who's coming to something cold nose and we missed it by a whole bunch of other just visually. A bunch of things that needed work in just worked was the the tr- visual treatment of it. We got behind me really wasn't sufficient to the scope of the material and so we we showed it to them and they were on the fence for a while. I think it was very much a fifty fifty proposition. you know. Luckily richard clifford mike lombardo. Luckily for us they decided there was enough proof of concept in there. You know the worth giving it another shot and so we went back and we did at reshooting. Most of the original pilot folded into the shooting. The first season we didn't just reshoot the pilot we shot the whole season. The pilot reshoots were worked into that into that whole schedule to prevent patent with the the great tim. Van patten did the first. Two episodes of the season and working with tim on that specifically was was a real but mazing masterclass in in just in how it's done and he's the director of those two who's director of the of the pilot in the second episode and just watching the way. He approached story watching the way he approach crew was really really educational for us and of it was kind of an object lesson in how to do it for us going forward. We learned a lot in him as we as we did from so many people. We were lucky. Enough to work with over the years and then the series launches from there and obviously breaks records for a streaming and for viewers and and hydrogen by time piracy. Unfortunately i though is how we how we really rated how we were one thing. I'm curious about. You mentioned that you were learning how to do things early on. You hadn't done it before you're relying on really talented directors and and got some leeway from the folks at hbo but by the time the series gets going you guys are shooting in croatia and iceland and malta and morocco and ireland. And all these places. I assume sometimes simultaneously when you you and david are in charge of an operation. That's that broad and going on in that many different locations. What's the leadership challenge for youtube. And how did you handle different cultures being built in those different areas. Different artists taking a different view on storylines in each of those areas. The communication you mentioned zooms new for you. But i imagine you were to watch dailies not in croatia and it's funny th. That's a really good point so much of it. We were lucky the technological aspect of it all like around two thousand ten when we were really shooting the first season. I don't think the show would have really been doable. In a way that we did it much earlier than that just because it infrastructure you needed to communicate and communicate with not just people sending emails or faxes or whatever but to send a large amounts of information over the ocean in multiple directions every day like that. That really was just kind of coming into place just in time for us to be able to take advantage of it and it was essential us being able to do what we did. But i think i'm more basic human level one of the things that came out of the learning experience of doing the pilot the pilot again. It was just an approach towards communicating with all the members of your team. Who are doing this together. I mean people don't make a television show. Ten people don't make the tobin show of hundreds of people making television show. You need to be communicating on a regular basis effective league in an kind of friction lists sort of way with a lot of them five hundred at once but with solids fifty to a hundred people. You need to be communicating with openly and well and the importance of just keeping those channels of communication open and the importance of people. Being able to come to you and say hey i. I know that that would seems like we've decided we should do things this way. But this is my job is what i do. Feels like we're going in the wrong direction on this set for feels like the way we're shoot down. This is a a dp in. I think the way that we're shooting. This doesn't feel right to you. Know whatever happens to be. It's a thousand small decisions that feed into the greater whole and the ability to kind of to be open to all that communication input from so many people who are lucky enough to as we were to have people who are just some of the best people in the world what they do just to let them contribute what they know to the process to open the process to those contributions. You end up with something. That's a whole lot better than anything you're ever going to come up with. You play moses on the mountaintop and come down in the handout commandments to people. Because you're going to see to get some things right that way you're gonna get more things wrong. Yeah you know whether it's to me. Van patent or a bernie caufield who is our producer partner on the show was from the second season on still our partner today and in you know someone who is just the best in the world at what she does. The only person you could think of who could have actually made something like this float. I was long list. Did and david nutter was one of the all time gods of television directing and just seeing how he approaches his work in his sets. And we know we were just. You're so lucky to have so many different brilliant crafts people artists than not even talking about the cast woohoo. We learned so much from as well and it has amazing time with a lot of it was just definite good fortune element to it like. We ended up with almost exclusively a great people people who really got along and people who work together well over long periods of time under you know it could have been retiring in stressful circumstances sometimes but it was always constructive not just constructive. It was always just so much fun with nobody. Really thought about how how it insanely like exhausted. They were like when the last time they got more than four hours. Sleep was was kind of a many ways charmed circumstance but you and david sort of leaders of it clearly. What you're saying that your ears were open. You are open to input your open to championing other people's creativity and talents but was did you. Did you consciously think about to keep people. Motivated inspired. Listen to thanked. Yeah wasn't certain human reality to it. Which is we knew on a basic human level. That were continuity. We had that are we. Were you realize very early on that every time somebody new comes into the process and they need to be gotten up to speed on where you're at every year you go on. That task becomes more and more difficult because as where you're at encompasses imb larger larger patrick territory. So ryan claiming the lay of the land to people in you know in season six. We did it. It actually ended up working out really really well with a lot of that but like it's it's a lot harder than season one so you realize that like keeping your production designer costume designer or any of the of the people who are at the heart of the production keeping them consistent skeeving same people involved was gonna make the show better than springing directly from that the same people are not gonna wanna do something this labor intensive year in and year out unless they enjoy it so yeah almost kind of it thinks had gotten to the point where it wasn't fun anymore it not being fun. That would be the only problem. The fact that people aren't having fun would also mean the people are just going to be moving on and making different career choices. Different like life decisions other than like instead of being with my family. I wanna be in morocco. Croatia spain and iceland this year. You know like working carrying seventeen different kinds of like weather gear with me in staying in a different room every three nights like they know they wouldn't have if people didn't enjoy it they wouldn't have that decision we needed for it. To work is well as it could have possibly worth. We needed those people to be making those decisions so it kind of in a way. It steered all of us david. Nice specifically towards trying to in bernie. A bro deserves more credit for than anybody to be honest because she was instrumental and actually making the decisions that made it possible and still human and humane genucel. If you were to beat people into the ground those people are not the nobody wants to get beaten into the ground and nobody wants to come back to a situation where that's happening so they wouldn't have and i think it was. It was just we kind of got from the pretty early stages that that was crucial mound. Those crucial for us to you know we didn't. I think a part of the reason that it worked the way it did was because we all really could not think of anywhere else we would have rather been and that's that's a pretty professionally pretty rare circumstance even with stuff that ends up working out relatively well there are times over the course of those processes where you would rather be somewhere else where you're at at that moment making something that i sometimes woke up tired sometimes woke up disoriented and not sure where specifically like in the world i was but i never woke up wondering why are we doing this because i think of anything else. I'd rather be doing well. I want to get to your partnership with david and how you guys met and so forth. But i want to go back a little bit further. You grew up in chicago. Is that right. Yeah highland park illinois for most of my childhood which is a suburb north of chicago. And did you go to public school or private school. There wasn't a public school went to holland parkway school which was Believe appeared now and again in john hughes movies back in the day. So did you have a ferris bueller like high school experience now. The john hughes movies were always sort of aspiration right and that way it was always like. Yeah baby there's somebody that i know of who's living this way but ensures me but It was it was a great place to grow up and it was a it was a really good public high school with some excellent teachers who might english teacher winnie anchorman. Who purse sixteen years old in her class of classes i took took oliver classes and just encouraged me to keep doing what i was doing which was already by then reading a lot riding a lot. You know it means a lot to you when you're fifteen sixteen years old to have somebody who's not your parents. Yeah what do you have any direct interests in your your wellbeing as i can tell you that you should maybe keep trying and keep working on what you're working on because it's it's headed in the right direction. You know it means a lot and so you were creative writing at that point. These were stories or were they essays about things reading or both would always kind of try to finagle a way to like turn something into a creative writing. Exercise wasn't supposed to be because it was always more enjoyable to me the other kind of writing. Maybe because you could you could make up more than you didn't have to be quite as right to fool people into thinking that you are right. The course of the story you know do the ineffective wire there. I went to wesleyan university. Where i was fortunate enough to early on. Come into contact with kit reed. Who was my reading instructor from the belief that time i was a freshman right through to my senior thesis project in jerusalem singular influence and and just an absolutely such an amazing teacher of writing in that she really wasn't prescriptive wasn't a kind of writing to her. That was the way should never like like a pinnacle in mind. Which she's like. This is what you should be scrubbing towards whatever that would be a lot of people who teach writing. They have their favorite writers and they they feel like you should aspire to something of this. Nature always started with everybody. I was in a bunch of so many classes with her and these classes were small or five or six people's he really got a chance to know the people you're in class with you got a chance to know who they were. There's people that and who they were creatively a lot and she always really the first thing she did was trying to figure out what you wanted to do what you were aiming for. Whatever that was it didn't matter if it was science fiction people there were kind of kitchen sink. Realism people. There weird quirky fantasy people. One of whom was the first class. I took with removing the second. Was dan handler. Who went on to become limited. Snick it and it was. It was so far ahead of everybody else. In the class in terms of the level was working at it was always a really the nicest guy but always very intimidating to read his work because we were all kind of on somewhere between the second and fourth floors and he was already like setting up his office in the penthouse. Live the equality of what he was doing. She kind of keyed into his sensibility or mice instability or person's ability. Whoever was in the class and she tried to help you do the best job you could do at the kind of thing you are trying to do in that that that was a pretty unique quality and what was responsibility back then as a writer what. What was your sort of niche. I mean i was. I was kind of all over the place and it was part of it. Took it took me a while to. I had grown up reading. John rhys stuff. But then i in high school. I started moving into more literary stuff. And i like james. Joyce and herman melville kafka lot but those are still some of my favorite writers. The world that that influenced doesn't always produce the best the best undergraduate work out of the gate thereby influences might not immediately lead to The most readable material coming from someone who's nineteen years old case they didn't luckily it was a little bit. Kurt vonnegut in there so there were some people who wrote wrote in more straightforward way. That helped kind of things. At least somewhat tethered to like earth on stylistic front but i was kind of searching around for what made sense for me and it was trying a bunch of different things and she was maybe wrote a story about a divorcing couple. One week she tried to help you do the best job with that story. If you wrote a story about outer space the next week she would shift yours with you and try to help. You was widely read enough and just kind of versatile enough to tell everybody do that. Good a job as they could with what they were attempting and she She actually she passed away about a year ago. I know that so many people over the years you've had her lucky enough to to work with her and get to know her and spend time with her in her house. Were partner husband. Joe were really felt the loss very deeply because she was just choose of very unique person and a wonderful writer who i would suggest i would suggest ahead of time. The lots of ways would suggest people seek out her short stories Especially which are which are really excellent. And she was aware of game of thrones and your success. Yeah yeah yeah we stayed. We stayed in touch the whole time and it was. There are people who helped you stick with what you were doing. It feels good if you feel like. They know that you're out there doing this thing that they your stayed on the past. They help guide you down and so it was really gratifying to know that she was aware of it and she knew that she was go. Whatever it was worth was really instrumental in putting me in a place where i was able to even think about doing something like the stuff we were doing and proud of you. Yeah yeah i. I think i think she will. You know it's funny. Because i had gotten a chance even well before thrown talk to her about 'cause lemonade snick it of it all. Proceeds game of thrones I could tell how proud she was. Damn because that is just such amazing singular voice that he developed thinks she was probably. I can't speak for him. But i think she was probably really helpful in helping him. Feel the confidence. You just keep doing what he was doing because what he was doing was unique. Didn't didn't sound like other people's stuff to read like other people's stuff that ended up being his biggest strength. But you know takes some courage to kinda keep going down that road. That isn't the everybody else was on. So you graduate from wesleyan and you wanna pursue writing and screenwriting. Is that right yeah. I always kind of done both fiction writing and screenwriting and over the years. It's just started to realize that. I liked doing them. Both and the truth is i did them both in eventually. A warner brothers acquired descriptive mine. I realized that there was a career. You know there was an opportunity to because i by that point we were looking towards my then fiance looking towards getting married and the realities of life existing and of paying your mortgage your bills start dawn on you and realized that like one of these more viable least for me in the long run than the other ones. I leaned towards that. But i'd always done both in had been for a long time and bounce back and forth not really sure which one made the most sense for me to focus on but then you pursued a master's in ireland. Is that right. Yeah ireland's where. I met david. We were driving the college in dublin. At the master's irish literature. Anglo irish literature program was opposed to irish literature in gaelic. Which i unfortunately don't read but yeah and we met there both of us kind of went with the intention of going down a very academic track like one point nineteen ninety-five with That we're going to be college professors and at some point i think over the course of that year. It was one of the best years we've ever had was one of the most fun. And also just most intellectually rigorous and intensive years. We never had. I think we both simultaneously and independently of each other just started. We steered in the more creative direction. Which we'd both been pretty heavily invested in to begin with and so after ireland. I ended up in iowa. Mfa program for writing there and david shortly after that ended up in irvine but writers program. And then after i was done with iowa dawned on me that i wanted to do this. If i wanted to work in film or television that it was realistically a difficult thing to do. Unless you're out here. Until i came back and he was already here irvine and so we'd we'd stayed in touch intervening two years anyway and so we just kind of we found ourselves living a mile away from each other. That's so we just kinda picked up from there. And as a partnership it was forged then and then through this the wild ride of game of thrones. Can you talk about what you bring the partnership on what he brings. Are there things that he does better than you do. And you kind of go. Gosh i really rely on to to take care of this aspect of the project or things that you bring that that he appreciates you for. I mean we didn't. We never really took a kind of a departmental approach. It wasn't like i'm going to write the outline and then you jokes wasn't really that kind of relationship. It was always kind of both of us trying to be versed enough in everything. We were doing that if one of us were not around the other one could take care of whatever needed to be taken care of an answer. The questions needed to and that's almost more unique partnership is that you are of to have the same brain in a way. Yeah i mean. I think it helps because obviously we have different. You're not the same person so younger. You're not one hundred percent alignment. But if you're you're ten degrees apart and that's good like your eyes are ten degrees apart that gives you stereo ration that let you know that that actually you complement each other. And if i i miss something or i think something's great ne- thinks it's it doesn't make any sense it makes me. He's close enough feelings about what works. And what doesn't or close enough. That if i i'm thinking something's amazing. And he's not responding to it. That's possibly at a bad night sleep in his heavier crappy morning or it's possible that like i need to reexamine what i what i think is great you know and right and vice versa. Really going into it. There was no way no way to know how entering into a situation like when we entered into how. That's gonna work with somebody else until until you do it. I mean we were very good friends girls. We never would have considered doing this to begin with but there are plenty of people who enter into things like this as good friends and leave it as good friends who will never work together again or leave it as People who will never work together again. Who are no longer friends. I mean they're the sad reality. Is that sometimes the situation like glenn that we were in can really pull people apart if it doesn't work but it sure luckily very in our situation had the opposite effect and we ended up kind of co raising all of our children together and sort of like a strange like traveling commune when we were heading over there and it could worked out better but we. We were fortunate that we didn't we didn't know that it was going to be that way. And i don't think there's really a way to to plan for it to be that way. You can do your best and you can realize that it's a. It's a long game that stomping your feet over whether that shot cranes from left to right or right to left might not know maybe in the long run. It's not as important to die on any one of these smaller hills. When you've got a began to climb you know. And i think that's probably we both kind of happened upon that way of dealing with situations where you realize that. If he's really really adamant about something. And i find myself arguing against it just because that was what my first thought might have been that. Maybe the strength of his convictions. Trump's what could have usually been you know just sort of a a whim on whatever into my head. I right and vice versa. I'm i absolutely hate. Some line of dialogue arrived insistent. Some line of dialogue is great. And maybe he just says okay. You care more about this. Usually the person we can get into the you know relatively unusual case where we really disagree about something. It's it's almost always one of us. Who feels a lot more strongly about the other one. Yeah you as time goes on you you come to realize that there are thousands and thousands of decisions that need to be made you kind of need to take along along view on how you make those decisions together and once you once you kind of nailed down that basic way of approaching things it makes for something that's productive and sustainable over a long period of time and remove. Your ego is as possible. That's part of it is just. It's really just realizing if i'm arguing about something my argument because i really truly thought through all the possibilities in potentials here and i know for certain that this is the best way to go or am i arguing for it because i asked two shoes b. or c. I chose so now from tied up in this choice. Be and i need to lay down my life for choice. B which i might have chosen differently if i you know had eggs for breakfast instead of instead of oatmeal you know so it really does and if you if you really search yourself. I think it's pretty frequent that you find that some of the things that you think you believe strongly didn't really originate in in any kind of a real strong conviction or a studied approach to a question. Just what popped up once you realize. That was very easy to let go of it. 'cause it's like you could just popped up and let go of and something else will pop up in another five minutes. We'll deal with that. One word comes in shop. There are a few standard questions as part of the supporting cast. They relate to los angeles and we are known for our movies. Our food and our climate so the first question is what is deby. Weiss's favorite movie really difficult. Want the answer to that is always always ends up being kind of like. What's the of a handful. Ten or twenty of them like with the last one. I saw so i if i had to be honest. Jaws is kinda what jaws. When i saw when i was seven years old. My father took me to the movie theater. Surprise me. we saw jaws. When i was seven and a distant something to my brain that i remember the experience like it was not my earliest memories with one of my earliest real vivid memories. Like that still there like it was yesterday. Glad it was. Jaws is also happens to just one of the best movies ever made and not some crappy movie. That just happened to a lot to me. When i was seven i got. I got lucky that he did. He chose that one was jaws instructive and then one of the lessons of that movie is sometimes. Something is scarier when it's not shown. Don't show the shark right away. That's right so many movies were all just watching. And i'm like why are you showing the shark. We're five minutes into the movie. I don't want to see the sharp five minutes. Did you utilize that whether it's white walkers or or different things. Did you try to utilize that a bit on game three. Yeah oh definitely yeah especially you know. There are two questions. There's just like don't show the shark because we can't afford to show the shot that was that was the case in jaws to write reading reading back over the details of jaws showing the shark because the sharp is broken tax. Which in hindsight led the a happy accident that the shark broke is one of the things that made. The movie is brilliant as it was then. But then you get to a place where you have the the resources and the the wherewithal to show the shahrokh as much as you want the meta in some ways. It's harder that you need to exercise restraint in showing the shark or restraint in the way you show the shark. So i'm not just staring at shark for forty minutes because it's not scary or it's not moving or not impactful whatever effect you're trying to create with a piece of spectacle if it happens for twenty thirty minutes a row It's probably not that impactful one. Yeah jurassic park when there's the couple of water and you hear the pound of the yeah right. The dinosaur see the water shake that scarier than actually in the dynasty rapidly became a master of that adult so much else. It's just about how you give the experience to people in a way that makes it hit the hardest. Secondly what is your favorite meal in los angeles their restaurant that you and your wife enjoy or something you make at home that you love feeling of i tell people how much i like sushi park on sunset. I'll never get into sushi park outside again because we'll be. There's not that much out the door. We don't have a huge following here this past. I wouldn't so. I'd say that in terms of the place we go back to most often. We'd be peter parks. Peter joint parts restaurant on sunset. Sushi park wishes unassuming and the very best sushi. I think in the in city and Round think of where else we we we. We live nearby motzer. So and so is it's been one of those places that's just stuck around. Always been fantastic. Yeah rosen island right yeah yeah. Yeah thirdly favorite place in l. a. They're part of town or is there any other place in la besides this ruin sitting. I've i've had forgotten all the other. I used to love hiking griffith park but longtime stepped on that. Yeah love going down to the beach longtime so done that. Maybe the summer things open up. You know to be totally honest by one of my favorite places to go in. La was always the arc light now sadly at least for the time being. They've had to shut their doors. And i hope they can figure out how to reopen it and get everybody who who worked there and you know dependent on it for a living back up and working to get all the rest of us who dependent on it for a great place to go watch movies with other people yeah. I hope we're all of our sakes the that somebody can figure out how to get it going again because that was just being honest about the places to spent the most time and went to the most often made made us really happy together last question so i am the as i mentioned the father of a two and a half year old. Actually she turns two and a half today At the half birthday happy half birthday to my daughter half birthdays matter. When you're too they do. There is a big deal for her account. You get to count the hafer that's right and And with another on the way. I'm always curious about people's parenting advice. And you're a father. What is your best parenting advice. Either that's original to you or that's been passed on to you. I'm wondering if you asked my my son's whether i should be giving parenting advice a bit curious. They would say yeah. I just you know it. It's i think for a lot of us whatever we do. Maybe stepping outside my area of competence here making assumptions about people. I don't know. But i feel like a lot of us are busy and a of the balance between work life for comes really difficult as especially as your kids get older rely on not just to be there but actually help give them advice about things going forward. Help guide them going. Forward one thing that has been a pretty great byproduct of this otherwise pretty crappy situation. We've all been in. As i've gotten to spend a lot of time with my kids. That i just i know in the natural course of life and work and what we do that just wouldn't have been as many actual hours spent with them not even necessarily goal directed or project oriented just being together and feeling the value of the time we got to spend together of its own right independently of anything. We were doing accomplishing. I've personally kind of felt how great an important that was grateful to been given a chance to do it by bush's been under other circumstances but it's just been just spend the time spent with them. I feel i mean. I know what matters to me and i like to think it matters to them. Well dan weiss. Thank you for the time you've spent with us today. It was a lot of fun. And thank you for joining the supporting. Kansas

hbo david benny george r r martin carolyn strauss Hbo portland david Netflix deby Dan ally goldsmith harvard westlake weiss hbo Greg shapiro b weiss west russ george's park wesleyan university croatia
A Photographer's Contrasting Views Of L.A.

