17 Burst results for "Dan Shaw Bell"

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Dan shaw bell in fewer than ten minutes. My goal is to extract the best bryson. The world's smartest and most interesting people might ask them just five questions. My guest today is singer. Songwriter and actor. Jesse mccartney jesse's first three albums made the top fifteen of the billboard top two hundred and his most known for his singles beautiful soul and leaving he's performed and collaborated with t pain new kids on the block and backstreet boys. He's appeared in fear. The walking dead and alvin and the chipmunks jesse's first album and seven years is called next stage. We talk about everything from the inspiration for the album to growing up as a popstar during this podcast episode jesse. Welcome to five questions thanks. Dan appreciate him in. What were some of the negative implications of being a big pop star at such a young age. The biggest thing is grappling with missing dances. Which you know obviously years later you'll look back and you're like how insignificant but at the time it's very real you know for you as as a child you know missing things like graduations. Although i made mine. I barely made it and i didn't get to go to my senior year of high school. I didn't get to be with my class that i rule up with since kindergarten in new york. I was in los angeles working. So i think just missing the little things especially when you grow up with them and then you're thrown into this world. It's easy now to look back. But i remember then thinking this is terrible. I'm not going to go to my junior prom or my senior prom. So i think those moments kind of sting when you're sixteen but i certainly wouldn't trade it. I think it was a fair tradeoff overall. Yeah i mean. We're only looking back in hindsight now and a lot of childhood stars have to make those sacrifices in order to capitalize on their momentum and talents when they're young. Because now you know people. The who you are if you released music. It's more likely to get low rather than someone who has not put in the years when they're when they're a kid and you started at such a young age you know at seven years old so That definitely gives you an advantage. What obstacles did you encounter as you transitioned from being in a boy band to your own solo career. And how did you overcome them. The biggest thing was a hurdling. The fact that i was doing it now by myself on stage carrying the show but also it was after a time where things were a little contentious between myself or the band and the producers kind of when i learned what the industry is gonna be what it was about that. It wasn't just getting up on stage singing that there was business behind it..

Dan shaw bell Jesse mccartney jesse chipmunks jesse alvin jesse Dan los angeles new york
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"My goal is to extract the best advisement in the world's smartest and most interesting people might ask them questions my guess. Today's actress podcastone entrepreneur. Sophia bush may know sophia. As a co star of one tree hill alongside past five questions. Guest hillary burden but she's also started movies like john tucker must die an incredible to she's been a longtime environmentalist co founder of fashion kind. A sustainable luxury fashion company. We talk about both are acting in entrepreneurial career during this podcast episode. Welcome to five questions at the thanking me here even though you wanna play volleyball team to do theatre growing up. How did your experience on stage make you realize that you were meant to be an actress. I don't know if it was the immediate experience. But i think that the years that followed really slowly led me to realize that that's where my passion ignited. English was always my favorite subject. And yet i thought i was supposed to go to med school. And you know be be a good first generation I realized that. I wanted to try something else. And i'm very very thankful that my school called my that year. I didn't even think my career as possible. I only have been able to follow your passion and see this new side of yourself Even in childhood to be an actress. But you've gravitated towards fashion and entrepeneurship as well as the co founder of the luxury fashion company fashion kind. When did you originally connect with the co founder. And how do you both complement each other. Things actually two thousand seventeen and we know that because a friend of mine went to business school with her and just said listen. This woman wants to change fashion in its global impact for me. There's also the sort of lifelong admiration for the art of it. I have such respect for fashion and also the world fast fashion is really kind of destroying the planet. I have no idea how to be a person who needs to use it for my work but also wants to change it i just. I don't. I don't know what i'm supposed to do. I'm one person. How does this work. And i was introduced nina fair him and she said you know i'm starting. This company called fashion kind. The reality is that if you want to create change in markets you have to create change at the abrash lots. We started really getting crafty on what that could look like. And i've been working behind the scenes with her for two and a half years. We've been able to track transit. What people are buying and how they're shopping is changing through this year of working from home. And we're really really excited about just entering some new ideas data points into the conversation around how we consume and what be consumed. That feels like a really exciting conversation. You know play this small party. Yeah i love that. Especially because you're environmental activist in. He mentioned various stats. Like i'm a staff person myself. And i believe it. Data is a geek. Did you have that type of education going into this business. And what skills do you think you learned as an actor experienced. You had that you can bring into this company and then what you think from this company you can learn and apply to your career as an actress. I am always studying data. I love stats. I love percentages love information. I love to know what's happening. Globally has changing things are trending learning some of the stats in environmental work and also in human rights work. I thought okay. There have to be some story points. We can connect people because most people don't know this. Most people aren't being given this information. People are busy going to work providing for their families. I really believe that. One of the things i'm good at. We hear about the number of garment workers who were killed in a factory in bangladesh because it collapsed when we hear about people who've died in fires in the same working environments we have to remember their humanity. We have to know how our purchases which feel inconsequential might be affecting those people being carved. I'm a storyteller. I can come in and talk to my partner who is an incredible nba. Mind and say this is how we have to explain this story. I have the privilege of this platform. So i get the a megaphone for issues like this. I get to talk about human rights in terms of fashion in terms of environmental justice in terms of equity. And if i get to make those connections for people that that gives real purpose to my career. I am accents and i call myself a data storyteller. I assume that you can say the same about yourself is using data to tell the story because data gift. The story credibility people want to work for or by from brands that have the same values as now get to be environmental justice advocate. And how does fashion kind of these issues. Specifically the environment was really what kicked off all of my social activism. In the first place. I grew up in southern california. My entire life my best memories have revolved around being outside experiencing nature by no means. Do i believe i'm environmental justice expert. What a ham is a person who shows up to learn from environmental testing experts communities of color are disproportionately harmed by environmental injustice. Women and girls are disproportionately harmed by environmental injustice. These things are so important to us to you. Connect eliminate and so in figuring out how to have those conversations about housing justice about food access as justice. All of these things route back to the environment we think about fashion as a formality. We all wear clothes every single day. Clothing is as essential to human life as sleep and if we can begin to understand that what we wear effects people. We can begin to make more conscious choices. Not only is it about brands. That work sustainably in their environment. So that harvest materials sustainably or that die their materials sustainably. But it's about how do we sustain the human beings who are doing better so that they can continue to do so answer that they can continue to provide for their families. I do agree that people wanna know how things are made in grown doused between fashion and food. You're elevating messages and data. That would not get the airtime because they need because a lot of people who are the researchers usually don't have the big pot for people with big platforms dollah data. But i do. And i'm like cool just going to talk about it all the time to everyone who will listen to me and finally what is your best piece of career advice. You and i both whether we realized that are not as we were getting into. The early stages of our careers learns to be flexible. We stayed curious. We got creative and we kind of forged our roads by responding to what was happening in real time. Everybody out there is always like follow your passion. I'm like what does that even mean passions change but if you can follow what you're curious about if you pay attention to what you spend the most of your free time doing that might lead you into a portion of your career or into deepening of your career and also nobody wants to talk about these days because everybody just wants to seem like it just happened because that's like a cool thing to do on instagram or something that you have to work really really hard you have to be willing to start at the bottom. You have to be willing to bust your ass and learn you know you. Don't get to start at the top ever. i think it's having a real work ethic. I think it's being willing to respond to your curiosity as a clue requires flexibility. But will certainly you to more interesting places than you might have imagined. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom sophia to follow her journey can find her on instagram facebook and twitter we she shares her political and social views conversations family and company updates to watch the full extended video version of this episode go to youtube dot com slash dan shaw bell and please remember to rate and review the five questions. Podcast on itunes..

bangladesh twitter two and a half years southern california facebook itunes sophia john tucker five questions first generation Today both One youtube dot com instagram one person English two thousand seventeen Sophia bush nina fair
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"<Music> mark <Music> of outlook. <Speech_Music_Male> After because <Speech_Music_Male> I think <Speech_Music_Male> they has to be <Speech_Male> a serving <Silence> of truth. <Speech_Male> And a serving <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> of sweet <Speech_Male> so that people can <Speech_Male> accept like aspirin. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and. <SpeakerChange> What's your best <Speech_Male> piece of advice? <Speech_Male> The best <Speech_Male> pizza career advice <Speech_Music_Male> I ever <Speech_Music_Male> got was <Speech_Male> from our Chris Rock <Speech_Male> and he said, <Speech_Male> you don't have to know what you <Speech_Male> will do. Just <Speech_Male> what you want. The <Speech_Male> certain things <Speech_Male> that I <Speech_Male> just will not <Speech_Male> do. Are <Speech_Male> there certain product <Speech_Male> projects? I wouldn't <Speech_Male> take certain <Speech_Male> lines. 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So <Speech_Male> much easier <Speech_Male> to know what <Speech_Male> you won't do because <Speech_Male> that is a <Speech_Male> so fine <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That acting <Speech_Male> travels wear on. <Speech_Male> I think the whale <Speech_Male> part <SpeakerChange> is more <Speech_Male> nuanced. <Speech_Male> Don't set those boundaries. <Speech_Male> You could end up in <Speech_Male> a totally different path <Speech_Male> and where you would imagine absent <Speech_Male> in your <Speech_Male> life, and that <Speech_Male> will karcher <SpeakerChange> happiness <Speech_Male> and family <Speech_Male> everything that <Speech_Music_Male> you love and all <Speech_Male> in all of that <Speech_Male> is in one <Speech_Male> finite <Speech_Male> reality. <Speech_Male> Is encompassed <Speech_Music_Male> in that in that <Speech_Male> kind of retaining wall <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that you know. <Silence> <Advertisement> You <SpeakerChange> can't, Cross. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Thank <Speech_Male> you so much for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sharing your wisdom <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> l. to follow <Speech_Male> his journey can read his <Speech_Male> book surrender, White <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> People and find me on <Speech_Male> facebook instagram <Speech_Male> youtube and <Speech_Male> twitter. He shares political <Speech_Male> and social <Speech_Male> commentary appearances, <Speech_Male> news <Speech_Male> articles, clips from <Speech_Male> his radio show and important <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> voices in the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> African American <SpeakerChange> community. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Hope, you enjoyed <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> today's show <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and the amazing advice <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> guests <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> provided. Remember <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that you can only <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> benefit from advice <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> if you packed <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on it before <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you do, we <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> would appreciate your <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> feedback in <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the form of a review. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You can <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> leave a review on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> itunes stitcher <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> or a <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> pod catcher of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> your choice. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Your feedback <Speech_Music_Female> would be very much <Speech_Music_Female> appreciated <Speech_Music_Female> head over to <Speech_Music_Female> Dan Shaw Bell <Speech_Music_Female> Dot, com slash review. Now.

