20 Burst results for "Dan Pink"

Habits of Highly Effective Real People by Chris Guillebeau

Optimal Living Daily

05:12 min | Last month

Habits of Highly Effective Real People by Chris Guillebeau

"Habits of highly effective real people by Chris Gil Abo-. Of Chris GIL ABODE DOT COM. Quote. Everybody talks about wanting to change things and help and fix. But ultimately, all you can do is fix yourself and that's a lot because if he can fix herself, it has a ripple effect. Rob Reiner. Humans are not machines and we don't all want the same things but we do want to do something purposeful to use the time we have to the best of our ability and we also long to discover our authentic selves. If our lives consists of series of choices, how do you highly effective real people make them he is a short list of characteristics for your consideration. First and foremost they know what's important to them. I've been saying for a while the greatest productivity hack is to love what you do. It is much much easier to be both productive and satisfied. When you spend most of your time on something, you find meaningful often go back to this principle as a compass point it really does no good at all to become efficient at the wrong things on balance is actually negative because the fish and you become the more likely it is that you'll continue on the wrong path. Therefore, it's better to fail quickly at the wrong things seeking discover the right once. They decide for themselves before other people decide for them. Highly, effective real people tend to be questioners. The don't accept what they are told at face value even examine their own beliefs if inconsistencies and opportunities for improvement whenever someone asks, you can have a or B, which do you want Davin respond by saying I'd like see please visit hard at first because easier as you gain experience if to understand that throughout your. Life, there will always be people who want to decide on your behalf. They have their own because they to our human. They care about themselves more than the care about you to be effective to do what matters to you and to pursue the right more on that. In a moment, you need to resist external expectations that don't apply to you. Only, when you have your own house in order, can you operate effectively with others because otherwise will be open to manipulation and misdirection? They take time to enjoy life in whatever way makes sense to them. Even, though they are highly effective, these real people aren't afraid to spend time on hobbies or different interests. As the saying goes time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time and that's the key point time they enjoy wasting maybe of a weird hobby or maybe your idea of fun is different from other people's who cares do whatever you need to recharge and regroup. In. Conversations they listen. They don't just think about what they're going to say next listening is an underrated skill yet, it's easy to develop just start doing it. Empathy takes practice sometimes it's helpful to repeat back with someone says not robotically but in more of a I wanNA make sure I understand this way over time you can also learn to listen not only to what is said but what is unsaid and sometimes more important. They learn what time is best to wake up and go to sleep. Is Not. The same for everyone was my number one takeaway from reading Dan Pink's when zone lot more in the book of course. But that concept stuck with me more than anything else once they know their ideal rhythms, they try to stick to them making exceptions only occasionally sure is fun to change things up now and then but if you operate most effectively according to a certain routine, you'll be most effective when you stick with it. Highly, effective real people embrace goals. Goals vary and some might not even call them goals but the consistently worked toward something. They know that the process is more important than actually achieving the goals. But to have the process, you have to have an end point to look towards goals are the tangible expressions of values while we decide are important to us, and therefore the choices we make each day how the effect of real people know the actions they take on one day will affect the opportunities available to them in the future. Should they live long enough to see it? Lastly, they find a balance between service and self care. Highly effective real people that life isn't all about them. They WANNA serve others however they can. They want to make a difference as consider their goals, values and decisions. This value is always present. Yet Mitt is an exclusive chop rate most effectively in life and to get what you really want. You'll need to think about yourself not every goal is to be perfectly aligned with what it produces for other people. Personal growth comes through challenge. It all these the overall philosophy of nonconformity. You can do good things for others and yourself at the same time it's not a dichotomy or an either or. I don't think I'm always highly effective person though I tried to always be a real one when if you'll off track I, go back to some of these points especially those about being intentional making my own choices also try to remember the universal truths changes constant. Is. Temporary. So once again, how the effect of real people seek to use whatever time they have to the best of their ability?

Chris Gil Abo Chris Gil Rob Reiner Dan Pink Davin Mitt
Powerful Everyday Opportunities To Persuade