The Frame

25:53 min | 1 year ago

A Photographer's Contrasting Views Of L.A.

"From the MON broadcast center parting ways with the team behind game of thrones and then photo journalist Jorge Rodriguez you hear your parents and I just had to get out there and make a living and the singer who welcome to the frame I'm Steven Cuevas filling in often Dan Weiss parted ways with Lucasfilm this week after recently inking another star wars fans we reached Hollywood reporter senior editor Aaron Couch to talk season they were looking around the landscape and and seeing star wars fans can be pretty toxic it just angered game of thrones fans do we really want to spend the next five to ten through their decision to step back from star wars well it was back in early twenty eighteen the original deal was these guys are going to write and produce a trilogy we don't think there was ever a script for this first film which was supposed to come out in December in Star Wars Universe the speculation was these guys will probably that is connected but far enough in the past were they wouldn't have to worry too ask but they took Georgia Martin series of books and helped create this amazing world on screens the they got beyond George Martin's books on game of thrones the show really suffered in quality so the question the project had to do with their commitments to net flicks and they signed a two hundred and fifty million dollar understand Lucasfilm was a little bit nervous because you know you have to keep to be their interest or skill set so certainly when the Netflix deal happened in August I bodies teather fall or get pushed off of the star wars spaceship numerous a hiring process right because clearly they are not always picking people that firings were kind of no brainers you know in two thousand fifteen director Josh trank but then you have surprises you you have Phil Lord and Chris Miller fired from Solo while they're working I think they think we want these fun fresh voices and then maybe it turns out that that's not still undefined development deal with Netflix what if anything does that say about the diminished somewhat right in doesn't seem to feel like a creator friendly You know Tony Gilroy was brought in really is the considered the author of that movie by many people you know those involved are much more risk averse than say George Lucas was in Kevin Foggy to work with the Kathleen Kennedy on a able to take some risks and have some filmmaker personalities kind of showing off never they've had an early on maybe a few director switches here and there but nothing coming up on the frame photographer different sides of Los Angeles there are his day job photos of film stars and Teen heartthrobs In Years Ice Cube and Dr Dre in the early days of the seminal rap group Nwea this aunt of the south and east neighborhoods where he grew up Rodriguez's work was here when his book was published he told me I about how he got into photography I remember ahead turned out a massive photo journalists but anyway I needed an elective and some I'm for it especially when it comes to being in the dark room developing well tha- that was get out there and make a living I mean I had to help out but it was the greatest thing that happened just something that happened but it's what I knew I saw a quote and I think you UH sought being a gang whatever I could have done that easily but that wasn't and came back and started working and photo labs about here at the beginning and that's the cover photo for double vision the new book that covers the the photo really has the sense of movement looks like he's hustling hustling him up the is When I worked at Columbian the photo lab during my lunch hours if there was something in shoot when we are on without why was there but I want to build a document that part of Carribean Authority treated the community that line in the buffalo azan being beaten with batons I'm an father you know he's born in Mexico City and he's like a hardcore may connell anyone specifically when it came to these photo no not that I was I'm a big fan on a movement when it began that's what I was going to do I'm going to document all these marches and in Josh Kun the writer We met because he was cured I remember telling them I am doing a book but my version was just of the Mexican American Experience Look and exhibit called Double Vision the title of the retrospective of your I worked in so many areas in Hollywood and the recording industry that's he's a chavitz fasted in looking at proof sheets with Jim Morrison after work I could stay and work on my own thing so I remember shooting the doors at Rockin roller he is just a regular guy and I shot the first Jackson five liner Michael Jackson you've got to know them a little bit too and there's some factors one photo of shooting baskets he's playing basketball he played basketball. Yes uh-huh uh-huh when Michael I've had the opportunity to embed with and shoot says China's many Blissett if you will the times around him he's busy you know this was during the great boycott I have of Cesar with the Kennedy Banner Behind Him I recall just William Z. when you're around somebody like that you know something's going on but you know that that individual members of Nwea again I see I see those photos as to kind of rock stars in their own right yeah that was like in ninety ninety one you're in presence of somebody that that you know they're different the people I think when when they heard the music they didn't they think it's clever and gave me four cassettes and I played one on the way home and I couldn't believe the only rap music I plan that because I like ace it's you know dealing with this book doing research but I am a source else folks that need photographs you still shoot all I do every day yeah media George it's been a pleasure thank you thank you so much Jones had to walk a fine line inside culture I kinda ran away but I ended up the with her faith she grew up Catholic in San Jose but her experiences singing in church swim her music is a diy take on gumby rhythms mixed with church harmonies performer. I started singing in the church choir when I was twelve the joining 'cause I'm about to die kind of thing my drag mother in San Francisco I met her at a bar they have been performing like every weekend. We're like a Saint San Francisco San Jose reflection on religion not having religion on what spirituality that I wrote for the album but I also at that time was singing on the streets life and was thinking of how free I felt when I was at those and create something else that channels might hurt my my savior suit me so this song is specifically but it's like something he wanted to consume and for his consumption goth themed and very like s so when he told me that I was on this album the way like I've heard Chavez vodka sing or low levels and handed blending in the farm that my mom grew up with so the border to come to the United States silent it with her and this family farm black dresses and my aunt here like as soon as I land she's like oh I'm and I'm over here like looking like the craziest which lady alien we are and I'm this and that and like we actually had really

Jorge Rodriguez Saint San Francisco San Jose San Francisco San Jose Michael Nwea Cesar China William Z. Jones United States Chavez fifty million dollar
Full Episode: Friday, May 17, 2019

World News This Week

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Full Episode: Friday, May 17, 2019

"Hey, I'm Brad milkey, and I hosted new daily news podcast from ABC news called start here. Every day we get you up to speed on the stories that are going to be driving your day. We get important context from experts with on the ground access, and we do it all in twenty minutes. So start smart and subscribe to start here. From ABC news. World news this week. I'm Daria Albinger in New York coming up. Growing backlash as abortion ban, sweep across the south of many peop- for many places. We afford one people. President Trump on bales an immigration overhaul with an eye on the twenty twenty election of a military airplane in our building. And f sixteen armed with missiles crashes into a warehouse filled with workers looking at the resourcefulness of students for those who less given do they do more with them the maker of the SAT's ads. And then I e score and. Game of thrones comes to an end the people in events that made headlines when world news this week continues. So you just woke up your phone is lighting up with headlines and push notifications and text from your mom saying, how do I click this? Okay. Maybe that's just me. But if you wanna get up to speed, check out the new podcast from ABC news, start here, literally, the ground was shaky. I'm Brad milkey and every morning we're going to take you to the stories that matter with fast fresh insight low, Robert Mueller. Michael Cohen calling all in twenty minutes start here. Listen for free on apple podcasts or your favorite podcast app, the battle over abortion is here. That's the message from supporters and opponents of new laws, banning abortion, that of passed in at least half a dozen states. The movement sparked by the appointment of two conservative justices to the supreme court where abortion rights, opponents hoped the new laws, eventually are upheld, but are they pushing for too much too soon? Here's ABC Steve O's, and Saami big budget, Hollywood productions called the south home in the last few years. Thank. Wchs. Too. Generous tax breaks approved by lawmakers Black Panther the avengers, the blindside, and so many more. But now that those same lawmakers are either banning or nearly banning abortions Hollywood actors and producers are calling for boycotts in Georgia, which recently banned nearly all abortions after six weeks of pregnancy. Jason Bateman Elissa, Milano, Gabrielle union, and John Cheadle are all threatening to refuse or pull productions in the state. We're more than four hundred and fifty movies and TV shows were filmed last year. Former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams encouraged abortion rights supporters not to punish workers of the state's film industry, most of whom likely opposed the new laws as well. The only real compromise is from government and politicians to say that we don't get to decide what woman does with her body. Democratic lawmakers in Maryland and Colorado are threatening to cancel all government travel to Alabama and threatening to pull investments from any companies headquartered there on social media, the hashtag boycott Alabama is going viral with help from celebrities like riana. And Chris, Evans abortion activists are calling for a total boycott of Mercedes Benz, which produces cars at a plan outside Tuscaloosa and has US headquarters in Georgia, they're also targeting, Alabama's fifteen point one billion dollar poultry industry, but those who've been fighting for decades to restrict or eliminate abortions are standing firm. I really. Portion harder. I'd rather the baby's born, and if the person doesn't want the baby been that can let somebody else, adopt baby speaking to reporters on Thursday, vice president Pence cheered the new laws saying, I'm proud to be part of a pro-life administration and President Trump and I have worked to stand for the sanctity of life since the outset of this administration Democrats, running against them or promising to bring the fight on the issue, even the top Republican in the house, as some of these restrictions go too far in my whole political career. I also believed in rape, incest, or life of the mother, there was exceptions. That's exactly what Republicans have voted on in this house, as a resident if a movie industry were to get up and leave the state, the people would hurt the most or people who live in some of liberal counties in Georgia, the people who are pushing these laws, the lawmakers have a sense of righteousness on their side, and no boycott will change that. Also this week questions were raised about how serious of a threat, Iran poses to the United States and its allies in. The Middle East atop British general said the US is wrong about a possible attack by Iranian-backed, militia on Americans and sources say, even President Trump has expressed frustration with hawks and his administration ABC news chief global affairs. Correspondent Martha Raddatz has more with the US carrier strike group now in the Arabian Sea and bombers at the ready. The president was asked directly. But with the evacuation of personnel from the American embassy in Iraq and the sabotage of four oil tankers for which U S officials say, Iranian operatives are to blame congress wants answers, the director of national intelligence, Dan Coats holding a classified briefing for leadership in the house and Senate with members saying it wasn't important for step. The full house and Senate will be brief next week. The administration also working to declassify some of the most troubling intelligence and official tells ABC news their images, which show Iranian cruise missiles on small Iranian boats in the port city of. Cia Mahar missiles officials feared could be used to attack ships or land targets. The Trump administration also placing more pressure on China in the trade war between the world's two biggest economies. The president signed an executive order Wednesday banning equipment. China's Wally in US networks and American companies now need federal approval before selling their equipment to the Chinese tech giant, the move after both countries Levy, new tariffs, sending US markets into a tailspin to start the wave of the trade war, now, taking hold with China, imposing retaliatory tariffs markets lost more than a trillion dollars in value Monday. The worst day for trading in months, President Trump still steadfast in ongoing negotiations. I love the position. We're in the president giving time-wise saying it will take three or four weeks until we know if efforts on the trade deal with China have been successful pointing to a meeting with China's president. She in late June. We're going to be meeting as you know, at the g twenty and Japan Trevor alt-, ABC news, Washington. Stocks rebounded to close the week in the grain on Friday. President Trump announced to deal to scrap tariffs on Canada and Mexico. The president also looking to get the upper hand over Democrats ahead of the twenty twenty elections ABC's, Karen Travers. Reports from Washington a different tone from President Trump out of many people from many places we afford. One people unveiling a new immigration plan, President Trump focused on who he wants to see stay in the US, not just those he wants to keep out. We want these exceptional students and workers to stay and flourish and thrive in America. The Trump administration would do that by dramatically changing who gets priority to come into this country. Preference going to highly skilled workers, people with advanced education and those with English proficiency instead of people with family ties here system will finally be fair transparent and promote equality and opportunity for all senior administration officials say goal is to show, the president is not against immigrants, but in favor of legal immigration. But it was just a month ago that Mr. Trump said this our systems for a country's full kid come in. A country is full the White House insists this proposal is designed to become law. But there's deep skepticism on Capitol Hill. Democrats weren't consulted. The plan doesn't address the millions of young undocumented immigrants known as dreamers atop democratic priority. Karen Travers, ABC news, the White House attorney general William bar was sent to El Salvador late this week to meet with his counterparts from the triangle countries, El Salvador Honduras Guatemala, Central America is where many migrants crossing the US border are coming from many of them fleeing gang violence and corruption, while incense Salvador bar explained why is investigating the investigators that led to the Muller report Torney, general, Bill bar tells Fox News, why he launched an investigation into the origins of the Russia, pro I've been trying to get answers to questions and I found that a lot of the answers of Banat inadequate and I also found that some of the explanations, I've gotten don't hang together the investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the. Elections led to the indictment of more than thirty individuals as well as several Russian businesses on charges ranging from computer hacking to conspiracy, and financial crimes, Meghan use ABC news, Washington. Meanwhile, documents were made public Thursday, raising questions about how President Trump's team may have tried to influence testimony of his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, the newly unsealed documents show. Michael Flynn provided extensive information, special counsel, Robert Muller, about the Trump campaign, and also felt pressure from the president and his supporters Flynn received communications from people associated with the campaign or congress that could have affected both his willingness to cooperate and the completeness of that cooperation in one voicemail, a member of the president's legal team requested a heads up about what Flynn was prepared to tell investigators ABC's Aaron Katersky, reporting this week, we heard for the first time a leaked recording in which Boeing is warned about an automated system suspected of being connected to two deadly crashes, the warning. Came after the first crush, but before the second union reps, for American airline pilots in a tense, November meeting with Boeing's top engineer about that new flight control system in the max. Dem systems on the inordinate anybody else. It's called 'em Cass and can force the nose down repeatedly, the pilots pressing for action Boeing replying. It was starting work on a software fix. I can ever have a tragedy like this in even worse than another one did happen, a little more than three months later in Ethiopia in both crashes nearly three hundred fifty killed ABC's David curly reporting in southern California on Thursday and f sixteen fighter jet loaded with missiles crashed into a warehouse filled with workers, a military airplane in our building. The Air National Guard jet on a training, mission smashing to a stump amid metal racks and cardboard boxes its tail the only thing visible above the pile of wreckage. I heard the explosion I turned around and I just think the burst of flames, the crash raining debris down on workers inside twelve of them rushed to the hospital. I just think the ceiling from all over the building just start collapsing. Just glad to be alive. The pilot apparently losing control. Of the jet just shy of the basis runway able to adjust and parachute to safety, his parachute and cockpit. Canopy landing near the runway his plane veering off in Chicago, three people accused of killing a pregnant teenager, and cutting her baby out of her womb appeared in court on Friday, we say nineteen year old Marlin Ocho Lopez went to the home of forty six year old Clarisa Figueroa. It gets them baby clothes after having a conversation with her via social media. They say Figaro and her twenty four year old daughter. Then strangled, the woman with a cord and took the baby soon after Clarissa ran out of the home telling neighbors that her new baby wasn't breathing. She went to the hospital as for a motive Chicago police superintendent, Eddie Johnson says, only they know that we can only assume raise the time as the woman's boyfriend is also charged with concealing death. The baby is said to be in grave condition. Ryan burrow, ABC news. Chicago in Colorado. A police officer is out of a job following an incident that drew national attention newly released body camera footage shows boulder. Police officer John smiley investigating. Zaida. Atkinson in March for trespassing after spotting the college student, picking up trash in front of his building the tension rapidly escalates, sit down. Then you're probably gonna get taste in the second because you have a weapon put that down put it down and comply with my orders Atkinson, refuses. It's film. And right now, eighty have lease. You could taste the freaking picking up trash on mine, thraw a scathing internal affairs investigation. Finding the officer did not have probable cause to charge Atkinson, with any crime and should have ended his contact as soon as Atkinson gave his name and address more officers arrive eight in all some with guns drawn. You put your buffets way finally police confirm at concern story. Yes. Okay. The tents twenty two minutes standoff ends. Wins surprise. I believe that this man had approached me because I'm a black male and all white town boulder. Police claim there was no evidence Atkinson was racially profiled, but say smiley likely would have still been suspended or fired instead, the fourteen year veteran, quit the force ABC's Clayton send del on Tuesday. A lawsuit was approved against rebel, one of the top football helmet makers in the country. Leading football to a stronger future popular football helmet company Redel is now under fire and Ohio father is suing them over his twenty two year old son's death. Nearly three years ago this week adjudge giving the suit the green light had to trial to accomplish that no other parent has to do what I'm doing right now. In Hamlin claims the company's helmets are responsible for his son cody's death after a decade of playing tackle football beginning at the age of eight home of manufacturers did not design these helmets for their children, and they can actually increase the odds of getting brain damage, Cody died after he suffered a seizure while fishing causing him to fall off the boat and drown. His father says an autopsy confirmed the seizure was caused by CT that degenerative brain disease found in some athletes in the lawsuit. Hamlin says the helmets are uncertain. Safe for their intended purpose and unable to protect against foreseeable risk of brain and urological injury rebel calls. The claims meritless telling us that Hamlin's allegations are unproven and vigorously contested, but doctors tell us there is no helmet that can prevent concussion. That was ABC's. Paula Farris, a big change coming to the SAT's the maker of the exam made the announcement on Thursday. It's not just verbal and math skills being evaluated on the new SAT exam. But the environment in which each student grew up adversity is rather common and widespread an evident, but what can't be seen easily is those students in the face of that adversity accomplishing things David Coleman. The CEO of the college board, which administers the SAT's explaining the new environmental context dashboard, which will assign each student, a score from one to one hundred taking into account fifteen factors about the students environment such as school quality long with crime and poverty levels in their neighborhood. All the kids being lifted up here are not just lifted up as repayment for what they've suffered or for their adversity. But because to spite that adversity they've worked hard and accomplish great things, the number will only be reported to colleges and universities, not the student. It's looking at the resourcefulness of students for those who has given to do more with them. The average student would receive a fifty. Brian Clark, ABC news. We learned of the deaths this week of three entertainment, icons, their careers spanning from Hollywood's golden age to the internet age on Friday. The owners of grumpy cat announced her passing at age seven, the famous feline had more than three million social media followers. Her tiny angry face is one of the most recognizable memes on the web grumpy cat's death came days after the actors door. Stay and Tim Conway died. Dora's day able to sing dance and play both comedy and dramatic roles became one of the biggest box office stars of all time, day wasn't the name. She was born with Doris Marianne capital, hav consensus, natty, Ohio, and I ended up in Hollywood, and if I can do it, you're gonna do it. They may thirty nine films including the man who knew too much love nearly and pillow talk one of three romantic comedies with rock Hudson. That's it man to any Doris day devoted most of her later years to animal rights as founder of the door. Stay on animal league Tim Conway. I gained a national following the nineteen sixties on the kale's navy. But it was those memorable characters played on the Carol. Burnett Bill for which he's best remember, Macy's GAN's Cady come in her. Right now. That's right now. In the late eighties. Tim Conway began starring in a series of popular satirical. How sports videos as Dorf in extremely short, Swedish man more recently voiced the character barnacle boy on the Nickelodeon cartoon SpongeBob squarepants Bill deal, ABC news on Thursday. It was learned that world renowned architect. I M Pei died at the age of one hundred to pay designed the glass pyramid in front of the Louvre in Paris, the rock, and Roll Hall of fame in Cleveland, this week, the nation also honors law enforcement officers who died in the line of duty. This is the week. The nation stops to honor its police officers fraught with risks marked graves with the Zona department of public safety says national police week is dedicated to those who put their lives on the line every day, every day. Police officers country goes to work and faces the possibility of coming home, paramount on their minds of families minds think younger men and women wouldn't be interested in a job like that. You'd be wrong. Do we cover? That's every day. We're not seeing huge wagon people wanting to be an officer up, and we still have a lot of applicants every year. So that's a good song. There is a service in Washington DC, honoring those who died in the line of duty over a hundred police officers throughout last year's national law enforcement officers memorial, is really a constant reminder of the risks involved when you put on that badge. Sherry Preston, ABC news. Coming up. For nearly a decade fans loved it until they didn't. But like it or not game of thrones is coming to an end more. On the pup culture, powerhouse, when world news this week continues better help offers licensed professional counselors specialized in a wide array of issues, like depression, anxiety, and grief. Connect with your professional counselor in a safe, private online environment. It's a truly affordable option and listeners can get ten percent off your first month by going to better help dot com slash world news. Fill out a questionnaire to help them assess your needs and get matched with a counselor you'll love get cashback for shopping, you were already going to do racket in is a free member base. Loyalty program that lets you earn cashback on shopping. It over twenty five hundred stores like Macy's best, buy, Nike, and more shop online internet percentage of every purchase you make up to forty percent cashback every three months members are paid the pay pal or another method sign up. Today, rocketing dot com. That's our A, K, U, T E, N dot com. Game of thrones dominated pop culture like no other TV show has over the past decade and maybe ever, almost every other TV show had to reference, the HBO hit to cash in on the craze, Andrea and junior bonded over it in black ish, not watching Jane won't on. On. Did I tell you in the office, there's that episode where Dwight teaches Erin to throaty? Even Sesame Street got into trout. Mr. I can try. But now it's all coming to an end with the series finale on Sunday. Here's ABC's Jason Nathanson, unleash the dragon. Just one more episode left of game of thrones. We'll denarius rule the seven kingdoms or will it be John snow, what about Santa or aria and brand, I think I know how it ends. I don't know for sure. Entertainment Weekly news editor James Hibbert was onset. When the finale was filmed last year, I could say the final episode deals with the aftermath of Danny's devastating attack on king's landing, and how that impacts all the characters last week, deniro storm on my name break chains, and mother of dragon character. We've been led to believe was a benevolent conquer basically committed a war crime when she killed thousands of innocent people with their dragon a move that shocked fans including Jimmy Kim. I was very disappointed with the Kalisa. She's I thought better of her. I never imagined. She'd be burning women and children. Final episodes are hard to get just right years later, people are still upset about the sopranos and lost and Seinfeld, but Hibbert says he doesn't think that'll be the case here. I don't think it'll be. Vice of in the way that the sopranos was divisive. I think it's going to be a bit more of a traditional satisfying ending a lot of respects the final season of game of thrones. As a whole has many wanting to unleash drag it on show, creators, David Benny off, Dan, Weiss, an online petition this week to remake the final season with different writers has over eight hundred thousand signatures as I type this and Hibbert, thanks Sunday night, show won't change that. I don't expect the divided reactions to end with the finale whatever happened Sunday night. Game of thrones place in pop culture history has been solidified based on the books by George r Martin series was a hit for HBO when it debuted in two thousand eleven growing its audience every year in time when Moshe viewers season to season, it set EMI records and done what few shows if any can do in this fractured. Tv landscape create appointment viewing game of thrones has changed TV. Well, it certainly blew apart, the notion that TV shows have to have a limit to their scale. Suction. So it's raised the bar in terms of what TV is. And I think it's bold storytelling moves busted, a lot of tropes, that make it difficult for a standard TV drama nowadays to do the usual TV thing of telling basically the same story week after week without any consequences or permanence to the characters. So typical horn of giants mill to the end of an era, at least into one of the many in the works game of thrones spinoffs, debuts Jason Nathanson, ABC news. And those are the people in events that made world news this week world news this week was written and produced by Chris Howell. I'm Daria Albinger, ABC news. When breaking news changes the world, ABC news, accurate, credible and unmatched on Twitter at ABC News Radio.