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

08:52 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Host Dan Shaw Bell. My goal secured create the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them. Just five questions. My guest today is former pro. Wrestler turned entrepreneur. Diamond Dallas page born in point pleasant New Jersey. His name came from his love of the Dallas Cowboys. Football Team after attending Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina. He started working fulltime running a nightclub in Florida while also being a rustling manager in the American Wrestling Association a year later he worked as a color commentator in Florida championship wrestling which became professional wrestling. Federation working alongside Gordon so league. Before becoming a wrestler himself he was eventually brought into world championship wrestling after dusty. Rhodes offered him a contract at WCW. Ddp started as a manager that eventually rose up the ranks to become the United States. Heavyweight champion continued continued to Russell for the World Wrestling Federation after they bought. Wcw and went on to win the WWF tag team championship and WWF Eurropean Championship. During his time there. After suffering from a neck injury he retired but eventually came out of retirement and has made appearances in. Wwf total nonstop action wrestling all elite wrestling and other cents. More recently he was inducted into the Wwe Hall of fame published his. Second Book. Positively unstoppable and launched his fitness program DDP Yoga. Ddp was my favorite wrestler when I was watching WCW so excited to learn more about his experience as a rustler life lessons and what he's working on right now as a child you were raised by her father. And then your grandmother what impact they have on your life. What life lessons did you learn from them? Actually I didn't raise my dad bounce around. Apparently the family toes eight years old then. I ended up with my grandmother and she was an awesome lady. Pretty much raised myself where it's really helped me a lot. Is I have really great self parenting skills right back where I was doing cocaine when I was twenty eight years old and I realized. Wow this shit is way too good. This could own my life. I immediately stopped. You know I love the drink and and have the party Back when I was younger at some point I learned. Okay you don't WanNA blackout. Don't drink that much backed up by drinking self-discipline when everyone told me I couldn't do something. It wasn't so much I wanted to prove them wrong. Wanted to prove me right. You know when you do a lot of self parenting when you're younger. It can be super destructive or it could be super haven't pages. I think my life speaks for itself in your autobiography admitted dyslexic. And it's common that many of the world's most successful people are dyslexic. How was your dyslexia? Both strength and a weakness as you earn on super weakness when it came to Try and do study because it was impossible it was just like the and add and no one knew what the hell that was back then my skills as a communicator probably came way better than your average pair if you look at the guys who off the top of my head Tom Cruise Muhammad Ali Jay Leno. Pretty Damn good communicators. You learn how to work around at when I finally learned to read really in my mid forties having all the tools now My legacy speaks for so even though my friends love the wwe I was WCW fan and you were my favorite wrestler because I enjoyed your charisma and of course the diamond cutter finishing move. What was your favorite and least favorite part of being a pro wrestler? And what did you say your legacy is? The least part was the travel. I still hate the travel beginning. You'll love it but as time rolls on it will drag you. Burn you out love being in front of the people but don't need the chanting of DP even though that's an amazing drug keep me going. I really love the part about changing people's lives anytime you help someone man it makes you feel really good about you when they come back and tell you how you've changed your life and you've never even met that that super powerful. I literally had it as a wrestler but today I think what I'm doing today is overshadowing a all fame wrestling career and could be any prouder. My legacy will go down as the guy who really journey about other people and Want to see them do the best they can be. It's funny because Scott all once said when he was living counter ability he's dallies addiction is helping people and the more. I thought about that. I thought about guess he's right about that. When did your wife introduce you to yoga? And what transferable skills from rustling enabled you to create a successful Yoga fitness program? Originally Kimberly turned me on to it and I finally gave in to doing yoga. Because I'm a guy who wouldn't be caught dead doing yoga. The first forty two years of my life that I finally gave in because it was out of necessity and I don't even call. I do yoga because it's so different but it has a lot of the Yoga principles meaning the positioning and and some the flows what may DVD. Py Two different. And it's twenty years in the making. I'm constantly changing. Step up to make it even more accessible. That's the way you have to be in the ring. You know you've got to be growing and changing and know who you are as the character. Because at the beginning I was a job. Got A guy who got his asked me. And then I finally became like a lower mate card level guy and I fought my way up to being a mid card guy than a lower top guy and then a mid card top guy top top guy along the way you change now bad workout since start in bed like you can't get out of bed. I got five workouts for three workouts for you in bet. I've got eight workouts for you in a chair. I've got ten workouts view using a chair and then from there you can do any of my beginner. Intermediate advanced or cycle extreme workout. So I'm constantly changing and growing. You're only as good as your last match. You're only as good in life as your last accomplishment and a lot of people live off of one big accomplishment to me. I'm growing all the time and wrestler as you know sports entertainment or wrestler. One in the same you have to constantly be growing and changing Chris Jericho is the best example. Iraq is the best example I can give is. Ours is constantly growing constantly changing constantly taking on new things. He's never done before I today. Were not just a fitness company. You know I'm not just a fitness guru. We've got a whole production company agree. Do All of the Production Ray. W We do the vignettes that you say about the people like that's our production oriented another one of my company that other one is going into Protein drinks and you know things that are really helping tastes. Were going into a whole restaurant. Chain is in development right now and we'll be up and going by two thousand twenty one go but I wanNA get real foods of people you know. I've inspiring people wherever I can mentally physically. And what food they take it. And what's your best piece of career advice? Put the work in. Nothing happens without the work and if for some reason it does. You won't appreciate it if you're just given shit name me one thing in your life that you've been given like just give it and you appreciate that so much. Have you been given the opportunity? You never appreciate how hard it is to get there and when you finally get there you really appreciate it so to me. Put the work in. Thank you so much for. Share your wisdom. Dd Pay to follow. His journey can find him on twitter facebook Youtube instagram where he shares old wrestling photos. Yoga stretches exercise challenges is family travels and stress relief advice. We hope you enjoy today's show. And the amazing advice. Our guests provided. Remember that you can only benefit from advice if you act on it before you do. We would appreciate your feedback in the form of review. You can leave a review on itunes stitcher or Pod Catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan. Shaw Bell Dot Com Slash Review now..

WCW wrestling World Wrestling Federation Dan Shaw Bell American Wrestling Association Florida Dallas Cowboys Dallas Coastal Carolina University Wwf total nonstop action New Jersey South Carolina Wwe Hall Gordon Rhodes United States Football Muhammad Ali Jay Leno cocaine
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Bell. My goals recreate the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by ask them just five questions. My guest today is the Editor in Chief of Cosmopolitan Jessica palce. Boorda Atlanta Georgia. Jessica moved to New York City at each fourteen to study ballet at the American Ballet Theatre after earning her degree in film production New York University School of the Arts Jessica held various editorial positions at the New Yorker Vogue Glamour and Teen Vogue before becoming the Digital Director for Marie Claire Magazine. She left the magazine to accept a similar role at cosmopolitan which eventually led to her becoming the youngest person in the history of the magazine to be the editor in chief at each thirty two in her position. Jessica perceive the content and editorial operations for the magazine Web Social Video and editorial innovation projects as someone who has contributed articles to magazines in the past. I was excited to speak to Jessica about her journey. Perspectives advice and legacy. What did you learn in your prior job? Roles have prepared you for your current role. I think the biggest thing that I learned in previous roles that has powered me forward at every phase is really to lean on my. You know so. Many skills can be taught and learned and I've found over the years that real passion real enthusiasm and real investment in the work is something that's may be more rare and I have it in spades and so I Use that to keep me Fueled and to keep me exploring to keep innovating To keep me from resting on my laurel and I think that has been a through line in my career as a fellow millennial leader encountered a lot of ageism in my early twenties as I was trying to grow my career. What obstacles have you had to overcome to be the youngest person to ever hold your status position? I actually think for me and my particular place at cosmopolitan asset to be the youngest. I see because my audience is young and so perhaps in this one role as opposed to any other. It's not the age that's been a hurdle I really do. Think that it's been a really great way of messaging the brand connection with its audience and I've been really respected by senior leadership really supported so I feel it's been a good thing. You speak a lot about the importance of mentorship which is a topic. That is often talked about but misunderstood. Can You describe your ideal mentor relationship? Yes so I'm I'm lucky enough to be in this relationship right now My boss Kate. Lewis is the chief content officer of for hearst magazines and what we have is so ideal for For me as a worker because she gives me a ton of a ton of room to run I think really what she gives me that is so is most powerful and that she's giving me from day one. It's an immense amount of trust She's really trusted that I had the right sensibility that I had you know a good gut check that I Knew where to take things. And she's an amazing sounding board when I have questions and she always surprises me by saying something. I couldn't have anticipated that she would say. But it's not on and so I think the fact that she really gives me room to grow on my own but then grows me wh- actively when I come to her is what's so special and also she's just in a lovely human being whose very warm and as I mentioned earlier she brings her passions were to she deeply passionate about what she does. Nothing factious it helped me Focus on my own and nurture that at my own team over the course of my career. I've interviewed those. Held your position before. Like Joanna Coles Kate White. How do you think you'll be different from your predecessors and what unique contribution are you looking to make? Oh that's a big one. I hesitate to use the term legacy you because it's so heavy but I do think that if I if I have one I I wanted to be that I put the audience. I always I never got in the brands way in terms of serving the audience in the best way possible and I think we do that in a lot of great innovative ways. We're very data forward magazines. We obsessive about audience insights and we also are the audience. We are a group of millennial and Gen Z. Women That is very reflective of our readership. And so I always tell my team that I am not the boss of this brand the reader. The boss of this branch and I think being able to keep that front and center and to really really hold that up as my Ito but at the same time push forward and innovate and do things that the audience can't predict. I think that's I guess what I hope. It's my secret sauce. What's your best piece of career advice? Apply for everything. You're not qualified board If you have the belief that you can do it you can like I said skills can be learned. It's the passion and the drive that is Is more rare. I have been interviewing candidates for jobs for a decade and It's shocking to me. How few of them have ever says I want this job. I love what this company does and I think that really does make you stand out and can help you overcome. Obstacles like not having the twelfth bullet point on who list of bullet points that the ideal candidate has thank you so much for sharing your wisdom Jessica to follow. Her journey can find her on twitter. Instagram where she shares her magazine covers pictures with their family. Live appearances and walks in New York City. We hope you enjoy today's show. And the Amazing Advice. Our guests provided. Remember that you can only benefit from advice. If you packed on it before you do we would appreciate your feedback in the form of a review. You can leave a review on Itunes stitcher for Pod Catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan. Shaw Bell Dot Com Slash Review now..