Accelerate Your Business Growth

03:37 min | 3 months ago

Powerful Everyday Opportunities To Persuade

"Today is no different. My guest today is Brian. A hearn. Brian is the chief influence officer at influence people. He is an international keynote speaker and specializes in in applying the science of influence everyday situations. Brian is one of only twenty individuals in the world, who currently holds the Chaldean Dini method certified trainer designation designation. Now trouble speaking back Brian's book influence people powerful everyday opportunities to persuade that are lasting and ethical is an Amazon bestseller, and is linked in courses have been viewed by more than ninety thousand people. Thanks so much for joining me today. Brian it's my pleasure Diana. Look forward to sharing with your audience. Well I look forward to this conversation that we're GONNA have now. For you. People actually stands for. Powerful everyday opportunities to persuade that are less than ethical, and I have to tell you that I I love that I. That is a really awesome. And so. My first question is, can you? Share some about why Understanding influence is something that is powerful. Sure. And thank you for the compliment on the acronym I. Don't remember when I came up with it, but when I did, it was like a light bulb coming on like holy cow. This is perfect for what I do. It's powerful because everything that we talk about and when I say we I talk about the other child, Dini trainers and myself specifically. Everything that we talk about is based on research. This is not Bryan Abrams. Good advice doesn't let me tell you what worked for me or look at. That person will work for them. This is based empirical data from more than seven decades of research from social psychology. More recently, behavioral Economics I would like in it to this. If you wanted to get healthy, you could talk to your neighbor, and they might give you some decent advice, but you'd be better off looking at what research has to say from Ab Exercise Physiology Dietitians and knowing that actually works on large numbers of people, and so that's why I say it's powerful. Okay and and you say it's an everyday skill. So can you explain that like? We, use the skill of influence every single day and I like to often say from womb to tomb. We are trying to get people to meet our needs. A baby doesn't know exactly what it's doing or why it's doing it. But when it comes out of the womb at cries, it might WanNa be fed or held or burp or changed, but it has a need. It's trying to get met, and as we grow into adults. We learn different ways that we try to get our needs met. Some people learn how to do it well and some don't but is a skill that we're using every day. And I often share a quote from a called to sell is human, which is written by Dan? Pink And in the BOOKIE, sites survey of more than seven thousand American business workers who were asked the question? How much of your day do you spend trying to influence? Persuade convince people not related to making sale,

Brian Bryan Abrams Dini Officer DAN Diana
"dan pink" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:50 min | 5 months ago

"dan pink" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"The first stirrings of something really interesting going on because what it means is it means people paying adequately and fairly absolutely getting the issue of money off the table and then giving people lots of autonomy. Let me give you some examples. How many of you have heard of the company Atlassian? Atlassian is an Australian software company. And they do something incredibly cool P- a few times a year. They tell their engineers go for the next twenty four hours and work on anything you want. As long as it's not part of your regular job work on anything you want so the engineers use this time to come up with a cool patch code. They come up with an elegant hack. Then they present all the stuff that they've developed their teammates to the rest of the company in this wild and will the all hands meeting at the end of the day and then being Australians. Everybody has a beer they call them fedex days. Why because you have to deliver something overnight? It's pretty it's not bad. There's a huge trademark violation. But it's pretty clever and that one day of intense autonomy has produced a whole array of software fixes. That might never have existed. And it's worked so well that Alaska's to take into the next level with twenty percent time done famously. Google were engineers could spend twenty percent of their time working on anything they want. They have tawny over their time. Their task their team their technique radical amounts of autonomy in Google. As many of you know about half of new products in a typical year birth during that twenty percent. Time things like g mail or cut. Bul News let me give you an even more radical example of it. Something called results only work environment. The row created by two American consultants in place at about a dozen companies around North America in a row. People don't have schedules. They show up when they want. They don't have to be the opposite of certain time or at any time. They just have to get their work done how they do it when they do. What were they do? It is totally up to them. Meetings in these kinds of environments are totally optional. What happens almost across the board? Productivity GOES UP WORKER ENGAGEMENT GOES UP WORKER SATISFACTION GOES. Up turnover goes down autonomy mastery and purpose. These are the building blocks of a new way of doing things now. Some of you might look at this and say That sounds Nice. But it's Utopian and I say nope I have proof the mid nineteen ninety s. Microsoft started an encyclopedia called Encarta they had deployed all the right incentives all the right incentives. They paid professionals to write. And edit thousands of articles well compensated. Managers oversaw the whole thing to make sure it came through on budget and on time a few years later. Another encyclopedia started different model. Right do it for fun. Nobody gets paid a cent or a euro or a yen. Do it because you like to do it just ten years ago if you had gone to an economist anywhere and said Hey. I've got these two different models for creating an encyclopedia if they went head to head. Who would win ten years ago? You could not found a single sober economist anywhere on planet Earth. Who would have predicted the wikipedia model? This is the titanic battle between the two approaches. This is the Ali Frazier of motivation. Right this is the thrilla in Manila. Intrinsic motivators versus Extrinsic motivators autonomy mastery and purpose versus carrot and sticks in who wins Intrinsic Motivation autonomy mastery and purpose in a knockout. Let me wrap up. There is a mismatch between what science knows. And what business does. Here's what science knows one. Those twentieth century rewards those motivators. We think are a natural part of business do work but only in a surprisingly narrow band of circumstances to those if then rewards often destroy creativity three. The secret to high performance isn't rewards and punishments but that unseen intrinsic drive the drive to do things for their own sake the drive to do things because they matter in. Here's the best part we already know this. The science confirms what we know in our hearts so if we repair this mismatch between what science knows. And what business does if we bring our motivation. Our notions of motivation into the twenty first century. If we get past this Lisi dangerous ideology of carrots and sticks. We can strengthen our businesses. We can solve a lot of those candle problems in. Maybe maybe maybe we can change the world. I rest my case fire nation. I would love to know your thoughts on this. Dan Brings up a lot of interesting points a lot of really good points. Let me know Johnny Yo. Fire Dot Com. I'll catch you there or catch you on the flip side start building an army of loyal affiliates and brand ambassadors who constantly promote your products today. The step-by-step is waiting for you on my Buddy Russell. Brunson new podcast miniseries traffic secrets. Open your podcast APP and subscribe to traffic secrets now or visit traffic secrets. Podcast DOT COM.