ABC news President Trump ABC president United States officer ABC Atkinson Tim Conway Daria Albinger Hollywood Washington Hamlin Georgia China Chris Howell Brad milkey congress Robert Mueller
BONUS Episode: Best Of Vol. 1

Everyman Podcast Show

21:12 min | 1 year ago

BONUS Episode: Best Of Vol. 1

"Here's a classic but a Goodie enjoys so you're saying you hear what happened there. I'd the end up in Atlanta My Mom and dad will go all Katie much. My mom mom went to go to Atlanta. Sure so and she you went up there and you you stayed some more years over there in Atlanta yes roles land landed like for you know. They tend to change Life things thanks kind of changed really go here about way RIA bad way. Oh while Atlanta. Yeah but but you son of going up there. Yeah needs at least allegedly urgently. Sorry Yeah Right. Yeah so and a real good time real good town and and It just so happened sometime time. I got caught up with good good person very nice person and so to be a pimp. You got down with a pimp and Atlanta's a little kid but what is. He elected me for some reason fight. He owns the one thing. You always a fight and so for some don't really started liking me so he wants to go to the store all the time right and they got to Going to stand in line for the wrassling tickets to food concerts to all right you going with me you get you a ticket and pretty much slack. Black black was his son for really Britain and Canada then was good. It was bad because some of the ways that that that because you remember I left dad and some of the ways his ways was kinda elected because he ate a lot of girls in the part. Got Me the girls. Oh I think for most men growing up especially young Women a little tight miniskirts. Wow grown laid so you look in so you wanted to jump in the life of pimping. Apparently they get into it nope not really I got whooped it more than pimp at the beginning really. Yeah 'cause he. He was older older older women. And I was young. And a cannon they had last year they had me going but at the same time nine as I got older learn more But they taught me a lot nose at us that and then for younger right okay so you just went and did your own thing once you kind of seeing that life of pimp. I'm getting older without but felt that because affeldt that because I had a couple women like I guess at that time. Okay so you got you Kinda got nicer. Some of the the the hose folklore you. I mean that's hard to avoid right. Yeah hanging out a pimp. And he's got hoes around them all the time. Did he ever have to slap a hoe. Actually I never seen it. Nobody ever seen slap the whole money. Slept shit out of that now. I never seen. They had to check a whole. I seem check them. Coupling really yeah Saito girl to check her I don't yeah well. I remember a story when he checked one of the I think what would the deer would I think that he she's supposed to have been somewhere at a certain time but she wasn't India. What do you mean a whole one of his? There's a whole do you remember the girl's name now But what I want to paint a picture somebody he asks you like a May notice that he's like a detective so was the pimps name that he had like one of those pimp like Ignatz name now was no pimp name. It wasn't my Pimpri. Li It was straight up. James James You call James James Man. Don't you think he would add like a cool name year but he had a class with two days they had a cool car he had a cool car back then was as a mark. Mark Five Dummy Margaret Mark. Five he had been marked four by get three to some. It was a good mark mark. Mark One of those Lincoln drying the Candy Candy Apple Yellow. No no no no no what are what are those is like a small like a charge. Tight really yeah. Oh okay. Okay like the muscle car dodger. Exactly sit up high year we had big slick Tasni with it was a it was it was candy what it was Candy Yellow Candy Yellow. It was like a fast call real fast man super cool. What's the Guy Driving in this candy? Yellow Lake Mark Four Five James. And then he'd come on a motorcycle the same color really. Yeah Yeah you we're the pimps suits at least actually nobody was clean. He didn't wear the Pinson leader but he wears go beyond wind on one change on the game with the Dress Code Magic Don- WANNA change. The code went because he was into that winter winter the fashion so the best thing I use probably that this is the best thing I can bring a silk okay so the thing that must have been smooth man. Okay so I I'm sorry. I'm fascinated by the pimp right now. I'm just like a mansion in this paper. He's giving me at our stick. Imagine Bishop Don Juan now. He's giving me a guy in so and he talked like smoothing within whatnot. You talk smooth man your son talks. He's angry now. You can't ask you something to drink. Yeah Man I don't know Oh sure pour it up. He's putting on that right now. Whatever no that's not an act that is just you a Tuesday so so No He's given us good story here about the pimps so okay so back to the host so he checks the whole. Do you remember what he might have said to her. It's a fascinating story that I remember him saying. Don't make me fuck you. That's Ali said a to remember that he wants to and I looked at her and I looked into an aboriginal say. Don't make me work so he got her face. Looks Tweeden in a year and that's it she took care of it. I wonder 'cause she oughta money on. Whether you're right you said she didn't show up somewhere on the Winston. All Yan Asinine said he wanted his hold on time. Call Ya okay. I do know that that's part of the. The whole thing is being own time. He always wished he was stressed. That part too. I'm sure girls to hear about four. Or is that a lot in the pimp in the real world the ones where they come on. Who would you got four girls who you really pretty good? Think I'd be a good pimp. Now do you think I'm too soft and you can get in their faces and be like don't make me fuck you up for calm down. You know what I was somewhere. It was the crazy thing. Good showed you indeed. Greatest Dame's Wallace Day. You ever seen in your life to grow to me. The show's crees. Being F gives us the story gives us a story. Wow what to do who was one or give us one all you gotta do. Okay got allowed over the free as a good site idea down pay. The the freak is like anti freeze. Oh wow now free now listen absolutely about this woman in in certain areas and anyway They say that what she used to say. She has used the pull her her hood hoop put her jaws lips and stretch it and tat nut so I probably should have bought it up in a night because that'll see playing with long. They probably rolled up a little bit. You know me they know civically complete not put him. Oh boy the people that are getting what he so anyway. He said he's seen the crew. Put over Jinan in a nut in like a bota of a giant giant. Like the judge does and pull it. You saw that at pay for Z.. Twenty dollars I got into. Did you have sex with the bay now nine. Oh no no no the show like a magic like no. I didn't believe it was a real magical show because I was like Hey Kaluga stage on the correct name rent in rent new right in the hood so you went to her house. Yup Veteran Yup Yep and she tied Hersey stood up. They would tie me to. Most people have a winning do I. I need some witnesses watched her tire vagina or pussy. Lips if you will into a bow tie a bow tie completely and uh not with the nut. She cited this C.. Did like the bow tie. Like don't don't think there was was was struggling. She was flirting with the first the first not with the Titan she had no. It's not see Lindsey put it in there and took it and that this ship and only reason why I don't have pitch because back then we didn't have. We didn't have the phone with the camera. Bag definitely done some instagram feed facebook posting. What would you would have Hashtag? What would have been your hashtags? I probably would say The Pie with naming Pussy Ribbon Senior Bowl folks this bill and you look oh man man. That was fantastic category. Yeah I think what you asked me earlier. You asked me like the shit about my job right yes tennis. Yeah Man I seen so much. I think a lot of crazy shit bro. I think I'm going to try to. I got a lot of crazy stories. I'm GonNa try to like you got any. Give us your best one best one. y'All want like I wanna go like some of his gross some of his Vegas but still fighting some of them we won't or you'll see similar one of writing. It's like everybody little like nobody's like completely normal but like. Nah You like these fuckers here man. I think I think the funniest joke you know. If you're crazy broward eighteen and I I was trusted. I I was working at the hospital. Right Win FLACCO was like making this like mark on South Florida. So I see some shit like y'all like y'all seeing that shit with a little boy was on flocked and he was like running into the wall and it's like staring at it does it. No Yeah you've you lie. You actually wanted to our patients and shit explain why he was doing that no because he was still high still thought he was teleporting in like unfortunate with flock of Locka hat actually has like permanent side effects like permanent psychosis permanent brain damage. Like you can't recall all this shit. What you ever have have? You can tell you've been broward at a bar love. Do you see some fucked up with their teeth or something. They'll forget they met you will. Oh is Dorrie yeah. I didn't know that shows a reversible. Yeah man one time with smoking in some way with the support I'm only McCallum name fuck When when a Dan Weiss home he's Yeah Super Maximum Hour. I might I was smoking. Well I was talking we this fucking man okay and we should describe because the people we love he he wears a cowboy Albouy head shake. If he don't like it. I mean I just put it out there because he says it alowed to everybody. He's as it hundreds of times. Yes yes also I knew I come from the flock asked me a bowl of weed in luminol foil. Yeah exactly like I'm a smoker. I was smoking weed all smoke and we would just about fuck. It was like me Maar fucking like ridiculous or Nicholas. Super me I can't forget it was one of the white comics now. Well why it was a it was kind of hobby. Yeah Kevin Hires that while you're hanging out with a bunch of other local community is Kevin Hobby Air. Mi Ridiculous List and this book our re-grand Super Maximum Shellman. Yeah right you smoke in a shea you hear me. I does some decrease it. One time I smoked lockup before like why I heard that like a dog you gotta swear to God. He's Fed Essiet dog. He's almost like you got to want to roll that. Can I. Can I touch to make sure still lie. That's the person who advocate. Kick them up. Look at the smoking rotation so you mean smoker with still for those who can't follow Khalil's explaining here is there was a bunch. Other fellow comedian friends that he decided to smoke with one. Apparently smoke flock. Would you rather I would rather just have being rotation arpey someone. That's smoking doctor for sure. ACHY HERPES I. I don't know little day EH. Herpes though I'm guessing that flock residual curvy. Herpes is bad. It's like asking me how WanNa die life a hundred times you wanNA taste but yeah I mean you know what I like. Take out the. He's in he's like a fascinating I know he's not going to get him on the show. I was GONNA say he claims to be a relative of yours. Bush is out of Dominican descent from Iowa. I said nothing of this. He said it was his cousin because he. That's the the Dominican say to people that are friends with and I think his family probably shuns him as they should accept them as your cousin then Nah he. It could be my cousin on like a video game. I'll make him the same character. Just because it's funny I it would be like an Alabama grandma. Let me see it. Play out to tell you this story about about crazy. I'm GonNa tell you sure. Yeah give us one solve What's I'm at work There's this dude. He got really mad because we gave them a shot in ask us. I acting on ruling shit. Okay so like this now for. He's still mad he's like all right. Don't think it's only my father. I'm GONNA get repaired. y'All y'all y'all by leading me DOT com. I think much of it no fucking he goes to the BAT. He goes to the bathroom in his room with right right so yes I know what is going so this come back with two cuffs to funding cuts and he just staring it. The funky game apparently mantles two cups. Any stirring like he gets a of drinks. But like I say you at what about initiate the motherfucking. Gays them back. He Uh it's a cup of number shitting put hits his like the nurse in the mouth like aw aw hit the nursing the mouth all and if people are screaming imprint. I've been to jail before. And then that's what they call gassing as like when my prison inmate gives a man I could correctional officer or something like that they call gassing when they throw like bodily fluids on personal person called gassing so he pretty much is gas the whole front desk. I'm sitting to the side. I run because I am that I gave me. I run didn't get hit. They call eight nine it they call it a whole they call a code. They call the code. They're like Dr Strong strong. That's like pretty much like all units on Ma Bucket ishbel lightning already the man the CEO looking at me like Mr the pillow book. You already like what he walks over. He wasn't meeting on this. I just want another Cup all earth you got a mob. Wait everybody's up in Puerto. Rico Ray Dali reappoint life ready now we will run in Brown. We ran EH. Come back after I took. I took a break. I'm paying like I album later on. Mike how's everybody doing like like somebody just died like the people weren't even mag as like 'cause they they knew. How do they do they? Would they would Iran Hansel. They had the chance to get mad. They would like to me like if you ever see blandly run just run. Don't run on if they're not running in that direction running direction that they're headed by. That's my more always. Yeah you know. Black People Hispanics are running. You need follow them. Why people never do the running to be running towards bad financial decisions to yes but in littoral state of panic? Oh a little state of panic and fucking that when you want to follow the legal because they know how to around us all around the focus she he goes to bed. May like people need to learn that Hispanic with the dog modell.

Atlanta Mark Five broward James James Man Pimpri Bishop Don Juan James James India Katie Puerto Britain HERPES Saito Ignatz Don- WAN Ali tennis Iran Hansel Dr Strong Jinan
All Zeity Trend 6/11: Euro 2020, Stephen A. Smith, Kim Jong Un vs BTS, Coffee, 'In The Heights'

The Daily Zeitgeist

17:25 min | 5 d ago

All Zeity Trend 6/11: Euro 2020, Stephen A. Smith, Kim Jong Un vs BTS, Coffee, 'In The Heights'