Jessica New York City Editor in Chief Kate White Marie Claire Magazine Teen Vogue Atlanta American Ballet Theatre New York University School Georgia chief content officer twitter Digital Director Lewis Dan Joanna Coles
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

08:32 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Are you looking to reach their full? Potential and achieve success in business and in life want only tried and tested guidance from people who have truly made an impact. You have come to the right place. Welcome to five questions with Dan. Chevelle New York Times bestselling author Bell distills the most actionable and tangible advice. From a variety of world-class humans including entrepreneurs authors Olympians Politicians Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance practical advice and concrete solutions. Our our chat start. Welcome to the seventy third episode of the five questions. Podcast I'm your host. Dan Shaw Bell Goes Curate. The best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today is bestselling author and founder of the Ultra Wellness Center. Dr Mark Hyman born in New York. Mark moved to Idaho after graduating from medical school. Then he worked as an emergency room doctor nostitz before becoming the CO medical director at Canyon ranch after leaving the ranch. She opened the ultra wellness center over the past seven years mark has written countless bestselling books including his latest entitled food. Fix had a save our health our economy our communities in our planet one bite at a time. He is the medical director at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine in as a medical advisor to bill and Hillary Clinton as who went from eating fast food and hot dogs on George Foreman grills to being Pasqua -Tarian. I have an appreciation for food as it relates to our health. That's why I wanted mark to share his insights with all of you because eating healthy transform my life and it can do the same for you. How did you originally get into the medical field? Well I was studying. Buddhism believe it or not in college and took a class called the medicine Buddha and begin to understand the nature of spirituality and healing connected and I WANNA be among rabbi and figured out so I I decided to go into medicine it was a way of serving and I believe that the the ideal they still do that. You know we're here contribution. There's so much information about what to eat. What not heat online. How do you know what to trust? It's really important to learn how to be a critical reader of the media and the science and doctors are taught. That's for the most part. Certainly most patricians are most government bodies. Give recommendations are it and here's the real simple answer. There's two kinds of stats that are worth looking at. One is population. Studies will Biaggi that takes people over long periods of time follows a behavior habits. And see if there's a correlation so eggs cause heart disease but it's not really that causes it. It's a correlation and most of the nutritional centres we have our correlation studies which do not prove cause and effect so study of women. Over fifty five six I would conclude with sex never leads to pregnancy the study. The purpose accurate. But it's completely invalid so what we do those kinds of analyses we we see these headlines. Extra kill people you know. Coconut oil is going to kill you and people get so confused. We have to begin to look at whether it's a randomized controlled trial or an experiment. Which means you take two people. You can have them. You know one treatment and half of them another treatment and see how they compare. That's the way determine what's true or not and most of us when we look at a paper headliner. Study aren't thinking about that. We're seeing owners are the correlation and that's the problem so it's time to think through that and it's important but I would not take every headline as Gospel Click big and you should be smarter to them. How do you structure guys? You're getting enough sleep in how you're taking everything into account because it seems like especially pursuing just starting to try and break negative habits. Bad Habits like this would relate son. Is it one time it's prescription to the by is really important and then connected to the house and it's a skill like anything else. I mean I can cook three meals a day from scratch whole foods in thirty minutes toll for offerings. But it's a skill. I learned out exercise into my life and structure my days that I can do the things I want in and this morning meditated today mock exercise tomorrow morning to visit. I know I play the meditation session afternoon and and control what eating in where I'm going so it's really about skilled at all. Men Learning how to practice the skills it help sustain you and actually invigorating overtime. The World Health Organization came out and said that as an occupational phenomenon. Recently what's the best way to prevent burnt out any food part of that you know? It's interesting mental. Health issues are rampant in fact In terms of overall effect quality of life it's the number one health bird around the world and also cost burden becomes particularly Lack of being gauged in a society as an active member. The solution solution in part is figuring out how to connect mental health with those behaviors generate mental health or social behaviors. Of 'cause L in the food again is probably one of the biggest drivers of cognitive function of mood of energy and people don't understand that I was. Exercises is very powerful in terms of rejuvenation regeneration. Sleep were asleep deprived nation. All those things are just super simple. Building blocks his focus on E. sleep an exercise in pure hearted dials in necessarily perfectly every day. But for the most part of the huge difference my nephew for example was having you know depression and lethargy and function and was not doing well and it really blame wasn't exercising. You couldn't function. I want to get bigger every day this week. And he's like completely turned around stuff. I think people don't understand the connection between their mind and their body in the reverse order in other words we know about the my body effect. But we don't know about the body mind effect and so in the DOCU series that I've created a broken brain. We really delve into how to fix rain. Fixing your body I. What's Your Best Pizza Criminals? My best piece of advice is what you love to do and do it and ten thousand connected what you want in life. What matters to you. We'll get you up and excited every day in positive experimentation has the process of of self reflection and self knowledge and awareness. So who are you what matter to when you love we care about excited? Just go for thank you so much for sharing your wisdom mark to follow. His journey can read his book food fix and find them on facebook. Twitter instagram where he shares his appearances travels food recommendations health insights and advice to watch the full extended video version of this episode. Where I asked mark even more questions you can go to Youtube. Dot Com slash. Dan Shah Al. We hope you enjoyed today's show. And the amazing advice. Our guest provided. Remember that you can only benefit from advice. If you packed on it before you do. We would appreciate your feedback in the form of a review. You can leave a on Itunes stitcher for of Pot catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan. Shot Bell Dot com slash review now..

Dr Mark Hyman Dan Shaw Bell Dan Nobel Prize Ultra Wellness Center New York Times medical director World Health Organization Dan Shah Al Idaho New York Hillary Clinton George Foreman Biaggi founder facebook Canyon ranch
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Dan Shaw Bell. My goals to create the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today is the founding member of the Black Crowes. Steve Gorman born in Michigan Michigan. Steve joined his elementary schools band playing the drums. At Age ten. He moved to Kentucky aspiring to be a guitarist that in college. He was a broadcast major while playing drums with several bands. In one thousand nine hundred eighty six. He formed the band lack of interest with his friends to record their first demo tape a year later he started playing with the black roads for the first nine albums then eventually rejoined in two thousand five more. Recently Gorman founded the band trigger happy and author of the book hard to handle which was named after the Black Crowes hit song. I caught up with Steve to learn more about how he was able to navigate a multi decade career such celebrated ban and what he's learned along the way you've been part of the Black Crowes for over two decades. Witnessing the success struggle and breakout firsthand. How you able to mentally and emotionally handle the highs and the lows in varying degrees of success Initially you know the easiest part and the most fun and all the things that feel the way you think a band is GonNa feel or actually in the local bandies no stress all a dream and the pursuit of trying to make things actualize to realize something young and you have nothing else to concern yourself with. That was all great. Once we hit the road and had a record out that turned into a hit things went sideways. Pretty quick in a lot of ways and not just for me for everybody. The way I handled it was to put my head down and say well as long as we work hard and as long as we stay together and united will get through anything. I'm a very team oriented guy Not Everybody in the band had that same philosophy and power struggles and and An Egos and insecurities that we all had to contend with. They showed themselves pretty early. And unfortunately we were so young that we got set in our ways and kind of continued the band for as you said. I'll actually almost three decades without really ever stopping and really doing the work to figure out how to be more effective at communicating and working together. He say you'RE A team oriented guy. What do you believe are the most important qualities of a teammate? Or in your case a band member and which the wants to avoid and why you have to know your strengths and and just as important if not more you have to know your weaknesses and you have to be willing to let other people do things. You're not so great at or that you aren't interested in doing. I mean to me. A band is not an extension of anyone or any five people's emotional or mental psyche wellbeing. None of those things have banned is. It's you know I never looked at it as a business. But it's an easy thing to compare it to. It's a mom and pop shop. Somebody needs to run the register. Somebody needs to stock the shelves. Somebody needs to figure out the books and in a band. You have all those responsibilities. You don't think about that as a local band. You just WANNA play shows. You just want him to get a record deal. It's important as you grow. And as the band's career grows that you evolve and take a realistic at what's required. We entered an entirely new landscape and stuck to our guns as to how we viewed the world as a local band and it was really damaging I think ultimately communication and or you know better analogy actually a basketball team. Someone rebounds someone passes someone shoots and if everybody understands their role in respects everyone else's contributions. You can go as far as you want. If you were to start another band right now. What would you do differently based on what you've experienced and why while I have a bad actually called trigger hippy? That is is in a lot of how that band operates is based on things I learned with the Black Crowes. Which is it's okay. It's perfectly fine to have somebody establishing the tone and the direction but you know the old adage you can go faster alone but much further together. I JUST WANNA keep make sure that everybody's on the same page. Everybody knows why we're doing anything we're doing and feel everybody out. You don't have to allow one person's opinion to derail an operation but everybody's opinion as valid and everybody at least needs to be heard and understood. What is the most important business advice you've learned as an artist? You wish you knew when you first started. Oh man you know. Every day I would probably have a different answer but I can say that the most important things that we were we were given great advice early on and we didn't necessarily follow it. I can't say thankfully that we were ever misguided or led down the wrong path. We were given great great opportunity and great advice. The thing that we probably struggled with the most and I'm including myself in that of course Separating separating the art from the business we went and made records and once those records are in the CAN. The goal is to get as many people as you possibly can to listen to them and you know once you've created your art sell it is foreign as wide as you possibly can and don't you know we had A. We struggled with feeling like that made us sell out so that it weakened the music by trying to do promotion and to me you know. The the art is only of use if it receives an audience. I think separating the two worlds you know like art and business can co. Mingle quite freely as long as you remember which one is which and not try to combine the two. I think it's like a separation of church and state when you combine them. They both get weakened. And what is your best piece of career advice? follow your gut because your gut is ultimately the one thing you're gonNa have with you forever and when you know the biggest mistakes and regrets. I have aren't when I made mistakes. It's when I made a mistake that my gut new was a mistake and I did it anyway when I say I'm a team player. The downside of that was to a fault I was a team player is a much younger man I would. I would give way to what I thought was for the greater good despite my central nervous system screaming at me. No this is a serious mistake because ultimately when it's all said and done you're still the one who's waking up in the middle of the night with your subconscious tapping shoulder going. You knew and you didn't do anything about it. So you know your gut is really all you have right or wrong. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom Steve to follow his journey can read his book hard to handle and find them on facebook twitter instagram where he shares announcements live performances travels pictures of his family and his cat. We hope you enjoyed today's show. And the amazing advice. Our guests provided. Remember that you can only benefit from advice if you packed on it before you do. We would appreciate your feedback in the form of review. You can leave a review on Itunes stitcher for Pod Catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan. Chevelle dot com slash review now..