Atlassian Google Dan Alaska North America Manila Microsoft Brunson Ali Frazier Lisi Johnny Yo
"dan pink" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

08:44 min | 5 months ago

"dan pink" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"The last couple of years looking at the science of human motivation particularly the dynamics of extrinsic motivators and intrinsic motivators. And I'm telling you is not even close if you look at the Science. There is a mismatch between what science knows and what business does and what's alarming here. Is that our business? Operating System. Think of the set of assumptions and protocols beneath our businesses. How we motivate people how we apply our human resources. It's built entirely around those extrinsic motivators around carrots and sticks. That's actually fine for many kinds of twentieth century tasks but for twenty first century tasks that mechanistic reward and punishment approach. Doesn't work often doesn't work often does harm. Let me show you what I mean. So Klux break did another similar experiment similar to this where he presented the problem in a slightly different way attached candle to the wall. So the wax doesn't drip onto the table. Same deal you were timing for norms. You were incentivizing. What happened this time? This time. The incentivized group kicked the other groups. But why because on the tax are out of the box? It's pretty easy isn't it? If then rewards work really well for those sort of tasks where there is a really simple set of rules and a clear destination to go to rewards by their very nature. Narrow our focus. Concentrate the minds. That's why they work in so many cases so for tasks like this a narrow focus where you just see the goal right there. Zoom straight ahead to it. They work really well but for the real Kano problem. You don't WanNa be looking like this. The solution is on over here. The solution is on. The periphery you want to be looking around. That reward actually narrows our focus and restricts our possibility. Let me tell you why. This is so important in western Europe in many parts of Asia and North America in Australia. White collar workers are doing less this kind of work in more of this kind of work that routine rule based left brain work certain kinds of accounting certain kinds of financial analysis. Certain kinds of computer programming has become fairly easy to outsource fairly easy to automate. Software can do it faster. Low cost providers around the world can do it cheaper so what really matters are more right brained creative conceptual kinds of abilities think about your own work. Think about your own work. Are the problems you face or even the problems. We've been talking about here. Are Those kinds of problems? Do they have a clear set of rules in a single solution? No the rules are mystifying. The solution if it exists at all is surprising and not obvious everybody in this room is dealing with their own version of the candle problem and for the Kennel problems of any kind in any field those if then rewards the things around which we built so many of our businesses. Don't work now it makes me crazy in. Here's the thing. This is not a feeling okay. I'm a lawyer. I don't believe in feelings. This is not a philosophy. I'm an American. I don't believe in philosophy. This is a fact or as you say my hometown of Washington. Dc A true facts. Let me give you an example of what I mean. Let me marshal the evidence here. Because I'm not telling you a story I'm making a case. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury some evidence. Dan Arieli one of the great economies of our time he and three colleagues did a study of Mit Students. They gave these MIT students. A bunch of games games than involved creativity and motor skills and concentration and they offered them for performance three levels every wards small reward. Be reward large reward. If you do really well you got a large reward on down. What happens as long as a task? Involved only mechanical skill bonuses worked they would be expected the higher the pay the better performance. Okay but once the task called for even rudimentary cognitive skill. A larger reward. Let the poor performance. Then they said okay. Let's see if there's any cultural bias here. Let's go to moderate India and test it. Standard of living is lower in Madurai a reward that is modest by North America. Standards is more meaningful there. Same deal a bunch of games. Three levels of rewards what happens people offered the medium level of rewards. Didn't know better than people offered the small rewards but this time people offer the highest rewards. They did worst of all in eight of the nine tasks. We examined across three experiments. Higher incentives led to worse performance. Is this some kind of touchy feely Socialist Conspiracy Going here? No these are economists from MIT from Carnegie Mellon from the University of Chicago. In do you know who sponsored this research? The Federal Reserve Bank of the United States. That's the American experience fire nation. More COMING UP AFTER. We thank our sponsor during this time of change. We want you to know that ZIP. Recruiter's focused hasn't changed. They're still doing what they've always done. Helping people find work and helping businesses find the right people for their open roles. If you're looking for a Ziprecruiter is working with you to find the right job faster. They are dedicated to helping you get hired from caretaking to delivering food and goods to building medical facilities supplying protective equipment and so much more in fact zip recruiter's apple send you up to date job openings. So you can be one of the first to apply. And if you're actively hiring ziprecruiter will invite candidates to apply to your most urgent roles making it faster and easier to reach the people you need by connecting people who need jobs in companies that need people zip. Recruiter is working with all of us. So we can keep moving forward. Let's work together ZIP. Recruiter dot com slash work together. One of the biggest struggles we face his online business owners is building an audience getting traffic to your website. Podcast videos social media channels. It's not easy but there's a framework that you can start using right now to consistently drive your dream customers to your business every day. Want THAT FRAMEWORK. Great News Fire Nation. My Buddy Russell. Brunson is a CO founder of Click finals and has grown his business to a near one billion dollar valuation using traffic driving strategies as a backbone of his business in fortunately for the rest of us. He's one of the most generous people I know. In the online business world he just created a new podcast. Miniseries called traffic secrets to help. You learn exactly how to borrow traffic from influencers in your industry. How to build an army of loyal affiliates and brand ambassadors who constantly promote your products. How effectively build an email list and so much more? Open your podcast APP and subscribe to traffic secrets now or visit traffic secrets. Podcast DOT COM. Let's go across the pond to the London School of Economics L. S. E. London School of Economics Alma Mater of eleven Nobel laureates in economics training ground for great economic thinkers. Like George. Soros Frederick Hayek and Mick Jagger last month economists at LLC looked at fifty one studies of pay for performance plans inside of companies. Here's what the economists there said. We find that financial incentives can result in a negative impact on overall performance. There is a mismatch between what science knows and what business does and what worries me as we stand here in the rubble of the economic collapse is that too. Many organizations are making their decisions their policies about talent and people based on assumptions that are outdated unexamined and rooted in more folklore than in science. And if we really want out of this economic mess and if we really want high-performance on those definitional tasks of the twenty first century the solution is not to do more of the wrong things to entice people these sweeter carrots or to threaten them with a sharper stick. We need a whole new approach. The good news about all this is that the scientists who've been studying motivation have given us this new approach. It's an approach built much more around intrinsic motivation around the desire to do things because they matter because we like it. They're interesting because they're part of something important. And in my mind that new operating system for our businesses revolves around three elements atonomy mastery and purpose autonomy the urge to direct our own lives mastery the desire to get better and better at something that matters purpose the yearning to do something we do in the service of something larger than ourselves. These are the building blocks of an entirely new operating system for our businesses. I WanNa talk about autonomy. In the twentieth century. Came up with this. Idea of management management did not emanate from nature. Management is not. A tree is a television set. Somebody invented it and it doesn't mean it's going to work forever. Management is Great. Traditional notions of management are great if you want compliance but if you want engagement self direction works better let me give you some examples of some kind of radical notions of self direction. You don't see a lot of it but you see.