"This episode is brought to you by guaranteed rate still searching for your dream home start at right dot com guaranteed rates digital mortgage mix applying for your mortgage fast and seamless and lets you apply anywhere anytime. Start at right dot com today. Whether you're looking to buy a refi guaranteed rates. Got your back. Nationwide go to rate dot com to start your digital mortgage. Today that's r. a. t. e. dot com equal housing lender subject to credit approval restrictions. Apply company and mls. Id two six one one. An mls consumer access. Dot org founders. Brewing company has found a way to make an p. a. You can enjoy anytime. That's perfect for any occasion with their all day. I at four point seven. Abc you can still taste the hops of course but it's the complex array of malts and grains that make all day. Ipa a beer. That will grab your attention. That full flavor and low a. B. is what continues to make it a staple in my fridge look for founders in your favorite beer store or check out their full line of beer at founders brewing dot com founders brewing company born in brooklyn michigan since nineteen ninety seven. Hello the internet and welcome to this episode of oh society trend courtesy of ben swindler. And all of my friends entire comedic personalities For my entire childhood was basically like you could do a documentary. Like where are they now. All the people whose whose in higher personality was jim carey like like. Where did they do. It was a fucking an entire culture of just like i may spend her. I'm just going to do a bunch of you know jim carey. Bits my whole and they were funny. It was just You know shout. John douglas shout brian. 'basta to the Now that's a great question. I think Brian is a lawyer. Okay so shall. And to think like he's arguing a case in coordinating duties to sing out of his ass crowd. Man miles was doing some jim carey stuff before we started and i went right back there i was like more should be the puck for my god. You know is there. Is somebody out there. It's like just two dudes talking. About how genius jim carrey is like. Oh my god all right. What's your favorite in living color. Bit a People come for the jim carey impressions but they stay for the trends and Here is some sports talk. Euro twenty twenty is happening in twenty twenty. One is happening rate now. Rebranding funny the european championship for football or soccer. Yeah was postponed obviously because of the pandemic but now we got it going on right now looking. Wonderful You're watching as as record this italy as leading turkey. Two goals to nil. And you know this is always like fun tournament for soccer fans and for people who have club allegiances. They can let those melt away in service of nationalism savor of good old healthy nationalism bradley force in human history. I like. i'm not english. So when i see harry kane plan like do hope it all goes bad for you. I hate you while people in england are like well. I can put aside my club. Yeah but i mean that dude. He's handsome why why are so many soccer players handsome. What's the deal with that. I don't know he kind of looks like now. Look leave me out of this. I'm not gonna say how how cool i carry. King looks alright. Well check it out the you have if you hear screams coming out of random houses from like six. Am to noon. And you're like what the fuck sport could be on right now. They're probably watching the euro cup brain. And that's how. I used to like. When i used to live in this one apartment building how i found that other people were fucking was soccer. 'cause like they were also screaming like just out of their minds morning but yeah i remember that the year. The lebron and dwayne wade went to the finals against against dallas. And like it was the lebron just kind of like tripled in the in the big on the big stage. I just remember being in new york city and just like here in just all over the place. Every time something would happen you would just. That's such a cool feeling part of something larger than yourself now. Every time i say something like this. I feel like i'm doing jim carey impression through fucking with ben stiller. So that's a play on ben stiller but he likes to drink booze. I'm guessing right i. I don't know. I mean to each their own. Handle stockton is trending and it's not because of You know some tragedy happened happening in stockton california but it could be a tragedy. If you're a fan of john stockton cyst desist. god. Stephen smith is saying that again. Donovan mitchell of the utah. Jazz is the greatest player to don a jazz uniform. And because of that. There's no need to talk about karl malone or john stockton and we're not even say jeff. Don't even don't even get me started going to say that name. But that's where he's at. And i think that's caused a lot of commotion for people who are probably like old heads and like. Are you going to study during the hall of fame. I agree with old heads on this one in the sense that we'll stephen a smith first of all makes commotion for living like things that are often indefensible. Just but yeah i mean. We're two games into a series. That is not that is the second round of the playoffs. Let's see how the rest of the playoffs go Before we you want to crown as as crowns asked but you know that just seemed a little a little strong Especially like i mean. I'm giving room for him to go much further beyond where he's at right now to take jazz title i'm also not counting out Co i feel like coli sits back like let's his team lose a couple feels you out and then just Stomps through your exit. You're behind the wheel of a car or the steering wheel. Just kind of blow just comes off in the middle of it and drought control right now. Based thing of that meme where they were putting together like the as if kawhi leonard was in that focus group from a kim jong hoon Who's doing pr for this guy. Because he's all over the place. I say l. t. looks holler help us the daily zeitgeist please. We want to get on that level with these mentions all over the place days in a row trending. Okay king show out to the the hermit kingdom god. This dude is out here because he has of course this is going to get traction because he says kay pop is a vicious cancer that is corrupting the youth of north korea. And apparently because of this there are going to be harsh penalties harsher penalties on citizens who are caught consuming south korean movies i k dramas or like k. Pop and yeah. I just popular culture. In general or k pop like music in particular. I think it's probably because like anything you know like. There's a whole industry are like underground industry from documentaries. You've seen about north korea where people smuggle in con- yeah on usb drives and that's how people able to kind of get a glimpse into the outside world and it's probably just because it is becoming like you can't just sort of you can't stop youth culture and shit like that no matter where you try and do and then you sprinkle in like really catchy k. Bob yeah bro. i'm sorry. I don't know how you gonna put that back in the box numb. But yeah they said they they call it. Anti-socialist influence and it's quote corrupted the attire hairstyle. Speeches and behaviors of young north koreans. I mean addressing. Look like him. What is right. What's his i mean like you do does not have great hairstylist. I would say for for as much money and attention as he puts into his image. The hairstyle is yeah. I mean this is the heart. I for someone who is trying to have a grip. Hold on the minds of your people through propaganda and lack of information lives probably the most unsettling thing you could see like just a wave of popular culture. Come over the country even if it's in secret but yeah like those are the things that gives people ideas for maybe living a different way. He's been picking fights with you know america and Some of the biggest military's in the history of the globe. And this is the biggest most the most unwinnable battle. He's he's picked to trying to fight. Bts army you're trying yeah okay. Good luck trying to light like a youth movement inside your own population. Yeah that's yeah. Yeah no i mean have you seen the swag have you. Has he seen a g dragon video. Do you know what you're up against. Kim jong he's gonna. I do love when somebody's just like well. I am the villain of this story. And this is the thing that the bill would do. So i'm going to dig in. Even if i'm sure like if you had real like psychology experts trying to be like you know actually you lean into it and then you corrupt it by leaning into it and then they don't want it anymore because you've made a whole gross in kim jong hoon stuff but i don't know i could see him a in desperation. Be like hey. Here's our new k. Pop k pop band Check out this group. Wmd the only way he could have successfully like if he leaned into loving it and like he started dressing like that. And then actually. I don't know how the north korean youth culture works. Maybe they would have been into that but this is not going to work So but that'd be interesting to watch it just shows you like the power though of popular culture at the end of the day like you know no amount of like leaflets. Like airdropped with like this is how life could be. It's like giving people a glimpse at just expanding their world view. Yeah and now you tell me miles after. We spent all our marketing budget on leaflets. That we drove it. From i i know crossing incline. I know i was watching dunkirk. I thought it was really cool in that opening. And then i'm like what is what's the point in it It's like give up. You are already not consuming. The greatest podcast subscribe now wasn't clear we don't even say the name of the podcast. A game of thrones coffee cup. We it's an age old mystery like two years. I guess and now we found out who did it. The last of the starks was the episode. Which is the one right after. They beat the night king. And everyone's like an alley. I guess it was it. Yeah oh yeah it was. Yeah probably yeah in my mind. I just blocked out that. That was that in a so. That's how you're gonna end. There's you know if you remember. There's a whole controversy. Because there's like just a straight up modern paper coffee cup on the table where denarius was sitting and people like jesus. Y'all really kept kept your foot off the gas on this when even catch all these props coming in they had to take it out and it created a whole thing first year like it was sophie turner and then she was saying he was amelia. Clark and then then a clarke said he was kit harrington and then the fans believed it was probably sophie turner and then emilia clarke blamed the dude conley hill who plays various and it just all became like all over the place but he just did an interview And she says that quote. It's not starbucks spoiler going to say it again for the record was not mine. I'm looking at you. Dan weiss d one of the show runner. She says it was him. Because in the seen him in. David benny off. Were playing. like extras. Like two hundred extras in it. And they were kind of they were in the scene to just in there. You know she said quote who. Look slightly like metallica tribute band. And she saying that they he was the one who put the cup. They're left become their. Wow that's able. They managed to really fuck everything up the benny. Because i wanted to like if it's a show runner you like You can't bring that cup on set like just for continuity like you're those are the few people like you're not going to check if a d. or something or just one of the producers onset yet i'm telling these fucking up the scene or you can't have that so who knows but that i wish that made the ending better. Here's opened three body problem. They don't manage to completely fuck that up speaking of managing to not completely fucked something up in the heights theatrical cinematic adaptation of the limb. Well miranda it was like sort of the thing the real heads oh you think. Hamilton's good you should have seen in the height that was out here on within the height so they adapted to the screen. I've not seen it yet. I did see the play before. I knew who lin manuel miranda was and it was very dope and the movie supposed to be very good so Out this weekend. I don't people are people are saying between twenty and thirty million which would be pretty decent for a For musical. i know it's weird. How like different lake normally be like. Oh that was a total failure rate and all them theaters are open but now like yeah all right. Twenty two million kabc. Oh but yeah. I mean i think. I know they're they're i. I've read a couple of things about how they were really taking the wardrobe really seriously to make you feel like you know these like lat. Next and afro-caribbean caribbean communities in new york and the amount of air force ones. I'm seeing i'm saying. Yes i i believe. You are in tune even some wheat colored. Tim adjacent Air force ones. I'm yeah i just i. i'll probably check it out. But you know me musicals. It takes a critical mass of people to be like you know. Yeah and then you watch it just angrily then. You're crying by the end. I wanna be them all right. Well those are some of the things. That are trending here at the end of this week. On friday june eleventh. Were back monday with the whole last. S episode of the show until. Then be kind to each other and be kind to yourselves. Wear masks the vaccine. And don't do nothing about privacy and we will talk to y'all on monday by miles zych gang. Everyone who's listening. Every if you can hear my voice. I wanted to let you know that It is time to shop for a father's day gift and shopping for a father's day. Gift has never been easier. You just shop online at macy's then pick it all up in store or choose contact. Free curbside pickup. And if you don't even want to get off the couch their same day delivery powered by door dash and available at select macy's and is valid on most stock items. Remember father's day is june twentieth. So visit macy's dot com slash zych gang. I want to introduce you to the most unique show on tv. It is the new stars. Original series blind spotting based on the critically acclaimed film biding takes a groundbreaking approach to tackling real life issues. Fueled by its use of comedy spoken word and the occasional choreographed existential crisis. It's unlike anything you've ever seen. It is of course. Executive produced by tv digs rafael castle. A blind spot in premiere sunday thirteenth only on stars and the stars that.

jim carey soccer kim jong hoon brewing company ben swindler john stockton harry kane ben stiller Donovan mitchell lebron kawhi leonard John douglas kay pop sophie turner north korea jim carrey dwayne wade Bts army karl malone Stephen smith
George R.R. Martin Still Hangs Out In Westeros

Nerdette

21:15 min | 1 year ago

George R.R. Martin Still Hangs Out In Westeros

"From WBZ CHICAGO. This is nerd that I'm Credit Johnson and I am so fricking excited to tell you our guest this week is George our our Martin. This word probably needs no introduction but just in case the short version is he wrote a bunch of books that became an insanely popular. Hbo Series that. You probably have I've heard of. It's called game of thrones. He still has two more books in that series to rate. He hasn't quite finished them yet. I'm sorry to say in this episode. We do not have like publishing date for you but we did have a really great conversation. We talked about how he manages fan expectations and the future fantasy and we talk about how writing those books is going so without further ado. Here's the interview. George R R Martin. Perhaps and one of the world's most famous nerds welcome to net. Well thank you and I'm glad to be here so interesting that the word nerd has now become a a a good thing right. I'm sold I remember when it was a bad thing in high school very traumatic. So yeah how do you feel about now do you kind of lean into it. Yeah sure ha there's still always interested in definitions you know. It is a nerd. Different from a geek and so What is the precise differences? I mean the way we've always thought of NERD is like you can be a nerd about. It doesn't really matter what the thing is. It's about how excited you are about right. So that means you could be an heard about anything like you could be a sci-fi fantasy fantasy nerd just as easily as you could be a Latin nerd or a knitting nerd or you know once Jennifer xactly right so you know the the doors wait. Open anybody's welcome in the club. Gladly embraced several right. Yeah it seemed accurate and we weren't winning on too much of a stretch so my first question for you is just you know like I know when I read a book that I really love. I find myself spending time there when I'm not I even reading it. You know. I'll have that moment where I'm like. What do you think hurry in her? Miami are up to right now wondering as someone who created such a rich tapestry world. How much time do you spend in West roasts these days? That's an interesting question. It really varies and it. It depends on what I'm doing but when I am actively writing when it's really going well and it doesn't always go well by any means there are good days and bad days. There were a good months and bad months but when it's going well I live in west rouse. I fall through the computer. I I wake up thinking of you know Tyrian Aria and and Or a gun the conqueror whoever I'm writing about and I go to sleep at night thinking about them and when I'm driving around I think about them and it just fills my life but in order to achieve this almost I Dunno Zen State of Obsession I have to push away real life. There are other writers who I know like right four pages. A day they write in hotels. They run on airplanes. They write everywhere. I've never been one of those writers. Sid completely separate. Yeah I need to be have the whole day just right nothing else on my calendar and it's odd irony that The success of game of thrones and a song of ice and fire the popularity's books books has made it harder for me to write these books because the number of interruptions attractions and other things have increased Komo doubled and tripled and increased tenfold and one hundred fold because essentially. What you're saying is when you spend days you know for example doing interviews with nerdy thirty? PODCASTS is not able to right. That's right I'm not writing today. I'm here in Chicago when I'm back home in Santa Fe I I will be pushing everything and in writing Yes and I know. Some of my readers and fans are very impatient about that. They wish I was like the other writers who you know like Stephen King who I talked to one side on a show. We did together about this very thing. And he's one of those guys who writes six pages a day come hell or high water or his catches. I got run over or whatever happens. Stephen King writes his six pages a day. I wish I could be like that. I can't I can't how are you managing fan expectations nations these days I. I don't think I do manage them. What do you mean by? I've learned to live with them. I mean for most of my career. Now a lot of people just know me from A game of thrones song of ice and fire but The first book that came out in Nineteen ninety-six what published my first story in nineteen seventy one. So I was already a well. Established author had written a hammer. Ask novels I'd written sixty seventy eighty short stories I'd won awards. I was pretty well established. Yeah but in those days and a and that stage of my career I worked largely anonymity In fact on many of my novels I didn't even tell my agents that was working on a lot of writers work on a basis of of They write three sample chapters outline and they sell the book and then they're given a deadline for it. I never liked that model because you know I was never good with deadlines even even when I was a student at the deal up here in in Evanston graduate school headlines. I didn't take you know when they went Kamanga seen or newspaper. You know newspaper deadlines every day. No and I think I'll go from argosy more Time magazine. The in you know. Give me a little time to fish. But it'd be better so I never sold my novels that way. I would start to work on a novel and then when it was finished I I would call it my agent say look I finished come please go sell it for me and they would. That's great but when I started a throng of ice and fire and the books came out and they became increasingly popular largely through word of mouth. No each one doing better than the last and in and building up a certain amount of momentum suddenly people begin anticipating next one and for the first time I got ripples of Will Win is coming coming out. A why isn't coming out this year to other right over. Here he publishes a book every year. I'm I'm not that other writer. I'm I've always been slow. I mean I have people people who who started twenty years after me who have like forty novels Trenton. Ten and it just increases as the series became more and more popular of course and I. I had this not a blog which I started. You know I was like the last person in the world. I started blogging when everybody else had stopped talking and switched to twitter. I'm always a little behind the curve. Here you know And I tried to explain. I figured the fans would well. I'm I'm working on it guys. Don't worry it'll come out eventually. I thought that would do it but it didn't do it. It was like when did it for some people I think once again you know yeah they get one hundred people saying take as long as you want no problem but for some it was throwing gasoline on the fire. Well that's not an explanation. What are you doing? Why are you should be writing? You know why are you doing anything. and Ed a certain point I. I gave up trying to manage fan expertise asset just said well you know I'm writing it. It'll be done when it's done uh-huh I some days. They have good days and I write five six pages. That's a great day for me. Some days I struggle and barely get half a page on some days. I go in and I look at what I wrote last week and say this is all terrible and I rip it up and started all over again so that has me wondering I mean. I think we're at such a fascinating time of fandom rate I mean speaking of nursery I think especially makers are facing so much pressure from their fans in a way that they didn't before simply because of the Internet right. It's like people can tweet at you all the time and I wonder like in some ways. I think that's a really beautiful thing. I think it's really exciting. That people love something enough to have that much passion in that many strong opinions about it. When I imagine for a guy like you that can also be really frustrating? It can be I. I think like like most writers I think this is true of the vast majority writers and probably a lot of artists of other sorts to you know mm-hmm we like praise. And it. It you know we absorb it eerily like sponges but then in one sense is slides off off our back and we hate criticism system. So you know I I can get one hundred good reviews and people saying great. We love you go on marking at me. And I'll yeah obsessed. Act that bad review scab and you know I admit to that. At least there's a lot of writers who oh no bad reviews. Don't bother author does bother them. I know their secrets behind. Closed Doors. So you know there are good things about the Internet certainly A.. and like everybody else living in twenty first century America. I'm I'm addicted to it but like many addictions. I don't think it's necessarily good for you. And they're are there are one. I think is really bad things about the Internet and I'm not just talking. Let me make this very clear here. Because I've I've given other interviews. Where made made general statements about the Internet and and and it gets picked up on on sure websites and made us? If I'm talking directly about my fans irs is on fire. I'm not talking about just the way it is everything. Kind of discourse on the Internet is a horrible level of of negativity activity and attacks. Twitter mobs and So tall and it's it's it's empowered Howard bunny anonymity that people can be anonymous where people can hide behind some some false thing and nobody would come up. You say some of the things that people write on twitter. They'd get punched in the nose or they'd have to take responsibility for comments but it empowers cowardice. You can you can attack people you can say horrible things you so you can say racist things misogynists things whatever you want and hide behind some false name and even if you get banned from twitter then in your pop up the next day with another new pseudonym and also the whole structure of it where how many characters is it like one hundred. I'm forty one forty. They expanded it now. It's too many you can pretty much say whatever you want. It's too many. Maybe but it's also not enough if I mean that's very true. My main vehicle for interacting with the Internet is still my blog but for the most part when I post there I post long things that you know. We've it written on a typewriter or thing would be three or four pages of thoughts or at least a page several paragraphs I develop arguments. Make jokes I do things. And I can't talk in one hundred forty character bursts here I mean real discussion any kind of meaningful dialogue between you and beams is more nuanced that and there should be some give and take and you should be able to make kindly fairly structured and complicated arguments or discussions and the Internet takes that away from us. Yeah I like to say The odds of you actually being able to change. Somebody's mind on twitter and facebook purchase like nonexistent distant. That's where people go to double down on whatever preconceived notions they have. And there's not a lot of wiggle room around. The George reminds us of something that's kind of obvious but also surprising which is the fact that the HBO series wasn't actually always assure sure thing remember sitting around with them saying well. I hope we get at least three seasons because we react. We really want to do to read wedding. That'll be you know enormous thing. I hope we get at least that far. And he names his favorite characters. From game of thrones. You're listening Turner died so you mentioned upcoming HBO shows. I'm really curious to chat with you. A little bit about what you see as the the future of the genre fine fantasy because I know I've been very excited even just over the last couple years about all the new stuff that's been coming coming out from folks like Jemison Nettie Okoro for and you know there's some good stuff where you can tell. These people grew up on the Canon and are just like totally blowing it up in terms of their imagination and excitement. And I think it's really exciting and I'm curious kind of what your take on. That is too you. I'm very pleased and proud of the success. Of Game of thrones has achieved people. Ask Me If I expected it and you know I I didn't expect it. How could you expect you when you start a book you hope that it will sell? Well he maybe. Even in Deir dream it'll be a best seller appear on the list when you start a TV show you hope it. We'll get it first of all. You hope it will get on the air right. Because I've I've been in this pisses long time many shows don't get on the air you write a pilot script. They never make it or they make the pilot but they decided not to do the series. You're always you're always worried that far. You're and I when we started game thrown side. David Benny often Dan Weiss schober nurse and I remember sitting around with them and saying well I hope we get at least three seasons season. Because we re- We Really WanNa do to read wedding that that'll be you know enormous thing. I hope we get at least that far. And of course we got a lot further than that it built and built and one of the things besides the individual success that the show has had any impact has had on my life. One of the things that I'm proudest proudest about is the effect that it's had on fantasy. Because before game of thrones television did fantasy at all they and I was connected with some of the earlier fantasy shows but they would put it on at eight o'clock seven central. You know which was called the family hour back in the eighties nineties indies. And you couldn't do anything to controversial or adult then nothing to upset or small kids might be watching. Fantasy was considered a children's literature. And there's nothing wrong with children's literature I grew up reading the heinlein juveniles and and You know I've read the Hobbit and you know when you're a child you read children's books but I think fantasy let's see can be more than that yeah and with. Hbo We came a thrones. We showed something that readers had known for decades because fantasy books looks fantasy books written for adults had been on the best seller list for for twenty thirty years. The real nerds now. Well what's happening now. The enormous success of game of thrones has opened the floodgates and right now virtually every major fantasy is being developed by a someone or other around. The world. I mean Amazon has both Ah Token show going and a developing Robert Jordan's wheel of time net shooting right now. Rogge Lin Manuel Miranda is working with Patrick raw threats. To do the King Cure Chronic Patrick Russia she only fantasy with their slower than I am. The long awaited third one trillion. I could go on and on there's many others Dirk materials starts into I'm working at HBO. On another rudge's lessening project. I'm working with Chicago's own Nydia corridor on fierce death or Afro Future Ism a Science fiction fantasy book All of these different people Amazon Netflix EPIX stars. The list goes on and on. They're all looking for the next game of thrones and the question is what will happen now. I think if one or two of these shows succeed seed maybe not succeed. On a game of thrones level but succeed in that all they have a nice five year run on television. They get decent ratings. Maybe they win a few emmys or something like that. If one or two of them succeed television will be transformed. Then I think fantasy will become a genre of television just like cop shows and lawyer shows I mean you never you never see. Oh a cop show. We already have a cop show. We can't do that a cop show. Yeah we'll put another country And as a fantasy reader someone who has read many of these works and loves these works. That's the outcome. I would like to see the danger of course is if if all of these shows fail for one reason or another then. I think television which is run by success will back off from fantasy Santos and say oh. No game of thrones was a freakish one at a time occurrence and it can't be duplicated so we won't. We won't do it anymore and obviously honestly I don't want that to happen speaking of the HBO show. Do you have a favorite character that was brought to life through the show. Oh it's hard to pick one now. They're all my children. Do you have a favorite child Tyrian. Lancaster is certainly charactered. I've always slamming Gingrich just did. He's won four emmys himself as best supporting actor. He's great but also the the kids were were Marmaris. I mean macy Williams has aria an Sophie Turner's Johnson Isaac is brand They were incredible. Yeah and even more so because they came out of nowhere Nina gold or casting director found them doing like school plays and you know we had people coming coming right out of drama. School like John Bradley West who played Samuel Totally And to to agree Amelia Clark. She had done on very you know one kind of iffy horror movie and one Commercial for women's shelters and really very little on film could Harrington was Doing Warhorse Onto Westend But really didn't have a lot of film and television experience we were we. Were introducing a lot of new actors. And I think they've all acquitted themselves. They have they. Have I think Brienne of Tarsus probably my favorite wendling title in Christie Amazing. Amazing George are Martin. Thank you so much for chatting with me. It was really really a pleasure talking with my pleasure. It's about how great was George. Wasn't he just like delightful extra delightful. Is this other thing that I talked to many say. Hi I'm Dr Martin and you should listen to nerd. It recaps. His dark materials with Peterson. That's right y'all you enjoy. Net recaps game of thrones with Peter. Single you you might also like nerdy recaps his dark materials with Peter Sehgal. We're still with Peter we're going to recap his dark materials. Airs Monday nights on. HBO STARTING This coming Monday. That means our recaps. Episodes will come out the following Tuesday afternoon. Obviously we think it would be awesome if you watched the show along with us. There's also a whole bunch of books that the show is based on that are excellent. You don't have to do either of those things. If you just want to hang out with me and Peter Tricia Volta just make sure that your subscribed to nerdy recaps his dark materials with Peter Segal. It's a really great acronym it's an are hd m. w. p. s. so easy so simple no vowels. I don't know why that doesn't mean that Internet proper is going to be taking a break. While we do those recap so you can catch us on the other and of course keep in touch with us by signing up for the newsletter to. I put all kinds of great stuff in there you can sign up for it at WBZ dot org slash net. A after the show is produced by me. Greta Johnston along with Justin. Our co-creator is tricia Bogota. And our executive. A producer is Brendan Benazech. Net is supported in part by the Alfred P Sloan Foundation enhancing public understanding of science and technology in the modern world. Go Watch so we show with us. Hopefully it's good. I have no idea but I bet it's going to be good.