Black Crowes Steve Gorman Dan Shaw Bell founding member Kentucky Michigan Michigan basketball facebook
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Questions. PODCAST CAST I'm your host. Dan Shaw Bell Michael's decorate the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today is the Creator. President and chief product officer Baked by Melissa Melissa Benesch Board and his New Jersey Melissa graduated Syracuse University. With a Bachelor's in child child and family studies her first job was as a sales assistant at teller up INC then. She worked at Deutsch Inc as assistant media planner where she was fired at age each twenty four her side hustle during this time was baking tie-dyed cupcakes for friends family and coworkers two weeks after being fired Melissa partnered with her brother Brian to create the baked bibles accompany fast forward to today where baked by Melissa is in fourteen locations ships nationwide Melissa's also the author of cakes by Melissa and investor time philanthropic initiatives like make a wish and the side with love campaign that helped spread kindness while I don't eat cupcakes. Oh cakes baked by Melissa Stores Walk Around New York City in at JFK. Airport so interested in learning more about how she made. All of this happen. How was losing your job job as an assistant media planner a blessing in disguise being fired was the best thing that happened because I was not passionate about the work I was doing and I I needed to find something that made me happy? Every day I went home. I Bake cupcakes. I sent them into work with my best friend's little sister who had an internship at a pr our agency the owner of the PR firm tried my cupcakes and love them and connected me with her cater. The next day the day after I was fired and and from that moment on I did everything. I possibly could to achieve the goal of baking cupcakes relevant and being Melissa Baked by Melissa where you initially had the idea for your company. What was your biggest obstacle? And how did you overcome. I think there were so many obstacles when we were first starting by Melissa. First off I was a twenty four year old was just fired from my job and advertise. Shit I didn't have the confidence necessary to really advocate for yourself but fortunately fortunately I surrounded myself with people who believed in me and then confidence in me like my big brother. WHO's also my co-founder waking up? Every day. Baking cupcakes day in and day out for seven months out of my apartment going on tasting doing everything I possibly could to get people to try product being resilient bouncing doc after a challenge there kind of challenges but I think the way I respond to challenges and my attitude of seeing every frustrating interesting situation as an opportunity to learn grow. Is the reason that we're here today like you. I remember working over one hundred hours a week when I started a company in my twenties. Where does your work work ethic? Come From and how have you continue to sustain it. Over twelve years in business can meet. The definition of success is working hard towards. I'm thinking that you love. I've always wanted a job that I love because I wanNA feel fulfilled at the end of the day. I WANNA feel tired and I think I just appreciate having the opportunity to do something that makes me happy and feel fulfilled at the end of every day. I I'm enjoying the journey. I guess like I still Ian Cliches and sound. I know the journey is the reward. I get to work with like-minded hardworking passionate New People. Who get you done every day? Just like me and the challenging hard as we're opportunities to learn grow and go out of my comfort zone and the great anything or just that amazing and you know I I appreciate it. All speaking of the people who've worked with co-founded your company with your brother Urnov since married your husband who has worked under you. How have you been able to manage these relationships without leading work at inbetween you? I think managing their relationship When working with family or not actually is probably the single most challenging part of building company? I've learn to time. I think when you find yourself in an emotional conversation. It's super import. and to measure twice. Cut One really listen and never respond to anything when you're feeling emotional and just trying new ways to respond to the things that happen thank you. That's what I do. I know I could always be better. Even if I feel like I was and talk to in the right way or treated the way I believe I deserve. There's there's still opportunity for me to improve and to change my response and I think that outlook on personal relationships within my business has has been super helpful but like of course. It's not easy to work with family. I do believe that the reward outweighs the challenge. And what's your best piece of crude vice. Oh Man I think there's so much that you need to do to be successful in your career. Whatever that career is? I do believe that it's not rocket. Science and there's a certain mindset and attitude that is necessary and essential for success which is being every challenge as an opportunity ready to learn and grow and looking for new ways to go outside of your comfort zone. Those two things together is very helpful. I you need needs to be positive and you need to approach every challenge with the mindset of okay. This is because now we could solve this problem and finding I think people that approached things the same way is going to be very helpful. Thank you so much for Sugar Wisdom Melissa. To follow her journey you could find her on facebook twitter instagram where she shares pictures with their family desserts media appearances and announcements. We hope you enjoy today's show and the amazing advice ace. Our guests provided. Remember that you can only benefit from advice if you packed on it before you do. We would appreciate your feedback in the form of review off. You can leave a review on itunes stitcher or Pod Catcher of your choice your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan Shaw Bell Dot com slash review now..

Melissa Melissa Benesch Melissa Baked Melissa Stores media planner Dan Shaw Bell Michael President and chief product of Syracuse University teller up INC New York City Deutsch Inc facebook Dan Shaw Brian Ian Cliches co-founder JFK Urnov
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

08:41 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Secure at the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest as as Video Blogger author and entrepreneur gnaws Daley born in Israel to a Muslim Arab family of Palestinian descent. Nasiri Yassin graduated Harvard University. Meanwhile Co founding his own social media search engine. After Harvard he became a software developer for two years before creating the facebook page gnaws daily his ambition she wants to create a new video every day per thousand days in different countries from the Philippines to North Korea which is now captured his new book around the world and sixty seconds I the opportunity to meet with nausea Singapore recently when I was on vacation to learn more about who he is and how he's been able to grow his platform to over fourteen million followers US and over four point five billion video impressions. What were some of your struggles as an Arab born in Israel? Why did you create content to discuss the Israeli Palestinian in conflict? And what impact do you feel. You made do question. No one chooses where they were born and no one chooses whether parents had sex and sex in a place this hold. Israel gave birth to their I was born in Israel but I'm not Jewish and grown up tennis in a way it was like a blessing but in another the way was like a curse the blessing in the sense that I was born in Israel Egypt or not in Syria The curse is not I was born in Israel as has a Jewish person. And so the way I think that is like internal law we we may or may be equal or or some stuff but for some reason in real life. We just don't have the same money. We don't have the same opportunities. We don't sank infrastructure. We didn't have the same education in and I don't know what that reason it is. But it always sets sort of feeling like you're also citizen in Israel and because of that you kind of feel that you are not heard on like your opinion doesn't matter serves only matter when it's time for elections. Oh where are they gonNA vote. All they're gonNA vote for the Left Party or whatever let's make sure they don't vote or whatever so it's Kinda sucks to be a national debate only any lecture for years. I've always wanted this whole idea that we should be heard or we have an opinion too and I think this is part. The reason why not dating was born this was so tired of like not to be heard and Because of this desire to be heard died only appropriate to make videos about Israel and Palestine in Dutch show. What actually takes place in this country and trying to introduce sit to other people? That may not have the chance to my people in Vietnam like people in Wisconsin like people in Thailand. Right and so it's nice to showcases rather elsa to the world that is a little bit different from five people died. Two people were killed kind of news. I went to a different kind of news. That doesn't talk about the killing and the dining but they're about people that are trying to change this place in a better. That's why it was important to you. Quit your job to travel around on. The world is a content creator committing to one new video posted every day for a thousand days. How did you get the courage and make that level of commitment without knowing if returning to a career good question so the commitments initially was to make video every single day for sixty days and after sixty days I realized this is? This is too much fun. I should continue under a thousand times. And this is why Nest any was called mass daily Davie and this is why it was made in thousand days in all the videos. The commitment was very very unfortunate because it comes from this principle that if there's no deadline there's it's nothing pushing you to create something even if the deadline is imaginary you'll never creates and so if you WanNa create your own leisure. I'll probably end up making three videos videos year. That's why I wanted to force myself to make three hundred sixty five videos in three hundred sixty five days. I don't know making videos everyday wasn't active courage. I think he was an act of principle that principle if you have principles and you follow on these principles every day. You're guaranteed success. Whatever what have you learned about yourself and the world? We live in after traveling to sixty four countries. In just a few years you learn is actually something incredibly boring. Like there's there's no people things the world is so different. It's so diverse. It's so like the world is actually amazing uniform and I love that night in the sense that like an Indian person in its London. Mumbai is not radically the district from a billionaire in Connecticut. It is not radically different and really to be able to see them both as equal I think. And that's the biggest thing that I was a learned from standing because every trae go to that can go to the middle of the most remote places in the world. Then you ask the skin in the village this question you say. What do you want to do when you grow up and the kid says? I want to go to Harvard in Connecticut Connecticut and ask them. What do you want to do you what I want to go to Harvard? You know. It is amazing. How aspirations of people are the same and that is a lot of Americans? Also I remember in the sense. That Edgy Buddy. Longs to be as successful or as rich as American and at some point everybody will be as rich as Americans or even sometimes richer and as a fundamental lesson that I learned when I was fully convinced I was like. Okay so what is what is the best place to be in. What is the best place to be in right now? And what is the best concept to me and I realized maybe the best content to me is a constant equalizers. Everybody in the sense that by give attention to the New York person has a lot of attention already and I should give the same attention to a kid Lunka as well because they deserve the same attention and this is why we made the videos in sixty countries rather than just staying one country iniquities one country. Can you talk about the career and life lessons you learn from your conversations is with people you've met while traveling the world. How do they affect you personally and professionally so this guy in Sir Lanka and he is a muscular disease so he cannot move his muscles and only thing he can move is like his finger? She has one thing that he can move and everything else. So he's bedridden for nineteen years right now at random random house in Syria Lanka. And you know we went there and Menin and then realized even though he can only move one finger of entire bond me. He wrote four books about his thoughts and the way he views life and what he wants to see in the world and that was incredibly inspirational because this guy could only move one finger and he made all of this like I can move every single muscle in my body and I'm not using my body to its full potential. I'm not using using my what I was blessed with to my folks even after I was meeting video every single day for a thousand names. That's inspirational he was. And what is your best piece of career advice. Do something every day and have strict deadlines so I grew up Muslim and be Muslim. Means you have to pray five times a day so you have to be very strict in my religion and follow it like religion and so I would say create your own. Religion that involves deadlines needs and call it. Deadline isn't and so said like really hard deadlines for yourself like every two days. I need to write an article and or every one day I need to make a video or every one week I need to be convenient right and follow through with that Thomas and never break it not even once. I believe if if you do that I believe success will come thank you so much for sharing. Your wisdom gnaws to follow. His journey can read his book around the world and sixty seconds and and find him on facebook instagram youtube where he shares his countless travel experiences around the world and the people he's met during them. We hope you enjoy today. Show and and the amazing advice. Our guest provided. Remember that you can only benefit from advice if you packed on it before you do. We would appreciate your feedback in the form of of review. You can leave a review on Itunes stitcher for Pod Catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan Shaw Bell Dot com slash review now..

Israel Harvard University facebook gnaws Daley Connecticut Nasiri Yassin Singapore US Co tennis Mumbai content creator Left Party North Korea Harvard software developer Syria Lanka Wisconsin New York
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