Mit London School of Economics L. Madurai Carnegie Mellon India Europe apple Dan Arieli Australia Soros Frederick Hayek Washington University of Chicago United States Federal Reserve Bank Brunson North America
"dan pink" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"dan pink" Discussed on Accelerate!

"We'll see you on the house. All right. Let's jump into my guest today, Dan pink, Dan, walk into the show and Paul, thanks. My pleasure. My pleasure. So. We're here to talk about your latest book when the scientific secrets of perfect timing. And is there such a thing? Perfect timing note Benner tonic. Absolutely. And the way to have better timing is recognized. The timing is not an art. It's a science and fortunately, whether were salespeople sales managers, whatever professionals, we tend to maker Tommy decisions based on intuition and gas work or really in most really fault Asians wrong to different we should be making it based on evidence data backs. Yeah. Was oral tradition in sales more than anything else. Still seems to carry the day. So so you wrote a what ultimately matters is the type of task and how task time align, and and you called which talked about you called the synchrony affects so explain what that means people. Let me take one step back though. And just say what we know about timing to different aspects of time timing over the course day timing over the course of lifetime, of course, pride dick over the course of career center at cetera until so. So a lot of this research. So so what I read about is really built on this wide array of research from multiple fields. I'm so it's not it's research and other psychology. It's an economics. But it's also in front of biology molecular biology endocrinology, and so all this bass research was flus about how to make timing essentially, our ally rather than our enemy now when we talk by the end of the day what we're talking about here. Keep in mind is following the most the biggest ideas are fraying power our cognitive abilities. Do not remain static over the course of the day. They change they change in cheerio ways they change in predictable ways..

Dan pink Benner Tommy Paul
"dan pink" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"dan pink" Discussed on Accelerate!

"We'll see you in the house. All right. Let's jump into with my guest today, Dan pink, Dan, walk into the show and Paul, thanks. My pleasure. My pleasure. So. We're here to talk about your latest book when the scientific secrets of perfect timing. And is there such a thing? Perfect timing note Benner tonic. Absolutely. And the way to have better timing is recognized. The timing is not an art. It's a science and fortunately, whether were salespeople sales managers, whatever professionals, we tend to maker Tommy decisions based on intuition and gas work or really in most really fault Asians wrong to different we should be making it based on evidence data backs. Yeah. Was oral tradition in sales more than anything else. Still seems to carry the day. So so you wrote that what matters is the type of task and how task time align, and and you called which talked about you called the synchrony affects so explain what that means people. Let me take one step back though. And just say what we know about timing to different aspects of time timing over the course day timing over the course of lifetime pride dick over the course of career center at cetera until so. So a lot of this research. So so what I read about is really built on this wide array of research from multiple fields. I'm so it's not it's research and other psychology. It's an economics. But it's also in front of biology molecular biology endocrinology, and so all this bass research was flus about how to make timing essentially, our ally rather than our enemy now when we talk about the end of the day what we're talking about here. Keep in mind is following the most the biggest ideas are fraying power our cognitive abilities. Do not remain static over the course of the day. They change they change in cheerio ways they change in predictable ways..