Hbo George R R Martin twitter HBO Stephen King writer Johnson Isaac Time magazine Chicago CHICAGO Jennifer xactly Sophie Turner Peter Tyrian Aria emmys Alfred P Sloan Foundation west rouse Peter Segal Komo Miami
Daily Nerd Brief September 22 2018

Talk Nerdy to Me

28:02 min | 2 years ago

Daily Nerd Brief September 22 2018

"Hey, listen. Not with me. Welcome to the weekend guys. This is Troy from Zia comments, talk nerdy to me and I have all the nerdy news that is fit to know for the weekend. Let me just do a little change up here. I am going to, boom. I'm going to share my desktop. The make myself smaller in the corner. So you don't have to stare at me. K. Wasn't what I was planning on doing, but. Made the wrong thing. Small. She said. Okay, they're screened. We're gonna move. Oh, move me down here. Put his leftist small. Guy psychedelic look in their inception. Sorry about that guys. Woo. Alway for the catch up so I can make sure everything looks good. Done in the Kerner. Minimize. All right. Let's go ahead and get started. I'm gonna make this interactive for you guys, so you can see what I'm talking about. Close l. I hope I'm pronouncing that right is set to direct Marvel's turtles. If you don't know the turtles were created by the celestial to defend earth from their evil while things are evil counterparts the deviance so that they're not of real popular group in marvel. Comics, I'm I'm surprised they're using them. They fall in line right around within humans. I mean, they're characters that are known. They're just not well liked are followed sound surprised. They're doing a movie for eternal 's, but they are. So let's let's hold out hope that this turns out to be good. There's no date yet and casting the only announced the director. Moving on more movies. Mr.. Blake, Shelton you probably know him from if you're a catchy music fan, you know him as like multiple Melva of the year award winner. He's also on the voice, the music singing competition. He's one of the judges slash mentors. He's been cast to be a voice in ugly dolls, the movie. If you don't remember dolls this drum circle with my cursor here outliving see it. This green dude. Here s one of the ugly dolls. They are exactly that they are ugly dolls. There's a big, big, big names in this thing. You got Blake Shelton Kelly. Clarkson Jonas pit bull want to Sykes in Gabriel, fluffy Iglesias. This is coming out in twenty nineteen. Mr. Shelton's going to be the character of ox who is the mayor of ugly Ville. The goes on tell you how cool Blake Shelton is we already know this is going to be on s. t. x. is based on the toy line by David Horvath and sun men Chem. And yeah, they won tore the year ward back in two thousand six. So this guy right here, Blake Shelton is going to be the voice of one of these are here. Egli dolls. Kingsman they have announced Kingsman three. And it's going to be starting turned Eggerton again as XY. Yeah, it's no date for yet. It's -posedly targeting November eight th of twenty nineteen follow up to the golden circle goal circle didn't do as well as the racial Kingsman. I actually liked it a little more. I love the brought in the American counterpart, the statesman. I would like to see them do a little more with that is going to be produced by von Matthew von, you probably know that name. He's also doing the reboot of kick ass. Great, great movie in itself based off of another Mark Miller comic. And like I said, is coming out November night of twenty nineteen. I, oh, I'm guessing that they will have the statesman because we see Jeff bridges. He was the main dude for the statesman. Champagne of believe was his codename Attaran Egger Eggerton Colin Firth, Mark strong who I thought dive in the last one. Maybe if he's back, that'd be cool. If not, maybe it's a flashback. Julianne Moore, I thought she died in the last one on Halle Berry is another one the statesman. Oh, good to see Elton John again and Channing Tatum. So yeah, the statesman are going to be on there because those are those are all statesman actors right there. So Kingsman three coming out November ninth of twenty nineteen. Video game guys, the app blow. If you are big starcraft slash the app blow player, dabble had several hit games. Expansions. It is coming to be an animated series at Netflix. Wow, that's gonna be. I hope it's not like the original doom that they did with Dwayne, the rock Johnson hope. It's better than that, which don't get me wrong. Doom wasn't bad, but it was just kind of lackluster. So this is done by the guy who did two guns in hell. Boy is going. Eureka. Yes, anime series activision, Cosby ager, Cosby's going to be the one doing this adaption for Netflix. He's a pretty prominent dude. Not only is he co creator of the scifi series Eureka which I just mentioned, which is why I mentioned it. He also co-founded boom studios, comics, publisher right there. So he is going to be putting your favorite game the oblong. Oh, into an anime series on Netflix. Okay. You may have heard you may not HBO is developing a watchmen series based on the watchman, Dave Gibbons? Alan more. They made a movie from it. They've made some prequel comics from it. Now they're bringing the watchman into the main DC universe because DC owns vertigo. Yeah, the. The musical composing for the wash Mun. HBO series. Ninth nails? Yeah, shirt. Resident addict is Ross are gonna be. Doing the musical score for the watchman HBO series, which leads me to believe is probably going to be just as dark as the comic book, which is good. The comic was great. It's a classic. If you have not read it, I was just picking it up before he watched the movie, the movie's a different and not as good alum more is in an excellent comic writer, and Dave Gibbons art fits perfectly with his writing. So go read watchmen before this comes down to be. Oh, so you have some history on the series. Another thing on h. b. o. the deuce this show I watched bow season so far. It's set in like nineteen seventies New York is following the rise of the porn industry. Basically in New York. It's really good. It's got James Franco playing two roles, brothers, he, he starts out working at a bar. They get tied in with the beginnings of porn with the mob, you know, massage parlors to the nudie booths to full on porn. I tell you, James, Franco Maggie Jill halls in it's also and she's a there to the really the main characters, the Franko character and see her James Franco playing the two brothers. And I apologize you guys listen on podcast you, you can Google it and see it. But yet he plays two brothers there. And yeah, they got renewed for a third season. It's going to be the final season. Supposedly. They are saying they always intended for it to be three seasons and done. They didn't want it to drag on and the deuce the that's a name slang name for the forty second street area there in New York City, which is where most of the story takes place. So if you have HBO and the only reason we have is for game of thrones and then you know, it's too much hassle to cancel it in the meantime till next season. So we watch us other stuff like the deuce and we were pleasantly surprised. The deuce was pretty good. K. collectible people funk, oh, pops the the funk os just won't stop the right the this generation's beanie babies just waiting for the bubble burst on this one. Funk, oh, has decided to release a set of pops based on not just based on game, it throws, but based on the creative team. Right. So you got Georgia. Are Martin David binney off, Dan, Weiss? Yeah. I mean, if you're into creators, I guess those are the three that are there tied to the game of thrones, but they're not characters and game of thrones this the creative team. So you can have the creative team Funke pops. They've also released some other Funke pops from game of thrones Asia carries like Lord virus. One of my favorite characters. You got y'all your yard, great, joy, oughta. Kirk Dr joy a lot gingery with his hammer brand stark and children of the forest and Barrick Dundar with his flaming sword. So these are all the funk oes that are going to be released. Dealing with game throws including the creative team. Okay. Here. Usually, I love Legos. This one I find terrifying this. This LEGO said is going to be the thing of nightmares. They made a life sized LEGO of the poured. They the Poor's were made on TV or on the movies to be these cute little bird looking things this LEGO. Is frigging scary looking. I, it's, it's not cute at any sense of the word. You know, set some five to three zero. You can open the mouth. The mouth opens and closes here supposedly the wings flat by pressing the tail in the back comes with this little little placard stand was information about the poor little pork mini figure, which is also not cute. Anyway, this set eight hundred eleven pieces. So it's not small. It's not big. You can see this picture with the mouth open and tell me that doesn't give you nightmares right there. That is while I scared, I'm scared. And you see here is demonstrated on the box. You push the Tel down and the wings flap open. It's seven inches tall? Yeah, just I get true LEGO or Star Wars fan for this thing because it is. So so much ugly and scary all in one set. But hey, to each their own, I don't like it. You might. Let's jump over to sad. Shoe sideshow has of late been branching out selling things. They're also selling art prints. Now, check this out. This is a limited edition. Alex Ross are print. It's going to be limited to two hundred selling for three hundred bucks. You can see on preorder comes out soon. Next couple of months before the end of the year. This one is uncanny x men. It's going to be signed by Mr.. Off. Ross is officially licensed by marvel limit two hundred. It's eighteen by twenty four inch hand signed by artists. That's always all hand sign because a lot of them will have the call auto pens, which is machine sign. These put a pin and Erin. The slide, the stuff in it does the automatic autograph for them. This one's hand signed. So he actually did this himself and it goes typical authenticity. You buy a framed. This is just. If you like the x. men, it looks like it's featuring storm right up front, but there's a plethora of the other x men around behind her. The burn catchers of better full-sized picture. This. See there. That's the hand sign issued a part by Mr Ross. There's the certificate will look like. And of course, since two hundred go number one to two hundred. Typically on these prints, you wanna get a lower number. And the reasoning of by the naked. I doubt you could tell the difference between number one and number two hundred. But the conventional thinking is the first ones that come off of the press are typically better. You know, the inks better. The press is not warn, but honestly, by the naked, I, I really doubt you will Bill telling difference looks like they're going to artists proves to. Ours proved prairie proof and I don't remember what EP stands for, but artists proves are the ones that they use the test out the printing predator proof. Sure. But I know that's another thing in EP. I don't remember. But yeah. We have a artists proof of an Alex Ross guardians of the galaxy, because all the rest were sold out. This thing is, like I said, it's going to be out in in Vancouver away ten pounds. It is taken from uncanny x. Men said in here. Well, it tells us on our you got colossus night crawler wolverine beast wise wolverine hyper beast Thunderbird and more. Yeah. Oh, ings Abeer us all of your in the background too. Nice piece an albatross pieces. You don't have to go to a major con to get. It's also hand signed by Alex Ross, which LA Times these cons. You're not gonna meet him anyway. If you think you're going to go to conning and meet Alex Ross, hem signed something. No, no, albatross doesn't. He doesn't do cons. He sends reps or people sell stuff for him. He's as a home to make these awesome pieces of art. You still have signed from him, but they have to send it to him to sign than back. This comes directly signed was her ticket by sideshow. K. some sad news tilt telltale games if you don't know who they are, they're the ones who make Walking Dead and Batman enemy within the episodic type story games. They last year, they laid off a ton of people and tried to streamline little bit to make more money not to make more money to make themselves more financially sound. Obviously that didn't work because they've they've with another round the layoffs and they are keeping a skeleton crew and as only finish the Walking Dead episodic game after that, they believe they're going to shutter the doors and lock them. If you were waiting for the wolf among us and stranger things, you're probably not going to see that the they're not gonna. Keep those around. They're gonna cancel. So they're gonna finish off, Walking Dead, it looks like, and then you know. No locked doors forever. So telltale games, it was nice knowing ya to, you know, sorry to go. Hopefully those guys will find jobs somewhere else. Pokemon go players, which I am one goatee, mystic. Okay. Pokemon go has kind of released a new couple new Pok Mon. They're really weird looking to. I haven't seen one yet. They were as the end of European Asia's community days. I guess they, they let them loose for half an hour. One has a head looks like a nut with Ditto body problem was when you caught one, it would immediately morph into a Ditto or chicken Rita. So people didn't get to keep those in their pokey decks and let me show you what those look like. This is what I'm telling you about right here. He's got like the little nut head with Ditto body. They'll I in the middle. They think that might be the kick Leon, this one, I, I have no idea what this one is, what their name dude looks weird. Let's kind of like a chameleon. I guess. But these are two of the new suspect. The data miners have found it in the system, the new suspected Pokemon, they're going to be coming out with, you know, Pok Mon when it first came out was huge book Mungo and it kind of died off for a while and then they released a bunch of other new staff with, you know, buddies and raids in achieve Mr. where they kind of want you made. You want to work together to get these achievements and it's it's having a resurgence. There's it's a slow resurgence. I've seen more and more people playing it. Like I said, I play it. I'm waiting to see these guys are here. I wanna catch him those. I gotta catch them all. Comic books. Marvel has unveiled, they're going to make Sheree. Number one, that is definitely number one, it's going to be a series. Sherry is to his sister. You know, the Black Panther sister, the really smart scientific one. She's getting her own series. This is one of the covers right there really, really pretty Kyle. Kind of like in that one. Let's see what else we got here. There's another whole bunch of other the avengers in the background, and I believe that's the only two, they show previews world. There's a handful at least probably ten different variant covers. They're all different variations with Sherry. Is going to follow her. You know, she's a genius level intelligence. They've kind of been hinting that she is one of the smartest people in marvel more smart, you know, smarter than Tony stark or banner, or even Hank him any of those guys. She supposedly head and shoulders above them. So this, I don't see date ones that come out. I wanna say, November, I could be wrong. Yes. Oh sure. He number one, she Enron title. Let's hope it sticks around longer than Black Panther. Did. Jumping over to the avengers. She hawk if you've been following recently you, she was the lawyer who got the blood transfusion from her cousin, Bruce banner, which gave her the gamma radiation in her blood. Her version of the hawk was always really slim model looking still strong just is still retained her intelligence just the yes, she was really thin and strong southern happened. One of the celestial came crashing earth and being curious, you know, she had to go touch when she touched Jones, started something in her in the gamma radiation is off the charts. You can see she is been this picture. And if your podcast, I'm sorry. Again, she's both up huge just like the regular incredible hulk and she is low worried about that. That in effect as effective her intelligence when she's in hulk form starting to. Speak in a small senses. Just like the hawk she has. Stephen strange range who you know, even though he's a mystic are sky, he was doctor before this. He's not stupid. We random tests on her come to find out the gamma radiation level on her is much higher than what's even Bruce banner. They're afraid, you know, she can. The game manifest itself as energy blasts through our hands. They're afraid that the this game build up will actually call to detonate like a bomb. So we've got that. Now she's a walking time bomb. She hoped kin explode pretty much killer butter out or really. Crazy, right? They keep changing these characters. That's one thing about comics that's constant is changed. Okay, marvel. Did they kill venom? That's a good question. If you've been reading the spoilers hair for them number safes, if you have it ready yet. If you don't want the spoilers, don't listen for the head. Okay. Venom number six. You see venom, the venom symbiosis has merged with the wreck stricklin symbo who was if you haven't been watching our briefs before. Now, it's they had symbols back in Vietnam who ran all these campaigns from him for them, though symbiosis could merge make this big dragon Grundel dragon, they all were supposed to answer to this. God named null who created them. He created him to be basically his servants to do his wars for him. He's trying to call them all back home. Them doesn't want to go and at least the restrict one doesn't. So he merges with the venom semio's. They eventually Eddie Brock is within them and the wreck Strickland symbiotic. They get knoll in front of this furnace. The wreck Strickland symbo sacrifices self too. Poll knoll into the furnace, the doors open and NEC's that. So he's trying to sacrifice hisself. He tells the venom symbiosis to turn off his pain receptors and leave venom doesn't do that. So you know, he's holding the furnace door closed with his back and at the end, you see, you know, venom Saint l. it was too much Eddie's all beaten and bloody in burned. And the venom symbiosis looks like he's pouring out of his mouth and nose area. Peers very much to be dead. So I, I have a hard time believing that would kill off them. But it sure appears like it right here in this scene. You know the Vince to be pooled or on the ground around Eddie. We don't know if he's dead or not, because ends with the Eddie saying, hey, Where'd you go? I can't hear you can't feel you. We'll find out in next him. Probably been number seven. I. That would be a tragic loss for marvel at killed off in them. I really don't believe they would. And if they did, I don't think he would say dead long. Okay, Justice league, they took a B-list villain. I won't tell you look at this picture here on podcast until you guys get Batman who laughs black Mana and cheetah. In this picture, one of them becomes a huge God killer. Who do you think guess guess. Okay, I'll tell you is cheetah. She somehow gets a hold of something from lex. Luther is goodie bag of treasures the he has in their legion of doom. It is called the tier of extinction and with that, she can kill gods and she does a spoilers if you don't want to know what's happening here don't listen. 'cause we're gonna give you the spoiler this dude dry hair that's beside Poseidon. She tracks down Poseidon her in black Manta. They're trying to find one. We'll make us cheetahs still has a beef against wonder, woman, longstanding hatred of her. She ends up killing Zion, but she kind of holds it over his, hey, no, hey, you wonder, wonder why your wounds are healing because of this. And she's no tells him about the terrible extinction. So after she kills beside. Trying to find information about the location of the graveyard, the gods, and we're wonder woman's at. Cheetah's kind of Oude that Chilin care who she has to kill to locate wonder, woman. She's going to. She wants to take out wonder woman. So we'll probably going to see a big. Battle between cheetah and wonder, woman problem is one woman not invulnerable anymore. She can. She can kill gods so she's not be lift or anymore. She may be able to take wonder woman out, but I don't see DC allowing that to happen pickup Justice league number eight. And you will get to see how cheetah gets powered how she wields it. All right guys. That is all that I have for you guys today. Whoop. I'm not going to ends. Yeah, police inscribe to this YouTube channel and give us a like and comment on this video. If you're listening on podcast, please subscribe to us on your favorite podcast platform. I will talk to you guys to Morrow later nerds.