09:06 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"I'm your host. Dan Shaw Bell by go security the best advice from the world's smartest inroads interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today author Speaker and marketing. Strategist David Mirman Scott. Born in Boston Massachusetts David graduated Kenyon. College with batches of Arts in economics hit multiple jobs as a clerk on Wall Street before working publisher Knight Ridder in their online newsroom. David moved back from Boston to join desktop. Data which was acquired by News Edge Corporation than sold the Thomson Thompson Reuters. David's ideology of using social media blogs and podcasts to earn attention instead of by it became the basis for his book the new rules of marketing and PR VR. The success of the book led to Global Speaking Career in advisory position at hubs bought in a series of other books including his latest entitled Fan. Accuracy David was an early mentor of mine. Back in two thousand nine when I was publishing my first book and has been on the forefront of the latest marketing trends for decades. That's why I was excited to speak with him for This podcast episode. When people ask me for my best advice in book publishing I refer them to what you told me before? My first book me to point out was published ten years ago. You suggested gesture that I should market promote in south the book without relying on the publisher. Can you explain how being accountable in this way has helped you achieve success. I think the idea of getting getting your own work out into the marketplace is essential. Your you know at best number one number two you can call on people to help you to get those ideas out there and you can create interesting kinds of content to get those ideas out into the marketplace. A publisher typically just goes through the process like a machine you know they have the list of twenty five people are going to send a galley to. They have a list of forty-eight people that they're going to send the press release to and you're one of twenty five books that they're announcing this year. But you're the only one in who is focused on your book and you're the one that can get it out there the other piece of advice that I give to everybody who asks about Book Promotion Ocean is spend as much time promoting your book as you've spent writing your book and the vast majority of authors will never do do that because they spend a year or two writing a book and they'll spend a month or two promoting it. Why should every entrepreneur focus on purpose values and community not just selling products and services? How can they make the shift if they aren't already doing so? I'm a huge believer in passion and I'm also a huge believer that passion Ashen is infectious. So if you're just talking about your products and services you're just pushing commodities out there but if you're talking in about how you're passionate about something and you're tapping into the passion that other people have that's incredibly readily powerful. That's a true human connection and I think in today's world what we're all hungry for is true human connection because there's too many products are ready. There's too many people out there on social media already. There's too many organizations and entities trying trying to get our attention but a true human connection. That's what we're all after and if you're focused on your passions and the communities that might be interested in your passions your way more likely to make a human connection just tossing products and services out there to the mark you co authored fin accuracy with your daughter. What have you learned from each other that has made you a better marketer and her a better suit so Phan Argosy was so so much fun to write with my daughter? She's now twenty six years always starting that journey when she was twenty one years old and she's so different from me obviously a woman obviously a different generation. She's a medical school student She's also mixed race and we share different passions. We we had to be people who transformed from father daughter relationship to full partners on this project. Otherwise it wouldn't have worked on so we developed a much stronger relationship as result. Would I learned as a marketer which is incredibly important for me you to learn is that there's differences with the millennial generation with Gen Z.. And there's differences with people will who identify as mixed race or who identify as LGBTQ. And those were things that I knew intellectually but I never really had had strong exposure to and those were things that my daughter brought to this project. That really helped me become a way better marketer and Frankly a better person in understanding the motivations behind people who are very very very different for me I think in the case of Rako all. I can't speak for her. I think that she understands that as a doctor which she will soon be. She's in her fourth year of medical school and she's going to be an emergency zero doctrine mid twenty twenty that to be doctors partly about communications. Partly about being able to be understood something that I know well having been a marketer all my whole career and I think she recognizes that being a good communicator. Being able to articulate your ideas well being able to speak in public being able to to write effectively are all going to make a wave editor Dr Throughout your twenty five year career. In the marketing field you've been at the forefront of some of the biggest trends like the rise of social media what are some of the marketing tool strategies and techniques that you would recommend people looking to build their brand so I think it's incredibly powerful today is is the idea of using images photographs video and using those images to show a human human connection. I think we're all striving for a human connection today and I've become a real big fan of the idea of a simple selfie Alfie. Something that people think is frivolous the idea of a photograph of you looking into a camera. Essentially we research the idea of neuro science. How people react to things like photographs and through the power of what's called mirror neurons? We believe when we see a Selfie. Oh fee when you see a photograph of someone looking directly at the camera our brain translates translate that to we are in the personal space of with that person. We are together in the same room physically with that person. That's what our brain tells us. Our ancient DNA tells us and too many people people focus on things like photographs of being very formal portrait style. Type photos that they use in business. And I'm a big believer in the idea of. How can you get casual with your video? How can you get with your photographs? How can you show the passion that you have through the images that you put out and that makes you a better marketer? Makes you better able to connect on a human level with those people that you're trying to reach and what's your best piece of career advice. My best piece of career advice is to celebrate getting fired fire and I just think I've been fired three times every single time. I've ended up with something better. I think the idea India of doing what you believe being an agent of Shane getting out there and making things happen has the potential sel to have a a fabulous career Wynonna company if you bring the company in a new direction you. Are you become a superstar. But if you don't don't manage to make that happen you can lose your job but then you weren't destined to be a successful in that organization anywhere so do your thing make it happen if it happens. Awesome if not find another company that will celebrate who you are. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom David to follow his journey can and read his book and find him on Facebook Lincoln twitter and Instagram shares pictures of his friends. Family Musicians Marketing Strategies appearances and travels so we hope you enjoyed today show and the amazing advice. Our guest provided remember that you can only benefit from advice. If you packed on it before you we do. We would appreciate your feedback in the form of review. You can leave a review on Itunes stitcher poor of pod Catcher of your choice your feedback feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan Shaw Bell Dot com slash review now..

David publisher Boston author Speaker and marketing David Mirman Scott Dan Shaw Bell David graduated Kenyon Book Promotion Ocean Knight Ridder Phan Argosy News Edge Corporation Thomson Thompson Reuters pod Catcher Dan Shaw Selfie Facebook editor India
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

08:41 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Cast. I'm your host dementia and my goal is to create the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions my guest today as the bassist and Co founder of the Red Hot Chili Peppers Flea born in Melbourne Australia. Michael Peter Bodo salary was nicknamed flea as a teenager based on his inability to sit still tell after moving to California. He attended Fairfax High School where he started his lifelong friendship with Red Hot Chili peppers. Lead singer Anthony Kadish originally jazz trumpet. Robert Player flea later was introduced to rock music and the Bass Guitar by Hillel. Slovak Flea co-founded the Red Hot Chili peppers in Nineteen eighty-four and since then they released eleven eleven studio albums that have sold over. Eighty million copies worldwide in two thousand twelve. The Band was inducted into the rock and Roll Hall of fame in Rolling Stone magazine ranked fleeing the second best bassist of all time. Flea is also the CO founder of the Silverlake Conservatory of Music a nonprofit music education organization for underprivileged children. I was very excited to speak to flee about his relationships life experiences and views that he wrote about in his new memoir acid for the children for this podcast cast. You said in the book that you don't have a deep connection with your mom growing up. How did that impact your future relationships as a lot I I think and I didn't really become aware of that until I was like in my thirties? I'm fifty seven now. I think that I looked For love in romantic relationships. Yes in a way that came from a place of not feeling affectionate and close to my mother. And that's not obviously not healthy romantic relationship to look for that type of Attention and luckily for me. And I'm so grateful to have consciously felt the pain of the relationship difficulties not that I've had and I've managed to grow beyond that so I'm wondering you know one way you know very difficult to go through those things in another either way. I'm grateful because it made me really look at myself and look at relationships and and forced me to to want to evolve changes human being you know and Also likely for me my. My mother's passed away now but even though we didn't really have the relationship became old enough to look at it with some degree of objectivity and I could look at the relationship with myself and my mother and and be kind of upset. I didn't give me less. Why didn't you give me the love that I needed I once I kind of got passed by realizing it and angry about it. Then I got a real healthy place of forgiveness and actually managed managed four jubilee beautiful relationship with my mother As an adult and in her later years and your your stepfather it seemed like he was a blessing in a curse to you. And you feel grateful for your time. Time spent with him. King describes the lessons you learned from sharing fares experiences with them. Yeah well you know he was. He was a difficult person. You know oh he was a drug addict and he was prone to really rational sets of violence and stuff but he was also unbelievably great musician. -sition and he also loved me with everything that he knew how he just had a you know battling his own demons and had a really hard time and you know it's really scary being around him because we never nuke was always kind of you know trepidation that he might blow up and rage and destroy the house or whatever but I also like I learned something from him that only and it's funny because like when I started writing this book I mean I don't funnies the right word but I learned so much about myself and how I grew in my yearning ruining my search to get to understand what happened when I was a kid and I realized that I learned from him that when he played and he was gone he played upright bass and he would play with is that very physical emotionally like everything in the world to him and he was planning that he was taking all the pain and torment zone life and turning running into something beautiful and only like when I started reading about it they realize that's what I do you know when I play music and it was such a great lesson you know and probably never would've played music I mean I don't know but He he opened me up to all the the limitless infinite gifts that music has given me in terms of you know place to express myself in something to focus on community friends and all of that stuff so complicated yeah complicated. There's never guys guys and bad guys are always both look at my friends as my family is. I'm an only child through and you saw your friends as part of your family teeter lane that type of relationship and why you need that to fill that void. Yeah well I guess it's sort of like you know coming from right about it. My Book I grew up in a very unconventional national and oftentimes difficult household. I didn't feel safe and I also was completely une watched as a kid you know I was out in the street running wild getting into trouble and the friends that I made. Were really where I looked for family where I looked for that bond that like that togetherness gathering s and that unity. That we all want you know we're all yearning for connection whether it's you know into an intimate one on relationship or sense of community just that feeling togetherness and and people being there for each other. There's a perfect setup for a rock band to start because we started and we pretty much all came from broken homes and all we're running around wild and all found profound meaning and friendship and to be able to translate that into music than the music became more than the sum of its parts. Because you feel like the struggle created that stronger bonds almost like pledging a fraternity sorority. Where if you go through the same things together you can relate to one another and form Stronger relationship as a result. Yeah totally yeah that historically people have always viewed vulnerability as a weakness but you viewed as a strength. Can you give me an example. About how when you vulnerable in one situation your life how that Julia closer to someone and improve the relation of that I mean whenever I've been eligible with anybody nobody And even if sometimes my vulnerability might be irrational like I might have my feelings hurt by you that you said something films and I'll I feel bad I feel bad and I'll say dude. Why did you say that that really hurt my feelings and you'll be like oh I didn't mean it that way? I meant to say that what you're doing is really beautiful. I took it as an insult because I I heard it the wrong way and vulnerability and then we for Japan because we connected over something you know what I mean and which has been the case ace very often you know in so many different ways especially like being a communal creative situation. My band got her feelings. Hurt all the time you know and their willingness to be vulnerable honorable and still express yourself and open yourself up to possibly being here. On the magic relationship relationship creative relationship any collaborate effort of any any kind Is it takes courage. But it's where all love is you know and you know and also like for myself writing this book. It's been an extraordinarily foldable feeling. But I think there's value in telling my story you know and there was value for me challenging myself to raise it right a piece of literature ensure that I thought could be contribution to the world of books you know like it was scary because I thought I had a good chance I might fail but I knew I had to do it on my own. Yeah I knew I had to have to be my voice. Nobody else's and I had to you know sink or swim so what I did. And what's your best piece of us. My best piece of crude vice ice is to work from a place of love. How do you go in that one of the first steps? The first step is you know asking yourself is this act of I'm doing is coming from love coming from fear and if it's coming from love continue to move in that direction coming from love it will guide you in the right direction. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom flee to follow. His journey can read his memoir acid for the children and on facebook instagram and twitter where he shares his memories raise performances. Pictures with friends travels and dance moves. We hope you enjoyed today's show. And the amazing advice our guest provided remember Bertha. You can only benefit from advice if you packed on it before you do. We would appreciate your feedback in the form of review. You can leave a review on I I tunes stitcher or a Pod Catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan. Shaw Bell Dot Com Slash Review now..

Co founder Slovak Flea Michael Peter Bodo Fairfax High School Anthony Kadish Robert Player Melbourne California Silverlake Conservatory of Mus Australia Rolling Stone magazine Hillel Pod Catcher Japan Bertha King Dan Julia
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