Dan pink Benner Tommy Paul
"dan pink" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"dan pink" Discussed on Accelerate!

"You to help you get your year off to a blooming start. Joining me today is Dan pink dams, the author of multiple New York Times bestselling books, including the classic sales book to sell is human. And today, we're talking about Dan's latest book, titled when the scientific secrets of perfect timing. So what you're gonna learn is that success in sales is not just about how you sell or what yoursel as you'll learn. It's also about when you sell out timing as a science it can make a difference when during the day, you undertake to do certain tasks, so we'll intuition about whether we work better in the morning whether or early birds are are night owls working late into the night. Well, as Dan explains in his book, and as out in our conversation, we now have the science, not intuition. The science to help us make timing decisions. So based on evidence based database on fact, so Dan lays out in the book the aspects of timing, and what the research in social psychology and biology reveal your best times. What's your criminal type is he'll explain what you're Chroma type is. So. When you have too much your cognitive abilities to take on certain tasks like to prospect to sell to analyze provide insights, all parv what's called the synchrony effect. So sure you stick around for that. Now before we get to damn what take a quick second talk about the sales house, the only all in one personal and professional growth program for B, two B sellers..

Dan New York Times bestselling
Work stronger with less stress, not longer

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

15:17 min | 2 years ago

Work stronger with less stress, not longer

"Business podcasts, visit c desk, sweet radio dot com. My guest with me today is Tiffany Bova. Hi, Tiffany. How are you? I'm fantastic. Thank you for having me today. I'm super excited. I'm super excited about this because you wrote a great book. But before we get into that, let me do the formal introduction, Tiffany, Bova and I'm going to spell her name right out of the gate because I want you type in it, not while you're driving, but as you're, you've got some place while you're typing her name and her dot com has her website. It's t. I f. f. a. n. i. Bova b. o. v. a. now people in the know will already know who she is, but let me do a formal introduction. Tiffany Bova is the global customer growth in innovation evangelist at Salesforce and was previously VP distinguished analyst and research fellow with Cartner. Tiffany has interviewed guests ranging from Dan pink to Arianna Huffington on her. What's next podcast? I'm going to pause there for a minute. You want to write that down. She has a podcast called what's next? What's next podcast? And her insights have helped companies like Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, oracle SAP del an Amazon, including Amazon web services among them, and she has helped them. So I think we have something to talk about and Tiffany has written and outrageously good book. It's called growth. IQ get smarter about the choices that will make or break your business. No, Tiffany. I want to say one other thing and then you're going to take over. Here's what I want to say. Okay, I'm ready. I read well over one hundred books a year, and I do well over a hundred and fifty business interviews a year. I want to announce to the world that. Your book is one of the best business books I have ever read. Wow, thank you. And I expect this interview to be awesome. So the book again, is growth. IQ get smarter about the choices that will make or break your business. So let's put the context in this way. You talk about context, combination and sequence. So start us out by talking about those three things. Well, thank I. Thank you for what a great amazing comment to make about the book. I worked really hard on it, so it's always nice to hear that the baby's not ugly. So that's always a baby, very, very attractive. But what I did and how I landed on that was I like you read a lot a business lot of business books, and I wanted to see what was missing from what I was consuming as I was on my own journey, right? Because I read to make myself better whether it be on managing or understanding certain trends, etc. And and what was missing for me was the house side of growth and what makes it different from one to the other? So how can people actually put into action

Kylie Jenner CEO Tiffany Bova Jessica Alba Salesforce Martin Wolf Taylor Swift Wells Fargo Partner Congress Marty Wolf Amex Jennifer Alba Executive Producer Jimmy
"dan pink" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"Some great resources and offers for you with a call at always to check in at ziglar dot com for the next event that you could attend or get involved with to inspire your true performance on this topic of family chances are you're primarily going it alone and doing your best how about some invested council in your family ziglar families launching a new seven day family challenge may twenty first through the twenty seven two thousand eighteen you get seven experts and seven key areas of family life including work life integration relationships mutation visible health and wellbeing finances community and spirituality each day these experts share their best advice for families and offer small challenge designed to help get you on the right track and each of the seven areas this lineup includes dr james dobson michael junior kerry wilkerson jackie bruton larry north jamal tasha miller and jim daly half of those have been guest here on the show but i know all their names tremendous leaders in the area of family you can learn more and sign up for the challenge by visiting seven day challenge dot com in the number seven seven day challenge dot com okay folks here then we walked through the seven spokes on the ziglar wheel of life with dan pink daniela's we obviously heard in the first shows were talking about win and talking about time in the necessity to be intentional we're going to go through the seven spokes ziglar wheel of life here and just look at these areas of places where you're intentional with healthy habits in those and maybe somewhere you struggle and really have to force that intention ality to be on top of it get a little behind the scenes look at you i one right off the bat is i look at you and what looks like workout clothes an ask about physical what do you do for the physical area of your life i just i'm actually we'll be exercising later in the day i'm just happy to be called my office with this on but i don't i'm sort of like casuals you are here.