Marvel Alex Ross HBO Blake Shelton Cheetah Eddie Brock Netflix HBO New York City Blake Shelton Kelly James Franco Bruce banner Dave Gibbons Kerner Sherry director Troy Jeff bridges DC Julianne Moore
Wed. 12/04 - Larry and Sergey Into The Sunset

Techmeme Ride Home

20:48 min | 1 year ago

Wed. 12/04 - Larry and Sergey Into The Sunset

"The tech name right home is sponsored all this week by Meta lab. Their slogan is meadow lab. We make interfaces for a decade medal. APP has helped some of the world's is top companies and entrepreneurs bill products that millions of people use every day. He probably didn't realize it at the time. But odds are you've use an APP that they've helped build or design and I'm talking about Apps like Slack Coin Base Facebook Messenger oculus lonely planet and many more. There's plenty of examples of innovative companies. That Meta lab has worked with and again this week. I'll be taking you through some of the case studies their greatest hits if you will but Milan wants to bring their unique design philosophy to your your project. Let them take your brainstorm and turn it into the next billion dollar APP from idea sketched on the back of a Napkin to a final shipped product. Check them out at medal APP dot. Co That's Meta lab dot co and when you get in touch as always tell them. Brian Saint you welcome to the tech name right home for Wednesday December fourth. Two thousand nine hundred nine brand today Larry and Sergei ride their segues segues off into the sunset a new entrant in the streaming wars more news from the reinvent conference. Youtube says it's our them. Change is working and the year that was in the world of Rennet. Here's what you missed today. In the world of tech late yesterday Sergei Brin and Larry Page posted a blog post announcing. Well let me just read it to you quote with Alphabet Alphabet now well established and Google and the other bets operating effectively as independent companies. It's the natural time to simplify our management structure. We've we've never been wants to hold onto management roles when we think there's a better way to run the company and alphabet and Google no longer need to CEO's and a president going forward sooner Pichai will be the CEO of both Google and alphabet. He will be the executive responsible and accountable for leading Google and managing alphabets investments assignments in our portfolio of other pets. We are deeply committed to Google and alphabet for the long term and will remain actively involved as board members shareholders and co-founders in addition Russian. We plan to continue talking with soon. Dr Regularly especially on topics we're passionate about end quote so the founders stepping down down from day to day roles at Google Slash alphabet. This was both a surprise and also not at all a surprise for a while. Now it's been an open secret in the value that the Google guys were basically checked out. Even Larry Page who was a Stencil the alphabet. CEO Even as soon was the CEO of Google and in a way nothing really changes depending on how you look at things. Larry and Sergei Still Control Alphabet Alphabet by way of their fifty one percent ownership of the super voting stock. They sit on the board of Directors Executive Committee so they still tell soon dr what to do and can can fire him if they so choose but at the same time. This is quite an important change of the guard and it comes at a super interesting time for alphabet as we've been discussing recently. The Google civil war the antitrust scrutiny the various executive executive scandals. Here's Casey Newton in his newsletter. This morning quote one popular theory was that they are fleeing something. Some speculated needed that they are fleeing a board investigation into ghouls troubled history of inappropriate relationships between Google's mostly males C. Suite and their subordinates. If you don't don't know the name Amanda Rosenberg you should or maybe. They are fleeing a period of historic worker. Unrest at Google others told me they must be leaving because of the ongoing antitrust antitrust investigations into the company quote later. He pulls an apt watchmen reference quote. It's hard not to look at Larry. Page's life and let's see a little doctor Manhattan in him. A young scientists becomes a Titan of industry in an accidental collision of technology and timing sending him into such rarefied air air that he all but loses interest in his former world. The rest of US shout questions at him forever. But we're just shouting into the void and quote indeed. This kind of reminds me of what an ex Google explained to me years ago around the time that alphabet was first set up. You have to understand and this person told me Larry and Sergei really do want to change the world. There's a reason why that sentiment is not just a cliche for all of the amazing impact. It's that Google Search and search advertising his head for all the ways that Google alphabet is an insanely good business on some level. Larry Mary. Ann Sergei we're always disappointed that in essence they ended up just reinventing the advertising wheel. Ninety nine percent of what Google Slash Alphabet does is advertising. Thus that was the explanation at the time for Alphabet yes. It was a way of streamlining the operations funds and organizing those other bets. But those other bets were there to keep Larry and Sergei interested. Maybe the best just haven't paid off soon enough. If I tell people all the time I love starting businesses I hate running them. I get bored. Wants things actually work out and run smoothly in essence. It's been twenty years of that now at Google. So maybe this is a bit of that or maybe it's just time but also and this is worth worth pointing out quoting dealer bone at the verge sooner pitch is rise through Google's ranks was well deserved because he has calmly and consistently delivered good products from the very first Google toolbar chrome Google's online APPs to ordering scattered hardware efforts. He steadily took on more of Google's user facing products. Until will eventually he took on the job of CEO. All of the stuff. Google made was innovative and smart but also directionless and unpolished. which is job was to take Google's products out of permanent Beta at the same time he's had to ensure future technologies especially those based on a I turned into real products for May purely product perspective effective which of course includes the look at products that make the whole thing go but chai has been very successful? Chai is not a corporate suit. Google is still google well and we'll still toss out weird ideas and still do weird stuff to the web and android all the time. But there's a sense of direction in the past few years that was lacking before end quote as we'll talk about on a weekend bonus episode this weekend now is certainly the time when Google could use someone with a strong sense of direction action at the helm because boy howdy. Is it looking like that. Company is going to be facing perhaps the biggest challenges of its life in the coming years so in that sense since maybe it really was past time for this sort of change to happen new entrant into the streaming wars plex today launched a free ad supported streaming service in around two hundred and twenty countries featuring thousands of movies and shows from studios like MGM Warner Brothers. Lionsgate and legendary. The back catalog of movies is impressive. Things like the the usual suspects the Terminator Apocalypse. Now rainman Teen Wolf. This is not just you know bottom of the barrel scraps stuff. This is stuff you might actually went to watch. Think of this as plexus answer to the roku channel and remember. It's totally free. Because adds quoting Sarah's in tech crunch judge today the service will feature both pre roll ads and traditional average but plex promises and add load. That's fifty to sixty percent less than what you'd otherwise otherwise find on broadcast television. Currently plex is leveraging ad network partnerships to sell those ads but says it may move into direct sales in twenty twenty. The service itself. Love lives right within Flexes Media Organization Software. This APP has evolved over the years to become more than just a do it yourself media player for home media today. Plex organizes your own media collections alongside podcasts web shows streaming news and music courtesy of title partnership the Free ad-supported it at content will now appear on the plex sidebar under a new movies and TV heading in this section. The content is organized in a somewhat. netflix style layout with image thumbnails. For easy browsing hubs for finding popular trending or genre specific content for example flexes also introduced. Several editorially. curated hubs as well as those personalized is to the user based on their cross platform cross content. Watch history in total. There are around seventy different hubs that could potentially show up here. Collect says quote. What if you could make your work take less work? Well so you can with Capterra capterra helps you find the right software for your needs fast. So you can get back to business even faster compares. Thousands of of software options read reviews an instantly narrow your favorites with Capterra. You'll have more time in no time. Find the right software right now. At capterra dot com slash last ride. CAPTERRA is the leading free online resource to help you find the best software solution for your business with over one million reviews of products from real software users. Discover everything you need to make an informed decision search more than seven hundred specific categories of software everything from project management to email marketing to Yoga August studio management. Everything no matter. What kind of software your business needs capterra makes it easy to discover the right solution fast? Visit CAPTERRA DOT dot com slash ride for free today to find the tools to make an informed. Suffer decision for Your Business. CAPTERRA DOT com slash ride CAPTERRA era. That's C. A.. P. T. E. R. R. A. dot com slash ride capterra software selection simplified. The holidays are time when many people think about giving back but when you donate how do you know what a charity can actually accomplish with your money. Imagine for example you want to help children and found to trustworthy organizations but they run different programs. One can save a child's life for every three hundred thousand dollars donated. Well the other can save a child's life for every three thousand. If you could tell the difference you donate to the one. That was a hundred times better at saving children's lives right. That's where it comes in give well-spent twenty thousand hours each year researching charities to solve this problem. They look for the charities that can save or improve lives the the most with your money. They publish a shortlist of the best charities they've found and share them publicly with donors. Like you for free learn. How much good your donation could do by visiting give well dot org slash ride home festival? Give well doesn't take a cut of your donation and first time donors will have their donations matched up to one thousand dollars if they donate through. Give well dot org slash ride home again. That's give well dot org slash bride home. More headlines from the reinvent conference Amazon has unveiled locals zones small data centers far far from Maine aws regions and made the availability of the previously announced. Outposts general quoting mostly cloudy quote customers can run outposts in two configurations in. Aws Native configuration. That uses the cloud leaders software as the primary interface and Vm Ware Cloud for aws configuration configuration. That will become available in early. Twenty Twenty Jesse said think of outposts as training wheels for the cloud designed for customers that want to run. Some of their applications is on hardware they control but also want to be able to take advantage of cloud services as makes sense. Local zones unveiled for the first time Tuesday or a little different different. Aws operates a huge network of data center regions around the world but any globally distributed network is subject to latency issues as the speed of light is a gating factor actor for some applications that require near real time feedback with local zones. Aws is extending its reach by building small data centers based around the AWS outpost design in strategic locations where it doesn't have a main region for example the first local zone will arrive in Los Angeles which is far enough away from. AWS's main West Coast Data Center operations in Oregon to cause problems for some customers. Bloomberg reported Tuesday that Disney animators were interested in. Aws outposts because the round round trip from Southern California to Eastern Oregon with taking too long local zones. Could help address those issues as well. Also announced yesterday Ed Sage Maker Studio a web based ID for machine learning workflows that offers ways to organize search and share projects data sets code and more lor and fraud detector an AI powered service to find. Anomalies in transactions. An enterprise search tool and something called code hoed Guru. A service to help spot computational expensive code a little bit of credit where do department mixed with big only if true department. You might remember that last year Youtube Youtube said it was tweaking. Its Algorithms the recommendation Algorithms to stop suggesting what it called borderline content content like conspiracy theories well youtube. Wants you to know that since doing so. It says that viewers are spending seventy percent less time on that content but they didn't provide much more in the way of details details to verify this quote. You said it was pushing users towards video from more reliable new sources pointing to Fox News and Brazilian radio outfit Jovem Compan- as examples. The company said that for searches for ongoing news events. Such as brexit ninety three percent of the top ten recommended videos are from Craters Youtube deems quote high authority the Company didn't disclose what sample size it used for that data or how many people click on the top videos under a given search urge or in what order to help direct viewers to more reliable information. Youtube said it had been showing users snippets of text news articles that it verifies Rafael as accurate particularly following breaking news events or displaying information panels that provide additional context that type of information will appear to viewers watching videos pushing people to issue vaccines according to the blog posts. Youtube said it relies on a number of factors to determine reliability including the amount of time a given video as watched how many times of videos clicked on as well as likes and dislikes. It also turns to about ten thousand contract workers around the world who review content which helps train it software to automate the process US and quote and meaningful changes coming to instagram. That APP says it will now require birth earth dates from new users in order to improve safety features for minors but also to better target ads for age restricted products until today. It's all you had to do to set up. An instagram account. was say that you are at least thirteen years old now. Quoting Writers Instagram said advertisers. Were we're not the driving force for the new requirements. Gambling and birth control are among other types of ads restricted to older audiences by instagram policies and laws. The policy change could help stave off passage of costly child. Safety and data privacy regulations as lawmakers and family safety groups in the United States Britain and elsewhere criticized the APP for exposing children to inappropriate material. The birthdate requirement is the latest step. INSTAGRAM has taken to move away. From long standing principles such as anonymity that had distinguished it from facebook namesake APP quote understanding how old people are is quite important to the work. We're doing not only to create age appropriate experiences but to live up to our longstanding standing rule not to allow access to young people instagram's head of product. The Shaw said in an interview with Reuters. He declined to specify age based features intesting but said age could be the basis for recommended privacy settings or education about staying safe online birthdates will not be visible to other users end quote finally today as they tend to do every year read it has published. It's it's twenty nine thousand nine retrospective headline numbers four hundred and thirty million monthly active users. which is up thirty percent year over year with one hundred ninety nine million posts this year? One point seven billion comments and thirty two billion up votes quoting tech crunch crunch the most updated post this year referenced. Read it's fundraise led by China's tencent which in February lead read. It's three hundred million dollars. Series D. valuing the site at three billion dollars users were concerned at the time the investment would lead to Chinese censorship which led them to flood the site with images that would be forbidden in China. One of these a photo of tank man at Tiananmen Square then became the most up voted post with two hundred twenty eight thousand votes. Meanwhile all the most voted Ama asked me anything post on the site was with Bill Gates which received one hundred and ten thousand votes read. It also noted a number of trans across us. It's over one hundred thousand active communities including sizeable increases in its top fifty beauty and style communities which grew more than sixty three percent and fifty two percent year over year respectively respectively to some extent these increases were driven by the blogger. Beauty feuds for example the are slash beauty guru chatter community jumped by eighty seven percent year over the year the arse slash skin-care addiction community was the most popular beauty community reaching over a million subscribers. Read it says wedding focused read it. Also grew with breath are slash weddings under ten K.. Up One hundred and nine percent and our slash bridezillas up by eight hundred fifty two percent year over year family and parenting communities grew by eighty seven percent year over year. The top fifty food communities grew thirty five percent year over year and several spirits focused communities grew like our slash Tequila up. Ninety nine percent are slash whiskey up. Fifty two percent are slash vodka up. Forty four percent are slash bourbon twenty seven percent and our slash winemaking sixteen percent the top fifty fitness and and wellness communities grew by thirty percent and quote. Oh and the most popular game of thrones sub read. It was a subset that likes to drag. Game of thrones rounds quitting the rap according to read it's Twenty Nineteen Year in review report which was released Wednesday the free folk sub read it is the most popular of the platforms. TV communities with the game of thrones separate it coming in at number two for the year. The free folk community is well known for among other things openly criticizing then. Game of thrones creators. Dan Weiss and David Benny off and posting slash discussing leaks whereas the straight GIO T. sub. Read it is usually the show's biggest cheerleader. And not as spoiler friendly free folk is also known for raising more than one hundred thirty thousand dollars for Emilia Clarke. Same you charity. The rest of rabbits top ten TV TV focused pages include in order the Bachelor Ru Paul's drag race big brother ninety day fiance teen mom. Og teen mom onto thunder Mifflin. Which is the office separated survivor? And Bravo's real housewives franchise and quote. Of course I remind you that our slash ride home exists. It's the sovereign it for this show where people tip me stories. They could end up being part of the show but also wear listeners. Like you sit back and commiserate with other listeners. Like you and debate the stuff that we talk about every every day. Check that out if you never have our slash ride home talk to you tomorrow.