08:58 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Are you looking to reach your full potential and achieve success in business and life want only tried and tested guides it from people who have truly made an impact. You have come to the right place. Welcome to five questions with Dan. Chevelle New York Times bestselling author Dan Shop Bell distills the most actionable and tangible advice. From a variety of world-class humans including entrepreneurs ignores authors Olympians Follow Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance. Practical advice and concrete solutions our power chat sal. Welcome to the fifty seventh episode of five questions with Dan. Shaw Bell as your host goes to create the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today is astrophysicist. I author and head of the Hayden. Planetarium Neil degrasse Tyson born in New York City to a gerontologist father and sociologist mother. He grew up in the Bronx in high school. He was the captain of the wrestling team. In the editor in Chief of the Physical Science Journal Neil first became interested in astronomy falling visit to the Hayden planetarium where he enrolled in various courses purses there he started gaining notoriety as a fifteen year old lecturing in his community he went on to earn his B A in physics from Harvard and his PhD in Astrophysics from Columbia. In in two thousand and one President George Bush appointed him to serve on a commission studying the future of the US aerospace industry and in two thousand four he was reappointed to focus on the implementation nation of the US space exploration policy in two thousand six. He was appointed to serve on the NASA Advisory Council and was awarded the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. Currently Louis Neil as the head of the Hayden Planetarium. A research associate of the Department of astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History and the host of the star. Talk PODCAST I. He has written sixteen books including his latest letters from an astrophysicist. That we discussed in this podcast you've written countless letters over the past. Thirty years in documented rented them in this book writing letters lost art form in the age of email texting and social media. How has reviewing and publishing these letters impacted how you live your life? I am reminded by these letters that thoughtful communication using the written word. It is something that perhaps should be rejuvenated in our culture. And we've come far from it would now communicating with emojis. I just think about that from a handwritten letter and in the old days you would have penmanship. That would express some of the mood of as a letter as well. Another dimension of communication who has provided by the writer. Not only that you might illuminate the first letter of the page. As the monks did in manuscripts that were written. So I'd like to see more thoughtful. COMMUNICATION COME FORWARD I. I wonder whether the anger that exists in social media is because we forgot how to communicate the nuances of what we you mean and what we think. They end up. Being Blunt statements that people use as reason to argue rather than as supporting words to pursue a conversation you have blended science and pop culture in an entertaining way that has gotten people who don't like our understand science interested it. How did you learn to be such an effective communicator? All I did was pay attention to people's reactions one on one when I would describe bribe science or any part of the universe to them. Do there eyebrows go up there. Did they look attentive. Did they look away. There's body language that you can do on that informs that it's feedback on whether you are communicating successfully. If You keep mental or written inventory on what works and what does not you can use that to shape future encounters. You might have with the public. And that's what I've been doing my entire life so I don't presume what I have to say is what someone will want to listen to. Instead I draw from my repository of knowledge of the universe and say to myself how can I shape ape this information and deliver it in a way that I already know can trigger enthusiastic reaction to that information. And that's what I do and I do that all all the time and when I did that with the press came back for more with documentarian they came back for more. When I did it on twitter? They came back for more. So I'm a servant of this Appetite and I'm delighted to operate in that capacity but I'm I don't forget that I'm a servant of that appetite not someone who's creating it you say that yeah. People tend to look outside of themselves especially people who are religious to find meaning in their lives. Why do you suggest people instead look inside themselves and how how has that benefit year? People look outside of themselves for meaning I in principle. There's nothing wrong with that. But if you spending your life looking for meaning and not finding it maybe it's time to look inside. That's really how I should have ever presented that point of view. If you're looking for me not finding it look inside yourself and see if you can create create the meaning. You've been searching for your entire life. And that usually means using your mind body soul your energy resources to improve either in your own life or the lives of others. It's not hard to derive meaning in those contexts meaning and purpose and value in civilization for having done so it could be small acts of kindness. You know the proverbial helping the lady old lady across the street. Is it volunteering. Charity where people are benefiting from your invested energies that can create and sustain meaning in one's life. And that's what I do in my own way. This year I worked on a global study focus on artificial intelligence with Oracle we found that people are now embracing ai and overall a positive relationship with it despite privacy and security concerns how can a improve our lives instead instead of causes harm. It's already improved our lives. Think of the things that computers are now doing that. You're not even questioning where you know. Thirty years ago. It would have been seen as sorcery. You have a thing that fits in your shirt pocket that tells you how to get to grandma's house and when and where the traffic is getting heavy and it will suggest roots for you to avoid the traffic vic and at no time is an actual human being involved in that process. That's a are you have cars. That are actively stabilizing the the axles. Because it knows what outcome you want and don't want that's why I was in the airport lounge. There's a big machine there you can get DECAF you can get expresso. You can get nine kinds of coffee plus hot chocolate pushing a button on the same machine that say I know there's another kind of a general I where it's not just a tasked machine. It is something that learns on its own and can make decisions on its own and can do different things. I don't see US heading heading that way anytime soon. Because that's not why we need something smart. We're GONNA have smart car drivers around. They will not get into accidents. That will never be drunk. They will not get distracted that will have all protections in that. We don't have for ourselves. That's a I but it's localized to a car. It can navigate from one side of the city to the other without a human intervening whatsoever. So Hey I is already upon us and I don't see some future future arrival of. Ai Is being fundamentally different. From what we've already experienced in terms of the practical workplace and what is your best piece of career advice. Do the hardest things at all times times. You will ascend a pyramid with powers of solutions that others don't have and then force people to beat a path to your door because you took harder classes then everyone else. Did you take easy classes. And everyone is equally as talented as you. And there's no way to distinguish you from anyone else in the workplace. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom Neil to follow all his journey can read his book. Letters from an astrophysicist listened to star Talk Radio and find him on twitter instagram and facebook where he shares his travels life reflections pictures she from space and time and celebrity conversations. We hope you enjoyed today. So and the amazing advice our guest provided remember that you can only benefit if it from advice if you packed on it before you do we would appreciate your feedback in the form of a review. You can leave a review on Itunes stitcher report. podcast your of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan. Shot fell dot com slash review now..

Dan Shop Bell Louis Neil twitter Hayden planetarium Nobel Prize Neil degrasse Tyson US NASA Advisory Council New York Times Shaw Bell wrestling Bronx New York City American Museum of Natural His George Bush editor in Chief Harvard writer research associate
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

09:53 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Are you looking to reach your full potential and achieve success in business and in life want only tried and tested guides. Let's from people who have truly made an impact. You have come to the right place. Welcome to five questions with Dan. Chevelle New York Times bestselling author Dench Bell distills. The most actionable and tangible advice from a variety of world-class humans including entrepreneurs ignores authors Olympians Follow Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance practical advice and concrete solutions our power chat sal. Welcome to the fifty sixth episode of five questions with Dan. Shaw Bell as your host. My goal secured the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today is the host of the hardcore history. podcast Dan Carlin born in California. Dan Is the son of actress. Lynn Carlin and film producer. Ed Carlin he obtained his degree in history at the University of Colorado Boulder before breaking into TV news in the nineteen eighties as a reporter for Kvil TV. In Eugene Oregon from Mary hosted commonsense a podcast where he evaluated current earn political trends from one thousand nine hundred four to twenty fourteen in two thousand fifteen he launched hardcore history a podcast that explores topics are world history such as the Cold Cold War the Asia Pacific or a series on Genghis Kahn the fall of the Roman republic and a series on world war. Two I spoke with Dan about his new book. The end is always near his personal history. How he's built his following and his best career advice? How did you become an effective storyteller? And how can others do the same. Well I'm not sure sure I'm so good with advice on this when only because I feel like I came out sort of at birth talking a lot And maybe something like that's genetic may have a little Irish storyteller Taylor gene that runs through individuals in the family. And maybe I I lucked out with version of it but but I think that the ability to tell a compelling the narrative is something that a lot of people are just born with. It doesn't mean you can't become a better speaker. They always have those Dale Carnegie courses on how to become a more effective speaker and so oh absolutely lots of people get better all the time and it doesn't matter how how much natural talent you have mean. That's why they're still speech in debate courses and all those things to make you better but in my case I feel like I just kind of locked out ended up at very verbal errands Tampa very verbal household. And I think it reinforce something that was already genetic genetic addict loud mouth to begin by saying what do you think makes an effective storyteller. What what are the qualities and attributes there a couple of ways you could go about it depending on on? You're right so if you're a person who was born as a as a natural storyteller will then. I think you stay with your strengths right. Because sometimes those people have very unique ways. Talk of a of a compelling tale that you wouldn't wanNA standard right. You wouldn't want that person to go take the Dale Carnegie Course and learn how to do it by road. They've got a natural talent with their own style. If you don't have something like that well then I think there's lots of things out there. They can literally teach you how to break down a story right so these are the main and characters. This is the dramatic tension. You want to establish in other words. There's a forum to this. If you don't need the form I think he keeps you freer and looser and more unique. But if you don't have the form to begin with he can teach you sort of let let's call it the elements of storytelling and I think he going learn If for no other reason even if you're just a logical mathematical things things by rote. NFL person there are ways to check all the boxes. And make sure your story or your narrative is compelling and explains all the things you want say what was one milestone L. stowed in your life that you are most proud of why well I mean. It's probably not the answer you're looking for but I mean I think having kids personally Because it's one of those things where if you WanNa talk talked about before and after a you know you're I think at least in my case and a lot of parents case you one person before you have kids in another person afterwards words in impacts your career if for no other reason than you realize it's not just a pass fail course. That has you as the person at the center. But you have people people reliant are you so I think everything takes on a different form of seriousness and You know it's it's funny because in past generations parents were often so much younger than they. They are now and I was in my early thirties by kids. I thought to myself God you know. The level of responsibility just skyrockets when you have to have when you think about other people needing you and so for me. I think got if I'd had that same. Level of responsibility skyrocket at Twenty One or twenty two. Either one or two things would have happened either. I would have been a disastrous disastrous failures of arid and way too young or you kind of look go. God what if I had that sort of growth responsibility and let's just call it. Emotional Ocean load carrying capacity. Would Twenty one or twenty to thirty one or thirty two so for me the milestone is and I think it was a different person before and afterwards is having children. Take US behind behind the scenes with your hit. PODCAST show hardcore history. What does it take to produce a quality show like yours and then build a loyal following around it a lot more than it used to be the short answer? Once upon a time those shows like twenty minutes long now there are many many hours It takes a lot of and I liked. It takes a lot of people before that. It's a nice ice feeling to be able to say you sort of in the sports metaphor you say that you left an all out on the field and I think you've got to be able to you really have to use every brain. I want to be able to walk away and feel like you gave everything you had to the project and so by the end of these things. I feel exactly like that like you left it all out in the field like his pizza boxes and Starbucks Cup all over the place like a bomb went off in the studio and And you can hardly talk anymore and so that somebody end of these things you feel very wrung out and like college. Final exams are over with. But there's a satisfaction level that sort of investment and effort brings on the other side especially if it's well received so it takes a ton of effort a ton of reading at and truthfully it's a little like performance art so it also takes a ton of good sessions in the studio to make work. Can you give an example from your career. And how tough moment made you stronger and more resilient it's almost a cliche at Winston Churchill. That great line about you never give in. Never give up every it's really one of those things where people say failure makes you stronger. It's a whole bunch of cliches but I'll tell you what I When the whole Internet boom was first happening in the late nineteen nineties and I knew a lot of tech people and it seems silly not to try to jump in and take advantage of everything that was going on so I started tech that company? Seven or eight friends of mine and I it was all based on something like amateur content years before they were podcasting. We were involved in amateur contact while the company didn't work and it didn't do what we wanted to do but there were a lot of interesting little nuggets that I learned along the way that have come in handy ever since and so it is a bit of a Cliche to say that you learn from your mistakes but it may be a better way to put it is. If you don't learn from your mistakes maybe they weren't big enough mistakes because So I I remember. They're just being a huge learning curve when I jumped from radio broadcasting into a business environment and I feel like even if the business itself didn't pan out all that stuff I learned heard I feel like I use all the time now even in analyzing other things so the old line about failure being helpful I mean obviously failure can be failure in the long run but but a lot of times. It's sort of what you make of it and I probably would not be here today talking to you about podcast today if I hadn't been involved in amateur content in the late. Nineteen nineties failed company. And what is your best piece of career advice. Oh It's funny I look back at it when you get to be my age. I'm fifty three now. You start to have a lot of people that you know who run into that proverbial time when their their their dreams are broken and they're full of regrets. They wished they'd turned left. Instead of right albuquerque all those kind of things and when you look back on their lives and try to analyze it as an outsider which is impossible to do but but when you look at them you can see several places a lot of times where you go guide. You know that person stay too long at this job or that person needs to be looking for for the next stop more. I people get comfortable. I guess is a good way to put it in their jobs. Because there's a lot of other things in people's lives that needs addressing and if the job's going okay the tendency is to say well I'll stand stand-pat here for a while or maybe they'll just promote me or something like that and so often I find that getting comfortable in that situation ends up being something that really slows people's careers down and it it. It's advice that no one wants to hear because life is tough enough to have to constantly be Johnny on the spot about looking for the next jump forward but it is one of those things things that later in life when you're my age you look back on and there's a lot of people regretting that. They didn't do more of that when they had the time. It's easier said than done but it's something that I've noticed quite a it may be we stay too long sometimes. Comfortable jobs thank you so much for sharing your wisdom Dan to follow his journey can read his book. The end is always near listen to hardcore history and fight him on twitter and facebook where he shares new episodes of his podcast life updates media interviews and interactions with fans. We hope you enjoyed today's show. And the amazing advice. Our guest provided. Remember that you can only benefit from advice if you packed on it before you do. We would appreciate she at your feedback in the form of review. You can leave a review on itunes stitcher or a pod catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very very much appreciated head over to Dan Shaw Bell Dot com slash review now..