jackie bruton larry north jama ality dr james dobson jim daly dan seven day seven seven day
"dan pink" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"Okay all right well it's it's it's huge thank you again i'm the best beneficiary of of these interviews i'm going gonna reframe around i'm violating especially the early morning stuff and the creativity part is possibly even the most reframing for my mind because i had put out there because it's because as you say it's kind of intuitive but again as i said it's like it's known in the literature we inspiration paradox okay thank you daniel for being here for giving this message folks you've got to get the book you've got to look at this it feels irrefutable i'll be testifying to it shortly as restructure around so thanks for being with thanks for having me i really appreciate it we'll friends are you ready to reorient your life around dan's perfect timing i for sure i mean gin get dan's book the new one win the scientific secrets of perfect timing at dan pink dot com or wherever you buy books if you got baillieu from this show please let dan and us no leave a review and i tunes an email us at thanks as ziglar show dot com tell us your itunes username and we'll thank you by sending you zig ziglar and thompson reuters book born to win and actual hard copy and again if you're ready to implant some of ziglar success endear life stopped going into loan go to sigler dot com see where you can get involved with the products the events that coaching just get somebody on your side from ziegler coming up next and show five seventy six we hear message from zig ziglar on parenting topic we haven't hit on a while we're all here to get a quipped for our lives of success but how about our kids how do we quip them in a world where it's tougher and tougher to counter the negative influence and just the gigantic amount of influences overall how do we influence them that's what zig talks about and from the message i posted this question on facebook i said do you use any strategies with your kids for one limiting the negative input they receive from people in mead.

dan ziegler daniel thompson reuters
"dan pink" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on Good Life Project

"We generally move through the day in these three stages as you say peak trough recovering now that's true for our mood if you look at all kinds of different measures of mood whether it is sociology looking at the emotional content of tweets to people self reporting how they're feeling over the course of the day in general are mood follows at peak trough recovery and then that pattern of mood that hasn't affected our performance and so so you think so you see things like kids scoring lower on standardized tests in the afternoon versus in the morning you see some remarkable research out of the la unified school district where kids take math in the morning do better than you take math in the afternoon in a significant way you see all these horrible things that happen in healthcare some twenty years ago my guest today dan pink left his career as a speechwriter for then vice president al gore to kinda strike out on his own as a writer soon after he penned in article for a young company called fast company that was called free agent nation that became a book that really exploded into police consciousness and effectively launched his career as an author over the past twenty years or so his written six huge books the latest call when where he dives deep into timing it's one of the things that we never look at are there good and bad times of day of month of life to do all the things that we wanna do to fascinating conversation we start out kind of tracking dan's life in career to a certain extent i've sat down with dan in the past when we were filming so if you want sort of a deeper dive into his.

la unified school district al gore writer dan pink vice president twenty years
"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"It's the people who are always posturing always gaming always like looking for an angle that doesn't work in the long run so so soon positive intent in two to positive intent be is kind generous if you can show up and do the work i think that's a pretty good respite that is a fantastic way to end this podcast down i couldn't thank you enough for spending this wonderful half hour with us i hope that you have had as much fun as i have it's always a pleasure to to speak with you and i appreciate everything you've done for me and i hope you have a great rest of your day but thank you so much for joining me today on the what's next podcast have enjoyed it i must say that was absolutely fantastic i am a huge fan of dan pink and always have been but that podcast i thought was great my favorite part and i'm sure you'll all guess was when he says sales are the people that keep your company and business i wanna put that in lights love it love that he said it but more importantly i think it gives us an opportunity to step back and pause and really think about when we choose to make big decisions in our lives big decisions in business when we choose to do things throughout the day whether it's in your peaktime whether it's in your trough time whether it's in your recovery time time of day matters but more importantly in what i really loved was breaks matter you know he actually takes ten minutes throughout the day and puts breaks on his calendar and get steps away and takes that break we all need to just make sure take a pause to that we can be our best selves show up for people for our customers and for our loved ones with that i wanna thank.