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Mom vs. Texas

An Arm and a Leg

29:45 min | 1 year ago

Mom vs. Texas

"Hey there there's GonNa be some cursing in this story so if there's little kids with you right now maybe save this one for later up to you all right. Here's a show. It's raining for a second just as I get to Stepney Waxes House in Houston and it takes a minute for her to get a dog quiet so we can talk high high high. Of course I like letting strangers in my house right yeah. That's my favorite thing. I'd I talk with Stephanie. Because she's a little bit famous. She published a book last year about grieving her brother who died of a drug overdose and he was a little more famous her brother. There was a writer and producer on parks and Recreation Harris whittles when he died made news and now not coincidentally she's making a podcast about the the OPIOID epidemic. That's how we ended up talking to the first time and it's got people like Sarah Silverman and sees on sorry in it. Who loved her brother? And it's good but I did not fly flight to Houston to talk about that. I came to Houston because Stephanie told me this story how she lobbied the Texas legislature to make insurance companies cover hearing aids for kids. She's got a hearing impaired daughter and I was like that's a hell of a story and just before I came. Stephanie sent me some links for background. I'd seen most of them before four but one was a video from some group called let Texas here. It's her and her husband telling their story making a pitch. My Name is Stephanie Wax on Michael Michael Wax. We're married. We have a daughter. Her name is Iris is pretty. Slick is really Nice logo. There's experts. I'm hi I'm Dr Scott More Court. I'm the current president of the Texas Academy of Audiology and there's a cast of thousands dozens chiming in at the Texas here. The Air Texas led Texas whole thing and I was like this may not be the story I was hoping for this. Looks like a hearing aid industry or whatever orchestrated some campaign and she's just one of the people they got to be in their videos and go to the capital and so this works but the answer was no. That's not what it was. That video was made by a friend of hers. The Slick Logo Logo Stephanie's husband designed it. This story is the real thing. This is an arm and a leg show about the cost of healthcare. I'm Dan Weisman and on this season. We are focused on what. I'm going to call self-defense. What we can do ourselves and for each other right now because I gotta tell you? The cavalry isn't coming as I make this season. There are presidential candidates talking about big plans chain American healthcare. But the way I see it. Nothing's nothing's changing anytime soon. Let's say your dream candidate gets elected along with Dream Congress and they pass your dream legislation and they do it in the first hundred dates but let's forget about the odds of that happening for a second. Let's talk about the timing. A hundred days into the next presidential administration is like springtime twenty twenty one. And even if we're looking at a crazy schedule like world war two mobilization. It's a couple for years after that before anything takes effect twenty twenty three. That'd be super crazy and in a world where any of spur anyone we love could wind up with some kind of serious medical or financial mess like any time. That's a long time to wait for the capital. So this season we are going after stories about what's possible right now that's GonNa include stories about fighting off still don't seem right. I got one woman who's like an injustice and exploring what is and isn't possible to fight and we're going to have a feature called fucking do that. It's GonNa Be Pretty Fun and this story about Stephanie Wax. It begins five and a half years ago when Stephanie's daughter Iris Orissa's point and she was awesome. I know every parent thinks that their kid is just marvellously beautiful but she was a truly gorgeous newborn baby. DOC's had to take throughout a little early Se- section but she's great. Everything was fine. She started nursing immediately like already superstar ring and this isn't super memorable for most parents but it turns out hospitals run a million little tests on newborns. They're like oh I'm here to do this. Oh I'm here to test this I'll just fine poke and prod. Whatever so they come in and they were gonNA I do her newborn hearing screening and I think I was like literally in the bathroom and I was just do it? I you know whatever I don't care and they're like Hey She didn't pass. But a a lot of c-section babies don't pass the first time well run the test again tomorrow. Sign to come back tomorrow. They test your again again. She doesn't pass and at this point. I like start googling. They test her again. Third Day doesn't pass. They're like come back in a couple of weeks for follow up but hey ninety five percent of babies like this they ace the follow. So don't worry about it and she gets home and baby. Iris seems fine. There's a loud noise. She responds great but two weeks later after that test. They're like your baby has mild hearing loss and she's going to need hearing aids her whole life. Oh and here's a great big packet of stuff about all the ways kids like yours will struggle academically. They miss up to fifty percent or more of what's going on in the classroom and it's not just the classroom you know. There's things called incidental listening. which is how most babies? He's learn language there overhearing conversations children with hearing loss. Have trouble with that. You know if you're not looking directly at them they have trouble knowing that you're talking to them and like imagine that on the playground. They get a referral to a nice audiology centre. Irish get hearing aids at six weeks and and this is where Stephanie and Mike Find Out that hearing aids are not covered by insurance they're considered cosmetic which is insane but they are. It is the hearing aids cost six thousand dollars minimum appar minimum and they last about three to five years. They're like little computers. So you think about a lifetime of that. I don't do math but it seems like road. Add Up. Meanwhile there's other stuff going on our house. Had this mold infestation. We had to move into my parents. Errands like fifteen hundred square foot apartment and you know we were like on top of each other with a newborn it was hell it blurs together honestly because it was just like a fucking you no tidal wave of bad news and some of it is not funny. Even in retrospect the same exact time that we moved out of my house my brother went to Rehab for the first time. He was addicted to opiates six months later. He's back in Rehab 'cause now he's shooting heroin and then when Irish year old he goes back into Rehab again and a few weeks later he checks out and immediately. Od's and dies like I was in truly crippling depression. Yeah today four years. Later Stephanie Says Harris's death has defined her entire life. Everything's she's done the book the podcast the whole deal. It's because of him later in our visit. She's giving her baby a bath Harry named after Harris and she brings up advice. Her brother gave her. I told her I can hear it in her voice much she misses we were very close. Yeah my primary relationship in the can't tell I mean she's saying this while she's giving her baby a bath but yeah Stephanie's kids are going to be thirty before she spent as much time with them as she spent with her brother so it's a rough time. Yes Oh my crippling depression translates into action. So she starts writing like crazy easy that turns into the book and about a month. After Harris dies she finds this change Dot Org petition. That says it is messed up. They don't cover hearing aids in Texas and the state state legislature ought to change it and I signed the petition. And then I was like who's running this thing. And she finds out it's like one audiologist and one mom and she's like let saddle up. I'm in let's do this. And it's not about her family's finances they actually lucked into a grant that gives hearing bring aids to parents and infants with mild hearing loss and it covers irises. Speech therapy for a year and a half. The problem for her isn't financial need. It's personal I just into place to put a lot of my inability to bring my brother back my inability to change the fact that my daughter couldn't hear like all of these things happened at once that I couldn't fix and so here she goes. I think she finds out. It's late past the middle of the legislative session in two thousand fifteen and this is where she learns. There's a million steps more than you'd think so they're way behind. Here's how the Texas this legislature works. You start in the House get assigned to a committee if you pass their. Bill goes to a calendar committee which basically just sides. We're going to schedule this to be heard on the floor. A lot of bills IOS die right there and if it doesn't there and it does pass the House the whole thing happens again in the state Senate and they get one victory. The bill comes out of the first to me but then clock runs out. There's no time to deal with the calendar committee and in Texas when the clock runs out. It's a long time before you get another shot. Legislature splits Texas meets every two years there legislature and for six months. So you've got like a very small mall window to get something done and so it's it's wild and crazy and our political culture. Answer is famously fucked up. No the Texas suspect but that's pretty fucked Texas is fucked up and I'm like that means you're next. Shot was like two years away. What kept you going for two years and competitive unlike? I'm like we didn't win. There wasn't any question that we would do it again. There was no question action which I love. So there's not much due for a while but she's keeping a facebook group going and stuff and a year and a half later January twenty seventeen the Texas legislature is starting up again and she's ready. And by this time the audiologist who started the whole thing is being treated for cancer and can't even participate and one of the other moms has fallen away but she stephanie finds to other MOMS and it's the three of them they drive the whole thing through the state legislature with not that many other people so this was not some highly orchestrated campaign by the hearing aid industry to get something done. This wasn't the hearing aid industry pretending to be a giant army of MOMS. This was three MOMS pretending to be giant army of MOMS which is awesome another day time to get Irish. Get into my minivan totally we keep talking. It's spring two thousand seventeen and the MOMS. Just keep pushing. They get through the committee in the House and get through the Counter Committee. They get through the House floor and once they've cleared the house. Stephanie says the Insurance Industry backs backs off because she says it the math one. This was getting real. It's no longer something you can quietly kill in committee and to not that many kids need hearing hearing aids the insurance industry the money involved not that huge said. Do we really want to be like the reason why kids are not getting this coverage and so they sort of softened of course the bill sponsor in the Senate and they get won a super conservative Republican lowest cost. Here's a snippet from over campaign. ADS The disaster disaster on the border cannot be underestimated our sovereignty and our security are at risk. I'm lois course and I'm not willing to give up one one aunt of Texas to the drug cartels and the human traffickers not one and lowest cost is exactly what they need -cause Republicans run the legislature in Texas. We were if we had like sponsors. The bill who Democrats the bill wouldn't have made it. It just wouldn't have you know so you end up getting into bed with people like they had the worst you know and like but they're actually not the worst. I have my mind opened a bunch and senator. co-course has a profoundly indepth niece with a profoundly deaf daughter. It's a match and Stephanie. And these MOMS they keep doing their thing. Stephanie brings three a year old Irish to the capital. A bunch of times in her little cowboy boots and we walked around the hallways to every office and she shook their hands and said Hi. My name is Iris. And these are my hearing aids and I love them and I use them to hear and she love hearing. It's like she's obsessed. I've glitter on them like they're awesome and it's overwhelming it's tiring and union constantly just like bugging everyone you know like please. Oh please tax please call please email you know you're just like become this broken record and everyone's on the Internet asking should they want and but the bill is moving and then this weird thing happens. which is they run into resistance from a really unexpected place place and it looks like it could be pretty serious like the day before their big hearing in front of a Senate committee? Suddenly everything looks like it could be up in the air so we'll have more about that right after this. This season of an arm and a leg is a co production of public road productions and Kaiser Health News nonprofit newsroom that covers healthcare in America. Kaiser Health News is not affiliated with the giant healthcare provider Kaiser permanent. We'll have a little more on Kaiser Health News at the end of this episode. Okay Stephanie's GonNa tell me about how this new surprising resistance threatened her whole effort we've arrived at irises school so no more cursing I think for a while. There she is. She's looking at you. This is a strange mayor I said would be with me. I get to show me her hearing aids they really do have glitter on them. I can hear with the with them out. I just can't hear search for most of the next five hours. Stephanie keeps telling me the story while she slept. Cyrus home gets an IPAD in front of her gets chicken nuggets and Apple Pieces in Thomas. The tank engine in front of Baby Harry and eventually gets around bath time and dinner with Mike in bed for the kids before dinner. There's some playtime irises bedroom there's unicorns horns and rainbows everywhere. And Iris Drags in a full-size Guitar from another room and This is my Uncle Hill. Which is on my this is? It was nine mom's brothers he'd I off and she serenaded the rest of us. We left you hanging. Who suddenly hated? Stephanie's bill the Deaf Community as Stephanie describes it the Deaf Community in Texas says happened to be involved in another legislative fight at the same time and the other one was super contentious briefly. There's an idea that deafness is an identity. There's culture to be part of hearing AIDS cochlear. Implants you could say they're taking something away and in the other fight deaf people with this perspective. We're fighting with among others the cochlear implant association so deaf people in that fight. See that Stephanie's bill involved tack like hearing AIDS and implants in some way and suspicion. Stephanie and the other moms worked hard to get up to speed and make nice and clear things up there like honest our bill does not mean anybody has has to get hearing aids or implants that if you want them insurance can't say no but when that first Senate committee here rolls around. It's still not clear that everybody's he's comfortable and then day before the hearing Stephanie. Her family all swimming hole in Austin. It's the middle of the afternoon and Stephanie is in her swimsuit you get this. Notre from wonderful allies works the speech center. Iris gets therapy. Is this woman. Emails me from the center. Hello Stephanie Hello Stephanie Exclamation mation where she's like could be a problem Texas Association of the Daf just posted a call to action to attend the hearing. Asked everyone to sign up to testify testify against Stephanie's Bill and in the fighter on that other bill the deaf community has turned people out in force so it raises questions about what kind of opponents might show up the next day deaf people people from the business community just government mandates Stephanie's ally has an hi dear like how about the bill sponsor guest to talk I at any of these hearings maybe Senator Colquhoun I could address any potential opposition right up top. And here's some things you could say. I forward this in my bathing suit. At the swimming hole to the senator's chief Assaf Chief of staff writes back this email him at three fifty one he bryce. You've got four of six. Sorry can you clarify. I'm not exactly clear what you're asking and Stephanie's like sorry. Exclamation mark is writing back and forth sixteen tries to clarify hope. This makes more sense. Emma guy does not right back and so the next day. It's time for the hearing. We had no idea like. We had no word from her. We didn't know if she'd gotten this message. What her plan was and they didn't know who's going to be there from the deaf community? How pissed off might they be? So they're sitting there with their allies is. He's t shirts that Mike Design. Oh by the time. Stephanie gets telling me this part story Mike has just come back from putting the baby Tabet. Never how how anxious. Because they didn't get back back to us about it and so she sits down. She gives his testimony about how much it means to her personally. Actually I've seen the tape and Senator Cohorts starts with dry recitation. You might expect what the bill's going to do serves and then I will tell you on a personal note members And I'm so proud today to have my who was one of my favorite and the struggle that we went through the blessing that she has been to our family she says her niece and the niece's daughter who was also porn deck. We'll speak later. The daughter Got Coakley implants when she was just a year a year old. She speaks as well as we do. And is the most incredible thing I've ever seen so so emotional. I'm so proud tale. Oh my God not a dry eye. Every up every senator was crying member. It's legit intense but it was like that tactic of like get her niece to get get up and also represent the deaf community slam dunk three pointer. It was the whole issue. I mean slaved three point and the deaf community no show of force. This one deaf person speaks against the bill and the bill passes the committee unanimously. It passes the calendar committee it passes the State Senate and the governor signs it and it becomes law. Aw thought it was a pretty good story by the time it's done. Iris is begging her mom to come to bedtime. Okay I'M GONNA come in five minutes. Okay I promise you pinky swear five minutes one Oy Alexis at the time for five minutes. Yeah we talk longer than that because we need to talk about what all this means you know. This is just one battle Seattle in a huge fight. Great big picture. I mean. Last year Stephanie's Family Spent More than twenty thousand bucks on healthcare. All in and that is not counting the new you hearing aid Irish needed and the Special Bluetooth part which is extra though. It's her teacher where Mike in Class. Just for Iris. After insurance that stuff is still like ten thousand bucks except Stephanie found another grant from the elks and got paid for. This is why this is why I wanted to pass the bill. Because I'm like I am savvy and I'm scrappy and like my kids not GonNa fuck in need anything but that is not normal. That is not a normal response because because people are fucking busy or they have like seventeen jobs and like mouths to feed and like people like nobody has time for this or the energy or whatever and I don't know just I'm I'm a fighter I'm just I have a fight of a fight in my soul and it's interesting because I am like super fucking negative and cynical you know. My disposition is like very like I said glass-half-empty Kinda Girl I. I don't know like I must have some sort of hope positively or something in my body because I do feel like activism as possible and people can make change and you did it with a lot of help we did it. Yeah but you decided to. Yeah yeah yeah with tiny like I was like I was like. Oh Oh there's a hearing aid industry was or an appearance and videos like this. Was You my friend. Jeremy did it for car But you know you did this and it's possible like this is the question of what does it take. This is a lot is what he does but it also is interesting being how we think of I think giant streets into the economy instead of industries. How impossible up against them but like there you just did it without really didn't have a network TV show? I didn't even really have like a substantial following. I don't I think time hadn't published book yet. Now he's podcasts. You're now you're just your normal lady. Yeah you can you can like it takes takes a little bit of like craziness I think and it takes like the reason for us like the reason was very strong our kids and other ills get other people's kids in Texas. Yes fucking Damn Straight Outta my the fifty thousand. Uh Stephanie. WHITTLES WAX is the host of last day. That's a new podcast about the OPIOID epidemic. I think it starts with the story of her brother. Harris whittles and then expands way way. It is funny and Super Sad and Super Smart Reverie listening to this podcast. We'll have a link to last day description for this episode of an arm and leg. And if you're listening to this show for the first time welcome welcome you can find out more about I said arm and a leg show dot com. And of course you can subscribe where ever you get podcasts. I'm GONNA plug after the PODCAST company A.. CAST their distributing an arm and a leg this season so we like that but you just go subscribe and while you're there wherever you are. Why not leave us a review and actually if you are digging show there is one super special thing thing you can do for us right now? A website called discover pods has kind of people's choice awards for podcasts and this show is a finalist in two categories categories and one is best new podcast which I am pretty psyched about but the super special thing is somebody nominated us in the best. I true crime podcast category and we are a finalist which is genius or as the first new. Tiffany that we were nominated said so funny and end yet not funny at all. I mean this show has no cops no prosecutors no defense as far as I know the things we document here like the price rates of insulin do not break any actual laws which you might say is the real crime here and it's not exactly victimless. So I I really really want to win this award. I need your help wherever you're listening to this show. There should be a link to the awards where you can can vote. Please please please do it. And tell everybody you know you can find the link at our website to a whole spiel about why we ought to win arm. Intellectual Dot Com go there follow the link. Vote for us and then tell everybody you know to do the same thing if you think the way we deal with. Healthcare in this country is a crime. Let everybody know. And if you're good at twitter or instagram or whatever just go hype the heck out of this we are at arm and the lake show dot com. You'll find other cool stuff there to head over there. Vote for us and spread the word. Thank you you rock next week arm and leg my neighbor the healthcare Ninja Meredith. Bela wrote to me last year. She has survived for years and years as a type one diabetic often with no health insurance and never with a lot of income. She's learned how to work the system to get the help she needs and to make sure she doesn't pay more than she's supposed to. It hasn't been easy and it takes a a lot of time. But here's one thing figured out like there's only three things that you're fighting. You're looking for problems with competence problems with breathing problems with maliciousness and luckily most things are incompetence meredith's amazing story and more her secrets to navigating the cost of healthcare and maintaining your sanity. That's next time on an arm and a leg then daycare yourself. This episode was produced by me. Dan Weiss now our editor is an Heiferman are consulting managing producer. Is Daisy Rosario. Reo from music is by Dave winer and blue dot sessions. Adam Raimondo is our audio thanks this week to Stephanie Widows Wax Inspiring or maybe it's gently shaming me into finally starting to post transcripts of this show to our website. Her Baby Harry is deaf in one ear. She and her family are learning American sign language and she hosts transcripts up for show. Oh we can do it too. Starting with his arm and a leg show dot com slash transcripts. This season of an arm and leg is a co production with Kaiser Health News. That's a nonprofit news service about healthcare in America. It's an editorially independent program. Kaiser Family Foundation is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente big healthcare healthcare provider. The Sharon answer. That's this Guy Henry. J. Kaiser was what a lot of people used to call an industrials. He built ships. He made steel. He's melted aluminum. He poured a lot a lot of concrete just like a mid twentieth century. Elon Musk Henry. Kaiser died more than fifty years ago. The healthcare provider and the news named after him or offshoots of totally different little side projects. He created it's fun story. You can check it out at arm analog show dot com slash. Dan Weber is national editor for broadcast and Tanya English senior editor for broadcast innovation at Kaiser Holdings editorial liaisons to destroy finally. Thank you to some of our new backers on Patriot. I literally could not make this show without. Oh you pledge two bucks a month or more and you get a shoutout right here. Thanks this week to Ryan O'hare James Edward Johnson. Jill Stanton Becky Friedman Karen Ross Jason Comfort. Peggy Zabuski Trina Damn Graham Walters. Greg Herschel Debbie Lewis Rebecca Taylor Jeff Ernst Rachel Listener. Learn Lorne Kimmel Rob. Benny Patrick O'Connor Carol Fox Jessica Kayla Mike Hurley Adrian Vlach and K Ward. Thank you so much seeing seeing you come in and support. This show makes me feel so good. It's like slaved three pointers. This is a recommends. Every week we pick one of our favorite shows is and this is one. We think you're GONNA love when is walking into a bank not just walking into a bank finally four forty five. I got robbed this bank the score season one. The bank robber diaries gets you into the mind of one of California's most prolific bank robbers. Just terrified terrify. These people. Not only would they give me the cash they would give me. Their terror made me feel strong. Turns Out Robin Bank takes a lot more than just a plan or a gun the score the bank robber divers out now. A cast is home to the biggest podcast from the US and around the world subscribed to this show and hundreds more now via gas. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

Stephanie Texas Iris Stephanie Wax Mike Design Harris whittles Stephanie Says Harris Kaiser Health News Senate AIDS drug overdose Sarah Silverman Deaf Community Stepney Waxes House Legislature senator Senate Houston Slick
Sunday, April 14, 2019