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Are you looking to reach your full potential and achieve success in business and in life want only tried and tested guides it from people who have truly made an impact you have come to the right place welcome to five questions with Dan Chevelle New York Times bestselling author Dench Bell distills the most actionable and tangible advice from a variety of world-class humans including entrepreneurs ignores authors Olympians Follow Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance practical advice and concrete solutions our power chat sal welcome to the fifty fifth episode of five questions with Dan Chevelle as your host goes to create the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions my guest today is the Co founder and CEO of away Steph Corey born in the suburb in Ohio Steph grew up traveling to visit her family in the Middle Eastern Europe after graduating college he worked in the merchandising undying and buying departments at both kate spade in Bloomingdale's then Steph join worry parker as the head of supply chain where she met her away cofounder Jennifer Rubio after after leaving worby parker she got her Mba while working as a consultant for Casper before launching away with Jennifer away global lifestyle brand that's transforming the entire travel experience away raised over one hundred million dollars with one point four billion dollar valuation and it's been recognized as one of fast company's most innovative evade of companies. I must disclose that way customer after I was nagged by my parents to buy a navy blue carry on suitcase last year and I'm happy that I did in this episode you'll learn more about staffs background how she's been able to grow our company so fast and advice that anyone could benefit from how did traveling the world as a child shape save your identity perspective and future career my childhood very global because I mother grew up in Romania and my father grew up in Lebanon and they actually actually both moved to the states when they were in school so I spent I spent my whole childhood travelling to visit family it was really important to them that we understood good but there are all different types of cultures and people around the world that aren't exactly like our neighbors suburban Ohio where I grew up and I think that global perspective and that excitement and openness understanding people different for me really shaped kind of like my were my worldview my perspective and my career and and and shaped Jeremy starting away in that we wanted to create a brandon a business that would cause people to get outside their comfort zone and explore the world in just three a years your company has grown to a one point four billion dollar valuation congratulations that's amazing despite the success what are some of your biggest struggles that keep keep you up at night when you're growing business like away no matter what outward sign of success people leave there's always so many challenges inside and we think when we think about the potential of the impact that this branch can have on the world around us we've just barely scratched the surface of what we can do so I would say one of the most recurring themes of challenge that keeps me up at night thinking about our team internally our team is what powers business and it's what can propel us to really transform the way billions of people around the world see their surroundings and see people different from an explorer leases that are different from what they're familiar with and building team team a culture set of shared values as we get bigger and bigger is probably one of our biggest challenges that one of the ones that I'm most excited about who has made the biggest impact doc in your career and what impact they make on you that's really easy the person who's made the biggest impact on my career is definitely my co-founder jen so she and I have been friends for years since before we started working on a way we used to be co workers together for several years as well and she has an ability to judge has to be so honest but at the same time really uplifting that she really brings the best of everyone out around them and her partnership ownership with me as we started dating on away originally a few years ago and now we're growing and scaling the business has been just one of the best things that ever happened to me which leadership principles have you used at work that you learn in school can you give an example that's a great question so when I was in business school I took a class on leadership leadership where we had like a multi-month unit on difficult conversations and it wasn't until I took that class that I realized that before it I actually like like most people certainly most women found difficult conversations really challenging and kind of shied away from them and shied away from the conflict and that unit unit on that class actually really taught me to embrace difficult conversations and that everyone involved in them can come out better for having had them and embrace them and now I really lean into that and Leeann to kind of healthy constructive conflict as something that really bring value to everyone involved I think that's been one of the most important important leadership principles that I got from school and what's your best piece of career advice so you start your career and you're really just getting started and I think when people are really early in their career they realize there's so much they don't know I think trap I sometimes see people fall into when they got five ten fifteen years into career if they start to think that they know so much because they know so much more than they used to my number one piece of crude by that I give myself and I give everyone around me he is no matter where you are in your career whether you're one year in ten years or fifty years in really embraced that you still don't know ninety nine percent of what there is just to now and have like total curiosity sponge growth mindset to really have your perspective challenge and learn new skills and ideas all all the time if you can successfully avoid the trap of thinking that you already know a lot I think that's what unlock the most potential in your career thank you so much for sharing sharing your wisdom staff to follow her journey you can check out our company away and find her on twitter and instagram where she shares her travels pictures with friends and family live appearances and business updates. We hope you enjoyed today's show and the amazing advice our guest provided remember that you can only benefit from advice if you act taught it before you do we would appreciate your feedback in the form of review you can leave a review on Itunes stitcher for pot catcher of your choice choice your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan Shaw Bell Dot com slash review now..

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

09:07 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Are you looking to reach their full potential and achieve success in business and life want only tried and tested guidance let's see from people who have truly made an impact you have come to the right place welcome to five questions with Dan Chevelle New York ignores authors Olympians Falon Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance practical advice and concrete solutions our power chat start sal welcome to the fifty second episode of Five Questions with Dan Shaw Bell as your host my goal secured the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions my guess today's documenting filmmaker and producer Morgan spurlock born in Parkersburg West Virginia Morgan graduated from New York University's School of the arts in Nineteen ninety-three he started his career as a successful playwright before benchley producing super size May and Kademi award nominated documentary that tracked his health as eight Remake Donald's meals each day for thirty days I get sick to my stomach even thinking about it this film completely changed my diet and led to my pursuit of healthy lifestyle Morgan has gone to produce several other documentaries including where in the world is Osama bin Laden freakonomics and the greatest movie ever sold more salie he releases big follow up documentary super size me to holy chicken which explores how the fast food industry has rebranded itself as healthier his first film. The film isn't what I expected at all Morgan literally goes through the entire process of opening a fast food restaurant called holy chicken in order expose the food industry I had the opportunity to sit down with him the same week he opened up a pop up restaurant in New York City so tell me commentaries and where the first steps for actually making them an producing yeah I think that I get inspiration and ideas for things all over you know could be could be in order oh mortgage dd show and then once we have that I started exploring what would I should pay to make them because then you start going down the path of wool how we've made what with the work I need to raise a lot of money and a lot of things fall off at that point but once once I'm kinda committed to making something I've never been in a situation knock on wood where I've started something you had equate never I've had friends of mine that started filming project I had to abandon them in the middle of I've never had to do that I feel very lucky but it can happen so I think for me I find us much research before I get started so that doesn't happen yeah for me I actually fell tried to give a documentary is that all the fundraising the ideas doing interviews again is so much water so much and what if something's that people don't know about fitting documentary bounce rate well you might say look what you've done a dream jobs and you will you watch love eighty watch movie legs two hours long grace two hours not begging that now realizing that in a two hour documentary which I this week for nonfiction pointing ninety minutes is the is the perfect time for moving is they don't realize that it's hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of hours they go into that that I mean any this when we shot four hundred hours footage in between one hundred and it's just an immense amount of footage that then you start whittling down into your narrative arc and yes I think that's the biggest one the other is you know it's easier not to do by yourself you know can you make me one hundred percent by yourself you can you know you can Trent wrestler that hang up and do it all solo I did a lot of work you know it takes a lot of time to buy yourself I'm a real believer that you let people do what they do best whether they're really peas or great sound in years or great editors I think people don't realize what their own limitations are none that I need to put a limitation undersell but the more you focus on one thing the more the more prolific in battery will be that one vein and the saints so find somebody who's the best those are the things we started and you view yourself as a storyteller when did you decide wanting to be a storyteller in how you know that your stories were resonating in that you were affected asteroid town over young you know when you take your seat seven years old and you tell them you know some friends here's a story on the playground and they're all listening you're laughing attention to what you're saying I mean I learned I realized early on that all I want to do is make movies shows and tell stories and it was it was against the realize that so early on so I think that you know for for me it was I was just enraptured in the media and the medium of as I was really really young I think a Lotta your films like super size me supersize me to make a huge impact the you've changed the food industry and so do you feel like you have a sense of purpose now that it's not just about creating the movie and the series but it's also about making a big impact about mark questions I think that after I made the first precise me and I went from that right into making it TV series facts thirty days where I saw actually made something that was entertaining but at the same time you know how the point of view or you know have a have a directive for people who are watching feel certain way or you know had compact culturally your star certain kind of conversation so we really boring and I got a lot of that personally really the path that I was still on how can we create something that makes you look at the way make you laugh the laugh you can make some more listen and whether that's now making making the chicken restaurant I think there's a way to have a sense of humor about what you do that and it'll taste like cotton candy once your best he approved us my best piece of career bias is it comes from disappearances IPAD growing up these tale in the movie business entertainment business business investments you need to accept the fact that most of what you try is most of what you sell work most of what you make is it going to accomplish what you initially set out to do but if you come into it saying I'm GonNa make this out of it I'm hoping for actually this is going to happen when you have it isn't like I'm just GonNa make this winning Austin or I'm gonNA crave this billion dollar food company long as I think you have steps in mind what you hope to accomplish then I'm such thing as failure everything out of step back we'll be a learning tool is stepping stone that get you to the next bigger then and when I was a kid going my father who is a serial entrepreneur I would see my father failed constantly busy create a business and it would be great that's the other thing is you just you never quit. Up Ryan keep going and you lose a user's fools so I think that the grace lesson I've got in your wisdom Morgan to follow his journey you can watch his documentary super size me to and find them on facebook twitter instagram where he shares his latest productions live appeared what is family photos and food adventures to watch the full extended video version of this episode where I asked Morgan even more questions you can go to youtube dot com slash Dan Shaw we hope you enjoyed today's show and the amazing advice our guest provided remember that you can only benefit from it advice if you packed on it before you do we would appreciate your feedback in the form of a review you can leave a review on Itunes stitcher pod catcher of your choice your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan Chevelle dot com slash review now.