dan pink ten minutes
"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"Is can be restorative and then in even the importance of full detachment during your brakes don't talk about some work prices or don't bring you phone with you and if we do those kinds of things you can mitigate some of the downdraft of the of the trough so again if you have to our two o'clock speech you know you know before you go on go take a you know a ten or fifteen minute walk take a ten minute walk outside without your phone in and that can be strongly useful so it's reading this really fascinating article the other day about speech giving speeches you know now that we've just been talking about this and you know i think that in the last probably thirty days speech everyone got all riled up about was the one oprah gave at the golden globes at ed people were throwing it wasn't so much just the masterful or ration that she gave in the her craft of telling a story but more saying it was when she he gave it and i don't make time of day but when in the temperature of culture that she gave it and when you think back on that it it's kind of a combination of all kinds of things right because if now if i go through your three stages at the time of day that that was being given most people in the audience were probably in the recovery phase were in that insight you know i'm i'm open right i'm not i'm not taxed on i'm not in the peak and i'm not sort of sitting in my trough so everybody was more open to listen to something like that.

fifteen minute thirty days ten minute
"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"What we know like the signs of telling us very clearly what kind of breaks we should be it so there's also this big movement in the corporate world beyond education right about breaks and then kind of being meditation rooms or nap rooms whether it's riana for huffington on on thrive you know i work at salesforce and you know in our new tower we have meditation mindful rooms and you know really just trying to give people that time to break during maybe that trough right absolutely right and i think that you know the sales forces of the world and other companies are do we see this pattern all the time like you have these i mean salesforce a great example zappa has done some interesting things with nap pods and whatnot and to some people they're like oh my god that's so that's so heavy left coast weird and but that always have all right that always happens with these things like these things start on the edge in moved to the mainstream we see over and over and over and i'm i'm old enough to remember the horror that many people felt when something like casual friday like oh my god where erosion of standard you're letting people dress however they want and now it's like everybody's pretty chill about how you dress when you come to work certain kinds of many many under settings not all into that moved in even things like you know parental leave was considered socialist crazy left coast and now you know especially something like paternity leave with the woman had the baby in the dude gets time off like going to destroy this country it's a.

huffington zappa
"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"We're better off doing analytic work worked every choirs heads down focus attention cognitive energy so that could be things like looking at your reviewing data or writing report or that kind of thing we're better off doing that kind of work analytic work during peak during the trough trump is not good for very much a lot of bad stuff happens there there's a lot of medical errors there's traffic accidents the students do worse on standardized tests that trump is a real down theory germs or mood in our performance and what we're better off doing during that period is our administrative work things like answering routine emails of filling out the certain kinds of expense reports all that kind of garbage that we end up having to do in the course of a day we're better off just bunching it into that period the recovery which is late afternoon to early evening that's an interesting period because our mood is better than during the trough but we're actually less good at the focused work than we are during peak and that is a pretty interesting combination because it means that if we're in pretty good mood in less inhibited it's a decent time for brainstorming iterative kinds of work what psychologists call insight problems and so if we just observer on behavior and take some small steps what we should be doing is trying to do our analytic work during the peach which again for most of us is the morning for night house it's late afternoon early thing to our analytic work during the peak or administrative work during the trough in our in our insight work during the recovery and what the research shows is that time of day just simply time of day alone explains about twenty percent of the variance in how people perform on workplace task so we what we're talking about here in any sort of intervention to try to do a little bit better there are no guarantees of things like if you put the right task at the right time you're going to be a superstar in but what it shows is that we can actually.

twenty percent
"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"All right great and end the the last one is a little counterintuitive when i first saw this from you so drink a cup of coffee and then taken up super bullish all right bullish as i could be if there's like a bullish neater at the top of it all right so i'm going to use that bullish at the top of the bullish meter to to start talking about your new book win maybe you can give us kind of the background to how you landed on this subject and topic and then maybe we'll get back to the cup of coffee taken up sure i'm gonna land on this book about timing and i landed on it because of really kind of self absorbed reasons i was making all kinds of win decisions time decisions in my own life you win should i do certain kinds of work when should i exercise during the day when did i start a product when should i quit a project when should i abandoned a project that isn't working and i was making the decisions in really have hazard way i thought i could make it in a better way i looked around for some guidance it didn't exist and then then i back i'm curious what like well why doesn't that exist so i looked at some of the research and that brought me down his rabbit hole of incredible research from many many domains that were all these scholars and fields from economics to anthropology to social psychology to chronobiology to anesthesiology to molecular biology is all these different fields asking very similar questions about timing i said wow this is totally interesting i would love to read this book and since it didn't exist i decided to write it yet i found it fascinating for all kinds of reasons.