60 Minutes

44:17 min | 2 years ago

Sunday, April 14, 2019

"Have you always wanted to speak a new language tribal? Whether it's for travel work or just for fun. Babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons can get you. Speaking confidently, and you new language choose from Spanish, French German and more you'll learn through real life dialogue, speech, recognition and interactive trainers. And Babbel's spaced repetition method actually makes you remember what you've learned. Try babble for free by texting minute to forty eight forty eight forty eight text minute to forty eight forty eight forty eight to try Babbo for free. The speaker is awesome. Awesome. House. Speaker Nancy Pelosi is the most powerful woman in American political history leading fractious Democratic Party AO C and her group on one size. I thought people the progressive group of aggressive unprogressive, and she's not afraid to stand up to President Trump. Please don't characterize shrank that I bring to this. They just have to know you throw punch you better. Take a punch. Would you know, the nice don't trust outsiders? He moved ruins begins its final season on HBO tonight. What you're watching is a I look at the very first scene. You don't have to be a fan to appreciate the acting and fantastical plot. Tonight. Go behind the scenes on one of the most expensive and epic TV shows ever. As the NBA playoffs tip off. This might be the overriding questioning basketball. Would this team in generation led by Steph curry, Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson able to triumph? We're not just the opposition. But over forces like ego, money and fatigue. It's inevitable. There's going to be some friction. Sometimes how do you guys handle conflict? We're going to be. I'm Steve Kroft. I'm Lesley star. I'm Scott Pelley. I'm interested in Cooper. I'm John Wertheim. I'm Bill Whitaker. Those stories tonight on sixty minutes. Ways. Carpool is not a boss ways. Carpool. It's not a taxi ways. Carpool is not the metro in DC riders ways. Carpool is not a slug line. What is ways carpool ways? Car pool is a new app that lets neighbors coworkers and fellow commuters ride together to work and home fast. Drivers say Hello to that express lane and get reimbursed for gas riders getting affordable commute and help. Save the planet and carpoolers get to know their neighbors and co workers a little bit better ways. Carpool is smart. Not only does it match you with people who are going your way it connects you with people who you'd actually want to ride with so you can commute smarter with no headaches people if you use ways ready, you know, it's built by community to give you the best traffic picture in real time. All the time. Ways carpool functions with the same high quality standards. Inefficiency? Download the ways carpool app today to catch a ride or give a ride to work or home ride together with ways carpet. Nancy Pelosi is the most powerful woman in American political history. She's been speaker of the house not once but twice and President George W Bush's nickname for her was three because of her place in line for the presidency under her leadership last year. The Democrats won back control of the house. The San Francisco liberal is now the voice of her party and chief critic of President Trump. She's also keeping close tabs on at least six house committees investigating the president, and she's pressing for release of the full unredacted Mullah report. The the report is about an attack on our elections by a foreign government. And we want to know about that we want to know about that in terms of being able to prevent it from happening again. So it's bigger even than Donald. Trump through says, she doesn't trust attorney general William bar. Do you think that the attorney general is covering anything up? I had no idea. And no idea you want us navy whitewashing. But I don't know if he's covering anything up. It's no use having that discussion. All we need to do is see the molar report and asking for the president's tax returns. It should not have taken this long for the president. He said he was under audit. When I was in a I was going to Martin Luther King breakfast in San Francisco, and one of the waiters there said to me, ma'am, speaker when the president says the mole reports going onto long just tell them not as long as your audit. Everybody has released the returns, and we will have legislation to say that everyone should must. But for the moment, he's been. So what's he hiding? Just hit her hundredth day as speaker. She recently called the president to ask for a meeting on infrastructure, but there's no sign that the gridlock that has plagued congress for years is easing one of the complaints. We've heard is that you don't reach across the aisle. Is it seems like right now nothing is getting done. You pass things. Whatever it is dies in the Senate died. Mooning together one hundred days the fact that we've been passed them in the house is a victory. Let's figure out the places where we can find common ground. There's always been bipartisan support for dreamers bipartisan support for gun safety bipartisan support for infrastructure, but why doesn't anything get done with? We just started. We just started with three months since we're in office. But you're talking about one hundred days per this president's been in office for two years, plus and we've been here three months. Hey, man, introduced to the idea of the spout power. The speaker is to set the agenda. We didn't have a speaker who would bring a gun Bill to the floor. We didn't have a speaker who would bring a dreamers issue to the floor. We do now. And that's a very big difference. That power of the speaker is awesome. Awesome. We feel successful and what we have done. But her becoming speaker was in doubt last December. When a group in her caucus agitated for a change to someone younger. It was the president of all people who rescued her in that now famous Oval Office meeting Nancy's in a situation where it's not easy for her to talk right now that did not sit well with her. Please don't characterize the trunk that I bring this as leader of the House Democrats who've just want a big victory right after the meeting. She walked to the mites center, orange coat with a whole new image her ascendance to the speakership no longer in jeopardy. Good afternoon. Using to be one of the very very few people who have stood up to him and to people to it is maybe not so much in public the way. This was televised. Well, that was his problem. In other words, I tried to say, let's not have this conversation in the public domain because you saying things that we have to contradict because they're not true. And he said, oh, I want the public to see will you want them to see that? You don't know what you're talking about? Really is what you said you've said if someone's ripping your face off you rip their face do that. And that's what it was. You know, you have this. I probably said, you know, they just have to know you throw punch you take a punch from grandmother. Then at the state of the union. She did her mocking clap, and it went viral now if you go to her own campaign website, you'll see she's touting herself as the patron Saint of shade. This is your new branding of Nancy bowlers. They made me kind of like a giant slayer almost or when I think that is killer. No, I think that happened to be a manifestation of the wind power that is coming forth now, but only one manifestation. Welcome to the tax today. She's a more self-assured Nancy Pelosi more willing to promote herself. I think I'm the best person to go forward. She told us that our democratic values are being threatened and says unabashedly that she is the right person to stand up for them as their founders said when they declared independence in the status in new nation. The times have found us time sound Lincoln not to be presumptuous to put ourselves in those categories, but the times had found us not because we're so great, but because of the urgency of the situation that country faces because of the situation the White House. Do you solemnly swear? In january. She swore in one hundred sixteenth congress that includes forty-three New Democrats from Republican districts who are called the moderates. Plus the most diverse caucus in history with unprecedented numbers of people of color and a wreck. Ninety one women. She is given high marks even among Republicans. We spoke to help you God. For her skills as a legislator in effective negotiator. We spoke to a group of democratic congresswoman veterans and freshman to ask how she wheels her power. She constantly is weaving. People together. That she was a moderate figure out how to do. Because she has the experience it's not easy to get through the legislative process and congress as coacher the progressive caucus. I feel like she doesn't try to shut something down before it needs to be shut down. How many of you are going to be willing to tell me how afraid you are her? She's the first person that has scared. The neck outta me. Honestly, but I have so much respect for her. And it's this combination of courage and grace, but why were you afraid of trust me? You don't wanna crosser? That's what I heard there were times early on where we had to take difficult votes kind of birth. We would run to the ladies remember to the vote. Run and hide some of them told us that they're afraid of you know, they're not vote against you. If they don't toe the line that they run out the bad. They do that. And they hide in phone booth. But men do that too. It's not just the women. But she does get pushback, for instance, from twenty nine year old Alexandria, oh, Cossio Cortez, a OC who has proposed some out of the mainstream measures. So you are contending with a group in congress over here on the left. Flank are these self-described socialist on the right? These moderate new yourself said that you're the only one who can unify everybody. And the question is can you by and large whatever intention, they came to congress with they know that we have to hold the center that we have doing go down the mainstream. They know that they do. But it doesn't look like that at looks. As if you're it's fractured. She likes to minimize the conflicts within her caucus between the moderates and the progressive who have these wings. A O C and her group on one side. It's I find people know it's the progressive group. It's more than I'm if aggressive in. Well, as I understand it. The progressives want radical change they wanna get rid of ObamaCare and replace it with Medicare for all. I was under the impression that you had said that you do not favor Medicare for all that AC. A Obamacare's better care at is better than Medicare. There's no question about that. The Ford will care benefits are better Medicare doesn't have a catastrophic plan. So if you want Medicare for all you're gonna have to change Medicare, and let's take a look at that. Well, Medicare for all it's not only being pushed by some members of your caucus. But also some of the presidential candidates, and it is allowing the president to say, you're also Shalit's do you know that when we did when Medicare was done by the congress at the time under Lyndon Johnson. Wrong. Reagan said Medicare will lead us to a socialist dictatorship. This is known going theme of the Republicans hell ever, I do reject socialism as a economic system, if people have that view, that's their view that is not the view of the Democratic Party speaker Pelosi is now the most public face of the Democratic Party. It's most successful fundraiser and the agenda-setter Democrats for we are for the people. She works tirelessly always on the move in three inch heels at seventy nine. I like that without the Gordon even when she takes time to visit one of our nine grandchildren as she did recently with Bella and her mother Christine Nancy second, it's brief this weekend. I came from Washington to San Francisco on Sunday in Los Angeles, Monday, Saint Louis, and then Chicago, and then New York and Ben Boston, and then Florida and then back to California and then back to Washington that's one week. Yeah. So lot of peanuts pretzels on the plane. It's not exactly an accident. That Nancy Pelosi became speaker, given how she grew up politics was the family business. Her father Thomas, della Sandro was a congressman from Baltimore. And then the mayor I was born into family. That was devoutly Catholic deeply patriotic and staunchly democratic she got married right out of college to Paul Pelosi, an investment banker and had five children in six years. Thank you very much. Mr Speaker at age forty six she was drafted to run for congress and won in nineteen eighty seven. When there were only twenty three women in the house, do solemnly swear. That when there were only twenty three did any of the big bulls. The man it was a men's club. Obviously encourage you to run for leadership. To lift your head up. You have to understand when only twenty three men are not threatened by the women in congress. They're not threatened by that. That's that's nice. It's nice. We have some women hatch on the top wind. You get to have numbers. And you wanna be run for leader. Let the different story, then they're like, why are they all gathering in the well, they all have the same color on today. What are they up to? We also have more women serving in congress than at any time before. In her prime at nearly eighty. She is deploying everything she's got into keeping the house in democratic hands flipping the Senate and above all defeating the president. How would you describe President Trump describe him? I think that he describes himself on a daily basis. I think that there's nobody in the country who knows better that he should not be president of the United States than Donald Trump. You think he knows it himself? I think he does. But I respect the office he holds and he's not worth the trouble of saying, you're so horrible. We can't work together. No. When you work you have complained quoting you, President Trump is engaging an unconstitutional assault on the constitution at night has what do you think the future of our system is if that's true? Well, I think our future is strong enough built on a strong foundation to withstand everything including the current occupant of the White House. I don't think there to term. So. Game of thrones has one more EMMY awards than any other television drama in history. When the eighth and final season begins tonight on HBO. Some thirty million Americans are expected to tune in tens of millions more will be watching live in nearly two hundred countries. And territories around the world the show is based on a series of fantasy novels written by George r Martin led the dragons and magic fool you. This is no kid show the characters are complex in the storylines full of graphic violence sex and shocking surprises, whether you're fan or not we thought you'd be interested to learn the unlikely story of how game of thrones began, and how it turned into one of the most popular television series ever made. Game of thrones is set in the mythical seven kingdoms of west rose. Ruler historically sits on the iron throne. Feuding families vibe for power. I have enough to one woman nip Yele shin and murder tools of the trade. Stat. Joint wall protects the seven kingdoms. Has come and with it the threat of total annihilation from a seemingly unstoppable army of the day for you. What is the show about power power? What it does to someone? How much we coveted how it goes wrong in the wrong hands. And how different is when you have it is when you coveting it. Please nearest toward area is the mother of dragons armies, raise dragons in his killed a lot of people in her quest to take the iron throne. That sheer number of ways that people are killed gets incredibly. We really kill amid. Didn't heiresses pretty old school depending the dragon show. So it can eat people. Indeed. But they like to charge them before they. About as always they like that meat cooked. Full down these steps serious says every her to the lesson. Christmasy Williams is are you start teenager seeking revenge for the murder of her father. How many people have you killed? I've lost count. I think in the book she has like the highest kill count Williams was twelve when game of thrones started. She's now twenty two this was her first acting job. I think. I wanted to dance. And then my second audition was for game of thrones. And then it looks just actors all over the world right now listening to that screaming things I do. The George or Morton is the novelist behind this murder and magic you see nineteen ninety six he published the first in his series of books called a song of ice and fire for years Hollywood pursued him trying to turn his books into movies. Their approach was inevitably to simplify them. Okay. These folks are too big. We have to cut it all down. I didn't want it simplified. So I said repeatedly the sexiest word Hollywood. No, that's the sexiest where no I don't want to do it until David Dan came along. So that earlier part of the sequence was pure CG, David and Dan or David Benny off. And Dan Weist the time they were young screenwriters and novelists with no television experience, but they love the massive scale of more than story. I mean, no disrespect that you were relatively novice in in this realm of television disrespectful. It's the fact we'd never produced anything ever produced anything that we thought we were facing with a real uphill. Title of trying to explain to him why he should avoid all of these film offers and accept these two guys who've never made a television show before in their lives. And really he just wanted to know if we knew the books, they knew the books cold and convince Morten that of HBO signed on they would make an epic cinematic television series. That was true to his story. I knew that none of the conventional networks wherever gonna put this on without take all the sex and ninety seven percent of violence and making it a kiddie show that was on eight o'clock. I wasn't gonna let that happen. Agree seeing it as a series about much more than just dragons into Cajun magic. If you have a story that is about the human heart in conflict with it self about these very basic human emotions about love, and and ambition and greed for power. It doesn't matter if there's a dragon then it or if it takes place alien planet, or if it takes place in in Faulkner's, Mississippi human stories, are humans stories are human stories to rest is is just furniture. I drink, and I know things that focus on the humanity of the characters is what appeal to Peter Dink Lynch. He plays Tyrian Lancaster, an outcast member of the ruling family of west rose Dink Leauge was the first actor to sign on despite reservations about the fantasy genre Jordan in this genre. Always have point shoots and big beards and relegated to either comic relief or angry warriors. Without romance and human characteristics. Really? And that just doesn't attract me as an actor. But this guy Tyrian Lancaster has all of that. And then some. Dinka recommended Lena Hiti to play his sister, the cunning and ruthless surgery. Lancaster? I love my brother. She also happens to be in an incestuous relationship with her other brother Jamie played by Nikolai Kosta WALDO, read the script. And I and then I was like who what I could remember half the couches in. It is confused ahead of names. Then you don't remember the names? I felt that in the beginning who's gonna watch incestuous twins dragons like you know, what I mean? Paul, thanks. I don't know. And then it showed all of that. David rose was shot in ten different countries. Dozens of locations many in remote, and desolate places. Hundreds of crew members worked behind the scenes, and in all more than twelve thousand extras were used attention to detail was critical. Major battle scene sometimes weeks to shoot and had to be carefully choreographed. And then there are the dragons the challenge was making them as lifelike as possible, especially when actress Emilia Clarke was supposed to be writing on them. Those seen start as cartoon like animation in a process called previous realization. Nelia Clark was then filmed writing what in early episodes was a pretty low tech contraption you're writing on a hard green show. And then there was a poll, I the end, and it was essentially like the dudes on the railway who and I'm kind of trying to like as bad as never. Like, how are you? Steak and people just gonna looking around. Does it look weird however edited together with special effects? Some of the most important sets. They actually built from the ground up like hassle black, which is an quarry outside Belfast actor kit Harrington who plays one of the central characters. Jon snow showed us around. But it's interesting that they built you feel like this is an actual castle. That's been here for hundreds of years. It's not some sort of CGI creation. That was always with Ryan's. I felt was amazing. It was a level of detail. The went beyond the audience. See John's new was killed in so black and then magically brought back to life. Other main characters weren't so lucky. It's Doric played by actor Sean bean appeared to be one of the most important characters in the beginning of the series. Then he got his head shopped off before the end of season one, I could not believe you killed off Ned stark. I have to reputation of being exceptionally bloodthirsty in person. You don't see very bloodthirsty Star Wars kills more people than I do. I mean right in the opening of Star Wars, they unleashed the death star against the planet Alder on, but you know, who's living on all plate. That should mean something. So I try to make you feel the deaths I don't necessarily have more than people. But I try to make you feel more after Ned stark was killed all the actors realized their characters could be next. We get all the all the scripts in one package all the scripts for that season. Does go to the end the last page of the last script of episode ten and go backwards to see if you were alive to see if I die. Yeah. You just wanted to heroic way. At least you don't wanna go out like offscreen. Like, hey, did you hear about period? What? You don't wanna go out that way? Brutality in game of thrones has been controversial particularly scenes of sexual violence. Degrading treatment of women actors Wendelin, Christy, Liam Cunningham, and John Bradley say there's a reason for showing it all, you know, terrible things happen to some of the women on the show. This story is loosely based on the war of the roses. And I would say learn learn that this is what has happened in history. And this is not what needs to happen in the future. Grownup show written? We're on the floor. Grownups violence disgusting. Yeah. We show clind of the reality of unpleasant, overly nature of what human beings are capable of doing with a human beings. Now that the final season is about to start their plans to shoot a prequel series HBO intends to turn council. Black and other locations in Northern Ireland into tourist attractions props used in the show or still stored in a warehouse outside Belfast dragon yet, it's a baby baby dragons wow for fan of the series. It's like visiting a shrine their stacks dummy. Dead bodies from battles dragon head skulls and one of kit Harrington's, most famous costumes, which weighs about thirty pounds. Haga? She. Barely all. Yeah. Wow. Remember Ned store and lost his head in season. One. We found it. That's that's neds head. Oh my God. Perhaps the most iconic characters of all and game of thrones. Or white walkers. Supernatural villains who control an army of zombie like followers old whites. Their look was created at the studio in Kent England by Barry gaur, and his team will say I walk are all the time. On all the time agreed to show us just how complex the makeup for white walkers is comfortable enough. They separate pieces of silicone or painstaking when you plied with glue then make up and paint fills in the details. The whole process takes about four hours the transformation is startling. I keep forgetting that. I am dressed like a white Walker. You would think would you would feel this. But it actually after while it's just kind of feels like your regular skin temperature. The patients will want to your body temperature. We'll think he's quite easy ticket that you're wearing something. It is like a second skin despite all the meticulous attention to detail and careful planning about halfway through the series. The thrones executive producers, Dan Weiss and David Benny off realized they had a problem TV show was catching up to the end of Georgia or Morton's books. Ordinate hit promised two more novels to end the story. But he'd missed all his deadlines. He told the producers how he thought his books would end. But he didn't have all the details. So the final seasons Weiss and Benny off produced the TV series from the beginning on their own decide how the game ends what is the feeling as a writer whose dreamed up all these characters over sudden too. See taken in a direction that is not directly of your making David Danot on the most popular TV show the world. I gave my baby effort action, and and it's not my baby anymore, but we are still my baby. The end of last season. John snow and the mother of dragons United with some of the leading families in west rose to try to stop the advancing army of the. But can't humans put aside their differences to save themselves or breed and distrust the end of the seven kingdoms. Whoa. Jay novas don't trust outside. His we can't tell you. How it all ends? But this is how the final season. The NBA playoffs tipped off this weekend. And the Golden State Warriors are trying to pull off what no team is accomplished in more than a half century. Not the Michael Jordan bulls. Not the Magic Johnson Lakers. Not the Larry bird's, Celtics. The warriors are attempting to make their fifth straight trip to the NBA finals and win their third straight title Golden State thrives with an extravagant collection of talent you'll hear from most of the star studded lineup in a moment. But the overriding question in basketball right now will the best team in a generation able to triumph over not just the opposition. But over human nature forces like ego, money and fatigue. We recently spent a week with the warriors in this their last season in Oakland, one observation among many when you're the hottest actum sports. The show starts early. Ninety minutes to tip off at oracle arena. Home of the warriors. Stephan curry emerges for his warm November. No matter the night. No matter the opponent fans show up early to want this curry launches dozens of shots every conceivable spot on the floor. Once he gets loose. He keeps. And for his final trick, the mother of all hill Mary's halfway to the locker room he dreamed, of course, he does. British shooter in the history of the NBA. He's only exhibiting the warriors embarrassment of riches. Here's Kevin Durant. MVP of the finals, two years run meet Klay Thompson. Team three pointers in a game. Earlier this season broke the NBA record. But wait, there's more. Stream on green among the best defenders in the league. And with thirty. It's DeMarcus cousins. This roster is enough to make a coke, relax. Steve Kerr who came on five years ago admits he takes a hands off approach with this team. The specially with curry when he tells them into anything, you don't tell stuffed orienting. No that's the trust. You have him. Yeah. I had to learn my first year coaching. It's probably midway through that first season. We're playing the clippers Steffes goes into this like curly. Neal person Asian Harlem, Globetrotters, round the back. I'm like like this don't dribble through traffic movable. And of course, swift. I walked back to the bench and good shots. But that was actually a key moment. The important thing for me to realize was who Steph was who clay is who are they they're gunslingers? Knows. What he sees it? He was an important role player on the Michael Jordan bulls teams in the late nineties. He told us the vibe at Golden State feels similar to a point. I sat watched Michael Jordan every night in Chicago, something special was happening. The differences it could happen from Steph. Kevin clay could happen from any one of those guys on a given night. We stuck around one day after practice to meet those guys. Along with veterans. Andrea Igwe Dawa finishing his Wheaties. Hey, John in stalwart, Shaun Livingston seeing. It was a rear five on one interview with the player's showing some signs of midseason fatigue. Go staff by told you Steph would be the last one you've predicted that. They were willing to confirm or deny that Korea's always late day shirt. Not until a few questions later when he gave himself. I'm gotta keep the bus waiting. This guy. Who? We've got the most wines. Great question the most elite. We do have a set time. No after games, we usually have time on the board when we used to be on a bus but couple guys don't even worry about that. He just come when I want. Not with standing the warriors style of play recalls of symphony. Emphasizing collective over the individual. There's so much talent on this team that you guys sometimes have to sacrifice ego. And you ever wonder what it would be like just put all your talents on display think we do you do that right now? Do you feel like you guys are sacrificing maybe minutes interns, say everybody if they really wanted to say we play forty minutes night shoot forty shots. Like enervate. I guess oh there on the podium with trophy. You're running around hugging everybody because you know, like, which I've been through together. So that's the phone part. Beyond the champagne soaked locker rooms and championship rings. They've also managed to transform the sport the warriors shoot from long range more often than they go to the rim. Making them near impossible to defend. It's changed the geometry of the game. And you're saying league wide. No guys are shooting three pointers from all over the reporters. Not a gimmick anymore. Not a gimmick. It's it's kind of a staple. That's deep will requires constant upkeep. Once practice and did we watched as to rant God in his extra work, his intensity is mesmerized? He's so dialed in it's like he's in the zone. Like zen state for decades. There was no Zan to the warriors. The only constant in their eighty two game seasons losing they want to twelve straight years without reaching the playoffs. Does that make a sweeter that you guys didn't start out at this champion caliber team? Trust me. I would allow the way my rookie, you're too. It wasn't fun winning twenty three games. But even last year when fifty eight games people thought that was a down year for us. And we want fifty eight games. I mean that would be a all time high for so many teams much said is feel like I've played for three different teams. What are you seeing that the team trying to figure it out to the status team that we've got now we're very confident who we are what we all bring to the table. I like this one but after five long seasons and five short summers. This one is beginning to show signs of wear and tear. This is worst. Ever the speed era? We've been playing you know, ninety one hundred games season and the grunted and not having off season. Also know that teams play their best basketball versus everyone's pretty in their game. When the warriors come to town this supposed to be that way. Especially when he was set the standard in hole league. You know, everybody wants to beat that every night backing up keeping this team going is an expensive proposition, the combined salaries of Cree Durant and Thompson alone are expected to top one hundred million dollars next season. The warriors already paid tens of millions in tax to the league for seating the NBA salary camp. More talent also means more ego when expectation and it's all complicated by free agency. There's been relentless speculation about Durant in particular leaving Golden State after the season if produced in unmistakable tension every day actually about free agency ice my teammates. My coaches round up the fans about it. Let's play basketball. It's inevitable. There's gonna be some friction. Sometimes how do you guys handle conflict? We were looking at him. He said pieces big word for you these days. What do you mean by that? Did you say? I'm sure thought about it. It's fallen largely to Kerr who had never coached before the warriors to foster the team's culture. He told us the bulk of his work is done outside of gametime. Drawing up the place is maybe twenty percent of what's eighty o-. Eighty is being a psychologist Steve Kerr strategy for dealing with the drama something he calls. The fun. Fact, he's put a premium on joy over this championship run. This is a coach who will cancel the occasional practice in favor of bonding time at the bowling alley. What's the fun factor? This season. The fun factor is your campaign promise. Have you met it? Yes. But it's harder than ever do something with the same group of people over and over again, maybe get on each other's more often. Anyone understand the burdens that come with winning with eight the titles to his name? It's curve is a knack for looking after his backups as well. As the starters relate to those guys the end of the bench, not just the stars relate to the stars. Oh, my favorite nights. Are when our starters play really well and our bench gets to play like whole quarter fourth quarter during that fourth quarter are starters are jumping for joy, that's the ultimate for you. In this top to bottom spirits seeps all the way into the teams laundry room. We made the rounds after a game one night with Eric. How's it director of team operations who has been with the warriors since the nineteen eighties? Among his duties keeping track of all those shoots. Does everything for our team many championship teams give their employees remains the warriors didn't just give housing ring. They surprised him with one at center court during the ceremony man heart saying, can I was like really, you know, me what does that mean to the time and effort put into it that they recognize that you still get emotional talking about this, don't you? It was just an incredible feeling next season. The warriors will pack it all up and move across the bay to downtown San Francisco, the new arena is ten miles. But a world away from Oakland. Team president Rick welts gave us a tour of the model for side suites, which come flush with the Butler and private wine storage. What's the price point? If you have to ask you can't afford it. Most fans can't afford it at two million dollars per suite each season. The warriors may have sold out every game at four but many of the faithful won't be able to follow their team to San Francisco. The warriors me so much to us Tyree as Sean lives in Oakland in walks. Forty five minutes to every game at oracle their home of the warriors for the last forty seven years. What's the vibe in Oakland about this mood? How people feel about that? Good man, because it's hor when the team you've been holding down for so long, even when it was bad is is kind of leave you, you know, roofs on the floor. The warriors still have the NBA's longest season ticket waiting list. We were thinner quarter of the new arena the day after the concrete was poured of we told your owners they paid three times of let for the building of paid to buy the team ten years ago. I prefer you didn't describe it to exactly that way. So of course, we could resist Joe lak- venture capitalist in Peter Guber. A Hollywood producer bought the team in two thousand ten for. What was then the highest price ever for an NBA franchise. The warriors are now worth at least seven times. So the good news. Is you paid four hundred fifty million dollars for a franchise now? Valued at three billion, the bad news is you're gonna spend over a billion on a new arena, privately finance guys paid for that everything every dollar is not one dollar public. Any and it makes him very nervous. He calls me. All the time. I said don't worry. We're gonna get through. I worry every minutes. The warriors is that right? To worry worry. Stay worrying say why are you in? But we noticed the laughter stops abruptly when you call this team, the defending champions you guys enter the play offs and best. You can do is defend. That's bad perspective that perspective. How would you you restrain like you have to shift to attack? You gotta go after you can't just sit in like, I'm protecting something. We'd are cocky to walk hair say are trophies ours. We gotta defend you from it. We just gonna go get it June. This team may get it's three peat dynasty. Dynasty or the joy Reid may end. Either way let the owners do the Golden State worry the coach is happy to savor the moment. So our last year at our last year in Oakland, and this city has been really special to us and to the warriors for the last four decades or so.

NBA president Nancy Pelosi San Francisco congress HBO Medicare basketball President Trump Kevin Durant Oakland Klay Thompson President George W Bush us Paul Pelosi White House Steve Kerr Michael Jordan Senate