Virginia Morgan Morgan spurlock Dan Chevelle Dan Shaw Bell New York Nobel Prize New York University's School producer Osama bin Parkersburg West facebook Kademi Donald Dan Shaw Ryan thirty days two hours one hundred percent
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Are you looking to reach your full potential and achieve success in business and in life want only tried and tested guides. Let's from people who have truly made an impact. You have come to the right place. Welcome to five questions with Dan Chevelle New York Times bestselling author Dench Bell distills the most actionable and tangible advice from a variety of world-class humans including entrepreneurs ignores authors Olympians Falon Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance practical advice and concrete solutions our power chat sal welcome to the forty seventh episode of five questions with with Dan Shaw Bell as your host go secured the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today is is the Number One New York Times bestselling author of the Five Love Languages Gary Chapman born in China Grove North Carolina. Gary graduated the Moody Bible Institute received Bachelor's doctors and Masters degrees from Wheaton College in wake forest. He continued his education at the southwestern Baptist theological seminary receiving both a masters of religious education and a doctor of philosophy degree in one thousand nine hundred seventy one gary joined the Calvary Baptist Church in Winston Salem North Carolina and now holds the title of senior Associate Pastor in nineteen ninety two. He published his first and most notable book. The five love languages which is now sold over eleven million copies is in forty nine languages since then he authored many other books in the five love language book series including his latest entitled. Love Language Minute for couples currently currently Gary travels the world presenting seminars about building healthy relationships between couples families and teams. My ex-girlfriend suggested I take the five love languages assessment. It is scored at nine for quality time in eight for words of affirmation in only a two perceiving gifts. My Love languages profile makes sense because quality time means a lot to me and makes me the most fulfilled in any relationship I encourage you to take the assessment and I'm confident that you'll enjoy Gary's words of wisdom in this episode. You spent decades as a counselor and pastor. What is the most common mistake people make that hurts their relationships. And how do they stop making it. Oh that's a big question. You know I would say that. A lot of the biggest things is selfishness. We all see the world through our eyes is and we don't naturally see them through their eyes so learning listen to each other and be empathetic with what they're saying even if you you don't agree with them and let them share their thoughts their opinions their ideas and be able to say thank you hear what you're saying. It makes sense and it always makes sense in their head. It makes sense anatomy share my perspective and you you spend your energy trying to look for solution rather than trying to win an argument uh-huh. That's one of the key issues I think in marriage how good knowing our love languages helped bring us closer together at work and at home well. I think the love language concept deals with the deep emotional need all of us have to feel loved about a significant people in our lives and if you're married the person who would most it's like to love you is your spouse and the love language helps you to communicate love effectively. Most couples love each other they would. We love each other certainly inherited years. We love each other. We love each other but we don't always feel loved and it's because we're expressing love in a way that would make us feel but not in a why they won't make them feel that and so that's why learning the primary love language. The other person is extremely important if you're. GonNa be affected in communicating love and meeting the a deep emotionally the same principle is struggling work relationships only there we don't we don't call it love we appreciation. If we feel appreciated in workplace then we give it our best. If we don't feel appreciated <hes> then we tend to do what we can get by with. What does the delicate balance between South Care Air and care for others. I think South Carolina steps has to come first. That is the fundamentals of south care eating sleeping exercise. I mean those are the fundamentals of the physical body and then keeping emotionally healthy yourself which means working through any difficulties. What is you have a past experience that is working through those emotions of hurt and pain and anger and whatever it might be there so that you can be the person newer designed to be and then the caring comes when we care for our sales now we have the ability to reach out and care for others and that's essentially what love is it is looking out for the benefit of the other person is trying to enrich their lives. I love these accidentally opposite of selfishness and so we thank ourselves then we have the ability to reach out and genuinely love others how has technology impacted relationships and what's the best way to use it to get closer to others others without letting it get in the way you know technology can be an asset reliability to relationships the asset we can tell pretty easily you know opportunities rights to use social media to interface with each other like out of town which Im lot speaking around the country to be able to text my wife when I know she wouldn't be available to talk to her art center photo of where am what's going on in my life. It's good for our relationships so technology can really help us develop Balance Austin relationships. I think the downside is that we can be sitting in the same house. Maybe even in the same room. Both of us are advice book or some other coach. Alenia listen to what other people are saying interfacing with other people and we are physically in each other's presence but nothing going on between us where two different worlds. I think the key is to ask yourself as a couple. How can we utilize technology to enhance our relationship and what are the things so we need to avoid in order to keep away from those things that apart and what is your best piece of career advice. If we understand that lives deepest manny thing is found in serving others and you apply that to your career. Is You're asking yourself. How can I enrich the lives of other people that was walking across across the University of Virginia campus. <hes> sometime ago. I was speaking in their auditorium and in a side door etched in stone above the door org were these words you are here to enrich the world and you impoverished yourself if you forget the errand and I thought wow I had that as a motto and I wondered how many students ever stopped read that but as far as career delete nights it you seek to use your career or to enhance the lives of other people to enrich the lives of other people and when you do that chances are you not only have successful relationships which you'll also have a successful investors. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom Gary to follow his journey you can read his book. Love Language Minute for couples and find them on facebook twitter and instagram where he shares his inspirational in heartfelt quotes relationship advice helpful articles live appearances and conferences. We hope you enjoyed today's show and the amazing advice. Our guest provided remember that you can only benefit from advice. If you packed on it before you do we would appreciate appreciate your feedback. In the form of review you can leave a review on itunes stitcher for a Pod catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very very much appreciated head over to Dan Chevelle dot com slash review now..

Gary Chapman Dan Chevelle Dan Shaw Bell New York Times South Carolina Moody Bible Institute southwestern Baptist theologic Wheaton College China Grove North Carolina Nobel Prize York Times senior Associate Pastor facebook Winston Salem North Carolina Calvary Baptist Church manny instagram
"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

08:51 min | 3 years ago

"dan shaw bell" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Welcome to the thirty fifth episode of five questions with Dan Shah bell as your host my goal. It the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today. Songwriter producer author Moby Borden. Richard Melville hall in Harlem, New York City Moby was named after Herbert Melville, who authored the classic Moby Dick, his father died in a car crash will drinking when he was only two years old. His mother struggled to support him relying on food stamps and welfare to make ends meet his first job was as a caddy on a golf course then took up music when he turned nine Moby play guitar and his mom taught him how to play the piano in one thousand nine hundred eighty three he became the Qatar for the punk bad. The Vatican commandos and started producing electric music after dropping out of college, he pursued his career DJ, eventually siding with instinct records in the mid nineteen ninety s in one thousand nine hundred nine Moby released his fifth, and most well known album entitled play which soul. Old over twelve million copies worldwide, any went on tour for almost two years. He's written two memoirs porcelain and his latest, Thanet bala- part, which will be discussing in this episode in the book you talk about how you grew up in poverty in the long term impact, that's avenue. Can you describe that? Yeah, I grew up in Darien Connecticut, which is one of the per capita, one of the most affluent places in the world. But my mom and my dad died quite young, and so my mom and I lived in dairy, and because the schools were good, but we were on food stamps, we were on welfare. She was unemployed allot, so until I was eighteen years old. I never met another poor person and growing up poor in an affluent, and such an affluent environment. Is very disconcerting in a lot of ways because you have a constant sense of inadequacy a constant sense of shame. You know, you can't really bring people back to your house. You have to know. Pretend that the clothes you're wearing didn't come from Salvation Army, or will. So even now I mean, I've had you know, the circumstances of my life changed a lot, but I still feel like you know, if you grow up poor to some extent, you'll always self identify as being a porchet when you were at your lowest point, what was the first thing you did start to revive yourself. Bottomed out as an alcoholic and just a an emotional mess for pretty longtime. There's about six years from two thousand to two thousand eight when I finally got sober and. That bottoming out as I said it wasn't just like one or two episodes was hundreds and thousands of daily misery. And when I finally sort of emerged from it. Emerging involved admitting to myself that the things I thought were going to bring me happiness and meaning didn't, you know, whether that was fame, affluence, degeneracy depravity, you know. You know, alcohol drove all the thing that I relied on CNN happy, I had to finally mitt they weren't working. And then there's that huge challenge when you accept that the things in your life art working, but you don't have the skill set to replace them. So you have to start like humbly, cautiously assessing the other things in your life to figure, what does actually work in who are some positive influences Dalby get through that tip. And it's funny 'cause we're sitting on weaker and Elizabeth between building mountain Elizabeth. And when I was drunk, I mean, the first time I got drunk and this neighbor who was nineteen seventy eight so forty one years ago. And but I also got sober in this neighborhood, and the best teachers, I had in sobriety where the old alcoholic and a, you know, I mean, also because we're a block away from the Bowery so like AA meetings around here, especially awhile ago really gritty. You know, it wasn't like fashion stylists, who had may be had like too many glasses of Chardonnay. It was like bottomed out, Bowery drunks, who had like lost kidneys and had hepatitis seat. Like really bottomed out people, but their wisdom their simple simple and it was very unconventional at times, like. Remember this all Valerie drunk saying to me, once he said, he's basically, the key to happiness is selflessness and spirituality. This is like eight year old bottomed out our drunk, who's probably still homeless. And he said, it's he said, if you focus on spirituality and service, he said, you'll do. Okay. And I thought he was full of nonsense. Turns out he was hundred percent. Correct. Yeah. And you talk about mental health, and both are up from, as I depression is somewhat of mental health crisis in America and you everywhere in the world. People are feeling it who how do you best deal with mental health, your mental health and then, like the being at the other people that are interesting. I think first and foremost, easiest is the physical side. You know, I mean thoughts are complicated. Emotions are complicated personal histories are complicated and trying to understand thoughts and emotions and our personal histories like fair challenging, but our bodies that we can kind of understand, you know, like if you eat garbage you're going to be depressed, you're going to be second. You're gonna be depressed if you fill yourself with chemicals you're going to be depressed. So it's almost like, like I think there's the Buddha apparently said like you can't really have a troubled mind in a very healthy body. So it's like first and foremost, get healthy. And I think for a lot of people like remove the toxins, remove the super refined foods, remove the animal products, and you'll find that like a lot of depression, actually comes simply from your body trying to process stuff that it was never designed to process, and then once you've done that, and you can with the degree of clarity address, your thoughts address your. History address your feelings, and what's your best piece of crew? My best piece of career advice is might sound like a cliche, but it's above all else, love what you do. That's nothing's more important than that. Because if you love what you do like, like why is tesla? What granted he Lonzo team? But like why did tesla dwell because he loves what he does? And why did apple become like the biggest corporation and human history? Because Steve Jobs, love what he was doing if you love what you're doing. It increases the chances. You'll be good at it. It increases the chances, you'll work harder at it getting creases the chances that you'll like work through adversity. It increases the chances that, ignore the haters, like, if you don't love what you do you will doubt yourself every step of the way if you love what you, do you will be so good at what you do, and you'll work so hard at it. And then, like, for example, music, like if I make a record and it's does well fine if I make a record and it fails, I don't really care because I'd love to working on, you know, so that's. Two most important piece of advice. I could have anyone just give up too quickly. Yeah. I'm going to see how many times have we people do that, like someone start something that they're not sure about it doesn't work out. So they stopped same thing. Start stop start stop like just love like being spied by the love for what you do. And you will work eighteen hours a day, and be happy constantly, thank you so much for sharing your wisdom Moby to follow his journey can read his book, then fell apart and find him on Facebook, Instagram. Twitter YouTube where he shares his new music travels political views and pictures of animals to support animal rights. Help you enjoy today, so and the amazing advice, our guest provided remember that you can only benefit from advice if you packed on it before you do, we would appreciate your feedback in the form of review. You can leave a review on, I tunes Stitcher for a pot catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated. Head over to Dan Shaw, bell dot com slash review now..

Moby Moby Borden depression Moby Dick Dan Shah bell Salvation Army producer Richard Melville hall Qatar Herbert Melville Thanet bala Harlem CNN Darien Connecticut Facebook Twitter Steve Jobs Dalby New York