"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"I'm ready are right actually make eric on the idea but i'm bullish on on my willingness to dry i think they'll be less painful than you might think are all right ready okay the first one machines will be able to write speeches used by politicians it sure barish i would say i'm barrick about that so there's a reason i asked that question for those of you don't know dan was that chief speechwriter to vice president al gore from ninety five ninety seven so i thought i'd get him a little you know hey what do you think and the reason embarrassed about that because a lot of speeches in speech giving certainly certainly be a machine up his software that will be able to craft sentences but one of the things about speeches particularly political speeches is that there are there so many unspoken nuance things that are really i think a little more complex little bit too complicated for machine to to to knock out now i could be wrong andrew this most political speeches aren't very good they could have been written by machines unless i'm gonna stick it with harris on that one all right all right fair enough all right the next one and i pulled this from one of your recent tweets women women make better money managers than men roche i i had i read that and i said oh my god i'm keeping that one a lot of research on this easy a lot of research in the tiffany that was actually pretty interesting study of of hedge fund managers showing this really this correlation between measures of chasta roane and poor performance and the poor performance basically came from excessive risk taking you also see this in some research on forget about money management but just talking about individual investor behavior that women are much more likely to do the research women are more likely to make cruden investments women are more likely i think this is true throughout many many domains to be more comfortable admitting what they don't know so bullish on women as investment managers.

barrick dan al gore harris eric vice president andrew
"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"Uhhuh welcome to the what's next podcast with tiffany boba tiffany's top rated speaker thought leader and sales marketing influence are known around the world as an industry visionary today he's using her twenty years of sales experience to help companies focus on creating a high growth coach while adapting to the new realities of the market she's always asking ourselves what's next hi this is tiffany bobo welcome to the what's next podcast i am thrilled today to have dan pink who's the author of six provocative books including his newest when the scientific secrets of perfect timing is other books include the long running new york times bestseller a whole new mind and the number one new york times bestseller drive and to sell his human each have been translated into thirty seven language so everybody's reading it which is great for the last six years thinkers fifty has named him alongside michael porter clayton christianson roger martin and tom peters is one of the top fifteen business thinkers in the world pinks ted talk on the science of motivation is one of the ten most watched ted talks of all time with more than nineteen million views i love that ted talk by the way welcome dan to the podcast many thanks for having me to be with you again yes you know it's a it's a wonderful long distance love affair dan and i have he wrote the book he wrote the book to sell human and i said i gotta know this guy right so we met an event number of years ago and and you've just been fantastic to me over my career so it's really a pleasure in an honor to have you here today with me while i'm glad to be here so i like to start something out on my podcast called bullish and bearish nothing to paint i hope but it's just a couple of questions and then try to pin you down on one or the other so are you ready.

dan pink york times tom peters new york times michael porter roger martin ted twenty years six years
"dan pink" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on KOMO

"Psychology guy were talking today in the bosch show about motivation and we're trying to challenge some notions that we bet you probably have about what motivates people as dan pink that the author the wellknown author of the book dr says what we don't do what science knows in terms of motivation because our cultural messages are so strong none stronger than the idea that money motivates so so let's challenged this and we'll see if we come out with some agreement from you as you listen to this jim and when you would receive a you've been self employed for a while here but when you would before and your business grew when you would receive a bonus or a promotion what did you feel what did you expedia great it's a great question i and i was in very heavily bonus jobs most of my career most of my jobs a significant percentage of my a income each year was dependent on bonus checks now there was some good things about sixty there were some things that focus me that that made me look at my numbers more carefully made me plan ahead and try to figure out may be more strategic reasons why i could make my business grow internet bonus so it it it was in that sense it was like up puzzle to say whom i wonder how i can earn a bigger bonus check but you know that's different for motivation because that's that's the same kind of puzzle that i have to figure out as a selfemployed person may come home i going to run the business and create a product or service had somebody wants to buy and then i can make a living.

dan pink bosch self employed expedia
"dan pink" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"dan pink" Discussed on KOMO

"Way indirectly the program encouraged people to live why is why would you think that is well they want the they wanted the pizza and yeah i mean i know the story pretty well zone on a in too much of your of euro observation rounded bed you know you and i have been teaching this for years anytime we attach a reward to something we we unconsciously diminish the pleasure that the person takes in doing that thing right which is which is probably the single most indicting a data that the researchers came to his at the kids interest in reading actually declined as a result of the program and the reason that they lied is the the same as the reason that their interest in reading declined it's because the pizza chain was focusing the kids not on their intrinsic motivation to read which most kids naturally have but on the prize and in fact they were saying subconsciously to the kid readings sucks that that reading is not worth doing exactly by in an in and of itself we have to bribe you in order to do it now that's not their conscious reason for offering the program but that's the message for animal message that the kids got the other thing that happened of course is that kids read books that were below their grade level short books lots of pictures so they were choosing books not out of their intrinsic moshe motivation but juicing books that would get them to the prayer read one really challenging book at one pizza read for less challenging books get four pizzas exactly so so the message and the psychological structures of adults motivation are really the same as the psychological structures of children's motivations and the the message that we hope you'll take away from this this show in the next one the part to that will do next week is at motivation is perhaps the single most misunderstood subject in the workplace dan pink in the book dr he'd be dan pink literally wrote the book on motivation said that much of what we believe about motivation just isn't so what business does has not caught up with what science knows and steal these wrong ideas about motivation persist and in fact if i were to ask.

dan pink